William Ball Wright.

The Ussher memoirs ; or, Genealogical memoirs of the Ussher families in Ireland (with appendix, pedigree and index of names), compiled from public and private sources online

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Online LibraryWilliam Ball WrightThe Ussher memoirs ; or, Genealogical memoirs of the Ussher families in Ireland (with appendix, pedigree and index of names), compiled from public and private sources → online text (page 1 of 26)
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HEYNOLDS HISTCRiCAL
GENEALOGY COLLECTION



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY



3 1833 01397 6714



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center



http://www.archive.org/details/usshermemoirsorgOOwrig



THE USSHER MEMOIRS



OR,



dSenealoffieal Si^tmoixs



OF THE



USSHER FAMILIES

IN IRELAND

(WITH APPENDIX, PEDIGREE AND INDEX OF NAMES),

COMPILED FROM PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SOURCES.



BY



REV. WM. BALL WRIGHT , M.A., T.CD.,

FORMERLY ERASMUS SMITH'S EXHIBITIONER ;

S. P. G. MISSIONARY IN JAPAN (1873-I882) ;

AUTHOR OF "RECORDS OF ANGLO-IRISH FAMILIES OF BALL."



" Nescire quid antea quam sis acciderit, id est, semper esse puerum"

— CiCERO.

ILL USTRATED.



DUBLIN:

SEALY, BRYERS & WALKER, 94, 95 & 96 MIDDLE ABBEY STREET.

LONDON:
MITCHELL & HUGHES, 140 WARDOUR STREET, W.



n ^ 9



79 7 987 7



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^



^O^0Z57



THE USSHER MEMOIRS



1



v^ ■^^■■■'*




PRIMATE JAMES USSHER, D.D.,

Lord Archbishop of Armagh (1625-1656).



From an Engraving by Vertve, 0/ the Pairtting by Sir Peter Uly, formerly at Shotover



PRINTED BY SEALY, BRYERS & WALKER, MID. ABBEY ST., DUBLIN.



WIS. HIST, ^oGietY.-






L\C\



i -2



DEDICATED,

BY PERMISSION,
TO

SIR J. BERNARD BURKE, C.B., LL.D.,

ULSTER KING-OF-ARMS,

THE PRESENT SUCCESSOR

OF

CHRISTOPHER USSHER,

DANIEL MOLYNEUX,

AND

ADAM USSHER,

IN THAT ANCIENT OFFICE;

WHO, BY HIS RESEARCHES AND WRITINGS,

HAS DONE MUCH

TO MAKE THE STUDY OF FAMILY HISTORY INTERESTING ;

AND. BY HIS KIND COURTESY

HAS FACILITATED THE LABOURS OF THE

AUTHOR

IN THIS HUMBLE EFFORT

OF

GENEALOGICAL WORK.



PEEFACE.



i



In sending forth, another genealogical work, I mtist request the indulgence of
my readers with respect to such faults and errors as may he found. My
approaching departure to a distant country and the preparations necessary for
it, together with the labours and constant journeyings in connection with my
official duties, have rendered it a most difficult task to carry out to completion
without thorough leisure, a work requiring such minute accuracy and constant
reference. In any case I hare made the way clear for further investigation.
The subject of the book is one which must be interesting to many besides those
connected by blood with Ireland's greatest Scholar, and there is a large
amount of information as to the early ffistory of Dublin and of Trinity College.
The plan adopted has been to commence each chapter with a short pedigree of
that branch of the Usshers treated of therein, which is followed by an expan-
sion of the same in narrative form. The Appendix contains many documents
printed for the first time, such as extracts from Parish Registers, Freemen's
Rolls, the Funeral Entries, etc. ; there is also a Tabular Pedigree on the basis
of Sir Wm. Betham's in Elrington's Life of Primate TJssher, but greatly
enlarged. An alphabetical index of Usshers and some others mentioned in
the work is added.

I have to return my hearty thanks to all those members of the TJssher
family who have helped me either by giving information or subscribing,
especially Richard J. TJssher, Esq., of Cappagh House, Co. Waterford, who
has lent me many interesting documents and worked up the history of
his own branch thoroughly for me; also Major-General John T, TJssher,
and Dr. Isaac W. TJsher of Dundrum, who have taken the greatest trouble
in ascertaining all they possibly could about their own and other branches
I also thank all those who have kindly subscribed towards the publication
of these Memoirs.



PREFACE.



