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7

■ ' * ' —

THE DO'SET DINNER.



VIGGETY-PUDDEN PROMISED,



The tenth annual dinner of the Society of
Men of Dorset in London takes place at the
Holborn Restaurant on Monday, May 4,
under the presidency of Sir Stephen Collins,
M.P. ; and the hon. secretary, Mr. William
Watkins, has issued the following- cheerful
circular letter to the members inviting them
to be present : —

The Do'set Dinner.

To th* Manipus o' Do'set Vu'k in Lon'on-Toun.
Dear Zlr.

I do greet 'ee kindly, an' be in hopes that
thou bist well an' hearty!

I be martel pleased to tell 'ee that our yearly

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POEMS OF RURAL LIFE.



POEMS OF RURAL LIFE



IN THE DORSET DIALECT.



WILLIAM BARNES.




London :
C. KEGAN PAUL & CO., i PATERNOSTER SQUARE.

1879.



The Rights of translation and of Reproduction arc Rcscrz>ed.



TO THE READER.

Kind Reader,

Two of the three Collections of these
Dorset Poems have been, for some time, out of print, and
the whole of the three sets are now brought out in one
volume.

I have little more to say for them, than that the writing of
them as glimpses of life and landscape in Dorset, which often
open to my memory and mindsight, has given me very much
pleasure ; and my happiness would be enhanced if I could
believe that you would feel my sketches to be so truthful and
pleasing as to give you even a small share of pleasure, such
as that of the memories from which I have written them.

This edition has a list of such Dorset words as are found in
the Poems, with some hints on Dorset word shapes, and I
hope that they will be found a fully good key to the meanings
of the verse.

Yours kindly,

W. BARNES.

June 1879.



CONTENTS.



FIRST COLLECTION.



SPRING.



The Spring .

The Woodlands

Leady-Day, an' Ridden House

Easter Zunday

Easter Monday

Dock-Leaves .

The Blackbird

Woodcom' Feast

The Milk-Maid o' the Farm

The Girt Woak Tree that's in

the Dell .
Vellen o' the Tree



PAGE

3
4
5
8

9

9

io

12

13

15

io



PAGE

Bringen Woone Gwain o' Zundays 17
Evenen Twilight . . .18
Evenen in the Village . . 20

May 20

Bob the Fiddler ... 22
Hope in Spring ... 23
The White Road up athirt the

Hill 24

The Woody Hollow . . 25
Jenny's Ribbons ... 26
Eclogue : — The 'Lotments . 28
Eclogue : — A Bit o' Sly Coorten 30



SUMMER.



Evenen, an' Maidens out at Door 34
The Shepherd o' the Farm . 35
Vields in the Light . . 36
Whitsuntide an' Club Walken 37
Woodley 39

The Brook that Ran by Gramfer's 41
Sleep did come wi' the Dew . 42
Sweet Music in the Wind . 43
Uncle an' Aunt ... 44
Haven Woones Fortune a-twold 46
Jeane's Wedden Day in Mornen 47
Rivers don't gi'e out . . 49
Meaken up a Miff ... 50
Hay-Meaken . . . 51

Hay-Carren .... 52
Eclogue: — The Best Man in the
Yield .... 54



Where we did keep our Flagon 57
Week's End in Zummer, in the

Wold Vo'k's Time . . 58

The Mead a-mow'd . . 60
The Sky a-clearen . . .61

The Evenen Star o' Zummer . 62

The Clote .... 63

I got two Vields ... 65

Polly be-en upzides wi' Tom . 66

Be'mi'ster .... 67

Thatchen o' the Rick . . 68

Bees a-Zwarmen ... 69

Readen ov a Head-stwone . 70

Zummer Evenen Dance . . 71

Eclogue : — The Veiiiries . 72



CONTENTS.



FALL.



