William Arch McKeever.

Outlines of child study; a text book for parent-teacher associations, mothers' clubs, and all kindred organizations online

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possessing a strong latent instinct for matrimony. Thus
if we spoil one generation perhaps the next can make use
of the error.



137



PROGRAM 92

YOUTH AND THE SALOON QUESTION

1. Keeping the Boy from Taking His First Drink.
5-180.

2. Are the Youths of America Destined to be Entirely
Free from the Baneful Effects of the Saloon? Interna-
tional Reform Bureau, Washington, D. C.

3. The Local Fight with the Liquor Evil: Conducting
it for the Sake of the Boy. Union Signal, Evanston, 111.

4. A Report of the Prohibition Situation Throughout
the State of Kansas. State Temperance Union, Topeka,
Kans.

Suggestions

a. How about the soft drink as a first step toward
alcoholism.'^ Are not the refreshment stands and soda
fountains a curse rather than a blessing.?

6. Sometimes a conscientious father does not discover
which side of the saloon question he is on until his son
begins to grow tall. Then the decision is easy.

c. In many of the localities in the state of Kansas the
liquor traffic is as little known as petit larceny, and there
is very little of either.

d. The liquor dealers accuse the opponents of exaggera-
tion. Is this sin all on one side?



138



PROGRAM 93

YOUTH AND THE CHEAP LOAFING PLACE

1. What is an Ideal Treatment of the Pool Hall Situa-
tion? Address University of Wisconsin, Madison.

2. How to Meet the Degrading Influence of the Smoke
House. 27-183; Association Press, New York.

3. Dealing with the Moral Filth in the Cheap Caf§.
33-262.

4. The Cheap Card Game and the Gambling Place as
Menaces to Boy Life. 5-70; Editor Survey, New York.

Suggestions

a. Will some one describe an ideal pool and billiard hall,
a place where he should want his growing son to spend his
leisure hours.

b. The author has never been in a pool hall where he
found the society decent and respectable enough to war-
rant the admission of a minor.

c. But it is easy to condemn. If the chief loafing place
is to be banished, then a desirable social center of some
kind must be substituted.

d. The cheap loafing place is the center of much political
corruption also, a place where cheap votes are bargained
for.



139



PROGRAM 94

EVILS THAT LURE THE YOUNG GIRL

1 . How can we Know that the Girl's Chum is a Desirable
Companion for Her? 6-168.

2. The Dangers to Girlhood which Emanate from the
Vaudeville, the Cheap Theater and the Coarse Picture
Show. 58-251 ; 146-88, 97.

3. Cautioning the Girl Against Chance Acquaintances
with Strange Young Men. 57-156. Inquire of Chicago
School of Civics and Philanthropy.

4. Are Our Girls Tending toward the Use of Cigarettes
and Intoxicating Drinks.'*

Suggestions

a. Are we really tolerant enough of the silliness of the
adolescent girl?

b. How many of the mothers present at the meeting
have a plan which will furnish wholesome indulgence for
the social instinct of their fifteen year old daughters?

c. Have we not been selfish and short-sighted in our
effort to safeguard our own daughters and done nothing
for other people's daughters? Can we succeed with this
problem without the help of the whole community ?

d. What has been done by way of holding the property
owner responsible for the evil resort?



140



CHAPTER XIII
THE RELIGIOUS TRAINING OF THE YOUNG

PROGRAM 95

RELIGION IN THE HOME

1. Is the Old Fashioned Family Worship Destined to
go Out of Use Entirely? What then? 36-228.

2. How may the Home Life Inculcate a Wholesome
Respect for All the Churches? 5-349; 356.

3. Getting the Children off to Sunday School with
Lessons Prepared. 128-141.

4. How may we Interest the Boy and Girl in the
Activities of the Church? 27-326-370.

Suggestions

a. Question No. 2 is the biggest one in the list. Our
lack of full tolerance of other people's religion is still most
lamentable.

b. The author's position regarding the religion of
childhood has been much misunderstood. Children do not
naturally take any deep concern about religious matters.
The great instinctive interest in such matters comes during
the adolescent years.

c. What has become of religion during the time of the
great war?

141



t



PROGRAM 96

THE YOUNG AND RELIGIOUS GOOD FELLOWSHIP

1. May the Young not be Taught to Respect Religion
as a Universal Force Affecting the Lives of All Peoples?
1-324.

2. May Parents Induce their Children to Become
Regular Church Members and at the Same Time Inculcate
a Wholesome Cordiality Toward All Church Bodies?
6-284.

