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242, and succeeding chapters.]

[Footnote 53: In the colorless and unsentimental language of government
publications, the Japanese edict of emancipation, issued to the local
authorities in October, 1871, ran as follows: "The designations of eta
and hinin are abolished. Those who bore them are to be added to the
general registers of the population and their social position and
methods of gaining a livelihood are to be identical with the rest of the
people. As they have been entitled to immunity from the land tax and
other burdens of immemorial custom, you will inquire how this may be
reformed and report to the Board of Finance." (Signed) Council of
State.]

[Footnote 54: In English fiction, see The Eta Maiden and the Hatamoto,
in Mitford's Tales of Old Japan, Vol. I., pp. 210-245. Discussions as to
the origin of the Eta are to be found in Adams's History of Japan, Vol.
I, p. 77; M.E., index; T.J., p. 147; S. and H., p. 36; Honda the
Samurai, pp. 246, 247; Mitford's Tales of Old Japan, Vol. I., pp.
210-245. The literature concerning the Ainos is already voluminous. See
Chamberlain's Aino Studies, with bibliography; and Rev. John Batchelor's
Ainu Grammar, published by The Imperial University of T[=o]ki[=o];
T.A.S.J., Vols. X., XL, XVI., XVIII., XX.; The Ainu of Japan, New York,
1892, by J. Batchelor (who has also translated the Book of Common
Prayer, and portions of the Bible into the Ainu tongue); M. E., Chap.
II.; T.A.S.J., Vol. X., and following volumes; Unbeaten Tracks in Japan,
Vol. II.; Life with Trans-Siberian Savages, London, 1895.]

[Footnote 55: "Then the venerable S[=a]riputra said to that daughter of
Sagara, the N[=a]ga-king: 'Thou hast conceived the idea of
enlightenment, young lady of good family, without sliding back, and art
gifted with immense wisdom, but supreme, perfect enlightenment is not
easily won. It may happen, sister, that a woman displays an unflagging
energy, performs good works for many thousands of Aeons, and fulfils the
six perfect virtues (P[=a]ramit[=a]s), but as yet there is no example of
her having reached Buddhaship, and that because a woman cannot occupy
the five ranks, viz., 1, the rank of Brahma; 2, the rank of Indra; 3,
the rank of a chief guardian of the four quarters; 4, the rank of
Kakravartin; 5, the rank of a Bodhisattva incapable of sliding back,"
Saddharma Pundarika, Kern's Translation, p. 252.]

[Footnote 56: Chi[=u]-j[=o]-himé was the first Japanese nun, and the
only woman who is commemorated by an idol. "She extracted the fibres of
the lotus root, and wove them with silk to make tapestry for altars."
Fuso Mimi Bukuro, p. 128. Her romantic and marvellous story is given in
S. and H., p. 397. "The practice of giving ranks to women was commenced
by Jito Tenn[=o] (an empress, 690-705)." Many women shaved their heads
and became nuns "on becoming widows, as well as on being forsaken by, or
after leaving their husbands. Others were orphans." One of the most
famous nuns (on account of her rank) was the Nii no Ama, widow of
Kiyomori and grandmother of the Emperor Antoku, who were both drowned
near Shimono-séki, in the great naval battle of 1185 A.D. Adams's
History of Japan, Vol. I., p. 37; M.E., p. 137.]

[Footnote 57: M.E., p. 213; Japanese Women, World's Columbian
Exhibition, Chicago, 1893, Chap. III.]

[Footnote 58: There is no passage in the original Greek texts, or in the
Revised Version of the New Testament which ascribes wings to the
_aggelos_, or angel. In Rev. xii. 14, a woman is "given two wings of a
great eagle."]

[Footnote 59: Japanese Women in Politics, Chap. I., Japanese Women,
Chicago, 1893; Japanese Girls and Women, Chapters VI. and VII.]

[Footnote 60: Bakin's novels are dominated by this idea, while also
preaching in fiction strict Confucianism. See A Captive of Love, by
Edward Greey.]

