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I ff.

Educational values, 225 ff.

Eliot, George, 122.

Emotional transmission, media of,
280 ff.

Emotions, importance of, in ideals,
222 f.

England, education in, 34.

Environment, influence of, 16 ff.,
35 ; and heredity, 35 ff. ; and
school studies, 36 ff.

Ephrussi, p., 175.

Erdmann, B., 268.

Ergograph, as test of fatigue, 341.

Ethical end of education, 40 ff.

Evolution, factors in, 10 ff.; and in-
fancy, 30 ff.; and morality, 59 f.;
of school, 25 ff.

Examinations, 333 ff.

Excursions, school, 249 f.

Experience, definition of, 81 ; con-
densation of, 94, 137.

Explanatory deduction, 160, 308,
312 ff.

Fact, definition of, 166.

Facts, in educative process, 258 f.

False syntax, 126.

Family, as agency of education, 25 ff.

Fatigue, 340 ff.

FisKE, John, 30.

FiTZPATRiCK, F. A., 184.

Flechsig, Paul, 78.

Focalization, conditions of, 96 ff.



Formal education, 25 ff.

Formal steps of instruction, 285 ff.

Formative period of development,
190 ff.; hygiene of, 347 f.

Frequency, as a factor in recall, 169,
171.

Fundamental muscles, in appercep-
tion, 85 f.

Gardens, school, 253.
Generalist, definition of, 167.
Generalization, definition of, 166;

formal step of, 287, 299 ff.; pupil's

right of, 260.
Genesis, of instinct, 5 ff,, 98 ; of

judgment, 133 ff.
Genetic psychology, 79, I34ff., 145,

i84ff.
Geography, 37, 148 f., 176, 227 f.,

230, 231, 232, 246, 249 ff., 276,

294, 306, 307, 308 f., l\i, 11%,

332.
George, H. B., 231.
Germany, education in, 35, 319.
Gore, W. C., 145.
Grammar, iii f., 124, 126, 230, 289,

290, 292, 294, 297 f., 301, 302, 312.
Graphic representation, as medium

of education, 278 ff.; in develop-
ment lesson, 294 ff.
Groos, Karl, 179.
Guess-work, in deduction, 311.
Guilds, as educative agencies, 27.
GuLiCK, iir.

Habit, 115 ff,

Habit -building, 122 ff., 328 ff.; and
imitation, 241.

Habits, breaking up of, 1 24 ff. ;
function of, 121 ff.; generalized,
203 ff. ; hygienic, 346 ff. ; and
ideals, 212 ff. ; marginal, 117 ff. ;
moral, 120 ff.; pedagogy of, 122 ff

Hall, G. S., 187, 190, 193, 194, 195,
196, 197, 199, 245, 268, 270, 322.



354



INDEX



Harmonious development, as end

of education, 50 ff.
Herbart, J. F., 40, 55 ff., 86, 106,

285, 2S6.
Heredity, and environment, 35 f.,

90 f. ; and instinct, 5 ff. ; social,

g{.; theories of, 10 ff.
Hinsdale, B. A., 316, 322.
History, 37, 176, 180, 231, 276 f.
HoBHOUSE, L. T., 70, 9^, 131, 134,

141, 162, 175.
Home, education of, 25 ff.
HOWERTH, I. W., 38.
HuEY, E. B., 268.
Hutchinson, Woods, 126.
Huxley, T. H., 255, 311.
Hygiene, of educative process, 335 ff.
Hygienic habits, 346 ff. ; ideals,

346 ff.
Hylan, J. P., 96.

Idea, and image, 145 f.

Ideals, development of, 218 ff. ; emo-
tional element in, 223 ; in family
life, 219 f.; and habits, 212 f.;
hygienic, 346 ff. ; and judgment,
223; pedagogy of, 223 ff. ; psy-
chology of, 222 f. ; as race charac-
teristics, 219; in school life, 220.

Ideas, focal and marginal, 96 f.

Ideo-motor habits, 118 f.

Image, and idea, 145 f.

Imagery, in condensed experiences,
144 ff. ; in practical judgment,

131 ff.

