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William Batchelder Greene.

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INCORPORATED JUNE 18, 1890




1907



OFFICE OF THE CLUB
45 BROADWAY, NEW YORK

TELEPHONE: 3773 RECTOR






,,Z5



Gift
Author

20 c:t v^a^vi




A. L. C. ENSIGN.



FORMER PRESIDENTS-

MILLS W. BARSE,— 1890, 1891, 1892

ABRAHAM G. MILLS, — 1893, 1894, 1895
ROBERT C. ALEXANDER, — 1896, 1897

WILLIAM H. BOARDMAN, — 1898, 1899

WARREN HIGLEY,— 1900, 1901. 1902, 1903. 1904
THOMAS R. PROCTOR,— 1905, 1906



OFFICERS FOR 1907-^908*

WILLIAM P. SMITH
WILLIAM P. HALL

^nvttat^ antJ Creasfurer

SPENCER ALDRICH

45 Broadway, N. Y.

FRED. C. BACKUS, Asst. Secy.

Term expiring March, 1908

THOMAS R. PROCTOR GEORGE H. JOHNSON

WILLIAM S. WICKS SAMUEL J. BRYANT

HENRY F. TAYLOR

Term expiring February, igog

NATHANIEL R, NORTON, M.D. E. W. RICE, Jr.

SPENCER ALDRICH HENRY L. STODDARD

AUGUSTUS D. SHEPARD, Jr.

Term expiring February, 1910

FLOY M. JOHNSTON AVILLIAM E. LOWE

WILLIAM P. SMITH WILLIAM P. HALL

JOHN I. DOWNEY

4



COMMITTEES.

3£^tcutibe Committtt

WILLIAM P. SMITH (Ex-oflficio), Chairman

WILLIAM P. HALL (Ex-officio)

SPENCER ALDRICH, Secretary

THOMAS R. PROCTOR AUGUSTUS D. SHEPARD, Jr.

FLOY M. JOHNSTON HENRY F. TAYLOR

HENRY L. STODDARD

Committee on ^Dmtsisltons;

AUGUSTUS D. SHEPARD, Jr., Chairman

36 East 23d St., N. Y. City

JOHN I. DOWNEY HENRY F. TAYLOR

Commtttte on dTiJil) anK ^ame

FLOY M. JOHNSTON, Chairman
Poughkeepsie, N, Y.
WILLIAM H. BOARDMAN SAMUEL J. BRYANT

AUGUSTUS D. SHEPARD, Jr. E. W. RICE, Jr.

Committee on ^anitavi) ^^egulattonsl anB ?3u{ltJing

NATHANIEL R. NORTON, M.D., Chairman

113 East 7oih St., N, Y. City

WILLIAM P. HALL ALFRED MEYER, M.D.

WILLIAM S. WICKS GEORGE H. JOHNSON

Committee on dToresltf^

WILLIAM E. LOWE, Chairman
49 Wall St., N. Y. City
THOMAS R. PROCTOR WARREN HIGLEY

JAMES M. TAYLOR, D.D. THOMAS W. CAULDWELL

WILLIAM P. SMITH (Ex-officio)

€ru2(tee for dfore^lt EotJge

(Not yet appointed.)

Cru^tee for fHountatn ScUge

AUGUSTUS D. SHEPARD, Jk.

Crufiltee for Ui^hv Hobge

WILLIAM P. HALL

^ttorne^



ARLEIGH D. RICHARDSON

Ilion, N. Y.



FOREST LODGE,

Honnedaga Lake.



Post Office Address :
Mrs. Augusta Schenck, Manager. Honnedaga. Herkimer Co., N. Y.



This Clubhouse was last year placed on the same basis as the
other two Lodges whereby the property and management came
more closely under the control of the Trustees and from experi-
ence at Forest Lodge last year better satisfaction was given to
the members and guests.

The Club has secured the services of Mrs. Augusta Schenck as
Manager, who has had wide experience as housekeeper and
manager at Mountain Lodge and other Adirondack resorts, and
was the housekeeper at Forest Lodge last year, and the Trustees
have no doubt that this Lodge, under her management, will be
well cared for and everything will be done towards the comfort
of members and guests.

