William Arch McKeever.

Outlines of child study; a text book for parent-teacher associations, mothers' clubs, and all kindred organizations online

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the Nation and a Plan Whereby the Entire Local Com-
munity may Organize to Combat it.

Suggestions

a. The cruel and enticing cigarette advertisements —
what is to be done about them?

b. Apply to the National Anti-Cigarette League,
Woman's Temple, Chicago, for literature, and for a
formula being used to cure the cigarette habit.

c. Some of the communities have a scheme for keeping
the cigarette evil down and out. Co-operation will accom-
plish much toward this evil.

d. Clark, Yale and Columbia universities have made
extensive investigations of the cigarette blight on the
American youth. Appeal to them for data.

e. The Scientific Temperance Federation, Boston, has
much valuable information on the subject.



90



PROGRAM 45

USE AND ABUSE OF THE MOTION PICTURE

1. When and How Often should Pre-adolescent Children
be Permitted to Attend the Motion Picture Show? 5-107.

2. Effective Means of Using this Institution for Pur-
pose of School Instruction.

3. Special Moral Problems Connected with the Motion
Picture.

4. The Problem of Censorship and a Possible Solution
by Licensing only Morally Responsible Persons as Man-
agers.

Suggestions

a. We need no longer contend that motion picture is
the greatest educational device of modern times. But it is
not in the hands of educators.

b. An endless number of good things could be said
about the motion picture. But it is still teaching drinking,
gambling, robbery, cigarette smoking, and a vast amount
of sickly sentimentality.

c. Edison has invented a school and family size picture
machine with non-combustible films to match. How can
these be used so as to put the commercial picture agents
out of business?

d. One village in Kansas — Kincaid, — with 470 people
owns its motion picture plant, charges the usual price and
makes the business more than pay with clean films. Why
not others?



91



PROGRAM 46

DRESS AND DEMOCRACY AMONG THE SCHOOL CHILDREN

1. How does Inequality of Dress Affect the Work and
Management of the School ? 6-114.

2. How Meet the Insistent Pleadings of Pre-adolescent
School Girls for Faddish and Unnecessary Garments?
58-285.

3. Home and School Instruction of the Children on the
Care of their Clothes.

4. Discussion of Uniform Dress for School Children.

Suggestions

a. The following special references are suggested:
Handbook of Dress for Childhood, American School of
Home Economics, Chicago; Personal Hygiene and Phys-
ical Training for Women, Galbraith, W. B. Sanders Co.,
Philadelphia; Boys, Girls, and Manners, Florence H. Hall,
Dana, Estes & Co., Boston.

b. Overdressing of school girls — what shall we call it,
ignorance or immorality?

c. Are the cap and gown coming back into general use?

d. Inquire of two or three city superintendents of high
rank for suggestions on topic No. 3.



92



PROGRAM 47

THE SCHOOL LUNCHEON

1. What is a Wholesome and Satisfactory School
Lunch? 31- a. Bulletin.

2. How may the School Furnish Equipment and
Supervision for the Lunch Hour? 31- Bulletin.

3. May the School Authorities Make Inquiry as to the
Nourishment of Certain Classes of Children and Offer
Needed Assistance? See Report Bd. of Education, New
York City.

4. Report upon the Question of the Penny-a-piece
Lunch to be Furnished by the School. 31- a.

Suggestions

a. Let us keep in mind the generous attitude of the
club; namely, that we are trying to take an unselfish
interest in all the children. As a matter of fact this open-
mindedness will enable us to do more for our own.

6. In many cities the domestic science department of
the high school is preparing these cheap meals as a part of
their laboratory work. Get into touch with one of these
through inquiry of your own state department of education
and report the methods used.

c. Will some member suggest an ideal lunch for the child
who is supplied from home, and for the one who runs
home hurriedly at the noon hour?