Images, recall of, i69ff. ; in imita-
tion, 241 ff.

Imitation, and apperception, 243 ff. ;
in education, in, 239 ff. ; and
habit, 241 ff. ; law of, 240.

Incidental learning, I23f.

Indirect method, 256 ff.

Indolence, psychology of, 103 f,
/"induction, I57ff.
\ Inductive development lesson,



284 ff. ; history of, 285 ff. ; limited
field of, 304 ; as an organic unity,
303 ; as a time unity, 299.

Industry, habits of, 120, 2IO,

Infancy, significance of, 29 ff.

Inference, in deductive lesson, 309,
313 ; pupil's right of, 260.

Informal education, 23 ff.

Instinct, genesis of, 5 ff., 98.

Instinctive adjustments, 4ff., 83, 97.

Instincts, collecting, 113, 198; of
curiosity, 112, 166, 198; of day-
dreaming, 245 ; of emulation, 1 13,
198 ; of imitation, in, 198,329 ff.;
of inquisitiveness, 233 f. ; puzzle,
198, 307 ; of property, 198.

Instruction, book, 267 ff. ; and de-
velopment, 256 ff. ; hygiene of,
338 ff. ; media of, 265 ff. ; method
of, 256 ff. ; oral, 267 ff.; 317 ff.

Intelligence, and motor organization,

77-
Interest, 92, 106 ff., 197, 331.

James, W., 67, 81 f., 106, 191.

Japan, education in, 34 f.

Jennings, H. S., 7.

JosT, 178.

Judgment, 115, 128 ff., 212 ff.

Judgments, conceptual, 131, 136 ff.,
188; definition of, 130; in edu-
cative process, 256 ff., 284 ff. ;
formulation of, 299 f. ; hypotheti-
cal, 166; and ideals, 223; im-
personal, 156 ; intuitive, 155 f.;
practical, 131 ff., 188, 241 ff. ; uni-
versal, 166,

Kant, I., 177.
Keller, C, 341, 342.
Kemsies, F., 341.
Kinsesthetic sensations, 67 ff.
King, I., 74, in, 191, 193, 240, 242.
Kline, L. W., in, 192.
Knowledge, as aim of education,



INDEX



355



46 ff.; as race experience, 21; as

result of adjustment, 36 fF.
KUELFE, O., 96.

Laboratory, pedagogy of, 253 f,

Lambrecht, Lilian, 208.

Language, and concept, 140 f.; essen-
tial to educative process, 21 f.; as
medium of instruction, 266 ff.

Language study, 240 f., 245 ff., 267.

Lantern lessons, 246.

Latin, persistence of in schools, 48.

Laurie, S. S., 26, 270.

Law, definition of, 166.

Lay, W. a., 75, 80.

Laziness, psychology of, 103 f.

Lecture method, 270 ff.

Leisure, importance of in infancy, 31.

Leland, Ella P., 309.

Lesson, deductive development,
305 ff.; definition of, 284; induc-
tive development, 284 ff.; recita-
tion, 322ff.; review, 331 ff.; study,
316 ff.; types of, 284.

Lesson unities, 303.

Lighting, of schoolrooms, 339.

LiNDLEY, E. H., 198, 330.

Lipmann, O., 175, 178.

Literature, conventional value of,
231; ideal value of, 224; senti-
mental value of, 236 ff.

Literature, teaching of, 282.

LoBSiEN, M., 175.

Macaulay, T. B., 1 24.
McLennan, S. F., 155, 156.
McMuRRY, C. A., 106, 181, 288, 291,

293. 301-
McMuRRY, F. M., 288, 291, 293, 301.
Manual training, iii, 243, 244.
Margin, of consciousness, 105 f.,

106 («.), 145.
Marking, in recitations, 326.
Marshall, H. R., 106, 129.
Meaning, dependent on use, 67 ; and



conscious margin, 105 f.; theory
of, 66 ff.

Meanings, agreement of in language,
266.

Memoriter methods, 149, 177 ff.

