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The Maine Central Railroad

IS THE

OREAT RAILROAD THOROUGHFARE OF THE STATE,

And extends from Portland to and beyond Bangor, to the Boundary line

between Maine and New Brunswick, uniting therefore

the railroads of the United States and

the Maritime Provinces.



The Main Lines and numerous Branches of this Road, with its immediate con-
nections, REACH EVERY PART OF THE STATE ; the most important branch
— that from Bangor to Bar Harbor — having been completed in 1884, so that this is the

Only All-Rail Route to Mount Desert.

Time of Express Train between Boston and Bar Harbor, lOJ^ hours.
Nor is this famous resort the only one to which this Road leads, as it is also the
route to be taken for

MOOSEHEAD AND THE RANGELEY LAKES,

AND ALL OF THE

^N^oted Hunting* and Fishing- Resorts

Of MAINE and NEW BRUNSWICK, as well as to BOOTHBAY, CAMDEN,
NORTHPORT, and numerous other points along the sea-coast and in the interior,
which, with their invigorating atmosphere, are drawing increased numbers of visitors
each year.

The completion of the bridge across the St. John River at St. John renders through
cars between Boston and Halifax a possibility.



The Portland, Bangor, Mt. Desert & Machias Steamboat Go.

IS ALSO UNDER THE SAME MANAGEMENT.

Steamers leave Portland TUESDAYS and FRIDAYS at 11.00 p.m., or on arrival
of express train from Boston, for Rockland, Castine, Deer Isle, Sedgwick:, Sol'th-
WEST and Bar Harbors, Millbridge, Joneshort and Machiasport, or passengers for
the last three named points can take train to' Bar Harbor and connect with steamer
there.

RETURNING, leave Machiasport and Bar Harbor MONDAYS and THURS-
DAYS, via all landings.

Those desiring to get rid of threatened epidemics this summer will find more
delightful places in Maine than in any other part of the whole country.

Through cars run from Boston via Boston & Maine R.R., Eastern and Western
Divisions, and tickets and information can be obtained at their depot and city offices,
as well as all Maine Central and principal offices throughout the country.

F. E. BOOTHBY, PAYSON TUCKER,

General Passenger Agent. General Manager.






AND



Mount Besert Island



'An island full of hills and dells k^-
All runiph'd and uneven." \

' The gray and Umnder-smiticn pile
Which marks afar the Desert Isle."




^ ^ ■^'•' ^^ 'T'^^— '



PRESS OF LIBERTY PRINTING COMPANV,
107 Liberty Street, New York.



PREFACE.



3^0 T 7nnch of the history of Mount Desert is contained in
the following pages. To relate the story of this won-
derful Island and its people would require a large zwlume.
Nor is it claimed that much is contained here which has not
already appeared in some other form. The purpose of these
few pages is to give, in a brief and concise form, a descrip-
tion of some of the more interesting places found here, to
describe briefly the physical features of the Island, its bold and
rock-bound shores, its coves, harbors and bays, its mysterious
caverns, its wonderful mountaifis, its highland po?ids and lakes,
its curious geological formation, and, in addition, to give a
feiv of the more salient points in its civil histo?y, and the
marvelous growth of Bar Harbor and vicinity as a summer
resort. It is hoped that the matter is presented in a form
that will be found intelligible, and that the nu?nerous ques-
tions which are sure to be asked by those who co?itemplate
visiting Bar Harbor, or those who do visit it for the first
time, are here satisfactorily answered.

W. B. L.



Augusta, 1886.






j^ap Hapb



apjaor.





F all the numerous nooks and corners on the
North Atlantic coast which have become fam-
ous as seaside resorts, there is none whose
growth has been more rapid than that of Bar
Harbor. Less than a score of years ago it
was unknown to the great world of pleasure
M^jt:^ seekers. True, it had been visited by a few

,4^^ artists, who had found their way across from Southwest
f^^ Harbor by way of Somes' Sound, and who, attracted by
[its marvelous scenery, had remained here for the purpose
of transferring some of its unique views to canvas. It
was through these views that the scenery along this wild and
rock-bound coast, became somewhat familiar to the dwellers in
the great cities, and turned the tide of summer travel in this direction.
There was a little hamlet here prior to 1867, and Tobias Roberts had a
boat landing and kept a little store for the convenience of the few
straggling settlers on this side of the island. Since that time the de-
velopment and growth of the place has been almost phenomenal, and
in the brief space of eighteen years, it has become one of the most
popular summer resorts on the entire coast, rivalling such old established
places as Newport, Nahant and Long Branch.