To his Royal Highness the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces for
directing searches to be made for me in the MS. Records at the Horse
Guards ; to Sir J. Bernard Burke, C.B., for again allowing me to freely examine
the Funeral Entries and the Visitation of the City and Co. of Dublin ; to
J. J. Digges La Touche, Esq., LL.D., Deputy Keeper of the Irish Records, for
generous permission, through a lengthened period, to search the invaluable and
varied documents under his care, and also to the gentlemen in the Search-room
for their courteous assistance ; to Thomas French, Esq., Assistant Librarian
T.C.D., for similar kindness in regard to the very interesting historical and
genealogical MSS. in my Alma Mater, which have yielded me such a rich
store of cvirious information ; to Rev. C. T. M'Cready, Rev. "W. Reynell, W.
O'Donnavan, LL.D., and Mr. Edward Evans of Cornmarket, for many most
precious items of information and for the use of private MS. notes ; and also
to my clerical brethren who have freely allowed me to inspect their Parochial
Registers ; to the Town Clerk of Dublin for permitting me to read the Free-
man's Lists and Repertory of the Assembly Rolls ; to H. E. Doyle, Esq., C.B.,
and the other gentlemen who have helped me with regard to the illustrations,
lastly, to Messrs. Sealy, Bryers & "Walker of Dublin, who have taken such a
great interest and spared no trouble in the publishing of this book, I express
my sincere obligations. The portrait of Master John Ussher has been
substituted for that of Sir "Wra. TJssher, Jun., as the one supposed to be Sir
"William's is not certainly known to be his.

I am indebted to R. Day, Esq., F.S.A., for the loan of the "super libros "
of Primate Jas. Ussher, of which an exact fac-shnile is given on the cover.

I regret that I was unsuccessful in the application which I made for

permission to copy the TJssher letters in the Ormonde Collection at Kilkenny

Castle.

WILLIAM BALL "WRIGHT.

DuBLix, New Year's Day, 1889.



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



CHAP. PAGES.

PREFACE - - ^ - - - - -• '• ^^

HISTORICAIj INTKODUCnON - - - vii. — xi.

I. THE TJSSHERS OF YORKSHIRE, ETC. - - r - 1 — 3

II. EARLY NOTICES OF THE NAME TJSSHER IN IRELAND - - 3 — 5

III. ARLANTOR OR ARLAND USCHER AND HIS DESCENDANTS - 6 — 9

IV. THE USHERS OF 8ANTRY AND CROMLIN - - . 10 — 27

V. THE USSHER FAMILY OF 8T. NICHOLAS* PARISH, WITHIN THE

■WALLS, DXnBLIN - - - 28 — 42

VI. PRIMATE HENRY TTSSHER AND HIS FAMILY - - - 42 — 59

VII. THE TTSSHER FAMILY OF BALSOON, CO. MEATH - - 60 — 78

Vm. ARLAND USSHER, THE CHANCERY REGISTRAR, AND HIS FAMILY 79 — 86

IX. PRIMATE JAMES USSHER ... - - 86 104

X. LADY TYRRELL AND HER DESCENDANTS - - - 104 — 117

XI. CHRISTOPHER FITZARLAND USSHER AND HIS FAMILY - - 118 145

Xn. SIR WILLIAM USSHER, JUNIOR, AND THE USSHER3 OF USSHER's

QUAY - . - - . . - - 145—167

Xm. THE USSHERS OF MOUNT USSHER AND EASTWELL - - 168 — 194

xrv. REV. JOHN USSHER, D.D., OF CLONTARF, AND HIS FAMILY - 195 — 204

XV. COLONEL BEVERLY USSHER AND THE USSHERS OF KILMEADON

AND BALLINTAYLOR, CO. "WATERFORD. . - - 205 — 227

XVr. CAPTAIN ARTHUR USSHER OF CAPPAGH AND CAMPHIRE AND

HIS DKSCENDANTS . . . - . 228 247

APPENDICES I. TO X. - - - - - - 249 279

APPENDIX XI. TABULAR PEDIGREE - - - - 281 — 296

INDEX OF NAMES - - .. 297 304



LIST OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS.



Frontispiece. — ^Primate James Ussher, D.D.,

Lord Archbishop of Armagh. Born 1581, died 1656.
From au engraving by Yertue, of the painting by
Sir Peter Lely, formerly at Shotover.

To face p. 44. — Primate Henry Ussher, D.D.,

Lord Archbishop of Armagh. Born about 1550, died 1613.
From a photograph of the painting at Armagh Palace.