Memory, 169 ff.; experiments on,
1 74 f-

Method, direct vs. indirect, 256 ff.;
Herbart's step of, 286 ; independ-
ent of aim of education, 42 f.

Migration, as factor in evolution, 16.

Models, in literary composition,
245 f.; as media of instruction,
278 ff.

Monograph, definition of, 167.

Monroe, J. P., 258.

Moral education, in transition period,
189 f.; in formative period, 194,

347 f.; in adolescent period, 199 f.,

348 f.

Moral habits, 1 20 ff., 346 ff.

Morality, Aristotle's conception of,
55; as end of education, 55 ff'.;
evolutionary conception of, 57f.;
Herbart's conception of, 57; so-
cial nature of, 58 f.

Mosso, A., 341.

Museums, as educative agencies,
251 f.; school, 252 f.

Nature study, 289 f., 292, 297, 301.
Needs, as determining apperception,

82, 83 ff.
Neo-Darwinism, 10 ff.
Neo-Lamarckism, 10 ff.
Netolitzky, a., 338, 339, 340, 341,

342, 343-
Newsholme, a., 338.

Objective teaching, 247 ff.
Observation, training of, 53 f., 210,

215 f.
Oral instruction, 267 ff.
Oral transmission, in early culture,

28.



356



INDEX



Organization of educative forces,
2 ff., 185 ff.

Organization of experience, 161 ff.;
as affecting recall, 173; in educa-
tion, 173 f., 202, 332, 333.

O'Shea, M. v., 42, 65, 106, 135,
209, 215, 271.

Outlines, topical, 321, 332 f.

Parker, F. W., 181.

Pathology, evidence from, 75.

Pearl, R., 7.

Pentschew, C, 175.

Personal equation, 92,

Pestalozzi, J. F., 35.

Philosophy, definition of, 163 ; in

education, 182 f.; and practice,

163 f.
Pictures, as media of instruction,

278 ff.
Plasticity, of infancy, 30 ff.
Play, psychology of, loi i.
Pleasure, remote vs. immediate, 93,

107.
Powell, J. W., 15.
Practical judgment, 131 ff., 188,

241 ff.
Practice and theory, 162 ff.
Preparation, formal step of, 287,

288 ff.
Presentation, formal step of, 287,

293 ff.
Primacy, as factor in recall, 170.
Primary schools, iiof., 185, 187 ff.
Principle, definition of, 166.
Principles, in deductive lesson, 308,

Puzzle instinct, 198, 307.
Pyramidal tracts, 77.

Question-and-answer method, 270 ff.,

289.
Question - and - answer recitation,

323 ff-
Questioning, art of, 324 ff.



Questions, examination, 334.
Questions, study, 320 f.

Reading, 318 f., 328, 329 f.; hygiene
of, 343 f-

Reasoning, aggregate idea in, 156;
deductive, 157 f.; definition of,
152 f.; in education, 158 f., 161,
189, 193; inductive, 157 f.; logi-
cal, 157; power of, 214 f.

Recall, conditioned by develop-
ment, 201 ff. ; factors of, 169 ff. ;
in development lesson, 296.

Recency, as factor of recall, 169.

Recitation lesson, 322 ff.

Recitation periods, length of, 342 f.

Reflex action, genesis of, 5 ff.; na-
ture of, 4.

Rein, W., 181, 287, 288, 304.

Relation, in practical judgment, 132 ;
in conceptual judgment, 140.

Repetition, as factor of recall, 169,
171, 173, 177, 178 f., 201 f., 296,

333-
Review lesson, 331 ff.
Rhetoric, 124.
Rhythms, of fatigue, 342 ; of growth,

186 ff.
RiBOT, T., 73, 104.
Romanes, G. J., 6.
Ross, Margaret, 208.
Rote learning, 177 f., 316 f.
Rousseau, J. J., 258.
RowE, S. H., 342.
Ruediger, W. C, 187.

Savagery, education in stage of,

25 ff.
School, definition of, 32; divisions

of, 185 f . ; evolution of, 25 ff. ;

function of, 23 ff.
School excursions, 249 ff.; gardens,

253 ; museums, 252.
School hygiene, 335 ff.
Science, definition of, 161; as core



INDEX



357



of concentration, i8i ; as inter-
preting environment, 37.

