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University of California Berkeley



WILLIAM BLAKE,
















FROM A PORTRAIT OF BLAKE BY HIS WIFE.

facsimile from the original by the kind permission of
Mr. Home of the Hobby-Horse-Guild.



THE WORKS



OF



WILLIAM BLAKE

*
poetic, Sgrnbolk, antr Critical



EDITED WITH LITHOGRAPHS OF THE ILLUSTRATED

"PROPHETIC BOOKS," AND A MEMOIR

AND INTERPRETATION



EDWIN JOHN ELLIS

Author of " Fate in Arcadia," <&c.

AND

WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS

AutJwr of " The Wanderings of Oisin" " The Countess Kathleen" d-c.



" Bring me to the test

And I the matter will re-word, whicli mad ness
Would gambol from "

Hamlet



IN THREE VOLS.

VOL. Ill



LONDON
BERNARD QUARITCH, 15 PICCADILLY

1893

[All Rights Rcscr<-"t >






07

UHI7B&SITT]



V,3



CONTENTS OF VOLUME III.



FRONTISPIECE : FROM A PORTRAIT OF BLAKE BY HIS WIFE,
FACSIMILE FROM THE ORIGINAL MADE BY KIND PERMISSION
OF MB. HORNE OF THE HOBBY HORSE GUILD.



POETICAL SKETCHES:

King Edward the Third .......

Prologue intended for a Dramatic Piece of King Edward
the Fourth ......... 20

Prologue to King John . ...... 20

^o Spring- O thou with dewy locks, who lookest down . 21
To Summer ...... ... 21

To Autumn ......... 22

.To Winter ......... 22

To the Evening Star ..... 23

To Morning ......... 23

Fair Eleanor ......... 23

Song How sweet I roamed from field to field . . 25
Song My silks and fine array ..... 26

Song Love and harmony combine . * . . .26
Song I love the jocund dance . . . . .27

Song Memory, hither come ...... 27

- Mad song . . . . . . . . .28

- Song Fresh from the dewy hill, the merry year . . 28
-Song When early morn walks forth in sober grey . 29
, To the Muses ......... 29

Gwin, King of Norway ....... 30

-An Imitation of Spenser ....... 33

Blind-man's Buff ..... . . .34

A War Song : To Englishmen ..... 35



vi CONTENTS.







ONGS OP INNOCENCE :

Introduction . . . . . . . . .37

The Shepherd . .37

The Echoing Green . . . . .. . .38

The Lamb ' . 38

The Little Black Boy .39

The Blossom . 40

The Chimney-sweeper When my mother died I was
very young ......... 40

The Little Boy Lost Father, father, where are you going 40
The Little Boy Found . . . . . . .41

Laughing Song ........ 41

A Cradle Song Sweet dreams, form a shade ... 41
The Divine Image To Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love . 42
Holy Thursday 'Twas on a Holy Thursday, their inno-
cent faces clean ........ 43

Night 43

Spring Sound the Flute ...... 44

Nurse's Song When the voices of children are heard on
the green . . . . . . . . .45

Infant Joy . . . . . . . . .45

A Dream ......... 45

On Another's Sorrow ....... 46

sGs OF EXPERIENCE:

Introduction ......... 48

Earth's Answer ........ 48

The Clod and the Pebble 49

Holy Thursday Is this a holy thing to see ... 49

The Little Girl Lost In futurity 50

The Little Girl Found ....... 51

The Chimney-Sweeper A little black thing among the

snow .......... 52

Nurse's Song When the voices of children are heard

on the green ........ 53

The Sick Rose ' .53

The Fly 53

The Angel . 54

The Tiger 54

My Pretty Rose Tree /. 55"

Ah, Sunflower ........ 55

The Lily . . . 55



CONTENTS. vii

SONGS OF EXPERIENCE, continued : PAGE
The Garden of Love . . . . . .55

The Little Vagabond . . .... 56

London ... 56

The Human Abstract .... 57

Infant Sorrow 57

Christian Forbearance ....... 57

A Little Boy Lost Nought loves another as itself . 58

A Little Girl Lost Children of the future age . . 58

A Divine Image Cruelty has a human heart . . 59

^A Cradle Song Sleep, sleep, beauty bright . . 59

The Schoolboy .... ... 60

To Tirzah 61

The Voice of the Ancient Bard ... 61

THE GATES OF PARADISE :