[Footnote 61: "Fate is one of the great words of the East. _Japan's
language is loaded and overloaded with it._ Parents are forever saying
before their children, 'There's no help for it.' I once remarked to a
school-teacher, 'Of course you love to teach children.' His quick reply
was, 'Of course I don't. I do it merely because there is no help for
it.' Moralists here deplore the prosperity of the houses of ill-fame and
then add with a sigh, 'There's no help for it.' All society reverberates
with this phrase with reference to questions that need the application
of moral power, will power." - J.H. De Forest.

"I do not say there is no will power in the East, for there is. Nor do I
say there is no weak yielding to fate in lands that have the doctrine of
the Creator, for there is. But, putting the East and West side by side,
one need not hesitate to affirm that the reason the will power of the
East is weak cannot be fully explained by any mere doctrine of
environment, but must also have some vital connection with the fact that
the idea of a personal almighty Creator has for long ages been wanting.
And one reason why western nations have an aggressive character that
ventures bold things and tends to defy difficulties cannot be wholly
laid to environment but must have something to do with the fact that
leads millions daily reverently to say 'I believe in the Almighty
Father, Maker of Heaven and Earth.'" - J.H. De Forest.]


STATISTICS OF BUDDHISM IN JAPAN.


(From The official "Résumé Statistique de l'Empire du Japon,"
T[=o]ki[=o], 1894.)

In 1891 there were 71,859 temples within city or town limits, and 35,959
in the rural districts, or 117,718 in all, under the charges of 51,791
principal priests and 720 principal priestesses, or 52,511 in all.

The number of temples, classified by sects, were as follows: Tendai,
with 3 sub-sects, 4,808; Shingon, with 2 sub-sects, 12,821, of which 45
belonged to the Hoss[=o] shu; J[=o]-do, with 2 sub-sects, 8,323, of
which 21 were of the Ké-gon shu; Zen, with 3 sub-sects, 20,882, of which
6,146 were of the Rin-Zai shu; 14,072 of the S[=o]-d[=o] shu, and 604 of
the O-bakushu; Shin, with 10 sub-sects, 19,146; Nichiren, with 7
sub-sects, 5,066; Ji shu, 515; Yu-dz[=u]; Nembutsu, 358; total, 38 sects
and 71,859 temples.

The official reports required by the government from the various sects,
show that there are 38 administrative heads of sects; 52,638
priest-preachers and 44,123 ordinary priests or monks; and 8,668 male
and 328 female, or a total of 8,996, students for the grade of monk or
nun. In comparison with 1886, the number of priest-preachers was 39,261,
ordinary priests 38,189: male students, 21,966; female students, 642.


CHAPTER XI

ROMAN CHRISTIANITY IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY.


[Footnote 1: See for a fine example of this, Mr. C. Meriwether's Life of
Daté Masamuné, T.A.S.J., Vol. XXI., pp. 3-106. See also The Christianity
of Early Japan, by Koji Inaba, in The Japan Evangelist, Yokohama,
1893-94; Mr. E. Satow's papers in T.A.S.J.]

[Footnote 2: See M.E., p. 280; Rein's Japan, p. 312; Shigétaka Shiga's
History of Nations, p. 139, quoting from M.E. (p. 258).]

[Footnote 3: M.E., 195.]

[Footnote 4: The Japan Mail of April and May, 1894, contains a
translation from the Japanese, with but little new matter, however, of a
work entitled Paul Anjiro.]

[Footnote 5: The "Firando" of the old books. See Cock's Diary. It is
difficult at first to recognize the Japanese originals of some of the
names which figure in the writings of Charlevoix, Léon Pagés, and the
European missionaries, owing to their use of local pronunciation, and
their spelling, which seems peculiar. One of the brilliant
identifications of Mr. Ernest Satow, now H.B.M. Minister at Tangier, is
that of Kuroda in the "Kondera"' of the Jesuits.]