In 1866, Capt. Charles Deering began running the steamer " City of
Richmond " from Portland to Machiasport, touching at Rockland, Cas-
tine, Deer Isle and Southwest Harbor. He had previously, and as early
as 1854, commanded the steamer " T. F. Secor," which plied between
Bangor and Machiasport. The popular demand for a more direct com-
munication to Bar Harbor was responded to by the erection of a con-
venient wharf, and in 186S Capt. Deering commenced touching at
this point. This wharf was built by Tobias Roberts, assisted by Capt.
Deering, and the steamer " Lewiston" was the first boat to make regular
trips to Bar Harbor.

The wharf was subsequently purchased by the Eastern Railroad
Company, and greatly enlarged; it is the principal wharf there at the



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' ' 11' 1^




present time. Roberts erected a small hotel, the Agamont House, and
the first in the place, in 1867. The steamers " Lewiston " and " City of
Richmond" are owned and run by the Portland, Bangor, Mount Desert
and Machias Steamboat Company, although in 1884, the line, including all
other property of the corporation, was purchased by the Maine Central
Railroad Company, who now operate it under the old name and as a
separate company.

Bar Harbor took its name from the fact that at low water a bar is
exposed between this island and Bar Island, sometimes called Rodick's
Island. With improved facilities for reaching here the influx of visitors
rapidly increased, and hotel accommodations were correspondingly
enlarged. The nucleus of the present Rodick House was built in 1867,
by Daniel Rodick, formerly of Rodick's Island, where his ancestor
settled prior to 1776. In 1870. 1875, and in 1882, this house was
enlarged, until its present capacity is six hundred or more guests. The
Bay View House was built in 1869, and after being enlarged several times,
was changed to the Grand Central. The Atlantic House was built in 1870,
burned and re-built larger in 1873; the Newport was built in 1871, the
St. Sauveur was re-built after having been burned, in 1872, the Rockaway
in 1873, the Marlborough, formerly the Deering, about the same time, the
Ocean House in 1874, the Belmont in 1879, and the West End a little later.
Then there are the Des Isle, the Malvern, the Lynam Cottages, several
oiher smaller houses and more to be built whenever they shall be needed.
The following table shows approximately the number of the larger
hotels, their capacity and the names of proprietors:



Rodick,


D. Rodick & Sons,


600


West End, -


- 0. M. Shaw & Son,


300


Rockaway,


T. L. Roberts,


100


Newport,


- W. M. Roberts,


100


Marlborough, -


Charles Higgins,


100


Atlantic, -


E. T. Hamor,


roo


Ocean,


Samuel Higgins,


40


Grand Central,


R. Hamor & Sons,


350


Hotel Des Isle,


A, I. Saunders,


75


Lynam Cottages, -


J. S. Lynam,


100


Belmont,


J. C. Manchester,


75


Lookout, -


- S. S. Salisbury,


40


St. Sauveur,


Alley Brothers,


175


Malvern, -


De Grasse Fox,





Hamilton,


G. W. Hamilton,


40


Exchange,


W. C. Higgins,


40


Birch Tree,


J. A. Rodick,


50


Wayside,


Mrs. R. G. Higgins,


35



All these hotels are pleasantly located, and with special reference to
sea and harbor views,.and besides these hotels there are nearly seventy-
five cottages rented to visitors.