Introduction ......... 62

The Keys of the Gates 62

Epilogue : To the Accuser, who is the God of this World 63

To MY DEAR FRIEND, MRS. ANNA FLAXMAN .... 64

To MR. BUTTS 64

To MRS. BUTTS o5

VERSES With happiness stretched across the hills . . 66

THE BIRDS '68

THE Two SONGS 68

THE DEFILED SANCTUARY 69

CUPID 69

LOVE'S SECRET ...... ... 70

THE WILD FLOWER'S SONG 70

SCOFFERS .......... 70

DAYBREAK 71

THAMES AND OHIO / 71

YOUNG LOVE 71

THE GOLDEN NET .72

RICHES 72

OPPORTUNITY 72

SEED-SOWING 73

BARREN BLOSSOM ......... 73

NIGHT AND DAY 73

IN A MYRTLE SHADE 74

IDOLATRY .......... 74

FOR A PICTURE OF THE LAST JUDGMENT : DEDICATION . 74



Vlll CONTENTS.

PAGE

THE WILL AND THE WAY 75

SMILE AND FROWN ........ 75

THE LAND OF DREAMS ........ 76

AUGURIES OF INNOCENCE ........ 76

WILLIAM BOND . ........ 79

SONG BY A SHEPHERD ........ 80

SONG BY AN OLD SHEPHERD . . . . . . .80

LONG JOHN BROWN AND LITTLE MARY BELL . ... 82

MARY 81

THE CRYSTAL CABINET . . . . . . . . 82

COUPLETS AND FRAGMENTS :

I walked abroad on a snowy day ..... 84

Abstinence sows sand all over ..... 84

The look of love alarms ....... 84

To Chloe's breast young Cupid slyly stole . . .84
Grown old in love from seven till seven times seven . 84
The sword sang on the barren heath .... 84

Great things are done when men and mountains meet . 84
The errors of a wise man make your rule ... 84
Some people admire the work of a fool .... 85

He's a blockhead who wants a proof of what he can't
perceive . . . . . . . . . 85

If e'er I grow to man's estate . . . . . .85

Her whole life is an epigram ... . . .85

Anger and wrath my bosom rends ..... 85

I mock thee not . . . . . . . .85

Here lies John Trot 85

No real style of colouring now appears .... 85

You don't believe ....... . 86

You must agree that Rubens was a fool . . .86

When I see a Rembrandt or Correggio .... 86

I asked my dear friend, Orator Prig . . . . 87

O dear mother Outline . . . . . . .87

That God is colouring . ... . . .87

To Venetian Artists ...... . 87

NOTES TO THE POETICAL SKETCHES, SONGS, &c. , . 88

T HEBE is NO NATURAL RELIGION.



CONTENTS.



Facsimiles and Reproductions.



There is no Natural Re-
ligion (Jacxiniili' without
title) 3 pages.

The Laocoon group as
God, Satan and Adam
struggling in the toils of
Nature .... 1 page.



On Homer's Poetry .
The Ghost of Abel .
The Marriage of Heaven

and Hell
The Book of Los
The Book of Urizen .
Ahania



1 page.

2 pages.

27



TlIMKI,.



Thel.

Visions of the Daughter:

of Albion
The Song of Los
America a Prophecy
Europe a Prophecy
Jerusalem
Olilton
Vala .

The " Ghost of a Flea "
Sketches from the MS

Book



Reproductions^ continued.

8 pages. Plates The Soul hovering

( over the body .

10 ,



7

12 ,,

15 .,

100

15 ,1

18

1 page.

3 pages.



The Soul exploring

the recesses of

the Grave .
Reunion of the

Soul and Body .
Death of the Strong

Wicked Man .
Death of the Good

Old Man .
The Last Judgment



1 page.



VALA.



VOL. JH.



POETICAL SKETCHES, ETC.



VOL. in.



OP

VEBSIT7




POETICAL SKETCHES.



KING EDWARD THE THIRD.

PERSONS.

KINO EDWARD. SIR THOMAS DAQWORTH.

THE BLACK PRINCE. SIR WALTER MANNY.

QUEEN PHILIPPA. LORD AUDLEY.

DDKE OF CLARENCE. LORD PERCY.

SIR JOHN CIIANDOS. BISHOP.

WILLIAM, DagwortWs man.

PETER BLUNT, a common soldier.

