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BY



WILLIAM EDWARD J3UNT

(KEPPEI.L STRANGE)



TORONTO:
WILLIAM BRIGGS

WESLEY BUILDINGS.

C. W. COATES, MONTREAL. S. F. HUESTIS, HALIFAX.
1896.



Entered, according to Act of the Parliament of Canada, in the year one
thousand eight hundred and ninety-six, by WILLIAM BKIGGS, at the
Department of Agriculture.



75?



r



CONTENTS,



POEMS.

PAGH

DOMINION SQUARE 7

IN GOD'S ACRE - ' - . - - ... 9

HUMANITY'S INVITATION - - 10

A MONTREAL ECLOGUE - - - - - 12

THE SEA'S INFLUENCE - 15

His SIN - , . . . . . - : -15

THOUGHT AND SILENCE - - 16

SPRING - - 18

BELLS - - - - - - . - - 21

PESSIMISTIC 22

Now AND THEN 23

FIREMEN - - 24

ALONE ... 25

ABANDONED ... 25

SONG OF AUTUMN - - - 26

SLUMBER SONG - - ' ' - - - - - 28

AN OLD SONG BOOK - 30

A LULLABY 32



002



iv Contents.



PAGE

To THE FIRST BUTTERFLY - 34

A LITTLE BOY AFRAID 35

A SERENADE 37

ONLY A LITTLE WHILE, ONLY ONCE MORE - - 38

YOUR EYES ARE GREY 40

IF ONE MUST WEEP AND ONE FORGET -__ - - 41

FORGOTTEN NEVER ....... 42

To A FAIR MINSTREL 44

FLOWERS 46

LILY, LOVELY LILY - 47

VIOLET - - - .- - - - - - 48

DANDELION * " " - 48

MARGUERITE - - 49

THE WANDERING WIND ... 50

WHERE THAME WINDETH - - 56

ON LIFE'S PATHWAY - 62

THE AVENGEMENT 65

THE CHRISTMAS BELLS OF LONG AGO - - 68

SONNETS.

SONNETS OF MOUNT ROYAL

A NOVEMBER WALK. I. 75

II. 76

IIL 77

IV. 78

THE PASSING OF SUMMER. V. - - 79



Contents.



SONNETS OF MOUNT ROYAL Continued PAGK

THE PASSING OF AUTUMN. VI. .... 80

WINTER THE FIRST SNOW. VII. - - - 81

WORTH - 82

DOOMED 83

GOLDEN-ROD 84

MUTABILITY - ... .... 85

PATHOS 86

CHRYSANTHEMUM 87

THE UNUTTERABLE - 88

MELANCHOLY 89

ROMANCE - ! - ^ - 90

PASTELS AND SKETCHES IN PROSE.

A DAMASK ROSE - - ' 93

FROM NIGHT TILL MORN 101

IN THE LAND OF SHADOWS 110

A GREY DAY LAKE ST. FRANCIS - - - - 121

DOMINION SQUARE 123

MOUNT ROYAL

I. THE PASSING OF AUTUMN .... 126

II. A WINTER SUNSET 130

THE ARROW HEAD 133

AT PHILLIPSBURG

UNDER THE MAPLES JUNE 135

THE THOUSAND ISLANDS 137



POEMS AND PASTELS.



Dominion Square*

When afternoons merge into eves,

And nights glide by in stoles of grey,
The soft lights woo the tremulous leaves
(Streams quaver so in silvery play),
And shade-spun lace adorns the fair
Brocaded vesture of the Square.

No more in sunshine's yellow halls

Is spread the garish feast of light ;
Each blue-domed corridor enthrals,
Ethereal shades of peace invite.

There falls on retrospection's shrine
Libations of life's amber wine.



Dominion Square*



The wind is charmed with lullaby

(In silken shade sweet color dreams),
And now it whispers of the sea,

Of murmurous lakes and purling streams ;
It breathes a sighing sense of balm,
Of southern peace and groves of palm.

Here Music, masked as Laughter, brings

Her tribute to young Liberty ;

Care lieth gyved, nor Sorrow stings,

And Joy remembers he is free ;

While Time reweaves the days of old,
When all the world was blue and gold.