To face p. 62. — The Arms of Primate Hekry Ussher, emblazoned.

Quartered with those of the Yorkshire Usshers. From
the Funeral Entry in Ulster Office.

To face p. 86. — The Arms or Primate James Ussher.

From Brit. Mus. Add. MS., 5855, fo. 66b.

To face p. 130. — Sir William Ussher, Senr., Clerk of the Council.

Born 1561, died 1659. From a water colour copy in Natl.
Gal. of I., of his picture at Castledillon.

To face p. 172.— John Ussher, Master of Chancery.

Born 1646, died 1732, son of Sir Wm. Ussher, junr.
From a copy of his picture at Eastwell, Co. Galway.

To face p. 177.— Rev. Henry Ussher, D.D., IS.F.T.C.D.

Born 1741, died 1790. First Astronomer Euyal of Ireland.
From a miniature by his daughter.

To face p. 181. — Sir Thomas Ussher, KC.B.

Eear Admiral of the Blue. Born 1779, died 1862. From
a photograph by Cranfield, of his picture.



HISTORICAIj inteoduction.



As many of those who are readers of this work may not have the patience to
go through the details, or to pick out the interesting facts lying imbedded in a
mass of dry pedigree, the writer purposes here to give a short sketch of the
Ussher family, which was distinguished, not merely because from its bosom
sprang the extraordinary man, who towered so high in mental endowments
and varied learning above his fellows, but also because there were not a few
of the name besides, who were distinguished in other ways.

The first of the name who was undoubtedly an ancestor of the present wide-
spread branches of the Irish Usshers, was Arlantor or Arland Uscher or
Ussher, who appears to have been settled in Dublin as a leading merchant in
and before 1439, was bailiff of that City in 1461, Mayor in 1469, and died in
1479. A tradition as old as Archbishop James Ussher's time states that Arland
IJscher was descended from a John Nevil of the Northern Nevils, who
accompanied Prince John in 1185 to Ireland as Usher of the Court, and
adopted the surname of Usher or Ussher from his office ; but this tradition is
not corroborated by contemporary evidence.

It is curious certainly that from 1185 to 1439, there should have been no
knightly or landed family of the name in Ireland, as known to either public
or private records or other documents. Still the coat of arms which was in
use by the father and uncles of the great primate, viz. : a chevron ermine
between 3 batons or, on a ground azure, and the crest, a mailed hand and
arm holding a baton or, are testimony of the tradition being founded on
some such fttct.

It is probable that John le Ussher or de Ussher, who in 1302 was
made Constable of Dublin Castle by King Edward I., held the office for
several years, and was then re-appointed by Edward II. (who seems to have
been his friend or patron, the original appointment having been "at the
instance of Xing Edward's son,") was the grandfather or great grandfather
of Arland Uscher.



THE USSHER MEMOIRS.



If John le Usslier were the same as John Nevil, then the title " servant
of the King," and his connection with the King's son might have given
rise to the story about Prince John ; for there is always a tendency in the
absence of records to throw back the date of a tradition to the earliest coming
of the English into Ireland.

John le Ussher appears to have. lived latterly in England, and either died
or retired from office in 1309-10. Now if he were of the Yoik<hire or West-
moreland Nevils, his son may have lived and died in the North of England, and
Arland Ussher, the grandson, when coming over to Dublin, and settling there
as a leading merchant, may have brought the coat of arms and the story of his
origin with him. Everything seems to point to Arland Ussher's having come
from England. No Ussher appears in the long list of mayors and bailiffs of
Dublin before him ; no Ussher is mentioned in any way during the hundred
and forty years previous to him, as holding any office or any land in Ireland.
Again the fact, that Primate Henry Ussher and his three brothers, who had
studied in the English Universities, and one of whom, Christopher, was Ulster
King of Arms, quartered the 3 lions' paws erased sable of ths Usshers of
Fetherstone Hall, near Pontefract, Yorks (a famil}' who claimed descent from
an Usher of Pichard II. at Pomfret or Pontefract Castle) with their own
ancestral arms, points to their having had some belief in and knowledge of a
Yorkshire origin, and of a connection with that family. In the absence of
clearer evidence, the writer offers this only as a suggestion.