SCENE I. The Coast of France.

KINO EDWARD and Nobles before it. The Army.

KING.

thou to whose fury the nations are
But as the dust ! maintain thy servant's right.
Without thine aid, the twisted mail, and spear,
And forged helm, and shield of beaten brass,
Are idle trophies of the vanquisher.
When on the field in flame, confusion rages,
When cries of blood tear horror out of heaven,
And yelling Death runs up and down the ranks,
Let Liberty, the chartered right of Englishmen.
Won by our fathers in many a glorious field,
Enerve my soldiers ; then let Liberty
Blaze in each countenance, and fire the battle.
The enemy fight in chains, unseen, but heavy ;
Their minds are fettered ; then how can they be free ?
While, like the mounting flame,
We spring to battle o'er the floods of death 1
And these fair youths, the flower of England,
Venturing their lives in my most righteous cause,
Oh sheathe their hearts with triple steel, that they
May emulate their fathers' virtues ! Thou
vor,, III, 1 *



POETICAL SKETCHES :

My son, be strong ; thou fightest for a crown

That death can never ravish from thy brow,

A crown of gloryFrom thy very dust

Shall beam a radiance, to fire the breasts

Of youth unborn ! Our names are written equal

In Fame's wide-trophied hall ; 'tis ours to gild

The letters, and to make them shine with gold

That never tarnishes : whether Third Edward,
/'The Prince of Wales, Montacute, Mortimer,
/ Or ev'n the least by birth, shall gain the brightest fame,
V^ Is in His hand to whom all men are equal.

The world of men are like the numerous stars

That beam and twinkle in the depth of night,

Each clad in glory according to his sphere ;

But we, that wander from our native seats

And beam forth lustre on a darkling world,

Grow large as we advance : and some perhaps

The most obscure at home, that scarce were seen

To twinkle in their sphere, may so advance

That the astonished world, with upturned eyes,

Regardless of the moon, and those once bright,

Stand only for to gaze upon their splendour,

[He here knights the Prince and other young Nobles.
"Now let us take a just revenge for those

Brave Lords who fell beneath the bloody axe
\ s At Paris. Noble Harcourt, thanks, for 'twas

By your advice we landed here in Brittany,

A country not yet sown with destruction,

And where the fiery whirlwind of swift war

Has not as yet swept its desolating wing.

Into three parties we divide by day,

And separate march, but join again at night :

Each knows his rank, and Heaven marshal all.

[Exeunt.

SCENE II. English Court.

LIONEL, DUKE OF CLARENCE, QUEEN PHILIPPA,
Lords, Bishop, d'C.

CLARENCE.

My Lords, I have by the advice of her

Whom I am doubly bound to obey, my parent

And my sovereign, called you together.

My task is great, my burden heavier than

My unfledged years ;

Yet with your kind assistance, Lords, I hope

England shall dwell in peace : that, while my father

Toils in his wars, and turns his eyes on this

Hi native shore, and sees commerce fly round

With his white wings, and sees his golden London



KING EDWARD THE THIRD.

And her silver Thames, thronged with shining spires

And corded ships, her merchants buzzing round

Like summer bees, and all the golden cities

O'erflowing with their honey, in his land

Glory may not be dimmed with clouds of care.

Say, Lords, should not our thoughts be first to commerce?

You, my Lord Bishop, would have agriculture?

BISHOP.

Sweet Prince, I know the arts of peace are great,
And no less glorious than those of war,
Perhaps more, in the philosophic mind.
When I sit at my home, a private man,
My thoughts are on my gardens and my fields, )
How to employ the hand that lacketh bread.
If Industry is in my diocese,
Religion will flourish ; each man's heart
Is cultivated and will bring forth fruit :
This is my private duty and my pleasure.
But, as I sit in council with my prince,
My thoughts take-in the general good of the whole,
And England is the land favoured by Commerce ;
For Commerce, though the child of Agriculture,
Fosters his parent, who else must sweat and toil,
And gain but scanty fare. Then, my dear Lord,
Be England's trade our care ; and we, as tradesmen
Looking to the gain of this our native land.

CLARENCE.

my good Lord, true wisdom drops like honey
From off your tongue, as from a worshipped oak !
Forgive, my Lords, my talkative youth, that speaks
Not merely from my narrow observation,

But what I have concluded from your lessons.
Now, by the Queen's advice, I ask your leave
To dine to-morrow with the Mayor of London
If by your leave, I have another boon
To ask, the favour of your company.