Corn a-turnen Yollow . . 76
A-Haulen o' the Corn . . 77
Harvest Hwome:— The vu'st Peart 78
Harvest Hwome: — Second Peart 79
A Zong ov Harvest Hwome . 80
Poll's Jack-Daw ... 82
The Ivy .... 83
The Welshnut Tree . . 84
Jenny out vrom Hwome . 86

Grenley Water ... 86
The Veairy Veet that I do meet 87
Mornen .... 88



Outa-Nutten ... 90

Teaken in Apples . . 91

Meaple Leaves be Yollow . 92
Night a-zetten in . . • 93
The Weather-beaten Tree . 94
Shrodon Feair:— The vu'st Peart 95
Shrodon Feair : — The rest o't . 96
Martin's Tide ... 97
Guy Faux's Night ... 99
Eclogue: — The Common a-took

in 100

Eclogue: — Two Farms in Woone 102



WINTER.



The Vrost .

A Bit o' Fun .

Fanny's Be'th-day .

What Dick an' I did

Grammer's Shoes .

Zunsheen in the Winter

The Weepen Leady

The Happy Days when I wer

Young
In the Stillness o' the Night



io5
106
107
109
in
112
113

115

116



The Settle an' the Girt Wood

Vire 117

The Carter . . . .118
Chris'mas Invitation . .120
Keepen up o' Chris'mas . 121

Zitten out the Wold Year . 122
Woak wer Good Enough Woonce 123
Lullaby . . . .124

Me'ary- Ann's Child . . 125

Eclogue: — Father Come Hwome 126
Eclogue: — A Ghost . .129



SUNDRY PIECES.



A Zong . . . .133

The Maid vor my Bride . .134
The Hwomestead . . . 135
The Farmer's Woldest Da'ter 136
Uncle out o' Debt an' out o' .

Danger . . . .137
The Church an' Happy Zunday 140
The Wold Waggon . . 141
The Dreven o' the Common . 142
The Common a-took in . . 143
A Wold Friend . . . 145



The Rwose that Deck'd her

Breast
Nanny's Cow
The Shep'erd Bwoy
Hope a-left Behind
A Good Father
The Beam in Grenley Church
The Va'ices that be Gone
Poll ....
Looks a-know'd Avore .
The Music o' the Dead .



145
147
148
149
150
ISI
152
153
154
155



CONTENTS.





PAGE


PAGE


The Ple'ace a Te'ale's a-twold o* 156


The Guide Post . . .166


Aunt's Tantrums .


. 158


Gwain to Fe'air . . .167


The Stwonen Pworch .


• 159


Jeane 0' Grenley Mill . .168


Farmer's Sons


. l60


The Bells ov Alderburnham . 169


Jeane ....


. I6l


The Girt Wold House 0' Mossy


The Dree Woaks .


. l62


Stwone . . . .170


The Hwomestead a- veil


into


A Witch . . . -173


Hand


. 164


Eclogue: — The Times . .175



SECOND COLLECTION.



Blackmwore Maidens . .185
My Orcha'd in Linden Lea . 186
Bishop's Caundle . . .187
HayMeaken — Nunchen Time 189
A Father out an' Mother Hwome 191
Riddles . . . .192

Day's Work a-done . .196
Light or Sheade . . 197

The Waggon a-stooded . .197
Gwain down the Steps . .201
Ellen Brine ov Allenburn . 202
The Motherless Child . . 203
The Leady's Tower . . 204
Fatherhood .... 208
The Maid o' Newton . .211
Childhood . . . .212
Meary's Smile . . .213
Meary Wedded . . .214
The Stwonen Bwoy . .215
The Young that died in Beauty 217
Fair Emily of Yarrow Mill . 218
The Scud . . . .219
Minden House . . .221
The Lovely Maid ovElwell Mead 222
Our Fathers' Works . . 224
The Wold vo'k Dead . . 225
Culver Dell and the Squire . 227
Our Be'thplace ' . . . 229
TheWindow freamed wi' Stwone 230
The Waterspring in the Leane 231



The Poplars .