Bcre,



5n Gob's Here,

The rank grass was unshorn,

Dishevell'd, tangled, torn.
The spectral winds mocked loud and low
The mouldering yews o' the long ago ;
(Many the dead lying there below)
They did weirdly whisper and grimly blow.

From out the pictured glass,
(A doomed and routed mass),
Warrior saints from the field they bore,
In mingled wailing, all lost and o'er ;
Music anol color ne'er told before
To mortal such tale never told before.

The moon leaned o'er the tombs,
Shredding the husks of glooms,
Oh, eyes of earth and stars above,
They are forgotten and 'reft of love !
(Oh, the toll of bell and knell of love !)
But who stole their eyes to make stars above ?



fmmanttg'6 invitation.



fbumanitg's Jnvntation.

Follow me, follow me !
Strip from thy spirit the purple of pride,
Love, the white angel, shall walk by thy side ;
While thy brothers and sisters with misery dwell,
Wouldest thy way be my way 'tis through their dark

cell.

Wilt thou come ?

Then, follow me, follow me home !



Follow me, follow me !
Thy vesture is thin, thyself shalt be torn,
Fashion's lewd sneer and the Pharisee's scorn
Shall assail thee, nor plunder await thee for dole,
Thou shalt only be righteous, with peace in thy soul.

Wilt thou come ?
Then, follow me, follow me home !



1bumamt r Invitation.



Follow me, follow me !
Out in the night to encampments of pain,
Out in the night to the shelters of bane,
Where the moments are ashes and dust are the years,
And the well of life's water is bitter with tears.

Wilt thou come ?
Then, follow me, follow me home !



12 a Montreal



H /Montreal Eclogue.

Herbert:

I hate these dusty, noisy streets,
The garish lights, the sweltering heats,
The thousand fusty, musty smells,
The coal cart's fiendish din, the yells
From each persistent hawker's throat.
Oh, give to me the wild bird's note,
The wind's sweet sighing in the trees,
The scent of flowers, the sough of seas.

Albert:

I dreamt last night that far away
On marge of silver lake I lay ;
Lush melilet composed my bed,
A maple waved above my head,
The resinous perfume of pine
Scented the air, the dappled kine



/llbontreal jEclogue, 13



Prowled through the meadows lazily,
A tawny thrush sang on a tree,
Its sweet notes floated from a dell :
"Vehu," "v'rehu" and "villillel"
Upon the waters, crystal clear,
A dark eyed maid her bark did steer,
(Its white sail like a bird in quest) ;
I watched her glide into the West,
Where the grey waters meet the sky
That way the jewelled islands lie.
Yet in mine ears I hear the breeze,
So soft and low it woos the trees ;
The water like a mirror lies,
Stealing the clouds from out the skies.
The dream has passed, it went too soon
Even as I saw the rising moon,
A blue jay into laughter broke,
I rubbed my eyes and I awoke !

Walter:

Your dream brings other days to me,
In my old home across the sea,
A lark is singing in the blue,
The waving grass is wet with dew,



14 B Montreal



And in the woven grass is made

A pattern rare, like rich brocade,

Of buttercups and daisies pied.

A trout stream through the fields doth glide,-

It skirts Squire Jones's ivied wall,

Past spreading oaks, elms stout and tall,

And hawthorn hedges, snowy white,

Whose perfume gives the land delight

And charms the finch and thrush to song

But this I may too much prolong !

Herbert:

Not so ! All pleasant are such themes,
Sweet in the living, fair in dreams.
I am refreshed, nor more cast down,
You've brought the country to the town :
The streets are fields, the houses lanes,
Lakes linger in the window panes,
Those poles outside are surely trees,
Those wires are humming just like bees,
Those sparrows like to thrushes sing,
Oh, fancy is a pleasant thing,
And work is but a pretty play
Tell me some more another day !



Sea's Influence, 15



ITbe Sea's Snfluence*

The brine is in our blood from days of yore,
And ever in our ears the tide's-tune rings,
The wave runs through our legends and our lore,
And permeates a thousand diverse things ;
The mem'ry of our race's island home
Is charged with salt-sea spray and ocean foam.



HMs Sin.

He buried it in the fruitful land,
The flow'rs refused to grow ;

He buried it in the desert sand,
And all around was woe.

He cast it into the lonely sea,

Afar from mortal ken ;
'Twas borne by the tide, despite his plea,

Back to the haunts of men.