[Footnote 6: See Mr. E.M. Matow's Vicissitudes of the Church at
Yamaguchi. T.A.S.J., Vol. VII., pp. 131-156.]

[Footnote 7: Nobunaga was Nai Dai Jin, Inner (Junior) Prime Minister,
one in the triple premiership, peculiar to Korea and Old Japan, but was
never Sh[=o]gun, as some foreign writers have supposed.]

[Footnote 8: See The Jesuit Mission Press in Japan, by E. Satow,
1591-1610 (privately printed, London, 1888). Review of the same by B.H.
Chamberlain, T.A.S.J., Vol. XVII., p. 91.]

[Footnote 9: Histoire de l'Église, Vol. I, p. 490; Rein, p. 277.
Takayama is spoken of in the Jesuit Records as Jûsto Ucondono. A curious
book entitled Justo Ucondono, Prince of Japan, in which the writer, who
is "less attentive to points of style than to matters of faith," labors
to show that "the Bible alone" is "found wanting," and only the
"Teaching Church" is worthy of trust, was published in Baltimore, in
1854.]

[Footnote 10: How Hidéyoshi made use of the Shin sect of Buddhists to
betray the Satsuma clansmen is graphically told in Mr. J.H. Gubbin's
paper, Hidéyoshi and the Satsuma Clan, T.A.S.J., Vol. VIII, pp. 124-128,
143.]

[Footnote 11: Corea the Hermit Nation, Chaps. XII.-XXI., pp. 121-123;
Mr. W.G. Aston's Hidéyoshi's Invasion of Korea, T.A.S.J., Vol. VI., p.
227; IX, pp. 87, 213; XI., p. 117; Rev. G.H. Jones's The Japanese
Invasion, The Korean Repository, Seoul, 1892.]

[Footnote 12: Brave Little Holland and What She Taught Us, Boston, 1893,
p. 247.]

[Footnote 13: See picture and description of this temple - "fairly
typical of Japanese Buddhist architecture," Chamberlain's Handbook for
Japan, p. 26; G.A. Cobbold's, Religion in Japan, London, 1894, p. 72.]

[Footnote 14: T.A.S.J., see Vol. VI., pp. 46, 51, for the text of the
edicts.]

[Footnote 15: M.E., p. 262, Chamberlain's Handbook for Japan, p. 59.]

[Footnote 16: The Origin of Spanish and Portuguese Rivalry in Japan, by
E.M. Satow, T.A.S.J., Vol. XVIII., p. 133.]

[Footnote 17: See Chapter VIII., W.G. Dixon's Gleanings from Japan.]

[Footnote 18: T.A.S.J., Vol. VI., pp. 48-50.]

[Footnote 19: In the inscription upon the great bell, at the temple
containing the image of Dai Buts[)u] or Great Buddha, reared by Hidéyori
and his mother, one sentence contained the phrase _Kokka anko, ka_ and
_Lo_ being Chinese for _Iyé_ and _yas[(u]_, which the Yedo ruler
professed to believe mockery. In another sentence, "On the East it
welcomes the bright moon, and on the West bids farewell to the setting
sun," Iyéyas[)u] discovered treason. He considered himself the rising
sun, and Hidéyori the setting moon. - Chamberlain's Hand-book for Japan,
p. 300.]

[Footnote 20: I have found the Astor Library in New York especially rich
in works of this sort.]

[Footnote 21: Nitobé's United States and Japan, p. 13, note.]

[Footnote 22: This insurrection has received literary treatment at the
hands of the Japanese in Shimabara, translated in The Far East for 1872;
Woolley's Historical Notes on Nagasaki, T.A.S.J., Vol. IX., p. 125;
Koeckebakker and the Arima Rebellion, by Dr. A.J.C. Geerts, T.A.S.J.,
Vol. XI., 51; Inscriptions on Shimabara and Amakusa, by Henry Stout,
T.A.S.J., Vol. VII, p. 185.]