The Linden on the Lawn

Our abode in Arby Wood

Slow to come, quick agone

The Vier-zide

Knowlwood .

Hallowed Ple'aces

The Wold Wall

Bleake's House

John Bleake at Hwome

Milken Time .

When Birds be Still

Riden Hwome at Night

Zun-zet .

Spring .

The Zummer Hedge

The Water Crowvoot

The Lilac .

The Blackbird

The Slanten light o' Fall

Thissledown

The May-tree

The Lydlinch Bells

The Stage Coach

Wayfearen

The Leane

The Railroad

The Railroad

Seats

Sound o' Water



232
233
235
236
236
238
240
242
423
245
247

248

249
250
252
253
254
255
256

257
259
259
260
261
263
265
267
268
268
270



X


CONTENTS.






PAGE




PAGE


Trees be Company


. 270


Herrenston .


. 302


A Pleace in Zight .


. 272


Out at Plough


• 304


Gwain to Brookwell


• 273


The Bwoat .


. 306


Brookwell


• 275


The Pleace our own agean . 307


The Shy Man


. 277


Eclogue : — John an' Thomas . 308


The Winter's Willow .


. 279


Pentridge by the River


. 3IO


I know Who .


. 28l


Wheat .


• 311


Jessie Lee


. 282


The Mead in June


• 313


True Love


. 283


Early risen .


• 315


The Bean-vield


. 284


Zelling woone's Honey


. 316


Wold Friends a-met


. 286


Dobbin Dead


• 317


Fifehead


. 288


Happiness


• 319


Ivy Hall


. 289


Gruffmoody Grim .


. 320


False Friends-like .


. 290


The Turn 0' the Days


. 322


The Bachelor


. 290


The Sparrow Club


• 323


Married Peair's Love-walk


. 292


Gammony Gay


• 325


A Wife a-prais'd .


• 293


The Heare .


• 327


The Wife a-lost .


• 295


Nanny Gill .


• 329


The Thorns in the Geate


. 296


Moonlight on the Door


• 330


Angels by the Door


• 297


My Love's Guardian Angel . 331


Vo'k a-comen into Church


. 298


Leeburn Mill


• 332


Woone Rule .


. 299


Praise 0' Do'set


• 333


Good Measter Collins .


. 3OO







THIRD COLLECTION.



Woone Smile Mwore


339


Early Playmeate .


. 359


The Echo .


340


Picken 0' Scroti .


. 360


Vull a Man .


34i


Good Night .


. 361


Naighbour Playmeates .


343


Went Hwome


. 362


The Lark


345


The Hollow Woak


. 363


The Two Churches


345


Childern's Childern


• 364


WoakHill ...


347


The Rwose in the Dark


. 365


The Hedger .


. 348


Come .


. 366


In the Spring


349


Zummer Winds


• 3^7


The Flood in Spring


35o


The Neame Letters


. 368


Comen Hwome


35i


The New House a-gettei


1 Wold 370


Grammer a-crippled


352


Zunday .


. 370


The Castle Ruins .


354


The Pillar'd Geate


. 371


Eclogue : — John jealous


355


Zummer Stream


• 373



CONTENTS.



Linda Deane

Eclogue : — Come an' zee us

Lindenore

Me'th below the Tree

Treat well your Wife

The Child an' the Mowers

The Love Child .

Hawthorn Down .

Oben Vields .

What John wer a-tellen .

Sheades

Times o' Year

Eclogue : — Racketen Joe

Zummer an' Winter

To Me .

Two an' Two

The Lew o' the Rick

The Wind in Woone's Feace

Tokens ....

Tweil ....

Fancy ....

The Broken Heart

Evenen Light

Vields by Watervalls

The Wheel Routs .

Nanny's new Abode

Leaves a-vallen

Lizzie ....

Blessens a-left

Fall Time

Fall ....