93



PROGRAM 48

HOME ENTERTAINMENT FOR PRE-ADOLESCENT PUPILS

1. Ideal Plan for an Evening Hour at Home with the
Children. 5-126; 24-45.

2. Stories and Story-telling as Applied to Children of
the Elementary Grades. 27-30.

3. May Each Child in the Home be Trained to Con-
tribute His Particular Part to the Home Entertainment?
38-40.

4. Sunday Play and Entertainment for the Children in
the Home. 16-84; 23-212.

Suggestions

a. This general subject is a most vital one. With cheap
and enticing picture shows within easy reach the city
parent is hard pressed for an effective plan for keeping the
young within bounds.

b. It is suggested that one of the speakers visit a num-
ber of parents who are meeting this issue and secure their
plans and methods and report to the meeting.

c. Children will tolerate very meager food, very ordinary
clothing but they will not stay at home well unless the
entertainment be satisfying.

d. Why do so many children regard Sunday as the
dullest day in the week?

e. Should each child be trained in some home entertain-
ment specialty, as music, painting, and the like?



94



PROGRAM 49

THE SCHOOL PICNIC

1. May the School Picnic be Made to Mean More than
Mere Fun and Merriment? 5-133.

2. An Ideal School Picnic as Planned for the Home
Community. 6-149; 19-160.

3. Plays and Games Suitable for the Festive Occasion.
24-149.

4. Looking after the Comfort and Enjoyment of the
Parents and Other Visitors at the Picnic. 31- a.

Suggestions

a. The school picnic rightly managed tends to improve
the sentiment of the school.

6. Who is the right person to send along as chaperon?
One high school principal went along as leader and his
boys enjoyed the day with full and free use of the cigarette.
Some learned to smoke on the trip.

c. In making out a list of games avoid the "stunts"
and contests. They are becoming obsolete. Describe
some modern mass games instead.

d. On a few occasions a special place at the picnic has
been provided for the aged and infirm, where they could
enjoy the play of the children.



95



PROGRAM 50

CIVIC TRAINING FOR THE YOUNG

1. How the Home Discipline may Teach Respect for
the Law. 5-293; 54-55.

2. How the School as a Whole may be Taught the
Elements of Civic Government. 5-297.

3. May not the So-called Tattler or Tale Bearer be an
Assistant Keeper of the Law in the Making?

4. The Play Period Quarrels, Infraction of the Rules,
Punishment and the Like, as Occasions for Civic Teaching.
119-295.

Suggestions

a. Can it be shown that nearly all good government
grows out of trouble of some kind which needs correction?

b. Civics is taught briefly and often very abstractly in
some high schools. But the mass of the people never
attend the high school. What are we going to do about
this?

c. The author's plan of enlisting the co-operation of the
school is to invite all pupils to help with the school govern-
ment by reporting all serious misdeeds observed by them.
Once that method is in practice, the charm of wrong doing
is gone and the evil doer quits for want of backing.

d. Self-government of school pupils, if successful, al-
ways has an adult director behind the scenes.



96



PROGRAM 51

FINE ARTS TRAINING IN THE HOME AND THE SCHOOL

1. The Home Music Course as Related to the School
Work and Other Duties. 6-212.

2. Possibilities as to Home Instruction in Painting and
Drawing. 23-265.

3. The Fine Art (e. g. Music) as a Means of Closer
Unity and Fellowship in the Family . 4-22 ; 255 .

4. Music and Other Fine Arts as a Part of the Busy
School Life. (Apply to Milton Bradley Co., Springfield,
Mass.).

Suggestions

a. We expect adults to have an avocation — some in-
teresting amateur task to give diversion from the every
day business. Then, why not provide the same thing for
the child? Will some one defend the suggestion that each
child in the home be trained to do some side task which
will tend to bring out his individuality and to make him a
more entertaining person.?

b. There is always danger that the special training will
make the growing character a one-sided affair. For ex-
ample, many a girl has been permitted to let her musical
training overshadow the general schooling. This is a
serious fault, is it not?

c. The author believes that rote singing should have the
first place in every school-music program. Then, if time
and occasion are suitable, give the drill in the reading of
music. Is this theory correct?

