William D Murphy.

Biographical sketches of the state officers and members of the Legislature of the state of New York, in 1858 online

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associates in the present House. He was a thorough-
going, zealous Whig till the organization of the
Republican movement when he at once identified him-
self with that party. He is a member of the Baptist
church; a man of few words, but possesses a large
share of sound, practical common-sense, which
qualifies him well for a representative position. But
few men, indeed, are better qualified to take charge
of the interests of the state than Mr. Lewis.



JARYIS LORD.

Mr. Lord is a native of Ballston, Saratoga county,
N. Y., and was born in 1816. His parents came
18



206 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

from Conn., and his mother is still living. He re-
ceived a common school education, and removed into
Monroe county about twenty years ago. He was
chiefly engaged in farming till about three years
since, since which time he has been an extensive
canal and railway contractor. He never held any
ofiice until his election to the present Assembly; was
the first Democrat ever elected in his district; was
married in 1855 to his present wife, Miss Ezilpha
Tibbitts; attends the Presbyterian church; and is a
substantial legislator.



JAMES H. LYNCH.

Mr. Lynch is a clothing merchant, residing in Suffolk
street, in the city of New York, and was elected to
the seat he now occupies by upwards of two thou-
sand majority. He has always been a Democrat, and
quite an active politician. He is an attentive and
industrious member of the House; a fair speaker;
uses no pearls of poetry or flights of fancy, but deals
altogether in the purest Anglo-Saxon. He is about
thirty years of age.



ANGUS McINTOSH.

Mr. Mcintosh hails from the venerable county of
Schenectady, and is about forty-five years of age. He
is a successful farmer, residing in Duanesburgh, and
is a leading Republican in that town. He is a man



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 207

of considerable ability, and a firmness of purpose that
was probably unsurpassed by " Old Hickory " himself.
He is an industrious and successful law-maker, and is
a far better representative than the people of " Old
Dorp" have had in the legislature for some years.
He is now a widower; a church-going man, and sus-
tains a fair reputation in every relation of life.



WILLIAM J. McK OWN.

Mr. McKown is of Irish, Dutch and French descent,
and was born in 1811, in the city of Albany. His
parents, who are still living, are both natives of Albany
county. He was liberally educated, and in 1844 re-
moved to Oneida county, where he now resides. He
has always been chiefly employed in farming and
droving; never heldany public office until his election
to the present House, and was always a staunch, con-
sistent Whig till the inauguration of the Republican
movement. In 1842 he was married to Miss Lydia
L. Barton, and attends the Presbyterian church. He
is an excellent business man, and wields a large influ-
ence at home and in the discharge of his legislative
duties.



CHARLES McLE AN.

Mr. McLean was born in 1809, in New Hartford,
Oneida county, N. Y. His parents, who are now dead,
were natives of this state, and removed to Coopers-



208 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

town, Otsego county, in 1818. Subsequently they
removed to Cherry Valley, where the subject of this
sketch now resides. Mr. McLean was educated at the
old Cherry Valley Academy; served his time as a
printer with his father, who was then publishing the
Gazette at that place; and in 1830, went to Jamestown,
Chautauque county, where he published a Democratic
paper about a year. Returning to Cherry Valley he
then became sole editor and proprietor of the Gazette,
which he conducted till 1846, when he was elected
County Clerk. At the close of his official term he
again published the Gazette two years, after which he
was Postmaster till 1853, when he was elected to the
Assembly. In 1834 he married Miss Mary Judd, and
attends the Presbyterian church. He has held various
town offices; was Justice of the Peace twelve years;
has always been a strong, influential Democrat, and is
a faithful and intelligent representative.



ANDREW J. McNETT.

Mr. McNett is of Scotch extraction, and was born in
1819, in Henderson, Jefferson co., N. Y. His paternal
grand-father was killed in the Revolution, and his father
who was a captain in the wai' of 1812, was presented
with a sword by Gen. Brown, for his gallantry at Sack-
ett's Harbor. His father is a native of Massachusetts;
his mother of New York, and they are both still
living. Mr. McNett received an academical educa-
tion; was admitted to the bar in 1847; and in '48



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 20&

located in Buffalo, where he is now engaged in the
prosecution of his profession. In 1855 he was elect-
ed Attorney to the corporation of that city, and held
the office till January, 1858. He was married in
1847 to a daughter of Calvin Clark, of Jefferson
county, and usually attends the Presbyterian church.
He is an ardent Democrat, with a strong political
backbone ; and is one of the leaders of that party in
the House. He possesses a strong native vigor of
intellect, and is a successful law-maker.