The first cottage erected as a summer residence was built on Hardy's
Point, by Alpheus Hardy of Boston, in 1867, and this is still standing.
Since that time a large number of elegant cottages have been built, broad
streets and avenues have been laid out and constructed, elegant resi-
dences have been built upon the cliffs and bluffs, and the landscape which
twenty years ago was a barren waste, and almost worthless, has been
transformed into a large and beautiful village. Land has advanced in
price a thousand fold, and choice building lots will command almost any
sum asked. The following list comprises the names of the streets, and
most of the cottages at Bar Harbor and vicinity, with names of the
owners or occupants during the season of 1885, although the list is by no
means complete:

ALBERT A VENUE.
A. Higgins' Cottage, - - Parke Goodwin, New York.

A. Higgins' Cottage, - - - Charles Payson, Washington, D. C.

A TLA N TIC A VENUE.

Brewer Cottage, - - - H. La Barre Jayne, Philadelphia.

- Dr. Horace Jayne, Philadelphia.

John Suminsby Cottage, - - Miss Weidenfeld, New York.

Tripp Cottage, - . _ - Miss E. C. White, Philadelphia.

Thurber Cottage, - - - Dr. S. M. Miller, Philadelphia.



BIRCH POINT AND THE BA V SHORE.



Ambrose Higgins' Cottage,
Birch Point, _ _ .
Baltimore Cottages,
Derby Cottage,
Dove Cottage,
Dillingham Cottage, -
Edgemere, _ . _
Fernierest, - - -

Grant Cottage,
Jones Cottage, - - -
Minot Cottage,
Weld Cottage, - - -
Weld Cottage,



- Miss Buchanan,

Alpheus Hardy, Boston.

- Miss Buchanan,

Dr. Haskett Derby, Boston.

- W. P. Walley, Andover, Mass.
F. A. Wilson, Bangor, Me.

- T. B. Musgrave, New York.
Wm. F. Cochran, Yonkers, N. Y.

- H. A. Grant, Tarry town, N. Y.
F, R. Jones, New York.

- George R. Minot,

Rev. F. G. Peabody, Camb'ge, Mass.

- Mrs. F. M. Field, Boston, Mass.



COTTAGE STREET.



Andrew Rodick Cottage,
Andrew Rodick Cottage,



J. M. P. Price, Camden, N. J.

Mrs. William Stroud, Philadelphia.



Aunt Charlotte's Cottage,
Longstreth Cottage,
Mrs. Stubb's Cottage,



Manchester Cottage,
Rodick Cottage, No. i,
Salisbury Cottage,



Mrs. Henry Armltt Brown, Phila.
Dr. Morris Longstreth, "

Dr. John G. Curtis, New York.

Mrs. G. R. Davis, New York.

Mr. Lindsey Bury, Mandarin, Fla.
Mr. Robert Neilson, Philadelphia.
Mrs. James P. Chadwick, Boston.
Thomas Janney, Baltimore.

John B. Morris,
Mrs. H. Winter Davis, "



Cleftstone,
Mizzentop,
Mizzentop,



CLEFTSTONE ROAD.

Isaac W. How,



J. Arthur Beebe,
Mrs. W. D. Peachy,



New York.

Boston.

Washington.



Anderson Cottage,
Des Isle Cottage,
S. H. Leland Cotti



DES ISLE AVENUE.



Mrs. Clymer New York.

Col. Royal], Washington.

Capt. G. M. Wheeler, Washington.



Baymeath,
Edenfield,
Sonogee,
Sonogee,



DUCK BROOK.



John De Koven,
Samuel E. Lyon,
Mrs. D. H. Haight,
Mrs. D. K. Granger,



Chicago.
New York.



Homewood,
Lookout,
Stanton Cottage,
The Knoll, -^



EAGLE LAJyE ROAD.



Mrs. John Saunders, Philadelphia.
Mr. Robinson, Philadelphia.

Mrs. Stanton, Washington, D.C.
Mrs. Wilkins, Philadelphia.



EDEN S TREE T A ND VICINIT Y.



Bagatelle,

Brigham Bungalow,
Clovercroft,
Eddy Cottage,
Fox Cottage,
Lombard Cottage,
Villa Mary,
Witch Clyffe,



Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Pendleton,
Cincinnati, Ohio.
Wm. T. Brigham.
Mrs. George Place, New York.

James Eddy, Providence, R. I.

De Grasse Fox, Philadelphia.