97



PROGRAM 52

PRE-ADOLESCENT CHILDREN AND THE MYSTERIES OF LIFE

1. How to Meet the First Childish Inquiries about the
Origin of Life. 5-198; 11-181; 31- h.

2. The Sex Problem as Related to the Pre-adolescent
School Girl. 6-158; 31- d.

3. Counteracting the Morbid and Unclean Sex Stories
Often Heard by the Pre-adolescent School Boy. 1-112;
4-271.

4. May the School Offer Disguised Sex Instruction by
Means of Lessons on Plant and Animal Life? 9-114; 31- g.

Suggestions

a. We have spoiled the task of giving instruction on this
general subject by assuming that it is a very special one.
Why not regard it as one of the regular subjects of instruc-
tion, to be treated in the same way as the others.?

b. We shall never get far with our efforts to handle this
big question until we will decide to co-operate in the solu-
tion of its problems.

c. Social purity is just as much a community problem as
it is a home and school problem. If the community fails
to do its part the other institutions will meet with serious
obstacles.

d. The Song of Life, by Margaret Morley, (McClurg)
is very helpful on topic No. 4.



98



CHAPTER IX
TEE VACATION ACTIVITIES OF TEE YOUNG

PROGRAM 53

VALUE OF VACATION EMPLOYMENT FOR CHILDREN

1. Vacation Time as an Actual School Period. 5-25.

2. Demoralizing Influences of the Vacation. 6-101.

3. The Opportunity to Make Use of Spontaneity.
31- a.

4. A Plan for Changing the Vice of Idleness into the
Virtue of Industry. 19-43, 103; 27-178, 303; 30-68, 81.

Suggestions

a. The communities are just beginning to wake up to
the thought that school really goes right on during the
vacation season, although the teachers are dismissed.

b. One of the speakers should try to make a canvass of
the typical situation where the school children are per-
mitted to run loose during the vacation period. Bring out
the point of the irregularity and the indefiniteness of the
vacation conduct of the boys and girls.

c. It is difficult for us to appreciate the fact that every
waking hour of the lives of our children must be ac-
counted for; that is, if we are to feel certain of right devel-
opment of their characters.



09



PROGRAM 54

THE SCHOOL VACATION AND THE COMMUNITY

1. How to Unite All Forces for the Vacation Child
Welfare. 5-95.

2. Report of Community Child Welfare Work in the
Field at Large. 31- a; 18- Bulletin.

3. How to Make a Balanced Program for the Vacation
Child Welfare. 23-28; 159.

4. The Community Boasts of its Worthy Sons and
Daughters. Is it Also Responsible for its Crooks.? 124-25.

Suggestions

a. Investigate the local situation and you will probably
find a large amount of interest in the community welfare
of the children. But who will furnish a workable plan for
the local movement?

b. In the very nature of things no single group of the
local society can afford to undertake to direct the vacation
welfare alone. In such cases the movement is certain to
become a factional one and the best results spoiled.

c. It would be entertaining for some member to go over
a decade or more of the local history and make a list of
the cheap and criminal characters which the community
has actually produced. Who will dare to do this?



100



PROGRAM 55

FINANCING THE SUMMER SUPERVISION OF THE CHILDREN

1. Should the Local Board of Education Bear the
Expense? 31- a.

2. How may Necessary Funds be Raised by Voluntary
Means? 18- Inquire. 16-81.

3. A Plan for Raising Money by Means of the Chil-
dren's Entertainment. Write Extension Division, Uni-
versity of Kansas.

4. Aid from Co-operation with the Motion Picture
House. 16-88.

Suggestions

a. Make a serious effort to have reported some well
established precedents for urging the board of education
to finance the summer child welfare.

b. Usually, in asking for donations for such a good work
as this, one goes to the liberal giver. That is a mistake,
is it not? A right appeal to the person who is not in the
habit of contributing to any public cause will produce the
biggest results.

c. Has it not been generally observed that the secret of
getting out the crowd to the children's entertainments is
to see that all the children have a part in the program?