The Nevilles claim to be descended from Gilbert de Neville, said to have
been the Admiral of the Conqueror's fleet in 1066, and the Nevilles of Paby
Castle, York.^hire, marked this by a galley in their arms. Geoffry, grandson
of the above Gilbert, married Emma Bulmer, the heiress of Brancepeth ; there
is a tower at Kaby Castle stiil named " the Bulmer Tower," and near the top
of this tower a large B for Bulmer is twice cut in the stone.

Isabel, the dr. and heiress of Geoffry, married liobert FitzMeldred, who
took the name of Neville (cf. " Burke's Extinct Peerage ").

Peturning to Arland Ussher, we find that he married twice into old
feudal families of the Pale, viz. : those of Taylour and Berford, which would
be unlikely unless he were of ancient descent himself ; his sons also marrie.1
into the well-known families of Cheevers, Foster, D'Arcy and FitzWilliams.



HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION.



Arland Usslier liad by his 2nd marriage two surviving sons, John and
Christopher, who were respectively the founders of two great lines of
descent.

John Uscher or Ussber, the elder son, had by his marriage with Joan
Foster of Killeigh two sons, Arland and Thomas. The former of these,
Arland Ussher or Usher of Dublin,, foimdcd the Santry or Cromlin
family, now represented by the Ushers formerly settled at ]^irr, who
have always steadily adhered to the single " s " in the spelling of the
name. The most noted of this branch was the above named Arland
(the second) who was not only a prominent merchant and collector of the Port
of Dublin, but a man of religious zeal, having rebuilt St, John's Church.
The notices of him seem to point to his holding some important office, and
the writer discovered in a MS. pedigree in T.C.D. a statement that this Arland
was King of Arms. If this was so, he was probably an " Ireland King of
Arms," an office in existence long previous to the Ulster Office. He married into
the ancient house of Holy wood of Artane, descended from Sir Robt. de Holy
Wood or de Sacro Bosco, Knighted in 1361, as " the worthiest in chivalry,"
by Lionel, Duke of Clarence and Earl Palatine of Ulster.

The descendants of Arland Usher, jun., intermarried with the well-known
families of FitzJobn, Ball, Plunkett, Eustace, Malone, Segrave, Challoner,
and Shelton.

This lamily of the Usshers held fast to the faith of their ancestors, and
thus by forfeiture of estates, lost their former prosperity.

Among the Usshers of Birr were several men of fine moral and social
character, such as Noble Luke Ussher of Gurteen, and Noble Luke Ussher
who presided at a meeting of the Roman Catholics at Birr in 1833.

Thomas Ussher, the 2nd son of Arland Ussher the younger, married
Margery, dr. of Henry Geyton, a member of a very old civic family in
Dublin, and was by her the father of five sons and three daughters ; the first
and third of his sons were eminent merchants, the eldest daughter was wife
to John Garvey, Archbishop of Armagh, the second, third and fifth sons
distinguished in the Church, Law and Court. Of these, Henry, the second
son, a learned and pious Divine, having studied in Cambridge, Oxford and
Paris, was ordained and became Archdeacon of Dublin. It was while holding



THE USSHER MEMOIRS.



this dignity that lie gained great renown as a preacher, and went at the
request of the Lord Chancellor and his fellow citizens, and at his own expense,
to London, to plead for permission for the building of a new College. So
successful was he, that he returned with a Charter from Queen Elizabeth, in
which it is expressly stated that the Queen grants it owing to his persuasion,
and in consequence she appoints him to be first Fellow, his friend Rev. Luke
Cballoner, second Fellow, and TJs^her's nephew. Rev. Lancellot Money, third
Fellow of the Collfge of the Holy and Undivided Trinity near Dublin
Henry TTssher's youngest son, the distinguished Robert Ussher, Provost of
T.C.D., and Bishop of Kildare, fell on evil times in 1641, and died of grief
brought on by his troubles.