It is to be hoped that the patronage of the Lodge this year by
members and guests will be so great that no deficit in the running
of the Lodge will be shown at the end of the season.

The railroad stations for Forest Lodge are Forestport, on the
Adirondack and St. Lawrence division of the New York Central
R. R. , and Alder Creek, on the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg
R. R., under control of the New York Central R. R. (For parti-
culars relating to railroad service, see latest time tables.)

Mr. George W. Crandall, who now carries the Honnedaga,
and North Lake mail, runs a stage daily (except on Sundays),
which conveys passengers to the head of Honnedaga Lake; this
stage leaves Forestport about 9 a.m. The fare from Forestport
to Honnedaga Lake is $1.50, and from Alder Creek $1 75 for



FOREST LODGE. 7

each person over ten years of age, including ordinary hand,
baggage. Trunks. — up to loo pounds, from Forestport, 50 cents
each; from Alder Creek, 75 cents each. Freight rates, 50 cents
per 100 up to 500 pounds. $7.00 for wagon load of freight up to
2,000 pounds. The rate for bringing in boats on wagon, I4.00 to
f6.oo. Small express or other packages, 10 pounds or under, 10
cents; over 10 pounds and under 35 pounds, 25 cents.

PRIVATE CONVEYANCES.

Mr. Crandall will furnish private conveyances for all trains.
From Forestport to Honnedaga Lake: One person alone, I5.00.
Two or three persons together, $6.00. More than three persons
in one conveyance, $1.50 each.

From Alder Creek to Honnedaga Lake: One person alone^
$6.00. Two or three persons together, $7.00. More than three
persons in one conveyance, $1.75 each.

The foregoing rates include hand baggage and one trunk up
to 100 pounds in weight for each passenger, provided Mr. Cran-
dall and the passenger agree to the trunk's going on the same
conveyance ; otherwise at the usual rate.

Notify Mr. George W. Crandall (P. O. Address: Forestport,.
N. Y.) a few days in advance of arrival.

Always notify the Manager of Forest Lodge, Honnedaga^
Herkimer County, N. Y., two or three days in advance, stating
whether guide will be required. Also telephone from North Lake.
or Forestport so that launch will be waiting arrival of guests at'
head of Lake.

Hotel accommodations may be had at the[Forestport House or
Hotel O'Connor, Forestport, N. Y.

From the head of Honnedaga Lake transportation is made to-
Forest Lodge (five miles) by the Club launch, regular trips 50



a FOREST LODGE.

-cents per passenger, including hand baggage. Twenty-five cents
for guides, workmen, and children under twelve years of age.
Members, guests or children staying at the Lodge or a private
camp who desire to meet friends or accompany those departing
may make the regular round trip at twenty-five cents per person,
hut not to the exclusion of regular passengers. (Rates for special
tripsin preparation). Trunks 25 cents each.

The rates at Forest Lodge are as follows:

Room and Board $2.50 to $3.00 per day for each person. Per
week, $15.00 to $18.00. Lodging, breakfast or supper. 75 cents
each; dinner $1.00. Table board, $10.00 per week. Children
under twelve years of age, half rates. Nurses and maids, $12.00
per week, including room; table board $q.oo per week; meals 65
cents. Guides, 75 cents per day, including lodging. Workmen
f i.oo per day, without lodging 75 cents per day. Boats, 50 cents
per day.

Guides can be obtained from the Clubhouse at $3.00 per day,
not including board.

Telephone connection is now complete between the Clubhouse
and Forestport. Connection in Forestport, "Central New York
Telephone Company."

At the time of the publication of this book no Trustee in
Charge for Forest Lodge had yet been appointed. Until such
Trustee is appointed, Mr. Lewis L. Grant, Supt., will have
charge of the Honnedaga district under the direction of the
Board of Trustees.



MOUNTAIN LODGE,

Ltttle Moose Lake.