101



PROGRAM 56

THE MUNICIPAL PLAYGROUND

1. Physical Conditions and Location of the Ideal
Playground. 16-69.

2. The Playground Director as a Prime Essential.
16-104.

3. Means of Educating the Public in Behalf of the
Playground. 16-113; 5-102.

4. How to Make the Playground Attractive to the
Children. 16-66.

Suggestions

a. We may expect much legislation in the near future,
in regard to the municipal establishment of playgrounds,
parks, and gymnasiums.

b. The universities and the other institutions are be-
ginning to give courses for play and recreation directors.
The duties of the play director range with those of the best
teachers and the remuneration is about the same.

c. Topic 3 is a difficult and important one. Is the play
movement new in a given community? Then, we may
expect to find more than 50 per cent of the people either
opposed to it or wholly indiflFerent as to its purpose.

Appeal to the Playground and Recreation Association
of America for assistance in responding to the 4th topic
above. This organization will probably give the assistance
needed for any local community.



102



PROGRAM 57

EQUIPMENT OF THE PLAYGROUND

1. The Sand Box, Swings, and Other Baby Devices for
the Little Ones. 5-75 .

2. The SHde, the Trolley Glide and Other Inexpensive
Pieces for Small Boys and Girls. 6-90; 16-86.

3. Basket Ball, Tennis Court and Other Contest Equip-
ment for the Adolescents . 3 7-5 1 .

4. Settees, Outdoor Hammocks, and Other Restful
Places for the Adults. 16- Bulletin.

Suggestions

a. The members are urged to make free use of the
magazine Playground, which is a compendium of help and
suggestions on all the topics pertaining to the play move-
ment.

b. Let us again remember that the first essential in the
equipment of a playground is an able leader and a happy
crowd of children. With these the physical apparatus
may be scant and yet the work go on very well.

c. In climates where the summer season is warm a
shady place for the playground is very necessary.

d. Inexpensive home-made devices are very satisfac-
tory. The boys who visit the playground should make
these things with their own hands.



103



PROGRAM 58

THE PLAYGROUND MANAGEMENT

1. How may the Play Leader Teach Social Justice?
18-125.

2. How to Deal with the Reticent Child and the Over
Forward Boy. 18- Rec. No. 140, 141; 5-96.

3. Mass Plays that may Enlist both Sexes at Once.
42-427; 18-138.

4. Necessity of Police Authority for the Occasional
Outlaw. 16-89; 5-294.

Suggestions

a. Attention is called to the School Board Journal,
Milwaukee, Wis., which contains helpful articles on the
general subject of this program.

b. It is hoped that parents will soon learn to appreciate
the necessity of allowing adolescent boys and girls to
play together frequently in cases where there is a wise
and an able adult leader.

c. Some one should make a definite plan for protecting
the playground apparatus against the crude characters
who slip into the playground at night.



101



PROGRAM 59

THE PLAY SUPERVISORS

1. Character and Training of the Play Director for
Boys. See The Playground, 1 Madison Ave., New York;
American City, V. IX., p. 127.

2. Character and Training of the Play Leader for Girls.
6-31; 18-239.

3. The Ideal Kindergarten for the Playground. 6-14.

4. How may the Patrons Offer Voluntary Assistance
m Behalf of Discipline and Better Play? 18-192.

Suggestions

a. For many excellent helps on rural play and recrea-
tion and on this general topic, the members are referred
to the magazine Rural Manhood, New York City.

h. In the ideal case, we should have the boys' and girls'
playgrounds adjoining each other with merely a line of
separation, should we not?

c. How would it do to have a "Playground Day" once
a year and call all hands out to assist with the general
improvement?

d. The Division of Extension, University of Kansas,
has some small helps on this general topic.