Science teaching, 215 f., 253 ff., 314.

Seat work, 319 ff.

Secondary education, 49, 195 ff., 224,
229, 348.

Selection, natural, 5 ff., 98.

Self, concept of, 143 f. ; marginal
nature of, 106 («.).

Self-sacrifice, and morality, 60.

Sense training, 52 f.

Sensori-motor habits, 117 f.

Sentiment, definition of, 235.

Sentimental values, 233 ff.

Sex, instincts of, 83 f., 348 f.

Shaw Botanic Gardens, 252.

Shaw, E. R., 338, 339, 340, 343, 344.

Shuyten, M. C, 342.

SlEGERT, 191.

Sikorsky, 341.

Smell, development of, 52 f.

Smith, D. E., 149.

Smith, Theodate L., 245.

Snellen test types, 343 («.).

Social efficiency, as aim of educa-
tion, 58 ff.

Social heredity, 10, 18.

Socratic method, 270 ff.

Source methods, 275 ff.

Spelling, 123 f., 231, 328, 329,
330.

Spencer, H., 12, 34, 255, 262.

Squire, Carrie R., 208.

Stanley, H. M., 146.

Steffens, Lottie, 174,

Stout, G. T., 74, 89, 97, 106, 117,
142, 146.

Strain sensations, 67 ff., 145.

Study lessons, 316 ff.

Study periods, length of, 343.

Sully, J., in.

Swift, E. S., 172.

Syllogism, 159.

Symbolism, 145, 193, 199.

Symonds, J. A., 238.



Synthesis, in conceptual judgment,

140 ; in practical judgment, 132 ;

of sensations, 67 ff .
System, in education, i ff. ; Herbart's

step of, 286 ; in philosophy, 163;

in science, 161 f.
Systematist, definition of, 167.

Talleyrand, 267.

Tarde, G., 126.

Taylor, hi.

Teaching vs. Telling, 260 f , 306 f.

Technical vs. classical education,
221 f.

Technical terms, value of, 300.

Teljatnik, 341, 342.

Temperament, 90 f.

Temperature, of schoolroom, 339.

Text-book, definition of, 167 ; func-
tion of, 263 f. ; in development
lesson, 295 ; in study lesson, 316 ff.

Theory, and practice, 162 ff. ; and
common sense, 162 ; and educa-
tion, 165.

Thompson, Helen B., 130, 154.

Thorndike, E. L., 134, 193, 206,
209.

Titchener, E. B., 91, 96, 97, 117,
118, 135, 146, 153. 157. 224, 235,
344-

Topical recitation, 321 f., 326 f., 332 f.

Transmission, of acquired character-
istics, 10 ff.; social, 10, 18.

Trial and error, method of, 242 f.

Tribe, as agency of education, 26.

Truancy, curve of, 192, 197.

Tylor, E. B., 28.

Unity, of consciousness, 67 ff.

Use, as factor in apperception, 73 ;

in children's definitions, 79 f ;

represented by strain sensations,

76.
Use inheritance, 11.
Utilitarian values, 225 ff.



358



INDEX



Values, educational, 225 ff.
Variation, organic, 13, 15 ; in man,

15 ff.
Ventilation, of schoolroom, 339,
Verbalism, 266 f., 316 ff.
Verification, in deductive lesson, 309,

313-
Vividness, in education, 171, 177,
201 ; as factor of recall, 169, 170 f,

Wagner, L., 341.
Ward, L. F., 164.
Watson, J. B., 7, 31.
Weismann, a., 12.



Wendell, B., 184.

Will, as active attention, lOjf.

Wolff, Fannie E., 79.

Wood, Edith E., 13.

WooDWORTH, R. S., 206.

Words, and concepts, 140 f., 145 ;

recall of, 173.
Work, in education, 108 f. ; and

fatigue, 341 ff. ; psychology of,

loi ff.
Writing, 328, 329; hygiene of, 343 f.

WUNDT, W., 78, 106.
ZiLLER, T., 180, 287,



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