„ ^ .. Post Office Address:

Gborgb M. Studor, Manager. ,, ,, , ,, -^,j t- ., v-

Mountain Lodge, Old Forga, N. Y,

Buy tickets and check baggage to Fulton Chain Station,
except commencing the latter part of June, when on Friday nights
there is an Old Forge sleeper. Carriages meet all trains, on
notifying the Manager, and convey passengers and baggage to
Mountain Lodge. Please instruct the Manager on what train you
may be expected.

The charge for passengers, including hand baggage, is 75
cents ; trunks, 35 cents each.

The rates for room and board are $2.75 to $3.00 per day; $18.00
to $21.00 per week. Table board, $12.00 per week; breakfast or
supper, 75 cents ; dinner, $1.00. Children under 5 years (in
nurses' dining room), half rates.

No deduction from table board when one is absent less than
three consecutive meals, nor when boarding at the Lodge at
weekly rates, unless absent for as much as three days at a time.

Special increased rates will be charged after July 15 to one
person occupying a large double room.

Nurses and maids, $12.00 per week. Guides, 75 cents per day.
Workmen, $1.00 per day ; without lodging, 75 cents per day.

Cottages I, 2, 3, will be rented for $500 for the season, or |6o a
week, not including board; and each cottage must have four (4)
or more persons occupying it during the months of July and
August; if there are less than four (4), board for four will have to
be paid at the clubhouse.

Boats, 50 cents to 75 cents per day ; $2.00 to $3 50 per week.
Guides, $3.75 per day, including board and boat.

Telephone and telegraph connections via Old Forge.

The Club maintains a private telephone line between Mountain
Lodge and Bisby, and has direct copper wire long distance tele-
phone conneciion.

Augustus D. Shepard, Jr., 36 East 23d Street, New York,
Trustee in charge.



BISBY LODGE,

First Bisby Lake.

Post Office Address :
W. S. Weeden, Manager. g^^^^_ ^.^ McKeever. N. Y,.

The railroad station for Bisby Lodge is McKeever on the
Adirondack and St. Lawrence division of the New York Central
R. R. (For particulars relating to railroad service, see latest
time tables.)

Leave the railroad cars at McKeever. The Club has the
exclusive right for teaming between McKeever and Wolf
Lake. It keeps only two teams with buckboards in regular
service, and engagements should always be made beforehand
with W. S. Weeden, Manager, at Bisby Lodge, via McKeever,
N. Y. If more passengers than can be taken on the two buck-
boards come at the same time, those who have engaged passage
first have the preference and others must wait for a second trip.
The passenger rate includes reasonable baggage and is $1.50
for each person. From Wolf Lake to Woodhull Landing trans-
portation is made by Club Launch, transportation charge
including baggage hauled to Bisby Lodge, is $1.00 for each
person. The buckboard charge from Woodhull Landing to Bisby
Lodge, is 50 cents for each person. The charge is the same per
person, whether one or more passengers are carried; but for pass-
engers leaving the Lodge later than nine o'clock at night to meet
the night train, there is an extra charge of $2.00 for each passenger ;
there is also a corresponding extra charge of $2.00 for each
passenger leaving McKeever for Bisby Lodge before 7 o'clock in
the morning. The charges for residents at Bisby Lodge are as
follows:—

Room and board, $2.50 to $3.00 per day for each person;
$15.00 to $18.00 per week; table board $10.00 per week; lodging,
breakfast or supper, 75 cents; dinner $1.00; children under twelve




BISBY LODGE!




aj BOAT-HOUSE



RISBY LODGE. II

years ( in nurses' dining room), half rates. Meals sent to room,
25 cents additional. No deduction from table board when one
is absent less than three consecutive meals nor when boarding at
the Lodge at weekly rate, unless absent for as much as 3 days
at a time.

Nurses and maids, room and board, $12.00 per week; table
board $9.00 per week; meals 65 cents. Guides, 75 cents per day,
including lodging. Workmen, $1.00 per day; without lodging,
75 cents per day.