1 6 Gbou0bt anfc Silence



ZLbougbt an& Silence*

Imperial Thought queen Silence wooed,

The scene a garden fair,
The incense of adoring flow'rs

Perfumed the charmed air ;
The Lily and the ruby Rose

Had built an altar there.

Her rich simar of woven gold.

Like alabaster white
Her form. From out her wondrous face

Shone two such orbs of light
As grace the starry firmament

On some rare northern night.

His robes they were of royal hue ;

His brow deep, arched and high.
With sweet content he gazed long

Upon her symmetry.
Her regal couch of violets

The azure of the sky.



and Silence. 17



It was her kingdom and she reigned.

The satellites of Sound
She bade to drain the Poppy's cup

(Nepenthe far renowned),
And drunken with the scarlet wine

They lay fast gagged and bound.

She led him over flow'r-strewn rocks
To Wisdom's lordly cave,

Whose dais is a diamond,

Begemmed each aisle and nave.

And jewels priceless unto Thought
The willing hermit gave.

She wove them into patterns rare

Of color and of line ;
An aureole they were to him

His subjects for a sign
To evermore her grace revere

And worship at her shrine.



18 Spring.



Spring,

The trees are bare upon the hill ;

In many an unfrequented way
The scrambled snow is lying still ;

Yet saw I Spring's fair face to-day.

I saw her where the blood-root grows ;

Each dainty bud she stooped to kiss,
Till white and wondering blossoms rose

To dole of purity and bliss.

The willow wands she gaily waved,
And shyly many a flower peeped out ;

Her feet the rimpling streamlet laved,
Then, laughing, leapt a boulder stout.



Spring. 19



I saw, where'er she sauntered by,

The emerald fronds of ferns unrolled j

Her fairy-fingers touch the sky,
And azure palaces unfold.

'Neath last year's leaves, through all the woods
Did throb the pulse of lowly things ;

Love came, bedecked with tender moods,
And thrilled to song the world of wings :

They sang, those birds, for very joy,
They sang a song of love and gain,

Of happiness without alloy,

Of an old world made young again.

And backward through the years I ran

To find the boy I lost one day,
So anxious then to be a man,

So eager some grave part to play.

I found him not, but, in the quest,

I many a burden flung aside,
Of Shibboleth, too long a guest,

Of doubt and of despairful pride.



20 Spring.



And as the purple buds expand,
As violet, pink and white unfold,

And, flowering so, bedeck the land,
When leaves of liverwort are old :

So, by my sere and fading leaf,

New hopes had birth and purpose high ;
Life's new-born joy assuaged old grief,

And promise filled the azure sky.



21



Fling to the winds the message old
Of joy and peace, ye bells, adown

The mountain pathway, o'er the wold,

Through village sparse and crowded town.

Bid the wide universe rejoice

That ill and error pass away,
Peal out with one triumphant voice

That love shall reign and hate decay.

Proclaim through all the world again

That charity is only good,
That peace is blest and strife is vain,

And man a mighty brotherhood.



22



pessimistic.

We are but phantoms in a shifting scene ;

We act a part, and vanish in a breath ;
We shatter ev'ry hope on which we lean ;

And rest find only in mysterious death.

We are as spectres of the gloaming time,
Born after sun and dying with the moon ;

We rend the chords of passion like the mime,
And vanish from the memory as soon.

We pause awhile to dream of pleasant days,
And gild the present with a future bright

Vain hope, fate leads us onward to a maze,

Amid whose 'wild'ring paths dwells endless night.



IRow anfc Gben. 23



Wow anfc Uben.

Like to a plant upon a lone hillside

That grows and questions not and sinks to rest,

The while the summer glides into the West,
Makes richer mould where it has lived and died ;
A fuller soil for after leaf and flower,

For fairer blossom and for leaf more green,
More perfect form, more perfume and more power

The living legacy of what has been :

So, if our toil and time be spent aright,

In upward growth, in our brief season's sun,
When we shall droop and wane, our life's sand run,

And deep oblivion lead us into night,

While all unknown we lie beneath the mould
A giant race shall walk a greener sod,

A people better for the ones of old,
Sweeter in life, and nearer unto God.



24 jftremen.



jffremen.