For his labours in connection with Trinity College, Henry Ussher was
promoted to the Primacy, which he held with honour and respect till his death.
1613. His descendants were estated gentlemen at Balsoon in the Co. Meath.
The most eminent of them was James Ussher, who was a Roman Catholic
priest in Kensington, and died in 1771. Some of his works, such as " Clio,
an Essay on Ta>te," are written in a most chaste and exquisite style. ' He was
a famous schoolmaster, and partner in that profession with John Walker, the
author of the Pronouncing Dictionary. Arlund Ussher, third of the name,
was a distinguished Chancery lawyer, who married a daughter of James
Stanihurst, the Recorder of Dublin, and three times Speaker of the Irish
House of Commons. But the greatest honour this Arland Ussher had was
that of being the father of two most learned sons, of whom the younger,
Ambrose, was unfortunately cut off by death too soon for the world's gain, but
the elder, James Ussher, the famous scholar, antiquary and divine, was per-
haps in his own line, the most wonderlul genius in our Church since the
Reforraaiiun, and equally holy, humble and innocent as he was of command-
ing intellect, and almost miraculous attainments. He was successively
Professor of Divinity in Dublin University, Bishop of Meath, and Archbishop
of Armagh. His name as a man of learning became known throughout
Europe, and even penetrated into the far East, where he had agents employed
to secure rare MSS. of the Scriptures and other works. He was appointed by
Charles I. to hold the Bishopric of Carlisle in commendam, on being despoiled
cf his property by the Irish rebel?, but he lived to be very poor and dependent



HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION.



on the bounty of kind friends, owing to his faithiulness to King and Church
in the days of Oliver Cromwell. He died in his 76th year in the spring of
1656, leaving an only child, concerning whom and her descendants the writer '
has gathered many fresh facts for this work.

"We now turn to Christopher, the youngest son of the first Arland Ussher,
and who married 1st a D'Arcy and 2ndly into the great feudal family of
FitzWilliam or FitzWilliams,now represented by Earl FitzWilliam, and by the
Earl of Pembroke. Christopher Ussher died early in life, but left a son John
Ussher, who occupied a most prominent position, as Alderman, and Collector of
Customs, being greatly trusted by the Government of the day for his ability
and disinterested patriotism. He was also a man of deep piety and religious
zeal, and at his expense and in his house at Bridgefoot, Dublin, was printed
the first book in the Irish language.

His son. Sir William Ussher* the elder, married the daughter of
Archbp. Loftus, and obtained great influence as Clerk of the Privy Council,
an office which he held from 1593 until the fall of Chas. I. In his
house and at his expense was printed the first version of the Irish
Xew Testament. He died aged ninety-six, leaving many sons and daughters
who contracted alliances with leading Irish families, and his eldest son
Arthur also left a large family of sons and daughters, from whom many of
the present nobility and gentry are descended in the female line, such
as the Duke of Wellington, the Marquis of Ormonde, the Earl of Rosse, etc.
From Sir Wm. Ussher's grandson, Sir Wm. Ussher, junr., of Bridgefoot,
were descended John Ussher, Master of Chancery, ancestor of the Usshers of
Mt. Ussher and of Eastwell, Co. Galway, and of the Abbe Edgeworth, also of
Sir Thomas Ussher, K.C.B., well known in connection with the exile of
Napoleon I. to Elba. From Colonel Beverly Ussher, a younger brother of
Sir Wm. Ussher^ junior, came the Usshers of the Co. Waterford, and Ussher,
Lord St. George, ancestor of the Duke of Leinster.

• He charpred on the chevron ermine of the Ussher arms for difference a lozeng«
with the FitzWilliam arms, ».«., Gules on a bend cotised ar. 3 popinjays vert. Adam
Ussher, Ulster, 1619 1G33, bore the same with a crescent for difference.



THE

U SS H E R MEMOIRS/

OR,

GENEALOGICAL MEMOIRS OF THE USSHER
FAMILIES IN IRELAND.



CHAPTER I.

THE rSSHERS OF YORKSHIRE, ETC.

The name Usher or Ussher is often found in ancient documents in Engklid
after the Norman Conquest ; in the first instance as a title of office, and
then as a sirname derived from the office of the first person of the name.
Thus in an Inquis. post mort., 56th Henry I., we find Richard le Usslier,
Southampton, owned a house in Calpe Str,, Winton ; in Inquis. 106, 21st
Edw. I., " Ricus le Usser pro Priore Cantuar, Kcevic' Cantuar. tenement'
ibidem';" in 32nd Ed. L, Nicholas Ussher.

In Morpeth Deanery, Northumberland in the 35th of Edw. III.,
Robert Usher is witness to a deed of John Preston of Newe, and we find a
deed of May 29th, 1452, by which a tenement of the East side of Newgate
betw. the land of the Abbot of "Westminster on the south, and that of
Richard Uscher on the north side was conveyed to James Bukk. In 1461,
Jan. 10, 5th of Edw. lY., Rowland Usher grants to H. Bewick 2 tenements,
which tenements he had by charter of feoffment irova. Roger Uscher at 13s. 4d.
p. ann. for ever.