Boats, 25 cents per day; $1.50 per week.

Freight rates between McKeever and Wolf Lake:

Each TOO lbs. or fraction thereof, 25 cents; but where extra
labor has to be employed in the hauling of freight the same will
be charged to the member.

Each package (less than 100 lbs.) 25 cents, but any number of
packages arriving on the same trip for the same person are
rated by weight and not as separate parcels.

Boats, $3.00 each.

Lumber, yi inch stuff, per 1,000 feet, b. m. $3 00
dressed, dry, " " '• $4.00

rough, green, " " " $6.00

Shingles, per bundle, 25 cents.

Freight rates, Wolf Lake to Bisby, same as McKeever to
Wolf Lake.

The telephone connection to Bisby Lodge is via McKeever or
Old Forge.

The Club maintains a private telephone line between Bisby
and Mountain Lodge.

William P. Hall, 25 Broad St., New York. Trustee in charge.



TRAINS,



INFORMATION FOR MEMBERS AND GUESTS IN REFERENCE TO

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION TO THE DIFFERENT

CLUBHOUSES.



The nearest railroad to our Clubhouses is the Adirondack
and St. Lawrence branch of the New York Central. This branch
runs from Utica to Forestport, McKeever, Fulton Chain and
further north.

"Forest Lodge" is situated about twenty miles from Forest-
port railroad station, and Forestport village (about a mile west
of the station) is about two miles east of Alder Creek, a station
on the Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg Railroad, which is
under the control of the New York Central Railroad.

"Bisby Lodge" is about nine miles from McKeever railroad
station.

"Mountain Lodge" is five miles from Fulton Chain. In
the summer there is a small branch railroad running from
Fulton Chain to Old Forge, Old Forge being distant about three
miles from "Mountain Lodge."

Summer time tables of the New York Central Railroad will
give full particulars of the schedule of trains to and from these
different railroad stations.

Connection can be made at Albany with the Hudson River
boats.

Last summer members and guests, by taking the "Second
Empire" express, leaving the Grand Central Depot at 1:02 p. m.,
(this year leaves at 12.50 p. m.,) could take the branch train from
Utica to Remsen and change there to connect with the train
running from Herkimer to Fulton Chain by way of Remsen, and
and reach Forestport, McKeever or Fulton Chain stations the
same evening. Dinner can be obtained on the train before
reaching Utica for those taking the "Second Empire" express at
12:50 p. m.



TRAINS.



13



There was also a night train going south last summer which
members could take from McKeever or Forestport, leaving
earlier in the evening than the regular train, but members taking
this train from those stations would have to reach New York by
way of the West Shore road, arriving at New York City the
following morning. By taking this train a long wait until the
early hours of the morning at the McKeever and Forestport rail-
road stations was avoided.

In summer, members and guests can also take the "Empire
State" express from New York City, leaving at 8:30 a. m., and
change at Utica, connecting with the slower train leaving New
York before the ''Empire State" express, giving them time for
luncheon or dinner at Utica before the Adirondack and St.
Lawrence branch train leaves Utica for Forestport, McKeever and
Fulton Chain.



According to the present time tables members and guests can
take the 11:20 p. m. N. Y. Central train from New York to
Remsen over the Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg R. R.,
reaching Remsen 7 a. m. the following morning, and leaving
there at 8:30 a. m. for Forestport, McKeever and Fulton Chain,
having time for breakfast in Remsen before the 8:30 a. m. train
leaves. This train on the Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg
R. R., after leaving Remsen, runs directly to Alder Creek about
two miles distant from Forestport.



ANNUAL REPORT.

In accordance with the requirements of the Constitution, the
Board of Trustees respectfully submits, through its President, its
Annual Report for the Club year ending Februarys, 1907.

It hardly seems possible that the time has arrived for
another Annual Report of the President and Trustees
to the members of The Adirondack League Club. An-
other annual meeting finds the Club in a prosperous
condition and the various reports of the Trustees in
charge of the different Club Houses and of the several
committees, which will be included in this report, will
give to the members a very full account of the proceed-
ings of the past year.