JOHN MATHER.

Mr. Mather was born in Middlesex, Yates county,
N. Y., where he has always resided, and is about forty
years of age. He is of English and Dutch descent.
His father came from Connecticut, and his mother
from New Jersey. Mr. M. was educated in a common
school; was reared on a farm; has always been a
farmer; and during the last five years has also been
engaged in the mercantile trade. He has filled suc-
cessively nearly all the town offices, and was Chair-
man of the Board of Supervisors in 1852. He was
always a AVhig till that party disbanded, when he
joined the Republicans. He was married in 1842 to
Miss Mary Slayton; is a most uncompromising ad-
vocate of temperance; and belongs to the Congrega-
tional church. He is a valuable man in the commu-
nity where he resides, and was a proper person to
come to the legislature.



210 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

DAVID MILLER.

Mr. Miller hails from a section of country prolific
of great men, having been born in 1824, in Livings-
ton, Columbia county, N. Y. He received a common
school education, and has always been a practical,
thorough-going, and successful farmer. His father,
who died, at the advanced age of seventy-three, was
a farmer before him, and became rich by attending
faithfully to his own business. Mr. Miller has held
the office of Inspector of elections; was elected As-
sessor three times, and in 1857 occupied the post of
Supervisor. He was formerly an Old-Line National
Conservative Whig, and adhered firmly to that party
till it abandoned its organization, when he early
became a warm supporter of the American move-
ment. He was married in 1845 to Miss Eve Dick,
and attends the Dutch Reformed church. He is a man
of worth and influence at home, enjoying a high
degree of personal popularity, and has proven him-
self a sound, safe, practical member of the House.



MAE TIN MILLER.

Gen. Miller was born in 1816, in Greenbush, Rens-
selaer county, N. Y., where he now resides. He is
of Holland descent, and received a limited common
school education, for which he is entirely indebted to
his own exertions. He served an apprenticeship at
the rope making business; worked a number of years



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 211

at the carpenter's trade; and is now engaged in mer-
cantile pursuits. He held various town and village
offices previous to his election to the seat he now
occupies; was twice chosen President of Greenbush;
and is now Chief Engineer of the fire department in
that village. In 1834 he was commissioned by Gov.
Marcy to the office of Lieutenant ; was regularly pro-
moted to all the company and field offices; and in
1842 was elected Brigadier-General of the 8th Bri-
gade, of the militia of Rensselaer county, from which
he was honorably discharged, in 1854, by Gov. Sey-
more. He has always been a Democrat of the Jef-
fersonian and Jackson stamp, and an active and in-
fluential politician. He was married in 1847 to Miss
Mary Ann Van O'Linda, of Albany county, a sister of
the gallant and lamented Capt. Abram Van O'Linda,
who distinguished himself in the Mexican war, and
who fell, mortally wounded, at the storming of Che-
pultepec. He is an energetic and practical man, and
has proven himself a faithful representative.



G. P. MILLS.

Mr. Mills was born, in 1801, in Brookhaven, Suf-
folk county, N. Y. His parents were of English de-
scent; and natives of Long Island. Both his grand-
fathers served in the Revolutionary struggle. Mr.
M. was educated in a common school, and was al-
ways a merchant till about fifteen years ago, when
he turned his attention to farming. He was Post-



212 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

master ten years; a staff officer under Gen. Satterly;
and Supervisor five years. He was married about
twenty-one years ago, to Miss Sarah Hilliock, and at-
tends the Presbyterian church. He is one of the
oldest men in the House, and ranks as high in real
worth as he does in age. If all legislators were like
Mr. Miller, the country would be safe.



EDWARD A. MOOBE.

Mr. Moore is a descendant of good, old Dutch and
English stock, and was born in 1823, in the city of
New York, where he has always resided. All the
schooling he has, was received before he was thirteen
years of age, when he began to work for his father, who
was then a builder, and who is now farming in West-
chester county, continuing with him until in 1854 when
he retired from business, which Mr. M. then took
charge of himself, and is still so engaged. He was
married in 1855, to a daughter of C. Concklin Burtus,
and attends the Dutch Reformed church. He served
upwards of five years in the fire department of New
York, the greater part of which time he was foreman
of a company; has always been a shrewd, active
politician; and an unyielding Democrat of the Na-
tional school. He is one of the most straight-forward,
frank, and independent members in the House, and

*' Keeps his eye ever fixed on the American eagle,
Whom we as the proud bird of our destiny hail,

For that wise fowl, you can never enveigle
By depositing salt on his venerable tail."