1 fear Lord Percy will not give me leave.

PERCY.

Dear Sir, a prince should always keep his state,
And grant his favours with a sparing hand,
Or they are never rightly valued.
These are my thoughts : yet it were best to go :
But keep a proper dignity, for now
You represent the sacred person of
Your father ; 'tis with princes as with the sun ;
If not sometimes o'erclouded, we grow weary
Of his officious glory.



POETICAL SKETCHES :
CLARENCE.

Then you will give me leave to shine sometimes,
My Lord ?

LORD (aside).

Thou hast a gallant spirit, which I fear
Will be imposed on by the closer sort.

CLARENCE.

Well, I'll endeavour to take

Lord Percy's advice ; I have been used so much

To dignity that I'm sick on't.

QUEEN PHILIPPA.

Fie, fie, Lord Clarence ! you proceed not to business,

But speak of your own pleasures.

I hope their lordships will excuse your giddiness.

CLARENCE.

My Lords, the French have fitted out many
Small ships of war that, like to ravening wolves,
Infest our English seas, devouring all
Our burdened vessels, spoiling our naval flocks.
The merchants do complain, and beg our aid.

PERCY.

The merchants are rich enough ;
Can they not help themselves ?

BISHOP.

They can, and may; but how to gain their will
Requires our countenance and help. '

PERCY.

When that they find they must, my Lord, they will :
Let them but suffer awhile, and you shall see
They will bestir themselves.

BISHOP.

Lord Percy cannot mean that we should suffer
Disgrace like this. If so, we are not sovereigns
Of the sea, our right, a right that Heaven gave
To England, when at the birth of Nature
She in the deep was seated ; Ocean ceased
His mighty roar, and, fawning, played around
Her snowy feet, and owned his awful Queen.
Lord Percy, if the heart is sick, the head
Must be aggrieved ; if but one member suffer,
The heart doth fail. You say, my Lord, the merchants
Can, if they will, defend themselves against
These rovers : this must be a noble scheme,
Worthy the brave Lord Percy, and as worthy
His generous aid to put it into practice.

PERCY.

Lord Bishop, what was rash in me is wise
In you ; I dare not own the plan. 'Tis not



KING EDWARD THE THIRD.

Mine. Yet will I, if you please,

Quickly to the Lord Mayor, and work him onward

To this most glorious voyage ; on which cast

I'll set my whole estate,

But we will bring these Gallic rovers under.

QUEEN PHILIPPA.

Thanks, brave Lord Percy ; you have the thanks
Of England's Queen, and will, ere long, of England.

[Exeunt.

SCENE III. At Cressy.
SIB THOMAS DAGWOBTH and LOBD AUDLEY meeting.

AUDLET.

Good-morrow, brave Sir Thomas ; the bright morn
Smiles on our army, and the gallant sun
Springs from the hills like a young hero leaping
Into the battle, shaking his golden locks
Exultingly : this is a promising day.

DAO WORTH.

Why thatj my good Lord Audley, I dou't know.
Give me your hand, and now I'll tell you what
I think you do not know. Edward 's afraid
Of Philip.

AUDLEY.

Ha, ha 1 Sir Thomas 1 you but joke ;
Did you e'er see him fear ? At Blanchetaque,
When almost singly he drove six thousand
French from the ford, did he fear then ?

DAQWOBTH.

Yes, fear.
That made him fight so.

AUDLEY.

By the same reason I might say 'tis fear
That makes you fight.

DAG WORTH.

Mayhap you may. Look upon Edward's face,
No one can say he fears ; but, when he turns
His back, then I will say it to his face ;
He is afraid : he makes us all afraid.
I cannot bear the enemy at my back.
Now here we are at Cressy ; where to-morrow ?
To-morrow we shall know. I say, Lord Audley,
That Edward runs away from Philip.

AUDLEY.
Perhaps you think the Prince too is afraid ?

DAGWORTH.

No ; God forbid 1 I am sure he is not.

He is a young lion. Oh I have seen him fight



UHIVBRSIT7




POETICAL SKETCHES:

And give command, and lightning has flashed

From his eyes across the field : I have seen him

Shake hands with Death, and strike a bargain for

The enemy ; he has danced in the field

Of battle, like the youth at morris-play.