Citizen soldiers who battle with flame,
Dwellers in peace in the midst of alarms,

Types of Crusaders and peers of the same,
Rescuers manful and quellers of harms.

Fighters of fire with the axe and the hose,
Chivalrous, daring, swift-footed and sure,

Scorning inglorious, ignoble repose,
First to encounter and first to endure.

Modest as valiant, and simple as brave,
Steady and cool in the midst of surprise ;

Life but a part in the glory to save ;

Duty the watchword, and honor the prize.

Tried in the furnace and proven of gold ;

Fearless as eagle and gentle as dove ;
Held in all hearts as the heroes of old

As near in esteem, and nearer in love.



Blone. 25



Hlone.

Thy pure spirit has fled

Away
From a world full of sorrow ;

To-day,

My sad heart is led
By the fear and the dread

Of to-morrow.



Bban&oneO.

There was a lonely spot in that wild wood,
So lonely, in that place where all was lone,

The very trees would start in frightened mood,
And cling in close embrace while making moan.



26 Song of Butumn.



ot Butumn.



Come troll with me a merry lay,

And fill your bowl with right good wine,

I am old Autumn, always gay,
And rosy-cheeked, and bright of eyne.

Here's health to that young urchin, Spring,
My sister, flowery Summer, too ;

Of all good fellows I am King
So here's a health to me and you !

A vagabond's a lazy elf,

And groweth fat that's understood
By whining for another's pelf ;

But I grow fat because I'm good !

I wave o'er all the lowly sod

See how the royal banner gleams !

Illimitable golden-rod ;

I gild the rushes by the streams.



Song of Butumn. 27

I tint the leaves with Tyrian dyes ;

I ripen all the golden grain ;
I do it with my merry eyes,

All for your pleasure that's my gain.

I wink : the berries scarlet go

And purple they are full of fun !
The lush grape's jovial juices flow,

Nuts swell and fatten, every one.

The apples' cheeks grow pink with glee,
The red plums split their sides and fall,

And ('tis a glorious sight to see)
The peaches twinkle on a wall !

I know when brother Winter starts

He'll stop my pranks, but never fear!

Bid all good folk keep merry hearts
I'll be as blithe, I trow, next year.

So troll with me a merry lay,

And drain a bowl of right good wine,

I'm gossip Autumn, always gay,

With ruddy cheeks and bright of eyr.e.



28 Slumber Song.



Slumber Song.

Sleep and rest, for it is best,

Slumber sweetly soon ;
Fold thy tire"d eyes and rest ;

Silver dreams shall to thee croon,

Sweet the time and soft the tune,
In thy nest ;

Fold thine eyes, and thine the boon.

Now the busy hours are gone,

With the work and play ;
Jewelled stars look down alone ;

Through the sleep-time pass away

Owl and bat and shape of grey ;
Sleep, mine own !

Till the blue and golden day.



Slumber Song. 29



Night will close her raven wings

With the dusky hours ;
Sweet the early carollings

By the brook and through the bowers ;

Grateful are the morning showers ;

Slumber sings :
" Morn shall wake thee with the flowers."



3 &n U> Song



Bn tt> Sons Booh.

Pages closed this many a year
(Lying in this ancient room),

Lines so faint and leaves so sere :
Letters on a mouldering tomb.

Rose within its pages pressed
(Powders in my vandal hand),

Once was lovely, was caressed,
Treasured, in a vain strange land.

In the lavender of time,
All it was of poignant vow.

Various melody and rhyme,
They are but as mummies now.



Bn ID Song JBoofc. 3 1

(Stars that sing eternally

Surely faint as they grow old ;
Luna's white-harp melody

Ever groweth languorous, cold.)

Nay, but they are less than those :

Ripples on a fossil shore,
Press of lily, cast of rose,

Footprints on abandoned moor.

Matrices of tune and life :

Where the folly, guilt and pain,
Love and hope, and grief and strife ?

Fugitive as April rain !

Thus the various waves do pass
(Sounding on the shores of time),

Fleet as ripples in the grass,
Fleet as mimicry and mime !



3 2 B



H XuIIabi?.

Now the woolly lambs are sleeping,

Safely gathered in the fold ;
O'er the world the dark is creeping ;
From the skies the stars are peeping,
Silver stars and stars of gold ;

Night falls on the land and sea,
While thy mother sings to thee.