3. What may the Minister do to Meet the Require-
ments of (1) above? 129-202.

4. What may the Teacher do to Meet the Requirements
of (2) above? 5-352.

Suggestions

a. There will be different religious and different church
organizations throughout all times, perhaps. Why should
there not be? What we need is sympathy, a realization
that the human race is inherently the same at its core but
that our different attitudes and opinions are largely the
result of early environment and training.

b. Does anyone know of a school teacher who makes it a
point to teach religious tolerance? How can his number
be multiplied?



142



PROGRAM 97

RELIGION AND THE INSTINCTIVE AWAKENING

1. The Significance of the Instinctive Religious Interest
of the 'Teen Age. 1-362.

2. How does Religious Training in Childhood Give
Marked Assistance at the Time of True Conversion?
4-290.

3. A Plan for Bringing the Adolescent Boy into Active
Church Membership. 5-355; 20-164.

4. A Plan for Bringing the Adolescent Girl into Active
Church Membership. 6-291; 20-183.

Suggestions

a. Psychology has done far more to explain religion
than has theology. Will some member give a short
address on the psychology of religious belief.''

6. The adult convert who had no religious training in
childhood suddenly finds himself without even the rudi-
ments of a religious vocabulary.

c. One good way to get adolescent boys and girls into
the church is to bring them in together. Their religion at
first is much related to sociability and can well begin its
growth in such a relation.



143



PROGRAM 98

THE EFFICIENT SUNDAY SCHOOL

1. May the Same Pedagogy be Applied to Both the
Public School and the Sunday School? Write the Stand-
ard Press, Cincinnati, Ohio.

2. An Ideal Kindergarten Department for the Sunday
School. Write the University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

3. Methods and Devices for Holding and Instructing
the Pre-adolescent Boy. 142-109. Write The Pilgrim
Press, Boston.

4. Methods and Devices for Holding and Instructing
the Pre-adolescent Sunday School Girl. Write Fleming H.
Revell Co., New York; also American Institute of Social
Service, N. Y.

Suggestions

a. There are many foolish things taught in some Sunday
schools, and there is as yet a very general lack of recogni-
tion of the principles of psychology which must necessarily
be applied to all good teachings.

b. The pre-adolescent boys who are really interested in
the Sunday school lesson are few and far between. Occa-
sionally, however, there is a Sunday school teacher who
can hold them in line.

c. Is it not a fact that the pre-adolescent girl takes the
Sunday school training much more seriously than does her
brother? Why is this?



144



PROGRAM 99

THE SUNDAY SCHOOL AND THE YOUNG PEOPLE

1. Sunday School Work which Appeals to the Heart
of Youth. 23-97; Dept. of Religious Ed., Univ. of Chi-
cago Press.

2. Sunday School Work which Appeals to the Heart of
the Blooming Maiden. 6-288; Address The Christian
Register, Boston.

3. How to Transform the Sunday School into a Re-
ligious Social Center for All. 4-287; Address The Church-
man, New York.

4. The Sunday School Base-ball Team as an Opponent
of the Sunday Playing of the Professional League. Ad-
dress The Christian Century, Chicago.

Suggestions

a. Is not the idea of Sunday school for youths and
maidens rather more a social affair than a religious one?
Unquestionably the strongest instinctive for bringing
the young people together in the church is the social
interest.

h. Is there any serious objection to having the Sunday
school lesson and the social hour follow one another in
immediate succession?

c. Depend on the well-organized Sunday school base-
ball team to put the Sunday base-ball team out of business.
Has anyone a report of such an occurrence?



145



PROGRAM 100

THE YOUNG PEOPLE's RELIGIOUS SOCIETY

1. Is it Meeting a Vital Need in the Lives of the Young?
Address The Christian Advocate, New York.

2. What is its Best Relation to the Church and the
Sunday school? Address Herald and Presbyter, Cincin-
nati.

3. How may it Best Satisfy the Social Interests of the
Young? Address The Advance, Chicago.

4. What Service and Extension Work may it Under-
take? Address The Examiner, New York; also American
Unitarian Association, Boston.

Suggestions

a. The young person proceeds by easy and natural
steps towards a substantial religious life entirely under
the provision that he have careful training all the way.

6. Those who conduct the young people's societies had
better keep uppermost this question. What wholesome
enticement can be constantly held out to bring the young
people in?

c. Call for a talk by some one who has a scheme for
giving the young church members something to do that
will extend the usefulness of the church.