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 213

JASON C. OSGOOD.

Mr. Osgood was born in East Nassau, Rensselaer
county, N. Y., in 1804. His father was a native of
Columbia county, and his grand-father came from
Vermont. His paternal grand-father was a Com-
missary in the Revolution, and served during the
war. Mr. Osgood received a limited common school
education; worked at the clothier's trade and the
manufacture of oil till he was sixteen ; and has since
been a manufacturer and contractor, having con-
structed more dredging machines and land excavators
than any other man, perhaps, in the world. In 1834, he
went to Virginia, as a contractor, where he remained
about two years, and then, in 1843, removed to
Troy, where he now resides. He was a member of
the Assembly in 1853, and is the first Democrat ever
elected from the city of Troy to that body. In 1833,
he married Miss Aseneth Mayor, and attends the
Baptist church. He is one of the solid men of the
House.



FLETCHER PALMER.

. Mr. Palmer's parents came from New England to
New York, towards the close of the last century, and
his grand-father was a soldier in the Revolution. His
father is still living, and his mother dead. Mr. P.
received a common school education; was brought up
on a farm; began to study law at the age of twenty-
one ; was admitted to practice in the inferior courts,



214 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

at the age of twenty- four; has been practicing in the
Supreme court some sixteen j^ears; and has been
living in Deposit, Delaware county, N. Y., since 1834.
His present position is the first public office he has
ever held, but he has already proven himself equal to
its responsibilities. He was always a Democrat till
1848, when he supported Van Buren, and is now an
active Republican. He married Miss Nancy Peters,
in 1840, and attends the Presbyterian church, He
was born in Stanfords, Delaware county, N. Y,, and
is forty-seven years of age.



JOHN S. PALMER.

Mr. Palmer is a merchant, residing in Deposit,
Broome county, and is a Republican of the first water.
He is apparently an industrious, upright and faithful
member of the House, and is affable, sociable and
pleasing, both in his disposition and habits. He is
about thirty-five years of age ; is a man of family, and
the author is assured, belongs to some religious de-
nomination. Probably Broome county could not have
sent a more capable man to Albany than Mr. Palmer.



THOMAS PARSONS.

Mr. Parsons is one of the most substantial, Indus*
trious, and correct men in the Assembly. He has
always an eye and an ear open to what is going on in



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 215

the House, and probably would not suffer anything
of a corrupt or dishonorable character to pass through
the ordinary parliamentary routine, under the guise
of some general and inappropriate title, without his
detection. He is a quiet, unassuming man, but has
a strong native vigor of intellect and an iron temper-
ament, and when once thoroughly aroused speaks
fluently and forcibly. He is now a very extensive
lumber dealer in Rochester; is about forty years of
age; is a zealous Democrat; and occupies a high
social and political position in the city in which he
resides.



IRA R. PECK.

Mr. Peck was born in Massachusetts in 1810, and
his parents were both natives of that state. He
came with them to New York in 1818, and settled in
East Bloomfield, Ontario county, where he has always
since been engaged in farming. His education was
all acquired in a common school, and he taught some
years while a young man. He never held any public
oflBce till his election to the present House; was
formerly a Free Soil Whig; now a decided and
influential Republican; was married in 1832, to Miss
Clarissa Ann Hamlin, who died in 1833; and is a
very worthy member of the Methodist church. He
knows how to take care of his own interests and
those of the people of the state.



216 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

ZEPHANIAH C. PLATT.

Mr. Piatt was born in 1805, in Plattsburgh, Clinton
county, N. Y. His grand-father was among the first
settlers in that section of the state. His father, who
is still living, was born in Dutchess county, and his
mother was born on Long Island. His maternal
grand-father, Judge Tredwell, was one of the most
prominent public men of his day, as was also his
paternal grand-father. Mr. P. received an academical
education; passed two years under the charge of his
uncle, President Davis, of Middlebury college; and
has always been a farmer, besides being also within
the past twelve years engaged in the insurance busi-
ness. He has held all the various town offices during
quite a series of years; has always been a National,
Conservative Democrat; a very decided supporter of
the Temperance cause; was married in 1829 to Miss
Anna E. Miller; and belongs to the Presbyterian
church. He is a man of strong mind and good judg-
ment, and is one of the most quiet, steady, indus-
trious, honest, and useful workers in the House,



CYRIL R AWSON.