All the pretty flow'rs are dreaming,

Where the winds, melodious, croon ;
O'er the waters, softly gleaming,
Rimpled waters, purling, gleaming
Sweetly smiles the pleasant moon ;
Little bird sleeps in its nest,
Sleep, mine own, on mother's breast !



OLullabg. 33



Sleep, my darling, till the morning
Drives the hours of dark away ;
Till the sun, the world adorning,
Opes the flowers with the morning,
And the birds rejoice with day ;

Sleep, mine own, till morning's light,
Angels guard thee through the night !



34 o tbe ffirst JButterflg.



tbe jfirst



So blithe and brave !

You quite forgot the earth was bare-
Indeed, you cared for nothing, save
That skies were blue
Enough for you
The world was fair !

You fragile fly !

I'd laugh at your temerity,
Only so much I would that I
(Of envious kind)
Could match my mind
To trust like thee !



Xittle JB02 Bfraifc. 35



H OLittle Bos Bfratfc*

As I walked up the hill, last night,

As I went up the hill,
Tall trees arose to left and right,
The trees were dark, the moon was white,

And all the world was still.

As I walked up the hill, last night,

As up the hill I went,
Each tree (I closed my eyes in dread)
A giant was, with shaggy head,

Its hands so big and bent !

As I walked up the hill, last night
(Because I had to go),



36 B Xittle



Of course, I knew the trees were trees,
Not ghosts, and yet, I seemed to freeze,
And oh, I trembled so !

As I ran down the hill, last night,

As down the hill I ran,
I brushed away my foolish tears,
And laughed at all my childish fears

As brave as any man !



21 Serenade. 37



H Serenade.

Over the water's rim

Sinketh the sun away ;
Night, dusky Seraphim,

Hideth the garish day.
List to the lute and song

Under thy lattice, greeting :
" Life is brief, love is long,

Bliss all too rare and fleeting."

Stars in the azure sky,

Cloudlets that float afar,
Soft winds, that pause and sigh,

Fragrance of June's simar,
All the night's melody,

Crescent moon, lone sea and shore,
Crave precious glimpse of thee,

Sweet Sovereign Queen Lenore !



3 8 nig a Xittle TKHblle, nig nee



a OLittle Mbile, Qnly
nee flfeore.



If I could see thee once again,

A little while, once more,
Thy tender heart I might regain

And my lost peace restore ;
You would forget the scorn you felt

So penitent I'd be
You would forgive, while low I knelt,

If I might only see

Thy dear eyes shine on me,
Only a little while,
Only once more.

If I should see thee once again,
And find thee strange and cold,



nig a Xittle labile, nig nee dfcore. 39

And ever dead ah, bitter pain !
The bright, sweet love of old j
Yea, even while I felt your scorn

(All bitter though it be)
And my sad heart with grief were torn,
I'd choose such misery,
If I thy face could see
Only a little while,
Only once more.



40 i^our Bges are <3reg.



]i)our JEses are

Your eyes are cold in the misty light,

Your eyes are grey and your voice is strange,

Your voice was sweet and your blue eyes bright,
But faith departeth and all things change.

Ah, no, not thus will I let you go,
Not thus may we part and, well-a-day,

Shall an idle word, tossed to and fro
By wicked lips, change yea unto nay ?

You looked at me with your cold, grey eyes,
You passed, and never a word said you,

With the calumny and the poisoned lies
You questioned not that the tales were true.

No more shall sland'rous tongues bewray

The faith and trust which are love's strong right-

Ah, now your eyes are no longer grey,

Your voice is sweet and your blue eyes bright.



ne /ifcust Meep an& ne ffowt. 41



ne flftust Weep anfc ne fforget,

Two meet, life's lonely path along,
Two part, and meet again no more ;

Yet, when they vanish in the throng,
Perchance, one heart may nevermore
Regain the peace it knew before :

If one must weep and one forget,

'Twere better far they had not met.

The careless hour, so quickly flown,
One never shall recall again ;

Each hapless moment, dearer grown,
The one, with never-dying pain,
Must mourn ; and peace no more regain :

Since one must weep and one forget,

'Twere better far they had not met.



42 ^forgotten Bever.



^forgotten 1ftev>er.