The Misses Lombard, Boston.

Rev. F. H. Johnson, Philadelphia.
Mrs. F. C. Manning, Boston.



Highbrook,
Mossley Hall,



Barron Cottage,
Wyandotte, -
Devilstone,
Devilstone, -



HIGH BROOK ROAD.

Mrs. James Leeds,
- W. B. Howard,



Boston.
Chicago.



HA NCO C ^K S TREE T.

Mrs. C.Morton Smith, Philadelphia.

- Mr. J. Biddle Porter, Philadelphia.

Geo.W.Vanderbilt and family, N.Y.

■ - - Wm. H. Vanderbilt, New York.



HOLLAND AVENUE.

A. Higgins' Cottage, - - Mr. Ryerson, Chicago, 111.

Ansel Leland Cottage, - - Mrs. R. L. Fabian, New York.

Eri Bunker Cottage, - - Mrs. H. C. Beach, New York.

Ells Cottage, . . . . Dr. Hutchinson, Philadelphia.



Richardson Cottage,
Kebo Cottage,



KE/W STREET.

Mrs. John Whitaker, St. Louis, Mo.

- Mrs. J. W. Minturn, New York.
J. Lawrence Aspinwall, "

- Hamilton L. Hoppin, "



MO UN T DE SER T S TRE ETA ND VICINI T Y.



Cunningham Cottage,
Curtis Cottage,
Ledge Lawn,
Muller Cottage, -
Orlando Ash Cottage,
Parker Cottage, -
Primrose "
Shingle "
The Craigs,
The Eyrie, -



Miss L. Delafield, New York.

Prof. Geo. Harris, "Andover, Mass.
Miss M. C. Shannon, Newton, Mass.
Mr. Robbins, New York.

Mr. James P. Scott, Philadelphia.
Mrs. Edward Gardiner, Boston.

Mrs. A. J. Pendleton, Philadelphia.
Rev. William Lawrence, Boston.
Mr. James S. Amory, Boston.

Dr. Robert Amory, Brookline, Mass.



MAIN STREET.
Brewer Cottage, - - - Mrs. Daniel Wetmore, New York.
H. Higgins' Cottage, - - - Mrs. M. G. Evans, New York.

Mrs. M. L Higgins' Cottage, - M.rs. R. Snowden Andrews, Baltim'e.



Toppingwold,
Thirlstane,



MALDEN HLLL.

- F. W. Lawrence, Brookline, Mass.
Mrs. R. B. Scott, Washington, D. C.



Aldersea,
Watersmeet.



OGDEN POINT AND VICINITY.

Edward Coles,
Mrs. G. M. Ogden,



Philadelphia,
New York.



Cristie Cottage.
Hale Cottage,



sen 00 1 STREET.

- Charles Dennison, New York.



SCHOONER HEAD.

George S. Hale,



Boston.



Carey Cottage,

Geo. Higgins' Cottage,

L. Higgins'

L. Higgins'

Ocean

Stephen Higgins' Cottage,

Yellow House,



THE EI ELD.

- Prof. H. N. Martin, Haltimore.
J. P. Norris, New York.

- Dr. Wm. Todd Helmuth,
Lieut. VV. P. Edgarton,

- Mrs. Crehore, Boston.
Mrs. Van Buren, New York.

- Mrs. T. C. A. Linzee, Boston.



Guy's Cliff,
Beau Desert,



WOODLWRY PARK.

E. C. Cushman,
- W. S. Gurnee,



Newport, R. I.
New York.



It will be noticed that among those who have either owned or occu-
pied cottages here are some of the most distinguished men of the
country. The Vanderbilts, the Ogdens, the Musgraves, the Howards,
the Amorys, the Sears, and the Harrises are well known in financial
circles; Bishop Doane of New York and President Eliot of Harvard
College have cottages on this island, and Hon. James G. Blaine has pur-
chased a lot, and will have Stanwood Cottage ready for occupancy early
this summer. Some of these cottages cost not less than $100,000
each, and a large sum of money has been put into these temporary
dwellings.