[Footnote 23: "Persecution extirpated Christianity from Japan." - History
of Rationalism, Vol. II, p. 15.]

[Footnote 24: T.A.S.J., Vol. VI., Part I., p. 62; M.E. pp. 531, 573.]

[Footnote 25: Political, despite the attempt of many earnest members of
the order to check this tendency to intermeddle in politics; see Dr.
Murray's Japan, p. 245, note, 246.]

[Footnote 26: See abundant illustration in Léon Pagés' Histoire de la
Religion Chrétienne en Japon, a book which the author read while in
Japan amid the scenes described.]

[Footnote 27: _The Japan Evangelist_, Vol. I., No. 2, p. 96.]


CHAPTER XII

TWO CENTURIES OF SILENCE


[Footnote 1: See Diary of Richard Cocks, and Introduction by R.M.
Thompson, Hakluyt Publications, 1883.]

[Footnote 2: For the extent of Japanese influence abroad, see M.E., p.
246; Rein, Nitobe, and Hildreth; Modern Japanese Adventurers, T.A.S.J.,
Vol. VII., p. 191; The Intercourse between Japan and Siam in the
Seventeenth Century, by E.M. Satow, T.A.S.J., Vol. XIII., p. 139; Voyage
of the Dutch Ship Grol, T.A.S.J., Vol. XI., p. 180.]

[Footnote 3: The United States and Japan, p. 16.]

[Footnote 4: See Professor J.H. Wigmore's elaborate work, Materials for
the Study of Private Law in Old Japan, T.A.S.J., T[=o]ki[=o], 1892.]

[Footnote 5: See the Legacy of Iyéyas[)u], by John Frederic Lowder,
Yokohama, 1874, with criticisms and discussions by E.M. Satow and others
in the _Japan Mail_; Dixon's Japan, Chapter VII.; Professor W.E.
Grigsby, in T.A.S.J., Vol. III., Part II., p. 131, gives another
version, with analysis, notes, and comments; Rein's Japan, pp. 314,
315.]

[Footnote 6: Old Japan in the days of its inclusiveness was a secret
society on a vast scale, with every variety and degree of selfishness,
mystery, secrecy, close-corporationism, and tomfoolery. See article
Esotericism in T.J., p. 143.]

[Footnote 7: Since the abolition of feudalism, with the increase of the
means of transportation, the larger freedom, and, at many points,
improved morality, the population of Japan shows an unprecedented rate
of increase. The census taken in 1744 gave, as the total number of souls
in the empire, 26,080,000 (E.J. Reed's Japan, Vol. I., p. 236); that of
1872, 33,110,825; that of 1892, 41,089,910, showing a greater increase
during the past twenty years than in the one hundred and thirty-eight
years previous. See Résumé Statistique de l'Empire du Japon,
T[=o]ki[=o], 1894; Professor Garrett Droppers' paper on The Population
of Japan during the Tokugawa Period, read June 27th, 1894; T.A.S.J.,
Vol. XXII.]

[Footnote 8: For the notable instance of Pere Sidotti, see M.E, p. 63;
Séi Y[=o] Ki Buu, by S.R. Brown, D.D., a translation of Arai Hakuséki's
narrative, Yedo, 1710, T.N.C.A.S.; Capture and Captivity of Pere
Sidotti, T.A.S.J., Vol. IX., p. 156; Christian Valley, T.A.S.J., Vol.
XVI., p. 207.]

[Footnote 9: T.A.S.J., Vol. I., p. 78, Vol. VII., p. 323.]

[Footnote 10: See Matthew Calbraith Perry, Boston, 1887.]

[Footnote 11: See the author's Townsend Harris, First American Minister
to Japan, _The Atlantic Monthly_, August, 1891.]

