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William Chambers.

Chambers's miscellany of useful and entertaining tracts (Volume v.5-6) online

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Stiff everg-reens, whose spreading foliage mocks

"Want's barren soil, and the bleak frosts of age,

And mad oppression's thunder-clasping rage !

O meek retiring spirit ! we will climb.

Cheering and cheered, this lovely hill sublime ;

And from the stirring world uplifted high

(Whose noises faintly wafted on the wind,

To quiet musings shall attune the mind,

And oft the melancholy theme supply),

There while the prospect through the gazing eye

Pours all its healthful greenness on the soul.

We'll laugh at wealth, and learn to laugh at fame,

Our hopes, our knowledge, and our joys the same.

As neighbouring fomitains image, each the whole.



IMITATED FROM OSSIAN.

The stream with languid murmur creeps

In Lumin's flowery vale :
Beneath the dew the lily weeps,

Slow waving to the gale *

^' Cease, restless gale," it seems to say,

"Nor wake me with thy sighing ;
The honours of my vernal day

On rapid wing are flying.

To-morrow shall the traveller come

Who late beheld me blooming :
His searching eye shall vainly roam

The dreary vale of Lumin."

With eager gaze and wetted cheek,

My wonted haunts along.
Thus, faithful maiden ! thou shalt seek

The youth of simplest song.

* The flower hangs its head, waving at times to the gale. Why dost
thou awake me, oh gale ! it seems to say. I am covered with the drops of
heaven. The time of my fading is near, the blast that shall scatter my
leaves. To-morrow shall the traveller come, he that saw me in my beauty
shall come. His eyes will search the field ; they will not find me. So
shall they search in vain for the voice of Cona, after it has failed in the
field.— Berrathon. See Ossian's Poems, vol. ii.
30



MISCELLANEOUS POEMS OF COLERIDGE.

But I along the breeze shall roll

The voice of feeble power,
And dwell the moonbeam of thy soul,

In slumber's nightly hour.

DOMESTIC PEACE.

Tell me, on what holy ground
May Domestic Peace be found?
Halcyon daughter of the skies,
Far on fearful wing*s she flies,
From the pomp of sceptered state,
From the rebel's noisy hate.
In a cottaged vale she dwells,
Listening to the Sabbath bells !
Still around her steps are seen
Spotless Honour's meeker mien,
Love, the sire of pleasing fears,
Sorrow smiling through her tears ;
And, conscious of the past employ,
Memory, bosom-spring of joy,

SONNET

TO A FRIEND, WHO ASKED HOW I FELT WHEN THE NURSE FIRST
PRESENTED MY INFANT TO ME.

Charles ! my slow heart was only sad when first

I scanned that face of feeble infancy ;

For dimly on my thoughtful spirit burst

All I had been, and all my babe might be !

But when I saw it on its mother's arm.

And hanging' at her bosom (she the while

Bent o'er its features with a tearful smile).

Then I was thrilled and melted, and, most warm,

Impressed a father's kiss ; and all beguiled

Of dark remembrance, and presageful fear,

I seemed to see an angel's form appear —

'Twas even thine, beloved woman, mild !

So for the mother's sake the child was dear.

And dearer was the mother for the child.

LINES

TO A BEAUTIFUL SPRING IN A VILLAGE.

Once more, sweet stream ! with slow foot wandering near,
I bless thy milky waters cold and clear.
Escaped the flashing of the noontide hours ;
"With one fresh garland of Pierian flowers

31



MISCELLANEOUS POEMS OF COLERIDGE.

(Ere from thy zephyr-haunted brink I turn)
My lang-uid hand shall wreath thy mossy urn.
For not throug-h pathless srrove, with murmur rude,
Thou soothest the sad wood-nymph, Solitude ;
Nor thine unseen in cavern depths to well,
The Hermit-fountain of some dripping- cell !
Pride of the vale ! thy useful streams supply
The scattered cots and peaceful hamlet nig-h.
The ellin tribe around thy friendly banks
With infant uproar and soul-soothing pranks,
Released from school, their little hearts at rest,
Launch paper navies on thy w^aveless breast.
The rustic here at eve, with pensive look,
AVhistling- lorn ditties, leans upon his crook ;
Or starting", pauses with hope-mingled dread
To list the much-loved maid's accustomed tread :
She, vainly mindful of her dame's command,
Loiters, the long-iilled pitcher in her hand.
Unboastful stream ! thy fount, with pebbled falls
The faded form of past delight recalls,
What time the morning sun of Hope arose,
And all was joy, save when another's woes
A transient gloom upon my soul imprest,
Like passing clouds impictured on thj'- breast.
Life's current then ran sparkling to the noon.
Or silvery stole beneath the pensive moon :
Ah ! now it Avorks rude brakes and thorns among,
Or o'er the rough rock bursts and foams along !










Online LibraryWilliam ChambersChambers's miscellany of useful and entertaining tracts (Volume v.5-6) → online text (page 59 of 59)