146



PROGRAM 101

THE YOUNG MEN's CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

1. What is it Doing for the Boys of the Junior De-
partment? Association Men, New York.

2. How may it Keep from Becoming "Soft" and an
Innocent Loafing Place? 5-353; Rural Manhood, New
York.

3. A Plan for its Doing Vital and Aggressive Religious
Work among Young Men. Association Press, N. Y.

4. May it be Made a Real and Complete Home for
Young Men? Address Railroad Men, New York.

Suggestions

a. The Young Men's Christian Association has, in
many places, the reputation of being "soft." Why is this?

b. It is not the fault of the general movement but rather
the fault of the local management which sometimes brings
the association into ill-repute.

c. Is not the vital work of the association often of a
non-religious character? More really effective extension
work is what is needed.

d. Can the Y. M. C. A. ever become thoroughly aggres-
sive so long as it must beg continually for its means of
existence?



147



PROGRAM 102

THE YOUNG WOMEN's CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

1. How may it Serve Vitally the Needs of the Young
Woman? 6-297; Address Religious Education, Chicago.

2. A Plan whereby it may do Effective Social Service
Work. Address National Board, Y. W. C. A., New York.

3. To What Extent may it Furnish a Complete Home
for Young Women? Address The Club Worker, New York.

4. What is its Best Service to the Country at Large?
Ask for The Y. W. C. A. at Work, National Board Y. W.
C. A., New York.

Suggestions

a. The Young Women's Christian Association is be-
ginning to do a big work but its possibilities of service are
far beyond its dreams hitherto. Service is the key note
of its best work.

6. How can the association organize an excellent tracing
and finding system for all young women within its zone
of activity?

c. Will some one report on a feasible scheme for making
the Young Women's Christian Association a more suc-
cessful venture in a business way?



'148



PROGRAM 103

TEACHING PEACE TO THE YOUNG

1. Are Race Prejudice, Class Prejudice and Neighbor-
hood Prejudice all the Same Thing Existing in Different
Degrees of Development? Address, World Peace Founda-
tion, Boston, Pamphlet.

2. The History of the World as now Written for the
Young is a Record of War and Bloodshed. How Does
this Matter Affect the Peace Problem? Address, Society
for International Conciliation, New York.

3. Will the Practice of Team Work, Co-operation and
Good-fellowship while Young Affect the War Attitude
of the Adult? Address Survey, and N. Y. School of Philan-
thropy, New York.

4. May Children be Taught Diplomacy and Amicable
Methods in Settlement of their Differences? Address
School of Civics and Philanthropy, Chicago.

Suggestions

a. Simply because the twentieth century has witnessed
the greatest war in all history, it is not fair to say that
humanity has failed. What we must have is a new philoso-
phy of life. The civilization which has just gone down
with a crash was based upon selfishness and business con-
siderations. The new civilization will be based upon
human welfare. Good will and social service will be among
its greatest ideals.



149



CHAPTER XIV
TEE COUNTRY BOY AND THE COUNTRY GIRL

PROGRAM 104

THE RURAL MOTHER

1. What Minimum of Household Conveniences must
the Country Mother Have? 23-61.

2. How is the Rural Mother to Solve the Problem of
Household Help? 23-41.

3. The Ideal Service which a Farm Mother May
Render Her Growing Children ? Address Wallaces Farmer,
Des Moines, la.

4. Does the Typical Farm Mother Secretly Rebel
against Rural Life? Address Orange Judd Co., New York.

Suggestions

a. The country uplift will go on just as fast as the
people are enabled to realize all the higher values of life
in rural places. We have tried to teach rural humanity
by giving the people the bare necessities of life and an over
amount of work. They cannot be fooled.

b. Make out a list of worthy things which lure young
people in the city. Then provide these in the country
and a thing worth while is done.

c. An ideal program, including a careful division of time,
is what is needed here.

150



PROGRAM 105

FARM LIFE AND CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT

1. What Farm Life Experiences Contribute Most to the
Development of Good Character? Address Rural Man-
hood, N. Y.

2. Lifting the Overburden from the Shoulders of the
Farm Boy. 23-171.

3. Relieving the Strain on the Life of the Girl. 23-183.

4. A Plan for Bringing Happiness and Contentment
to Farm Boys and Girls. 35-83; 25-17.

Suggestions

a. Do not fail to have one speaker make out a balanced
schedule of activities for the rural young people.

b. Do not require one speaker to undertake to cover the
entire field. There is a natural division between the sexes,
and there is a three-fold division of infancy, childhood, and
youth. All the just claims of these six classes of the
young must be met.

c. Farm parents must have a conscious and constructive
plan for the development of the characters of their chil-
dren. Even an ideal rural school can do little unless the
home supplements its eflForts.