[Footnote 12: See Honda the Samurai, Boston, 1890; Nitobe's United
States and Japan; The Japan Mail _passim_; Dr. G.F. Verbeck's History of
Protestant Missions in Japan, Yokohama, 1883; Dr. George Wm. Knox's
papers on Japanese Philosophy, T.A.S.J., Vol. XX., p. l58, etc. Recent
Japanese literature, of which the writer has a small shelf-full,
biographies, biographical dictionaries, the histories of New Japan, Life
of Yoshida Shoin, and recent issues of The Nation's Friend (Kokumin no
Tomo), are very rich on this fascinating subject.]

[Footnote 13: A typical instance was that of Rin Shihei, born 1737,
author of _Sun Koku Tsu Ran to Setsu_, translated into French by
Klaproth, Paris, 1832. Rin learned much from the Dutch and Prussians,
and wrote books which had a great sale. He was cast into prison, whence
he never emerged. The (wooden) plates of his publications were
confiscated and destroyed. In 1876, the Mikado visited his grave in
Sendai, and ordered a monument erected to the honor of this far-seeing
patriot.]

[Footnote 14: Rein, pp. 336, 337]

[Footnote 15: Rein, p. 339; The Early Study of Dutch in Japan, by K.
Mitsukuri, T.A.S.J., Vol. V., p. 209; History of the Progress of
Medicine in Japan, T.A.S.J., Vol. XII., p. 245; Vijf Jaren in Japan,
J.L.C. Pompe van Meerdervoort, 2d Ed., Leyden, 1808.]

[Footnote 16: Honda the Samurai, pp. 249-251; Nitobé, 25-27.]

[Footnote 17: The Tokugawa Princes of Mito, by Professor E. W. Clement,
T.A.S.J., Vol. XVIII, p. 14; Nitobé's United States and Japan, p. 25,
note.]

[Footnote 18: M.E. (6 Ed.), p. 608; Adams's History of Japan, Vol. II.,
p. 171.]

[Footnote 19: See the text of the anti-Christian edicts, M.E., p. 369.]

[Footnote 20: T.A.S.J., Vol. XX., p. 17.]

[Footnote 21: T.A.S.J., Vol. IX., p. 134.]

[Footnote 22: Tales of Old Japan, Vol. II., p. 125; A Japanese Buddhist
Preacher, by Professor M.K. Shimomura, in the New York Independent;
other sermons have been printed in The Japan Mail; Kino Dowa, two
sermons and vocabulary, has been edited by Rev. C.S. Eby, Yokohama.]

[Footnote 23: On Sunday, November 29, 1857, Mr. Harris, resting at
Kawasaki, over Sunday, on his way to Yedo and audience of the Sh[=o]gun,
having Mr. Heusken as his audience and fellow-worshipper, read service
from the Book of Common Prayer.]

[Footnote 24: See a paper written by the author and read at the World's
Columbian Exhibition Congress of Missions, Chicago, September, 1893, on
The Citizen Rights of Missionaries.]

[Footnote 25: This embassy was planned and first proposed to the Junior
premier, Tomomi Iwakura, and the route arranged by the Rev. Guido F.
Verbeck, then President of the Imperial University. One half of the
members of the embassy had been Dr. Verbeck's pupils at Nagasaki.]

[Footnote 26: A somewhat voluminous native Japanese literature is the
result of the various embassies and individual pilgrimages abroad, since
1860. Immeasurably superior to all other publications, in the practical
influence over his fellow-countrymen, is the Séiyo Jijo (The Condition
of Western Countries) by Fukuzawa, author, educator, editor, decliner of
numerously proffered political offices, and "the intellectual father of
one-half of the young men who now fill the middle and lower posts in the
government of Japan." For the foreign side, see The Japanese in America,
by Charles Lanman, New York, 1872, and in The Life of Sir Harry Parkes,
London, 1894, and for an amusing piece of literary ventriloquism,
Japanese Letters, Eastern Impressions of Western Men and Manners, London
and New York, 1891.

See History of Protestant Missions in Japan, by G. F. Verbeck, Yokohama,
1893.]