The Club's membership at the last report numbered
296. During the past year, 16 new members have joined
and 17 have gone out of membership, leaving 295 mem-
bers to-day, owning 370 membership shares, 130 shares
still remaining in the Club's Treasury at $1,000 per share.



Since our last meeting, the Club has lost from its
roster John M. Clapp of President, Pa., who died at
Lakewood, N. J., October 17th; Frederick W. Haynes
of 16 East 36th Street, New York, who died in that city
in the month of May, 1906; Walter S. Logan of 27
William Street, New York, who died in that city July
19, 1906; Isaac Harris of 125 St. Marks Avenue, Brook-
lyn, N. Y., who died at his home January 30, 1907; and
Charles E. Miller of 63 East 54th Street, New York,
who died in that city December 20, 1906. These gentle-
men were members of the Club for years and their loss
is sadly mourned.

With only two of these gentlemen, however, was I per-
sonally acquainted. Everybody knew Walter S. Logan,



ANNUAL REPORT. 15

a lawyer of reputation, a man who devoted much of his
time to the furtlierance of patriotic enterprises, and who
will long be remembered as a useful citizen to his city
and the State. What shall I say of Charles E. Miller?
It is more than a quarter of a century since he made his
first pilgrimage to the Bisby country with me. This
visit was repeated for many successive seasons. Occa-
sionally we came in the fall. Although as expert with
rifle as wath his rod, he cared little for hunting. Mr.
Miller was an eminent lawyer, a safe counsellor, a thor-
ough sportsman, a faithful friend, and, gentlemen, he
was an honest man.

REPORT OF THE TRUSTEE FOR FOREST LODGE.

The season of 1906 at Forest Lodge marked the trans-
ition from the rental system to that of a salaried
manager. At the expiration of Mr. Nelson's lease, De-
cember I, 1905, Mr. Hazard Lasher, then Trustee in
Charge, under authority conferred by the Board, engaged
Mr. A. D. Barber as manager for one year at a salary
of $900. It was understood that Mr. Barber would
spend practically all his time, winter and summer, at
Honnedaga, which he did. At the same time Mrs.
Augusta Schenck was engaged as housekeeper for the
summer season of six months.

During the ten years when Forest Lodge was rented,
the property had suffered much from want of repair,
proper care and even from old age. Upon the engage-
ment of Mr. Barber, accordingly, a careful inspection of
buildings, grounds, wharf, etc., was made, and a num-
ber of important repairs and improvements directed, all



1 6 ANNUAL REPORT.

of which were very necessary to the preservation of the
property and to its efficiency, proper sanitation and de-
cent appearance. Among such improvements may be
mentioned — (i) The building of an entirely new and
substantial wharf for the launch. (2) Renewing the sills
and flooring of the boat-house at the Lodge and moving
this building to a point directly behind the new wharf.
(3) The building of a commodious and sightly outhouse
at the Lodge. (4) Clearing up, ditching and draining
the grounds on both sides of the Lodge buildings, which
work had long since been ordered by the Sanitary Com-
mittee. (5) New board walks throughout, requiring
new stringers and much new lumber. (6) A great
deal of painting outside and inside of nearly all build-
ings. The old paint was in such bad condition that it
was necessary to burn off most of it to make a good
•job, (7) The enlargement and remodelling of Jones
Lake Camp at an expense of something less than $150.

(8) General house cleaning, interior renovating and
rearrangement of rooms in the kitchen department.
This amounted to much more than was anticipated
owing to the fact that it was found necessary to rip out
much of the woodwork and to plaster the rear bedrooms.

(9) Thorough repair and painting of all boats, which
were in bad condition.

To carry out this work Mr. Barber engaged two men
in addition to the carpenter, who built the outhouse and
Jones Lake Camp by contract, so that four spent the
winter of 1905-6 at Forest Lodge. In order not to in-
terrupt their work, the firewood was cut by contract and
the ice-houses were filled partly by outside help.