I'm sure he's not afraid, nor Warwick, nor none,

None of us but me, and I am very much afraid.

AUDLEY.

Are you afraid, too, Sir Thomas ? I believe that
As much as I believe the King's afraid :
But what are you afraid of ?

DAGWOBTH.

Of having my back laid open ; we must turn
Our backs to the fire, till we shall burn our skirts.

AUDLEY.

And this, Sir Thomas, you call fear? Your fear
Is of a different kind, then, from the King's ;
He fears to turn his face, and you to turn your back.
I do not think, Sir Thomas, you know what fear is.

Enter SIB JOHN CHANDOS.

CHANDOS.

Good-morrow, Generals ; I give you joy :
Welcome to the fields of Cressy. Here we stop,
And wait for Philip.

DAGWOBTH.

I hope so.

AUDLEY.

There, Sir Thomas ; do you call that fear ?

DAGWOKT1I.

I don't know ; perhaps he takes it by fits.
Why, noble Chandos, look you here
One rotten sheep spoils the whole flock ;
And if the bell-wether is tainted, I wish
The Prince may not catch the distemper too.

CHANDOS.

Distemper, Sir Thomas I What distemper ?
I have not heard.

DAGWOBTH.

Why, Chandos, you are a wise man,

I know you understand me ; a distemper

The King caught here in France of running away.

AUDLEY.

Sir Thomas, you say you have caught it too.

DAGWOBTH.

And so will the whole army ; 'tis very catching,
For, when the coward runs, the brave man totters.



KING EDWARD THE THIRD.

Perhaps the air of the country is the cause.
I feel it coming upon me, so I strive against it ;
You yet are whole ; but, after a few more
Retreats, we all shall know how to retreat
Better than fight. To be plain, I think retreating
Too often takes away a soldier's courage.

CHANDOS.

Here comes the King himself : tell him your thoughts
Plainly, Sir Thomas.

DAG WORTH.

I've told him this before, but his disorder
Has made him deaf.

Enter KING EDWARD and BLACK PRINCE.

KING.

Good-morrow, Generals ; when English courage
Shall fail, down goes at once our right to France.
But we are conquerors everywhere; nothing
Can stand before our soldiers ; each is worthy
Of a triumph. Such an army, heroes all,
Ne'er shouted to the heavens, nor shook the field.
Edward, my son, thou art, among us here
Most happy, having such command : the man
Were more than base who were not fired to deeds
Above heroic, having such examples.

PRINCE.

Sire, with respect and deference I look
Upon such noble souls, and wish myself
Worthy the high command that Heaven and you
Have given me. When I've seen the field a-glow, '
And in each countenance the soul of war
Curbed by the manliest reason, I've been winged
With certain victory ; and 'tis my boast,
And shall be still my glory, I was inspired
By these brave troops.

DAG WORTH.

Your Grace had better make them
All Generals.

KING.

Sir Thomas Dagworth, you must have your joke
And shall, while you can fight as you did at
The Ford.

DAGWORTH.

I have a small petition to your Majesty.

KING.

What can Sir Thomas Dagworth ask
That Edward can refuse ?



10 POETICAL SKETCHES t

DAGWOBTH.

I hope your Majesty cannot refuse so great

A trifle ; I've gilt your cause with my best blood,

And would again, were I not forbid

By him whom I am bound to obey : my hands

Are tied up, all my courage shrunk and withered,

My sinews slackened, and my voice scarce heard ;

Therefore I beg I may return to England.

KING.

I know not what you could have asked, Sir Thomas,
That I would not have sooner parted with
Than such a soldier as you, and such a friend :
Nay, I will know the most remote particulars
Of this your strange petition ; that, if I can,
I still may keep you here.

DAGWORTH.

Here on the fields of Cressy we are settled

Till Philip springs the timorous covey again.

The wolf is hunted down by causeless fear ;

The lion flees, and fear usurps his heart,

Startled, astonished at the clamorous cock ;

The eagle, that doth gaze upon the sun,

Fears the small fire that plays about the fen.

If, at this moment of their idle fear,

The dog doth seize the wolf, the forester the lion,

The negro in the crevice of the rock

Doth seize the soaring eagle ; undone by flight,

They tame submit : such the effect flight has

On noble souls. Now hear its opposite :

The timorous stag starts from the thicket wild,

The fearful crane springs from the splashy fen,

The shining snake glides o'er the bending grass,

The stag turns head, and bays the crying hounds ;

The crane o'ertaken fighteth with the hawk ;

The snake doth turn, and bite the padding foot.