The Zilver-weed

The Widow's House

The Child's Greave



374
376
377
378
379
381
382
383
385
386

387
387
388
39i
392
393
394
395
396
396
398
399
400
401
402

403
404

405
406
407
408
409
409
410



Went vrom Hwome . .412
The Fancy Feair . . .412
Things do Come Round . 414

Zummer Thoughts inWinterTime 415
I'm out o' Door . . . 416
Grief an' Gladness . . .417

Sliden 418

Lwonesomeness . . . 420
A Snowy Night . . .421
The Year-clock . . . 421
Not goo Hwome To-night . 424
The Humstrum . . . 426
Shaftesbury Feair . . . 427

The Beaten Path . . . 429
Ruth a-riden .... 430
Beauty Undecked . . . 432
My love is good . . . 432
Heedless o' my love . . 434
The Do'set Militia . . .435
A Do'set Sale . . . 437
Don't ceare .... 437
Changes . . . -439

Kindness .... 440
Withstanders . . . .441
Daniel Dwithen . . . 442
Turnen things off . . . 444
The Giants in Treades . . 445
The Little Worold . . . 447
Bad News .... 448
The Turnstile . . . 449

The Better vor zeen o' you . 450

Pity 451

John Bloom in Lon'on . . 453
A Lot o' Maidens . . . 456



POEMS OF RURAL LIFE,

FIRST COLLECTION.



SPRING.



THE SPRING.

When wintry weather's all a-done,
An' brooks do sparkle in the zun,
An' naisy-builden rooks do vlee
Wi' sticks toward their elem tree ;
When birds do zing, an' we can zee

Upon the boughs the buds o' spring, —

Then I'm as happy as a king,
A-vield wi' health an' zunsheen.

Vor then the cowslip's hangen flow'r
A-wetted in the zunny show'r,
Do grow wi' vi'lets, sweet o' smell,
Bezide the wood-screen'd grsegle's bell ;
Where drushes' aggs, wi' sky-blue shell,

Do lie in mossy nest among

The thorns, while they do zing their zong
At evenen in the zunsheen.

An' God do meake his win' to blow

An' ram to vail vor high an' low,

An' bid his mornen zun to rise

Vor all alike, an' groun' an' skies

Ha' colors vor the poor man's eyes :
An' in our trials He is near,
To hear our mwoan an' zee our tear,
An' turn our clouds to zunsheen.



POEMS OF RURAL LIFE.



An' many times when I do vind
Things all goo wrong, an' vo'k unkind,
To zee the happy veeden herds,
An' hear the zingen o' the birds,
Do soothe my sorrow mwore than words ;
Vor I do zee that 'tis our sin
Do meake woone's soul so dark 'ithin,
When God would gi'e woone zunsheen.



THE WOODLANDS.

O spread agean your leaves an' flow'rs,
Lwonesome woodlands ! zunny woodlands !

Here underneath the dewy show'rs

O' warm-air'd spring-time, zunny woodlands !

As when, in drong or open ground,

Wi' happy bwoyish heart I vound

The twitt'ren birds a-builden round

Your high-bough'd hedges, zunny woodlands

You gie'd me life, you gie'd me jay,

Lwonesome woodlands ! zunny woodlands

You gie'd me health, as in my play

I rambled through ye, zunny woodlands !

You gie'd me freedom, vor to rove

In airy mead or sheady grove ;

You gie'd me smilen Fanney's love,
The best ov all o't, zunny woodlands I

My vu'st shrill skylark whiver'd high,

Lwonesome woodlands ! zunny woodlands !

To zing below your deep-blue sky

An' white spring-clouds, O zunny woodlands !

An' boughs o' trees that woonce stood here,

Wer glossy green the happy year



LEADY-DAY, AN' RIDDEN HOUSE.

That gie'd me woone I lov'd so dear,
An' now ha' lost, O zunny woodlands !