151



PROGRAM 106

THE EFFICIENT RURAL SCHOOL

1. How may the Instruction in English be Suited to
Rural Life? 132-266.

2. Can Mathematics be Made to Offer Definite Helps
to the Country Life? 132-295.

3. How to Teach Farm Geography by the Laboratory
Method. Address State Normal School, Bloomsburg, Pa.

4. Teaching Health and Sanitation in the Rural School.
23-122.

Suggestions

a. The language of the school anywhere should be the
language expressive of the best there is in the local life.

b. In nearly all the schools the mathematics should be
cut down fifty per cent and something better put into its
place.

c. The modern rural teacher will not put in more than
half of the time merely hearing lessons. About one half
of the time will be devoted to the interpretation of living
environment.

d. The normal school at Kirks ville. Mo., has been a
pioneer in this work. Write for their periodical.



152



PROGRAM 107

OTHER TASKS FOR THE RURAL SCHOOL

1. Some of the Advantages of Consolidation of Schools.
Among Country Schools, Kern (Ginn & Co., N. Y.).

2. May the Rural Teacher Become a Permanent
Resident of the District? U. S. Bureau of Education.
Pamphlet.

3. Should the District Furnish the Rural Teacher a
Plot of Ground and a Residence? U. S. Bureau of Educa-
tion.

4. A Plan for Making the Rural Teacher a Community
Builder. 132-11; Address The Rural Educator, Columbus,
Ohio.

Suggestions

a. It need not surprise us if some state should enact a
law making a consolidation of schools compulsory. Write
to the Bureau of Education, Washington, D. C, and if
possible secure the story of a rural teacher who farms part
time and lives in a community on a plot of ground fur-
nished for his service. Secure pictures, plans, and specifi-
cations, if such are available.

b. A good way to respond to topic No. 4 is to enumerate
the things which the rural teachers may actually do as a
community leader.

c. Some member should bring forward a plan for "con-
solidating" the rural school with every other good rural
institution.



153



PROGRAM 108

THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE COUNTRY SCHOOL

1. How to Renovate and Remodel the Cheap Country
School Building. Write Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y.

2. Model Plot and Plans for a Rural School Campus.
35-102.

3. How to Heat and Ventilate the One-room School
House. Address State Dept. of Education.

4. A Model Plan for Sanitary Closets and Drainage for
the School House. 132-32.

Suggestions

a. In some states the district is not permitted to erect a
new school building without making use of plans and
specifications furnished by the department of education.
This is a valuable law.

6. Again the Bureau of Education at Washington will
serve the needs of inquirers.

c. If some member works out an ideal plan for a new
school building, see that the matter is brought before the
attention of every adult member of the community. Thus
educate public sentiment.

d. Some of the state normal schools are now doing
valuable extension work among the rural schools, e. g.,
inquire of the State Normal School, Lewiston, Idaho.



154



PROGRAM 109

THE RURAL SCHOOL AS A CENTER OF LIFE

1. How to Make the Country School House a Social
Center of Life. 23-101; State Normal School, Kirksville,
Mo.

2. How to Use the School Building for Literary and
Political Purposes. Bulletin, University of Wis., Madison.

3. How may the School Building Serve the Grange and
Kindred Societies? Bulletin, K. S. A. C, Manhattan,
Kans.

4. How to Make the Rural School House Serve as
Church and Sunday School Room. Among Rural Schools,
Kern. Ginn & Co., New York.

Suggestions

a. The 'Teens and the Rural Sunday School, J. L.
Alexander, Editor, Association Press, N. Y., is a valuable
help on No. 1.

6. Write the Russell Sage Foundation, New York City,
for information on these topics.

c. Rural Manhood, New York City, will serve as a com-
petent text book and guide for the rural social workers.

d. The Country Life department. National Young
Men's Christian Association, New York City, will likewise
serve the cause most helpfully.

e. Let the chairman urge that each speaker bring
something very concrete and definite to the meeting.



155



PROGRAM 110

THE COUNTRY SCHOOL AND RURAL MINDEDNESS

1. How may the Pupils be made to take an Interest in
Farm Crops? 23-120.

2. Interesting the Pupils in the Life Stock of the Farm.
132-200.

3. May the Country School Offer Instruction as to the
Advantages of Rural hiie? Among Rural Schools, Kern.
Ginn & Co., N. Y.

4. May the Rural School Consciously make out a Plan
for the Social Life and Recreation of the Community?
Rural Manhood, New York.