INDEX

Abbess, 318.
Abbots, 312.
Abdication, 214.
Aborigines, 9, 38, 43, 77-79, 177.
Adams, Will, 334, 340.
Adi-Buddha, 174.
Adoption, 122, 126.
Adultery, 149.
Aidzu, 119.
Ainos, 2, 9, 16, 73, 177, 317, 379.
Akamatsu, Rev. Renjo, 425.
Akéchi, 332.
Alphabets, 199, 200.
Altaic, 39, 389.
Amalgam of religions, 11, 13.
Amatéras[)u], see Sun-goddess.
American relations, 11, 12, 157.
Amidaism, 276, 303.
Anabaptists, 162.
Analects, 128.
Ancestral worship, 106.
Anderson, Dr. Win, 435.
Angels, 304.
Animism, 15-17.
Anjiro, 329.
Apostolical succession, 262.
Arabian Nights, 192, 201.
Architecture, 82, 84, 210, 298-300.
Art, 68, 1l4, 195-197, 297, 298, 303-305, 314, 356.
Aryan Conquest of India, 44, 156, 157, 177, 207.
Asanga, 175, 205.
Assassination, 367.
Asoka, 165.
Aston, Mr. Wm. G., 360, 386, 387.
Atheism, 163, 164.
Atkinson, Rev, J.L., 410.
Avalokitesvara, 170, 171, 179.
Avatars, 201, 208, 221, 247, 269, 295.

Babism, 166.
Bakin, 444.
Bangor Theological Seminary, 378.
Batchelor, Rev. John, 317.
Beal, Rev. Samuel, 8.
Beauty, 207.
Beggars, 208.
Bells, 307, 308.
Benten, 204, 207, 218.
Bible, 27, 104, 364, 386.
Binzuru, 237.
Birth, 84.
Bishamon, 218.
Bodhidharma, see Daruma.
Bodhisattva, 169, 204, 234.
Bonzes, 310.
Bosatsu, 170, 204; see Bodhsattva.
Brahma, 247.
Brahmanism, 163, 185, 186, 218.
Brothers, 125, 126.
Buddha. Amida, see Amidaism.
the Buddha, 101, 103, 161, 162.
Gautama, 155, 161-164.
Shakyamuni, 160.
Siddartha, 410.
Tathagata, 259.
Tathata, 243.
Bunyin Nanjio, Rev., 231, 425.
Buddhism, 42, 74, 76, 106, 133, 136, 137, 140, 185, 186, 227, 231.
Buddhist, 165, 166, 183, 214, 229, 252.

Cannibalism, 74.
Canon, Chinese, 103; Shint[=o], 39-41.
Capitals of Japan, 182, 183, 296.
Celibacy, 272.
Cemeteries, 308.
Chair of Contemplation, 252.
Chamberlain, Prof. B. Hall, 39, 324, 388.
Chastity, 68, 124, 149, 320.
Cheng Brothers, 138, 139.
China, 134, 199, 215, 328, 355.
Chinese, 83, 134; Buddhism, 232.
Christianity and Buddhism, 166, 183, 185, 187, 195, 217, 218, 265, 270,
300-302, 306, 315, 319.
Chronology, 41, 370, 387.
Chu Hi, 11, 108, 139, 143, 144, 356.
Cleanliness, 84, 97.
Clement, Prof. E.M., 407.
Cobra-de-capello, 21.
Cocks, Mr. Richard, 380.
Columbus, 328.
Comparative religion, 4-6.
Confucius, 100-106.
Confucianism, 74, 107, 213.
Concubinage, 149.
Constitution of 1889, 96, 122.
Corea, see Korea.
Courtship, 124.
Creator, 145, 285.
Cremation, 182.
Crucifixion, 115, 368.