O let me rove agean unspied,

Lwonesome woodlands ! zunny woodlands !
Along your green-bough'd hedges' zide,

As then I rambled, zunny woodlands !
An' where the missen trees woonce stood,
Or tongues woonce rung among the wood,
My memory shall meake em good,

Though you've a-lost em, zunny woodlands !



LEADY-DAY, AN' RIDDEN HOUSE.

Aye, back at Leady-Day, you know,
I come vrom Gullybrook to Stowe ;
At Leady-Day I took my pack
O' rottletraps, an' turn'd my back
Upon the weather-beaten door,
That had a-screen'd, so long avore,
The mwost that thease zide o' the greave,
I'd live to have, or die to seave !
My childern, an' my vier-pleace,
Where Molly wi' her cheerful feace,
When I'd a-trod my wat'ry road
Vrom night-bedarken'd vields abrode,
Wi' nimble hands, at evenen, blest
Wi' vire an' vood my hard-won rest ;
The while the little woones did dim',
So sleek-skinn'd, up from lim' to lim',
Till, strugglen hard an' clingen tight,
They reach 'd at last my feace's height.
All tryen which could soonest hold
My mind wi' little teales they twold.



POEMS OF RURAL LIFE.



An' ridden house is such a caddie,
I shan't be over keen vor mwore o't,
Not yet a while, you mid be sure 6't, —
I'd rather keep to woone wold staddle.

Well, zoo, avore the east begun

To redden wi' the comen zun,

We left the beds our mossy thatch

Wer never mwore to overstratch,

An' borrow'd uncle's wold hoss Dragon,

To bring the slowly lumbren waggon,

An' when he come, we veil a-packen

The bedsteads, wi' their rwopes an' zacken ;

An' then put up the wold earm-chair,

An' cwoffer vull ov e'then-ware,

An' vier-dogs, an' copper kittle,

Wi' crocks an' saucepans, big an' little ;

An' fryen-pan, vor aggs to slide

In butter round his hissen zide,

An' gridire's even bars, to bear

The drippen steake above the gleare

O' brightly-glowen coals. An' then,

All up o' top o' them agean

The woaken bwoard, where we did eat

Our croust o' bread or bit o' meat, —

An' when the bwoard wer up, we tied

Upon the reaves, along the zide,

The woaken stools, his glossy meates,

Bwoth when he's beare, or when the pleates

Do clatter loud wi' knives, below

Our merry feaces in a row.

An' put between his lags, turn'd up'ard,

The zalt-box an' the corner cupb'ard.

An' then we laid the wold clock-cease,

All dumb, athirt upon his feace,

Vor we'd a-left, I needen tell ye,



LEADY-DAY, AN' RIDDEN HOUSE.

Noo works 'ithin his head or belly.

An' then we put upon the pack

The settle, flat upon his back ;

An' after that, a-tied in pairs

In woone another, all the chairs,

An' bits o' lumber wo'th a ride,

An' at the very top a-tied,

The childern's little stools did lie,

Wi' lags a-turn'd toward the sky :

Zoo there we lwoaded up our scroff,

An' tied it vast, an' started off.

An', — as the waggon cooden car all

We had to teake, — the butter-barrel

An' cheese-wring, wi' his twinen screw,

An' all the pails an' veats, an' blue

Wold milk leads, and a vew things mwore,

Wer all a-carr'd the day avore,

And when the mwost ov our wold stuff

Wer brought outside o' thik brown ruf,

I rambled roun' wi' narrow looks,

In fusty holes an' darksome nooks,

To gather all I still mid vind,

O' rags or sticks a-left behind.

An' there the unlatch'd doors did creak,

A-swung by winds, a-streamen weak

Drough empty rooms, an' meaken sad

My heart, where me'th woonce meade me glad.

Vor when a man do leave the he'th

An' ruf where vu'st he drew his breath,

Or where he had his bwoyhood's fun,

An' things wer woonce a-zaid an' done

That took his mind, do touch his heart

A little bit, I'll answer vor't.

Zoo ridden house is such a caddie,

That I would rather keep my staddle.