ANNUAL REPORT. 1 7

In anticipation of many additional improvements that
would be necessarily made during the summer season, it
was arranged that the guides should, as heretofore, be
engaged by the month and their spare time be utilized in
improvements of various kinds, such as care of trails,
building of foot-bridges, boat-landings, winter shelters
for outlying boats, etc.

Such was the situation when, on February 19, 1906,
the sudden and untimely death of Mr, Lasher deprived
the Club of his valuable membership and services, both
as Vice-President and Trustee in Charge of Forest
Lodge.

The undersigned had already expressed his intention of
retiring from the Board the following month, but upon
the request of various members of the Club consented to
serve out the remaining year of Mr. Lasher's unexpired
term and, as Trustee in Charge, to carry out the plans
already made and entered upon.

Members and guests who visited Forest Lodge last
season have spoken very highly of the service and table
provided by Mr. Barber and Mrs. Schenck, and in gen-
eral of the provisions made for their comfort in various
ways. During the month of August the Lodge was well
patronized, being practically full at one time, a condition
which had not existed since the enlargement of the
Lodge in 1902. The very slim patronage during the rest
of the season, from May ist to November 15th, together
with the maintenance of a corps of unused guides for a
large portion of the time, added to what must be recog-
nized as a more extravagant and lavish provision than
the patronage warranted, have resulted in a showing that



l8 ANNUAL REPORT.

is anything but successful, financially. In fact, the year
has been a very costly one to the Club, in view of which
it was decided to take steps that would insure a reduc-
tion of expense in the coming season, and at the same
time insure to members and guests substantially the same
comforts and good service which they enjoyed during
the past season. Much credit has been justly accorded
to Mrs. Schenck for the excellent management of her
important department, in view of which and of her long
experience and success in the management of Adiron-
dack resorts, the Trustees have engaged her as manager
of Forest Lodge for the coming season.

While no action has yet been taken on the following,
there seems to be a unanimity of opinion among those
familiar with the management of this part of the Pre-
serve that the guides should be placed upon a basis
similar to that in vogue at Bisby and Little Moose. If
such action be taken, due notice will be given to all
members, so that in future they may make their con-
tracts w^ith the guides directly, without involving the
management in what has proved to be a troublesome and
•expensive responsibility.

TELEPHONE.

Last summer an arrangement was made, through the
courtesy of Hon. Nicholas V. Franchot, Superintendent
of Public Works, whereby the telephone line from For-
estport to North Lake, built and owned by the State, was
turned over to the Club on condition that the Club main-
tain the line and supply the State with free service at
its various stations. Hand in hand with these negotia-



ANNUAL REPORT. I9

tions, a contract was secured between the Club and the
Black River Telephone Company, whereby the latter as-
sumes the duties of the Club as toward the State, the
Club simply paying the ordinary rental for its two in-
struments, at the Lodge and at the head of the lake.
Thus far this arrangement has proved fairly satisfactory.
Owing to the many improvements and repairs made
during the past year, Forest Lodge is in better condition
than it has ever been, and it is to be hoped that a large
number of members and guests will avail themselves of
the good accommodations and excellent service which
are assured for the coming season at this comfortable
and commodious Club House.

E. T. Carter,

Trustee in Charge.

The President has nothing to add to this very com-
plete and admirable report.



REPORT OF TRUSTEE FOR BISBY LODGE.

The season of 1906 was probably the most successful,
from the general Club view-point, ever experienced at
Bisby Lodge. The weather, as a rule, was fine, and the
enjoyment of members and guests was correspondingly
great. The new Club station at McKeever proved a
marked convenience and comfort to themselves — the ex-
cellent entertainment and care provided by Mr. and Mrs.
Radell contributing to that end. The Club ownership of
the McKeever to Wolf Lake road greatly improved the
service, as well as the comfort of the ride, and paid a



20 ANNUAL REPORT.

very handsome percentage upon the amount invested.
The new Ckib launch on the Wolf and Woodhull Lake
route rendered most efficient service, and contributed
largely to the enjoyment of members and guests in their


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