Mr. Rawson is a native of the old Bay State, and
is fifty- five years of age. He is a mechanic, and
taught school several years. He has been Inspector
of schools, Town Clerk, Supervisor, and Session



BIOGRAnilCAL SKETCHES. 217

Justice where he resides, and was a member of the
Assembly in 1857. He is an ardent temperance man;
attends the Universalist church; and is very faithful
and efficient in the discharge of his official duties.



WM. P. RAYMOND.

Mr. Raymond is a native of Berkshire county,
Mass., and was born in 1814. His grandfather,
Amos Raymond, was a Revolutionary soldier, and
served under Gen. Sullivan. Mr. R. came to New
York in 1817, and settled in Tioga county, where he
now resides. He received a common school edu-
cation, and is noW engaged in the honest occu-
pation of a farmer. In 1845 he was elected a
Justice of the Peace, which office he held four years,
and held various other town and village offices prior
to his election to the seat he now occupies in the As-
sembly. He was always a radical Democrat till
1855, when he abandoned many of his old political
associates, and marshaled himself beneath the Repub-
lican standard, where he has always since remained.
He was married in 1834, to Miss Elizabeth Searle,
and is a member of the Baptist church. He is an
invaluable man at home and abroad; enjoys a high
degree of personal popularity; is a faithful and indus-
trious member of the House; and is doubtless destined
to ascend still higher in the scale of usefulness and

distinction.

19



218 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.



TABOR B. REYNOLDS.

Dr. Reynolds was born in 1821, at Wilton, Sara-
toga county, N. Y., where he now resides. He is
of genuine American descent; received an academi-
cal education; and has always been a successful
practicing physician. He held the office of Town Su-
perintendent of schoolsjrom 1847 till '52; Supervisor
from 1856 until March, '58; and was a Democrat up
to 1855, when he joined the American party, to which
he still firmly adheres. In 1843 he married Miss
Sarah Ann Emerson, and is a church-going man. He
is an industrious member of the House; has rendered
himself popular among his legislative associates by
his kind and courteous manner; has a good head on
his shoulders; and a brave, generous heart in his
bosom.



RALPH RIG HARD S.

Mr. Richards is of English descent, and was born
in 1809, in Weathersfield, Windsor county, Vt. His
father, Eli Richards, died in March, 1858, at an ad-
vanced age. Mr. R. received a common school edu-
cation, and passed some time at the Castleton aca-
demy, in his native state. He was educated for a
teacher, but is now an industrious and successful
farmer. He came to New York in 1813, and settled
in Hampton, Washington county, where he now re-
sides. He held several offices, relative to schools,
before his election to the present legislature, and has



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. .219-

already established a reputation as a safe, practical
representative. He was originally a Whig, and
abandoned that party on account of its pro-slavery
tendency, and has never failed to vote with the friends
of freedom, regardless of party names. He has often
spoken in public, both on the subject of slavery and
intemperance, and has always been very anxious to
suppress the two evils. He was married in 1848 to
his present wife, Miss Mary Richardson, of West
Poultney, Vt., and belonged to the Baptist church,
till he left it in consequence of its- pro-slavery cha-
racter.



ALEXANDER ROBERTSON.

Mr. Robertson was born in 1816, in Warrensburgh,
Warren county, N. Y. His parents came from Scot-
land about the commencement of the present century,
and settled in the above town. Mr. R. was educated
in a common school, and was exclusively a merchant
from the age of twenty-one, until 1846, since which
time he has also been engaged in tanning and lumber-
ing. He held the office of Supervisor before his elec-
tion to the seat he now fills ; was a Democrat till
the organization of the Republican party ; was married
to his present wife. Miss Jane Peck, in 1854, and be-
longs to the Methodist church. He removed to Glens
Falls, where he now resides, about ten years ago,
and is a very prominent and useful man in the com-
munity in which he lives.



220 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.



CHARLES RUSSELL.