POEMS OF RURAL LIFE.



EASTER ZUNDAY.

Last Easter Jim put on his blue
Frock cwoat, the vu'st time — vier new;
W? yollow buttons all o' brass,
That glitter'd in the zun lik' glass ;
An' pok'd 'ithin the button-hole
A tutty he'd a-begg'd or stole.
A span-new wes'co't, too, he wore,
Wi' yollow stripes all down avore ;
An' tied his breeches' lags below
The knee, wi' ribbon in a bow ;
An' drow'd his kitty-boots azide,
An' put his laggens on, an' tied
His shoes wi' strings two vingers wide,
Because 'twer Easter Zunday.

An' after mornen church wer out
He come back hwome, an' stroll'd about
All down the vields, an' drough the]leane,
Wi' sister Kit an' cousin Jeane,
A-turnen proudly to their view
His yollow breast an' back o' blue.
The lambs did play, the grounds wer green,
The trees did bud, the zun did sheen ;
The lark did zing below the sky,
An' roads wer all a-blown so dry,
As if the zummer wer begun ;
An' he had sich a bit o' fun !
He meade the maidens squeal an' run,
Because 'twer Easter Zunday.



DOCK-LEA VES.



EASTER MONDAY.

An' zoo o' Monday we got drough

Our work betimes, an ax'd a vew

Young vo'k vrom Stowe an' Coom, an' zome

Vrom uncle's down at Grange, to come.

An' they so spry, wi' merry smiles,

Did beat the path an' leap the stiles,

Wi' two or dree young chaps bezide,

To meet an' keep up Easter tide :

Vor we'd a-zaid avore, we'd git

Zome friends to come, an' have a bit

O' fun wi' me, an' Jeane, an' Kit,

Because 'twer Easter Monday.

An' there we play'd away at quarts,

An' weigh'd ourzelves wi' sceales an' waights ;

An' jump'd to zee who jump'd the spryest,

An' sprung the vurdest an' the highest ;

An' rung the bells vor vull an hour.

An' play'd at vives agean the tower.

An' then we went an' had a tait,

An' cousin Sammy, wi' his wai'ght,

Broke off the bar, he wer so fat !

An' toppled off, an' veil down flat

Upon his head, an' squot his hat,

Because 'twer Easter Monday.



DOCK-LEAVES.

The dock-leaves that do spread so wide
Up yonder zunny bank's green zide,
Do bring to mind what we did do
At play wi' dock-leaves years agoo :



POEMS OF RURAL LIFE.



How we, — when nettles had a-stung
Our little hands, when we wer young, —
Did rub em wi' a dock, an' zing
" Out nettl\ in dock. In dock, out sting."
An' when your feace, in zummer's het,
Did sheen wi' tricklen draps o' zweat,
How you, a-zot bezide the bank,
Didst toss your little head, an' pank,
An' teake a dock-leaf in your han',
An' whisk en lik' a leady's fan ;
While I did hunt, 'ithin your zight,
Vor streaky cockle-shells to fight.

In all our play-geames we did bruise
The dock-leaves wi' our nimble shoes ;
Bwoth where we merry chaps did fling
You maidens in the orcha'd swing,
An' by the zaw-pit's dousty bank,
Where we did tait upon a plank.
— (D'ye mind how woonce, you cou'den zit
The bwoard, an' veil off into pit ?)
An' when we hunted you about
The grassy barken, in an' out
Among the ricks, your vlee-en frocks
An' nimble veet did strik' the docks.
An' zoo they docks, a-spread so wide
Up yonder zunny bank's green zide,
Do bring to mind what we did do,
Among the dock-leaves years agoo.

THE BLACKBIRD.

Ov all the birds upon the wing
Between the zunny show'rs o' spring, —
Vor all the lark, a-swingen high,
Mid zing below a cloudless sky.



THE BLACKBIRD.