Suggestions

a. How can we obtain text books which actually have
the rural point of view and teachers who know all the
country problems? These are the first two great essentials
in the re-construction of country life.

b. Much of the instruction in the country school is very
dulling, another part of it is entirely unnecessary. Fully
half of the time of country schools should be taken up with
laboratory work — studying plants, soils, insects, birds, ani-
mals, and streams. We want the children who grow up
in the country to recognize the poetic side of rural life.



156



PROGRAM 111

THE TRAINING IN RURAL INDUSTRY

1. How much Home Work should the Rural School Boy
be Required to do? 23-171 .

2. How much House Help should the Rural School
Girl be Required to do? 23-183.

3. How may Country Parents Plan for the Play and
Amusement of their Children? 132-112.

4. How may Country Parents Plan for the Sociability of
their Adolescent Sons and Daughters? 16- No. 26;
Playground, New York.

Suggestions

a. Does any one actually know a family home which
puts the problem of living a good life above the problem of
making the farm pay?

b. Does any one know a family home which plans for
the play, recreation, and sociability of its young people
before a plan for the crops and farm animals? Which of
these should be subordinated to the other, the children or
the crops?

c. Will someone bring to the meeting a description of an
ideal country picnic with perhaps some pictures to illus-
trate?



157



PROGRAM 112

THE DEVELOPMENT OF RURAL BUSINESS

1. Will Farm Children Necessarily Become Interested
in the Business of Farming? 23-275.

2. How may the Farm Boy be Taught to Acquire and
Own Property? 14- No. 2, No. 6.

3. How may the Farm Girl be Instructed in the Neces-
sary Forms of Business? 23-262.

4. May the Young Son or Daughter be Taught to do
the Farm Bookkeeping? Write Extension Department,
State Agricultural College.

Suggestions

a. Is the general problem of child life on the farm differ-
ent from the general problem in the cities? Are not the
natural tendencies and the instincts of childhood and
youth the same in both places?

b. Will not fair and adequate tests reveal the fact that
some country-reared boys and girls are suited only for city
positions? And is not the converse statement likewise
true?

c. The author believes that the farm book keeping
should be minimized. A large number of otherwise good
people waste much valuable time in unnecessary book-
keeping. Life is too short. The heart is hungry for so
many good things which we are likely to miss.



158



PART THREE
THE CHILD-STUDY LITERATURE



CHAPTER XV

THE PRELIMINARY BOOK LIST

Certain very definite rules of procedure must be
observed if the child-study society is to meet with most
commendable success, and one of these is to make use of
reference reading. Without a plan and a well-prepared
program the society is almost certain to dwindle away.
It seems easy and refreshing at the first meeting or two to
have many of the members air their views and opinions in
a rough and ready manner but this practice if kept up
long grows stale and ineffective. Definite preparation
on the part of each one regularly appointed to appear on
the program is the secret of success; and this preparation
is a comparatively easy task, provided the right class of
literature be available and the assignment of topics and
readings be made specific.

How TO Use the References

Below there is offered a list of a dozen titles of com-
paratively inexpensive volumes on child life. This list has
been made out with unusual care, and partly with the
thought of offering something on every phase of general
child study. In-so-far as is practicable, the first reference
for each and every topic will be confined to this pre-
liminary book list. It is urged that every child-study
society of any considerable size attempt to obtain these
volumes as the foundation of a working library. Each
member might agree to purchase and contribute one
volume. Or, a small assessment or collection might be

161



162 Outlines of Child Study

made as a means of purchasing the books outright. The
set can be kept in the local library, if there be one, or it
might be placed in charge of the librarian of the associa-
tion. In any event the members should have free and easy
access to the books and those participating in the program
discussions should have first right to their use. The books
are numbered consecutively, and in making the marginal
references the serial number of the book and the page of
the volume listed will be given.

The Nucleus of a Library

1. Youth. G. Stanley Hall. 370 pp. D. Appleton &
Co., New York.

This volume is recognized as a standard in its field, and
its author is the acknowledged pioneer student of child
life in America. The book emphasizes genesis and growth.
It is an epitome of Dr. Hall's larger work entitled Adoles-
cence. The chapters on "Faults, Lies and Crimes," "The
Growth of Social Ideals," and "Intellectual Education and
School Work" are especially illuminating.

2. The Care and Feeding of Children. L. Emmett
Holt, M. D. 195 pp. D. Appleton & Co., New York.

This little volume is regarded as an authority by
physicians and practically all others who are serious
students of the physical problems of infancy. Complete
dietaries and household prescriptions are among its virtues.
The mother who takes care of her own child, the nursery


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Online LibraryWilliam Arch McKeeverOutlines of child study; a text book for parent-teacher associations, mothers' clubs, and all kindred organizations → online text (page 8 of 10)