And if your Majesty's afraid of Philip,

You are more like a lion than a crane :

Therefore I beg I may return to England.

KING.

Sir Thomas, now I understand your mirth,
Which often plays with wisdom for its pastime,
And brings good counsel from the breast of laughter.
I hope you'll stay and see us fight this battle,
And reap rich harvest in the fields of Cressy ;
Then go to England, tell them how we fight,
And set all hearts on fire to be with us.
Philip is plumed, and thinks we flee from him,



KING EDWARD THE THIRD. 11

Else be would never dare to attack us. Now,
Now the quarry's set ! and Death doth sport
In the bright sunshine of this fatal day.

DAGWORTH.

Now my heart dances, and I am as light
As the young bridegroom going to be married.
Now must I to my soldiers, get them ready,
Furbish our armours bright, new-plume our helms ;
And we will sing like the young housewives busied
In the dairy. Now my feet are wing'd, but not
For flight, an please your grace.

KING.

If all my soldiers are as pleased as you,
'Twill be a gallant thing to fight or die ;
Then I can never be afraid of Philip.

DAGWORTH.

A raw-boned fellow t' other day passed by me ;
I told him to put off his hungry looks
He said, "I hunger for another battle."
I saw a little Welshman, fiery-faced ;
I told him he looked like a candle half
Burned out ; he answered, he was "pi<j enough
" To light another pattle" Last night, beneath
The moon I walked abroad, when all had pitched
Their tents, and all were still ;
I heard a blooming youth singing a song
He had composed, and at each pause he wiped
His dropping eyes. The ditty was, " If he
Returned victorious, he should wed a maiden
Fairer than snow, and rich as midsummer."
Another wept, and wished health to his father..
I chid them both, but gave them noble hopes.
These are the minds that glory in the battle,-
And leap and dance to hear the trumpet sound.

KING.

Sir Thomas Dagworth, be thou near our person
Thy heart is richer than the vales of France :
I will not part with such a man as thou.
If Philip came armed in the ribs of death,
And shook his mortal dart against my head,
Thou'dst laugh his fury into nerveless shame !
Go now, for thou art suited to the work,
Throughout the camp ; inflame the timorous,
Blow up the sluggish into ardour, and
Confirm the strong with strength, the weak inspire,
And wing their brows with hope and expectation :
Then to our tent return, and meet to council.

[Exit DAGWORTH.




12 POETICAL SKETCHES :

CHANDOS.

That man's a hero in his closet, and more
A hero to the servants of his house
Than to the gaping world ; he carries windows
In that enlarged breast of his, that all
May see what's done within.

PRINCE.

He is a genuine Englishman, my Chandos,
And hath the spirit of Liberty within him.
Forgive my prejudice, Sir John ; I think
My Englishmen the bravest people on
The face of the earth.

CHANDOS.

Couiage, my Lord, proceeds from self-dependence.
Teach every man to think he's a free agent.
Give but a slave his liberty, he'll shake
Off sloth, and build himself a hut, and hedge
A spot of ground ; this he'll defend ; 'tis his
By right of Nature. Thus being set in action,
He will move on to plan conveniences,
Till glory fires him to enlarge his castle ;
While the poor slave drudges all day, in hope
To rest at night.

KING.

Liberty, how glorious art thou !

1 see thee hovering o'er my army, with

Thy wide-stretched plumes ; I see thee lead them on ;

I see thee blow thy golden trumpet while

Thy sons shout the strong shout of victory !

O noble Chandos, think thyself a gardener,

My son a vine, which I commit unto

Thy care. Prune all extravagant shoots, and guide

The ambitious tendrils in the path of wisdom ;

Water him with thy clear advice, and Heaven

Eain freshening dew upon his branches ! And,

Edward, my dear son ! think lowly of

Thyself, as we may all each prefer other

'Tis the best policy, and 'tis our duty.

[Exit KING EDWARD.

PRINCE.

nd may our duty, Chandos, be our pleasure.
Now we are alone, Sir John, I will unburden
And breathe my hopes into the burning air,
Where thousand Deaths are posting up and down,
Commissioned to this fatal field of Cressy.



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