An' sparrows, clust'ren roun' the bough,
Mid chatter to the men at plough, —
The blackbird, whisslen in among
The boughs, do zing the gayest zong.

Vor we do hear the blackbird zing
His sweetest ditties in the spring,
When nippen win's noo mwore do blow
Vrom northern skies, wi' sleet or snow,
But dreve light doust along between
The leane-zide hedges, thick an' green ;
An' zoo the blackbird in among
The boughs do zing the gayest zong.

'Tis blithe, wi' newly-open'd eyes,
To zee the mornen's ruddy skies ;
Or, out a-haulen frith or lops
Vrom new-plesh'd hedge or new-vell'd copse,
To rest at noon in primrwose beds
Below the white-bark'd woak-trees' heads ;
But there's noo time, the whole day long,
Lik' evenen wi' the blackbird's zong.

Vor when my work is all a-done
Avore the zetten o' the zun,
Then blushen Jeane do walk along
The hedge to meet me in the drong,
An' stay till all is dim an' dark
Bezides the ashen tree's white bark ;
An' all bezides the blackbird's shrill
An' runnen evenen-whissle's still.

An' there in bwoyhood I did rove

Wi' pry en eyes along the drove

To vind the nest the blackbird meade

O' grass- stalks in the high bough's sheade :



12 POEMS OF RURAL LIFE.

Or dim' aloft, wi' clingen knees,

Vor crows' aggs up in swayen trees,

While frighten'd blackbirds down below

Did chatter o' their little foe.

An' zoo there's noo pleace lik' the drong,

Where I do hear the blackbird's zong.

WOODCOM' FEAST.

Come, Fanny, come ! put on thy white,
Tis Woodcom' feast, good now ! to-night.
Come ! think noo mwore, you silly maid,
O' chicken drown'd, or ducks a-stray'd ;
Nor mwope to vind thy new frock's tail
A-tore by hitchen in a nail ;
Nor grieve an' hang thy head azide,
A-thinken o' thy lam' that died.
The flag's a-vleen wide an' high,
An' ringen bells do sheake the sky ;
The fifes do play, the horns do roar,
An' boughs be up at ev'ry door :
They '11 be a-dancen soon, — the drum
'S a-rumblen now. Come, Fanny, come !
Why father's gone, an' mother too.
They went up leane an hour agoo ;
An' at the green the young and wold
Do stan' so thick as sheep in vwold :
The men do laugh, the bwoys do shout, —
Come out you mwopen wench, come out,
An' go wi' me, an' show at least
Bright eyes an' smiles at Woodcom' feast.

Come, let's goo out, an' fling our heels
About in jigs an' vow'r-han' reels ;
While all the stiff-lagg'd wolder vo'k,
A-zitten roun', do talk an' joke



THE MILK-MAID O' THE FARM.



An' smile to zee their own wold rigs.
A-show'd by our wild geames an' jigs.
Vor ever since the vwold church speer
Vu'st prick'd the clouds, vrom year to year,
When grass in mead did reach woone's knees,
An' blooth did kern in apple-trees,
Zome merry day V a-broke to sheen
Above the dance at Woodcom' green,
An' all o' they that now do lie
So low all roun' the speer so high,
Woonce, vrom the biggest to the least,
Had merry hearts at Woodcom' feast.

Zoo keep it up, an' gi'e it on
To other vo'k when we be gone.
Come out ; vor when the zetten zun
Do leave in sheade our harmless fun,
The moon a-risen in the east
Do gi'e us light at Woodcom' feast.
Come, Fanny, come ! put on thy white,
'Tis merry Woodcom' feast to night :
There's nothen vor to mwope about, —
Come out, you leazy jeade, come out !
An' thou wult be, to woone at least,
The prettiest maid at Woodcom' feast.

THE MILK-MAID O' THE FARM.

O Poll's the milk-maid o' the farm !



Online LibraryWilliam BarnesPoems of rural life in the Dorset dialect → online text (page 1 of 27)