Mr. Russell was born in 1809, in Shelbiirn, Chit-
tenden county, Vt., and is of English descent. His
parents were both natives of that state, and at the
age of twenty-two he settled in Bombay, Franklin
county, N. Y., where he is now residing. Mr. R.
received, like the great majority of his legislative
associates, a common school education; at the age of
twenty-one worked out on a farm at stipulated wages;
and has always since been a farmer, besides being,
also, now engaged in the mercantile trade and dealing
in cattle. He filled nearly all the customary town
offices before he became a . member of the present
House; was a Free Soil Whig before his avowal of
Americanism; is an active and influential member of
the American party; was married in 1832 to Miss
Hannah Wright, of Williston, Vt. ; and attends the
Methodist church. He is a very quiet man, averse
to noise and display, and is a valuable member of the
House.



CHAUNCEYS. SAGE.

Mr. Sage was born in 1816, in Verona, Oneida co.,
N. Y. His parents came from Massachusetts about
fifty years ago, .and settled in that county. He received
an academical education, and was exclusively a farmer
till 1849, when he removed to Williamstown, Oswego
CO., where he has since been engaged in the lumbering
and mercantile business. He was Supervisor two



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 221

years before his election to the Assembly; was a
Whig till 1848, when he identified himself with the
Free Democrats; and is now a Republican. He was
married in 1844, to his present wife, Miss Lucy Lee;
attends the Presbyterian church ; and occupies a very
respectable position in the House.



JOHN H. SALISBURY.

Mr. Salisbury was born in Watervliet, Albany co.,
N. Y., in 1807, and is a descendant of Yankee and
Dutch stock. His parents were both natives of this
state, and his father, Henry Salisbury, is still living,
at the ripe, old age of eighty-six. Mr. S. was edu-
cated in common and select schools, and subsequently
studied law with the Hon. John C. Wright, and was
admitted to the bar of the County courts in 1841. In
1848 he was admitted to practice in the Supreme
court, and has always since successfully prosecuted
his profession. He held the office of Superintendent
of schools in 1844 and '45; was Inspector of common
schools a series of years, and has proven himself one
of the most sound, practical common-sense men in
either branch of the legislature. He is a staunch,
national Democrat, as were also all his ancestors, as
far back as the adoption of the Federal constitution;
and was married in 1831 to Miss Margaret Quacken-
bush, who died in 1856. He then in 1857 married
his present lady, Miss Eliza M. Herrick, of Schenec-
tady county; and attends the Lutheran church.



222 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.



JOHN G. SEELEY.

Mr. Seeley is a fine, large, fresh, frank, good-na-
tured looking man, who can be easily distinguished
among the one hundred an^ twenty-seven members
with whom he sits. He is about thirty-three years
of age, and was born in the city of New York, where
he has always resided. He received a limited com-
mon school education, and served his time as a ship-
carpenter. He was a member of the common council
two 3^ears; has always been an unyielding Democrat;
and is a very active politician. He is married, and
attends the Baptist church.



EDWARD W. SENTELL.

Mr. Sentell is a native of Halifax, Nova Scotia, and
was born in 1806. He is of English and Welsh descent.
He emigrated to New York in 1824, and settled in
Ontario county, where he remained till 1835, when he
removed to Sodus, Wayne county, where he now
resides. He received a limited English education,
and served his time as a carpenter and joiner. Since
then he has been an extensive contractor and miller,
and is now devoting much of his attention to farming.
He never held any public position previous to his
election to the present Assembly, save that of Assess-
or, which he filled five years, but is nevertheless
well qualified to discharge properly many of the more
important duties of a representative. He was three



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 223

years Colonel of the 242 Regiment, as the immediate
successor of Senator Williams; was a Whig until the
organization of the Republican party; is a strong
temperance man; was married in 1830 to Miss Debo-
rah Harvey, of New Jersey; and belongs to the
Methodist church.



OSCAR F. SHEPARD.

Mr. Shepard was born in 1813, in Middletown,
Rutland county, Vt., and is of English descent. His
parents were both natives of that state, and his
father is still living, at tlie age of sixty-eight. When
about thirteen years of age, he removed, with his
parents, to the same town in which he now resides,
in St. Lawrence county, N. Y. He received an aca-
demical education, and taught from the age of nine-
teen until 1854, when he turned his exclusive attention
to farming, in which he had been previously partially
engaged. He has held various town offices; has been
six years Magistrate, and still fills the office; was a
Democrat of the Silas Wright stamp till he became
a Republican in 1855; is strongly in favor of a Pro-


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Online LibraryWilliam D MurphyBiographical sketches of the state officers and members of the Legislature of the state of New York, in 1858 → online text (page 13 of 15)