105



i



PROGRAM 60

SUMMER WORK FOR BOYS

1. How it may be Related to the Playground. 5-25.

2. Class and Group Work in Field and Garden. 14-9.

3. Management of a Wood Working Shop for Small
Boys. 5-29.

4. What may the Boys Do or Make in the Interest
of the Town.'* 14-9; Manual Training, Peoria, 111., V.
XV., p. 263.

Suggestions

a. The Manual Training magazine, Peoria, 111., is
an excellent help and text for all phases of juvenile in-
dustry.

b. Two things should be noted in reference to shop
work and garden work for the young; namely, an able
leader and each child pursuing the kind of work which
appeals most to him.

c. And then, if the leader be a person of the right tem-
perament, the boys and girls will follow his leadership
most willingly. But they must be engaged in groups.

d. Will some member make out a list of tasks that may
be suitably assigned to the boys of the home community.''



106



PROGRAM 61

SUMMER WORK FOR OLDER BOYS

1. The Play Leader as Employment Agent for Boys.
18- Rec. 142.

2. The Play Leader as Vocational Guide for Youths.
22-270.

3. May the Boys Make Play Apparatus and Other
Salable Articles.'* Extension Dept., Kansas University.

4. A Balanced Schedule of Work, Play and Social Rec-
reation for the 'Teen Age Boy. 5-29.

Suggestions

a. The magazine Vocational Education, Peoria, 111., is
recommended as a permanent reference text.

b. In attempting to furnish vacation leaders for boys,
the author has experienced much difficulty in finding
young men who were natural leaders in both play and
industry.

c. As yet the country at large does not well appreciate
the extreme value of intermingling industrial tasks with
the play occupations of the children. The reform schools
are in advance of the general public on this subject.

d. Two points need much emphasis here, (1) The ad-
vantages of working the boys in groups; (2) work that is
actually congenial to boy nature.

e. Write the Vocational Guidance Bureau, Boston, for
help.



107



PROGRAM 62

VACATION INDUSTRY FOR GIRLS

1. A Standard Program of Work, Play and Social Recre-
ation for Girls. 14-3.

2. How may Mothers be Induced to Give Their Girls
the Right Amount of Work? 6-12.

3. Girl Work Made Interesting through its Relation
to Play and Outings. 6-20.

4. Home Work for Girls, Rightly Understood, may be
"Cultural, Refining, and Instructive as to Social Sym-
pathy." 23-185; 14-5.

Suggestions

a. The members are referred to the United States Bu-
reau of Education, which has been making a careful study
of vacation industry, for some valuable literature.

b. As yet, not one-fourth as much effort has been ex-
erted in behalf of the girls of the country as has been put
forth in behalf of the boys. We still seem to believe that
girls will rear themselves if let alone.

c. Definite programs for the girls of the various ages
are few and far between. It is hoped that some member
will add a brief chapter to this scant literature.



108



CHAPTER X
TEE ADOLESCENT TRAINING PROBLEMS

PROGRAM 63

THE BEGINNING OF ADOLESCENCE

1. The Significant and Organic Changes at Puberty.
1-207; 58-24.

2. The New Mental and Psychic Tendencies Peculiar
to Adolescent Boys. 3-225 ; 27-151 .

3. The New Mental and Psychic Tendencies Peculiar
to Adolescent Girls. 9-122; 138-246.

4. New Methods and Devices Necessary in Dealing
with Adolescents. 3-222; 30-109.

Suggestions

a. It would be fortunate if the members have access
to Dr. G. Stanley Hall's epoch-making work. Adoles-
cence.

b. Instability of activity and purpose mark this period.
It is hard to define the adolescent boy or girl because of
the fact that he is likely to be something very different by
the time you get him defined.

c. In order to understand this general problem easily,
one will be under the necessity of making a careful study
of the organic changes which characterize the age of pu-
berty.