Since the opening of the Mount Desert Branch of the Maine Central
Railroad, a new impulse has been given to the travel in this direction,
and the number of visitors to Bar Harbor has more than quadrupled
within the last two years, and is yearly increasing.

Bar Harbor as a summer resort, owes its popularity to its pure
bracing air, its romantic and extended driveways, its enchanting ocean
views and its grand mountain scenery. The cool currents from the
Arctic seas reach these shores, modifying the temperature so that the heat
rarely, if ever, becomes oppressive. Eagle Lake, embosomed among
the mountains, and fed by crystal streams and bubbling springs, supplies



10

the village with the purest of water; this lake is 275 feet above the sea-
level, and a jet of water from any of the numerous hydrants can be
thrown to a perpendicular height of more than seventy-five feet. This
affords ample protection against fire, a matter of no small consideration
where the large hotels and most of the other buildings are constructed
of wood.




EAGLE LAKE.



Main Street is largely devoted to s.ores and shops, and groceries, dry
and fancy goods, boots and shoes, and clothing can be purchased here at
as low a price as they can in Bangor or Portland. Electric light has been
mtroduced and all other modern improvements have been made. A first-
Class weekly paper, the Mount Desert Herald, is published by JosephWood.



11



HOW TO REACH BAR HARBOR.

No longer as in days gone by, is the visitor obliged to cross the
Island from Southwest Harbor by the circuitous route, through Somes-
ville nor, as later, to depend upon a single line of steamers, making the
trip two or three times a week, to reach Bar Harbor, for since 1884,
there is an all-rail route to within eight miles of Bar Harbor wharf, and
safe ferry boats always in waiting to convey passengers across the inter-
vening space, known as Frenchman's Bay. The Mount Desert Branch of
the Maine Central Railroad is forty-two miles in length. Crossing the
Penobscot river at Bangor,it passes through the towns of Brewer, Holden,
Dedham, Ellsworth and Hancock to the terminus at Hancock Point.
The most remarkable feature along this route is an immense train of
boulders which the road crosses diagonally, entering it in the town of
Holden and leaving it near Reed's Upper Pond in Dedham. From the
car windows these piles of boulders can be seen, varying in weight from
a few pounds to hundreds of tons, and crowded together so as to
obstruct all vegetation, and resembling a huge dilapidated stone wall.
At some points immense blocks of granite are so evenly poised as almost
to threaten the safety of the railroad track. None of these rocks are in
place, but their appearance here is unquestionably the result of glacial
action. They constitute an ancient moraine whose general direction is
from Northeast to Southwest. It begins from the point where the
railway crosses it, toward Moosehead Lake, and terminates in a gravelly
deposit in the town of Orland. Ellsworth Falls is a thriving village
where power is obtained from Union river and a large lumber business
is carried on, and Ellsworth, the next station, is a beautiful little city
situated at the head of navigation on the same river. Hancock Village
with its neat white cottages is soon passed, and the next and last station
is Mount Desert Ferry, situated on the easterly side of Frenchman's Bay.
During the past season Bangor parties have erected an elegant hotel
at this point which will doubtless become a popular resort. It is built
upon a bluff near the railway station, and rightly named "the Bluffs,"
has delightful surroundings, and a fine view of the bay. Here the pas-
sengers leave the cars, embark on board the commodious ferry boat
which, with steam up, is waiting, and after half an hour's sail, in-
haling the cooling and refreshing breeze from the open sea, the bay is
crossed and Bar Flarbor is reached, Passengers can leave Boston in
elegant palace cars at nine o'clock in the morning and before eight the
same evening they can be at their hotel or cottage at Bar Harbor. Or
they can leave Boston at seven o'clock in the evening by sleeping cars,
arrive in Bangor at five-thirty the following morning and at Bar Har-
bor at eight-thirty. The day train during the excursion season is a fast




MOUNT DESERT FROM "THE BLUFFS." MOUNT DESERT FERRY.



18

express, and makes the distance between Boston and Bangor, including
all stops in less than eight hours.