An ancient family of the name Ussher was early settled in Yorkshire, and
Glover in his visitation of that county, 1585 (which is continued in 1612j)



THE USSHER MEMOIRS.



gives the pedigree and origin of the name as follows (cf. T.C.D. MS.,
F. 4-14, p. 66) :

JACOBUS f. . . . Domini Conniers, gent. Usher, Rich. 2, 1377, apudPomfret
Castle, wide no7nen est desumpta, m. . . . f . sola Hen. Hack-
worth de Hakworthingam Hall, in Co. Lincoln. Issue :
I. Joannes, 1403, of Fetherstone m . . . f. & h. Thomae Baghill de
Fetherston Hall, Yorks. Issue :
I. Robert Ussher of Featherstone ; m. Alice f . Ric. "Wentworth de
Bretton arm. Issue :
i. Robert Ussher, 1515, alive in 1585, m. Joana, f. & h., Tho.
"Wilbore de Arksty Hall, als New Hall als Whitefryers.
Issue :

1. Matthew Ussher, eldest son, m. . . .

(1) Robert Ussher.

(2) Matthew Ussher.

(3) Thomas Ussher.

(4) Cotton Ussher.

(5) George Ussher.

(6) Frances Ussher.

(7) Elizabeth Ussher.

(8) Mary Ussher.

(9) Ursula Ussher.

2. Thomas Ussher, m. Anne, dr. of_John Bore, of Doncaster.

Issue :

(1) Robert Ussher.

(2) Nicholas Ussher.

(3) Joan Ussher.

(4) Dorothy Ussher

3. William Ussher, m. Anne, dr. of Robt. Crawshaw, of

Epworth, in the Isle of Axholme. Issue :

(1) John Ussher, d.s.p.

(2) Joan Ussher.

4. Robert Ussher, Clerk in Holy Orders.

5. Richard Ussher, Clerk in Holy Orders.

6. Nicholas Ussher, s.p.

7. John Ussher, s.p.

8. Marf'aret Ussher.



THE USSHER MEMOIRS.



I. Isabel Ussher m. Robert Rogers of Bristol.
II. Margaret Usslier m. Thos. Wroe.

There ■would seem to have been a knowledge on the part of the Dublin
Ufeshers of some connection between them and this Yorkshire family of TJssher,
Many of the Christian names in both are identical, and Primate Henry TJssher
and his descendants quartered the arms of the Yorkshire TJsshers with their
own, as we also find in Arland Ussher's Funeral Entry, and in a coat of arms
of Primate James in a contemporary MS. armory in the British Museum.

The name Ussher or Usher is still common in the north of England,
and from thence extended early into Scotland. We find in a Close Roll of
the 4th year of Richd. II. the name of " Finalay Ussher, a Scottish merchant,
and previous to that, Robert Vsher, Provost of Peebles, cf. Excheq. Rolls, Scot.
1330. The Rev. W. Neville Ussher, Rector of Stow, Lincolnshire, writes
that his family now of Edinburgh and eminent merchants there, were formerly
owners of Toftfield in the parish of Melrose, where he has traced the name in
the parish Registers as far back as 1645 ; there is a tradition that they were
originally of the stock from which the great Archbishop sprang. John Usher
of Toftfield was an intimate friend of Sir TValter Scott, to whom he sold his
estate, which now forms a part of Abbotsford.

In the University of Oxford James Ussher was B.A. 1508, M.A. 1510,
Fellow of All Souls' Coll. Thos. Uscher was B.A. 1450. Wm. Huscher,
Chaplain, suppl. for B. Canon L. 1510.



CHAPTER II.

EARLY NOTICES OF THE NAME L'SSHER IN IRELAND.

The founder of the Dublin family of Ussher and its various branches was one
Arlantor orArlanton Uscher, a merchant of Dublin in the reign of Henry YL,
But there were persons of the name in Ireland long before his time. Thus in
a Plea Roll of 10th Edw. I. Hugh Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, Marshall of
England and Lord of the parts of Leinster in which Dunbrody was, in 1281,
complained of certain persons for entering his forests of Bentry in Wexford



THE USSHER MEMOIRS.



where they felled and appropriated oaks and other trees. An Inquisition was



Online LibraryWilliam Ball WrightThe Ussher memoirs ; or, Genealogical memoirs of the Ussher families in Ireland (with appendix, pedigree and index of names), compiled from public and private sources → online text (page 1 of 26)