109



PROGRAM 64

THE CARE OF THE HEALTH DURING EARLY YOUTH

1. Food and Clothing as Related to the Rapidly Grow-
ing Adolescent Boy. 11-213.

2. Amount of Work, Rest and Sleep Necessary for His
Normal Development. 23-171; 38-69.

3. Food and Clothing as Related to the Adolescent
Girl. 6-114; 43-62.

4. Amount of Work, Rest, and Sleep Necessary for
Her Normal Development. 1-310; 58-158.

Suggestions

a. The tide of physical life usually runs high at this
age. Some one has said, "The youth is easy to feed and
hard to clothe."

h. Again let us call for detailed programs and methods
of dealing with the young men. Topics No. 2 and 3 are
especially in need of precise treatment.

c. Is it true that the adolescent requires relatively
more sleep than the child four or five years younger.''

d. Making the Best of Our Children, by Mary Wood-
Allen (McClurg) will be found helpful here.



110



PROGRAM 65

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY AND THE CLOTHES PROBLEM

1. The Sixteen-year-old Youth: Keeping His Clothes
Within the Limits of Reasonable Expense and Democ-
racy. 5-236.

2. The Fifteen-year-old Girl: Keeping Her Clothes
Within the Reasonable Limits of Expense and Democ-
racy. 6-114; 94-109.

3. How may the School Contribute its Share to the
Solution of the Two Problems Named in (1) and (2)
above? Inquire D. S. Dept. K. S. A. C, Manhattan,
Kans.

4. A Plan whereby these two Classes of Young People
may Assist in the Care and Expense of Their Clothes.
14-2, 3.

Suggestions

a. The clothes question looms up big and important at
this period of life. Can a parent really deal with it singly
and alone, or is this not a sort of community problem?

b. Custom and sentiment here become very prominent
factors in molding character but it often matters greatly
as to who sets the standard. You may find communities
less than twenty miles apart where the standard of dress
among young people is radically different.



Ill



PROGRAM 66

love's first young dreams

1. A Plea for Adolescent Love and a Plan for its Direc-
tion and Safeguarding. 6-153; 124-75.

2. The Necessity for Planning and Chaperoning All
the Social Affairs of Adolescents. 5-134.

3. A Reasonable Amount of Guarded Intermingling of
the Young Sexes, or Segregation, which.'* 4-124.

4. "As one thinketh in his heart so has he been in his
past experience." Relate this to the General Topic
above. 3-93.

Suggestions

a. Too long we have tried to force the adolescent girl
to learn geometry while her heart was ringing with love's
young dreams, and all the while we have failed in our
purpose.

6. While there can never be a class in "love making" in
the school, this subtle activity will go on for all time,
swaying the lives of the youths and maidens. We cannot
use a text or teach the subject directly but we must meet
the issue with all earnestness.

c. The author is thoroughly committed to the policy of
co-educational schools.



112



PROGRAM 67

SOCIAL GAMES AND PASTIMES FOR THE 'TEEN AGE

1. A Program of Social Events to be Furnished by the
Home. 5-133; 142-75.

2. The Part Played by the High School in the Social
Affairs of the Pupils. 5-62.

3. How the Church and Sunday School may Properly
Indulge the Social Interests of Youth. 4-120; 27-338.

4. The Chums and Close Companionships of Youth.
9-118; 30-99; 122-158.

Suggestions

a. We may talk about history, commerce, and intel-
lectual training to our hearts' content, but the social affairs
will continue forever to mold the thoughts of the boys
and girls of the 'teen age.

h. Some day the high school will discover the neglect of
one of its best opportunities and put social training on the
regular weekly program.

c. It has been said that the modern preacher does not
necessarily preach very much. He is becoming more and
more a social engineer.



113



PROGRAM 68

THE FIRST TENDENCY TOWARD MATING

1. Age and Circumstances under which Youths and
Maidens may Begin Going Together in Pairs. 5-135;
138-276.

2. How may the Parents Keep the Youth from Going
at too Rapid a Pace in the Social World.'* 4-270.


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