Sheen flax of hair, an oval face,

Blue eyes, a sweet and child-like way
Not much to lose, my friend, you say,

Though youth must have its time and place.

Not much to lose, ah, no a thought

Of pity for the time so fled,

A wish, perchance, that one were dead ;
Yet are you right perhaps, 'twas nought.

The roses now that deck the way

Are fair as those that bloomed last year,
Their ending full as soon and drear

Why mourn the flow'rs of yesterday ?



fforgotten 1Re\>er 43

When the acute vibrations cease
Not lightly touched by grief to ring ;
Nor resurrect a buried thing

The future pleasant days of peace . . .

Ah when your platitudes are past
If e'er those days shall dawn for me,
Should I forget, nor cease to be,

May all my hopes be overcast.



44 Go a ffafr Minstrel.



Uo a tfaii; Ainstrel.

Enchantress, sweep the golden chords,
And cheer my heart with noble words ;

A tilting tourney lay
Of mailed knights and prancing steeds ;
Recount my country's gallant deeds.

Enchantress, touch the silvern strings
Which rustle like an angePs wings

And bear my soul away
To hills and vales where reigns Delight ;
Sing me a joyous song to-night.

Enchantress, let thy sweetest note
Of harp and voice unite and float
In one resplendent stream,



Go a tfair /nMnstrel. 45

Weave into its melodious flow

The maid I love and fain would know.

Enchantress, lean thee to thy lyre,
Evolve from out the resonant wire

Soft themes for rest and dream,
That thy rich fancies I may keep
To soothe me in the realms of sleep.



46 fflowers.



jflowers.

Fairest of all earth's beauties
Are the flowers

The scented, tinted flowers.

Fairest of all earth's flowers
Are the roses

The regal, radiant roses.

Fairest of all earth's roses
Are the maidens

The dainty, queenly maidens.



Tilly, love IE Xtt. 47



Fairest flower that blooms in garden, thou ;
Sweeter than the snowy hawthorn bough
Of tender Spring, with perfume overladen,
Or lush moss-rose. Pure art thou as a maiden
Just budding into womanhood :
As fragile, fair, as sweet and good.
The soft winds woo thee ev'ry day
And bear thy perfume far away ;
Amidst the fragrance of thy flowers
Glad bees hum in the golden hours.
Stately and majestically fair,
Emblem of a combination rare,
Of majesty and meekness
And overpowering sweetness ;
Pride and purity
Abide with thee,
Lily, lovely lily !



48 Wotet.



IDiolet.

Earthward thy gracious head is bent,
In mood half shy and wholly meek.

Thy robes are woven azure bright ;
In thy breast is hidden a star.



Banfcelion.

The rays of glory from thy golden heart

Crown the mean comrades of thy place and birth ;

True worth is ever humble though its part
An aureole of honor to the earth.



/IRarguerite. 49



In her garments white and golden,
With the graceful columbine,

By the woodland pathway holden
Is my daisy, mine ;

Or, in fragrant meadows growing,
All amongst the dappled kine,

Gentle zephyrs there a-blowing
My dear daisy, mine ;

There the woven, waving grasses,
Buttercups that brightly shine,

Insects gay and lads and lasses,
And my daisy, mine.

Songs of old are sweet with moly,

Amaranth and lotus fine,
But more fair, more sweet, more holy,

Is my daisy, mine.
4



50 abe 'QHlanOertnG TOnfc.



Ube



No man knoweth
Whence it cometh^
Whither it goeth.

What though I question thee,

Thou wandering wind, these things to know ?

In the rose-garden of the long ago,
When thou wast gentle with thy love, the sea,
And stooped to kiss the daisy on the lea,

Thy voice was sweet and low.

Then, 'neath an old oak's shade,

Glad time, when all the hours were mine,
Life with the burnished buttercup did shine,.



Wandering TOnfc. 51



So sweet the sound thy passing made,
So lightly thou didst trip adown the glade ;
No music like to thine.

I was so near thee, then,

Could from the past those dreams recall,
Each little dream and my fond hopes of all ;
This broken reed may serve for pen :
"The petals fall, so fall the hopes of men ! "
And laugh at that I scrawl.

As children scatter sand,

So stood I on the shores of time

Whirling the golden grains was it a crime ?

The world lay in my hollow hand ;

It was not then to me a strange vain land,


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