Persons preferring the water route can take the steamers " City of
Richmond " or 'Lewiston" at Portland, which make the round trip
between Portland and Machiasport twice a week, stopping at ]>ar Harbor
and all places of importance along the coast. This route has the advan-
tage of enabling one to view the grand scenery which is unfolded from
every side from the time Rockland is left until Bar Harbor is reached.

PLACES HISTORIC AND PICTURESQUE.

Many of the summer residents at Bar Harbor content themselves
with remaining in the vicinity of the village, and spend the whole season,
and season after season without visiting other points of interest, while
others do not like to settle down to the quiet of cottage life until all the
mysteries of the Island have been explored. To such as enjoy visiting
the outlying nooks and corners, there is every facility for doing so. The
roads are magnificent, the gravelly soil of the Island being the best of
material for making them. Large sums of money have been expended
in road-making, and they are everywhere excellent. Then there are
always teams in waiting, buck-boards, cutaways and carryalls, with one
or two horses as may be desired, and the cupidity of the owner is held
in check by municipal authority, the price per diem to each point to be
visited being established and a printed list furnished to those desiring it.

GREEN MOUNTAIN.

The first point of interest is Green Mountain, the highest point on
the Island. Some ambitious persons make the ascent on foot, and that
can best be done by way of the ruins of the old mill near the foot of
Mount Kebo, and then by way of the ravine that separates Green from
Dry Mountain. But by far the largest number prefer to go by the regular
conveyance furnished by the Green Mountain Railway which is by car-
riage to Eagle Lake, thence by steamer up the lake to the base, then by
railway to the summit. This gives variety to the trip which is a most
enjoyable one. A clear bright morning should be selected for this excur-
sion, when objects can be seen at a great distance. The railway itself is
a marvel of engineering skill, the entire length of the road being six
thousand three hundred feet, and the grade averaging one loot to every
four feet passed over. There is a good hotel at the summit which will
accommodate about thirty guests.

The view from Green Mountain, on a clear morning, is one never
to be forgotten. The coast line with its many sinuosities, the numerous
smaller islands scattered here and there, Mount Desert spread out like a
map and the inland landscape with its diversity of views, all go to make



15

up a succession of the grandest pictures imaginable. One familiar with
the history and legends of this wonderful Island, as he stands upon this
rocky eminence and glances over its sea cradled islands, its sun-bur-
nished creeks, its mountain lakes and its alp-like ravines, may easily
imagine that a savage is about to emerge from some glen, or to see
lying at anchor, the rude shallop of two hundred years ago; or still
stranger to behold some wanderer from across the sea in the habiliment
of his time, with steeple hat, peaked beard, slashed doublet and sword
by his side, climbing the sea-wall to seek his rude cabin on the shore.

SCHOONER HEAD.

There is a legend that in the war of 1812 a British frigate ran
towards the shore at this point and opened fire upon what was supposed
to be a schooner, but which was simply a white formation on a dark
ground. Schooner Head is four miles from Bar Harbor, the road being
the one nearest the easterly side of the Island. It is a spur of New-
port Mountain, and appears as a bare almost perpendicular headland,
about a hundred feet high, on the eastern face of which is still to be
seen the large white figure which, out at sea, looks like a schooner with
her three lower sails set. In the top of the cliff, at the left, is a deep cleft,
with a passage at its bottom worn through the rock to low water mark,
through which, during a severe southerly storm, the surf passes upward
with a rush and roar, and is driven with great force above the tops
of the trees. This is known as " Spouting Horn." Across a little cove,
toward the south, is Anemone Cave, a wonderful grotto where each suc-
ceeding tide deposits strange creatures from the sea, including the
polyp, known as the sea anemone, which remain stranded among rock-
weed and mosses, when the water recedes.

GREAT HEAD.

A little farther westward is Great Head which shelters the only
beach on the Island and a very small one at that. Great Head is a
prominent object when passing from Bar Harbor to Southwest Harbor
by water. " No description can do justice to its savage grandeur. It is
not to its height alone that it owes its impressiveness, but to the peculiar
massiveness of the rocks, the overhanging of the whole cliff, and the
never-ceasing beat and roar of the waves below."

OTTER CLIFFS.

The drive from Bar Harbor to the Otter Cliffs is five miles, and


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