Dai Butsu, 203.
Daikoku, 218.
Dai Mi[=o] Jin, 190, 204, 206, 230.
Daruma, 186, 208, 254.
Davids, T. Rhys, 155, 172.
Death, 84.
De Brosses, 23.
De Forest, Rev. J.H., 226.
Demoniacal possession, 281.
Déshima, 354, 358, 362-365.
Dharari, 199.
Dharma, see Daruma, 186.
Dhyana Buddhas and Sect, 172, 252, 254.
Diet, 293, 294.
Divorce, 125, 149.
D[=o]-sen, 236.
D[=o]-sh[=o], 181.
Dragon, 20, 21, 74, 115, 198, 242.
Dutch, 90, 336, 340, 353, 354, 358, 360, 362, 363-365, 366.
Dutt, Mr. Romesh Chunder, 161.

Ebisu, 218.
Ecclesiastes, 214.
Echizen, 312.
Edicts against Christianity, 335, 336, 342.
Edkins, Dr. J., 249.
Education, 313, 320.
Embassy round the world, 373.
Emperor, 148.
Emura, Rev. Shu-zan, 232.
England, 37.
Eta, 115, 150, 275, 316, 317, 367.
Ethics, 92, 94.
Euhemerus, 192, 193, 197, 201.
Eurasians, 344.
Evil, 58, 78.
Evolution, 62.
Ezekiel, 36.
Ezra, 102.

Family Life, 122, 125-127.
Female divinities, 66, 305, 319.
Fetichism, 22-27.
Feudalism, 10, 108-110.
Filial piety, 123, 149, 213.
Fire-drill, 55, 56.
Fire, God of, 53.
Fire-myths, 53.
Five Relations, 105, 114, 148-150.
Flags, 26.
Flood, 53.
Flowers, 58.
Forty-seven R[=o]nins, 118, 119.
Franciscans, 336, 337.
Friends, 127.
Fudo, 279.
Fuji Mountain, 400.
Fujishima, Rev. Ryauon, 231.
Fukuda, Rev. Gyo-kai, 425.
Fukui, 23.
Fuku-roku-jin, 218.

Gardens, 237, 294, 295.
Gautama, 158, 161, 164.
Genji Monogatari, 149.
Genj[=o], 181, 232, 233, 238, 239.
Germanic nations, 10, 44.
Ghosts, 206.
Giyoku, 183.
Gnostics, 193, 195.
God-possession, 201.
Gold, 184, 196, 210, 291.
Golden Rule, 128.
Gongen, 204, 205, 220.
Gore, Mr. T., 7, 384.
Graveyards, 308, 368.
Greater Vehicle, 165, 170, 240, 244.
Gubbins, Mr. J.H., 403, 447.

Hachiman, 204.
Hades, 53, 64.
Hara-kiri, 112, 121, 339.
Harris, Mr. Townsend, 145, 352, 360, 370, 371.
Hayashi, 129.
Heathen, 13, 30.
Heaven, 62, 63, 70, 81, 105, 112, 118, 144.
Hepburn, Dr. J.C., 372.
Hidéyori, 340, 342.
Hidéyoshi, 313, 333, 338.
Hindu history, 156.
Hi-nin, 115, 150.
Hinayana, 165, 167, 169, 228, 232, 238.
Hiouen Thsang, see Genj[=o].
Hiraii, 2.
Hirata, 86.
History of China, intellectual, 137.
of Japan, intellectual, 230.
of Japan, political, 10, 37, 44, 219.
of Japan, religious, 227, 228.
Hitomar[=o], 60.
Hiyéisan, 16, 297.
Hodge, 102.
Hodgson, Mr. Brian H., 411, 414.
Hokké-Ki[=o], see Saddharma Pundarika.
Hokusai, 314.
Holland, 338.
H[=o]nen, 261, 264.
H[=o]-[=o], 184, 237.
Hospitals, 216, 315.
Hoss[=o]-Shu, 238, 239.
Hotéi, 218.
Hotoké, 202, 269.

Idols, 175, 207, 216.
Idzumo, 44, 65.
Ikk[=o], 273.
Inari, 190.
Indra, 163, 247.
Ingwa, 217, 302, 321; see Karma.
Inquisition, 347, 348, 368.
Insurance by fetich, 24, 25.
Isaiah, 100.
Isé, 28, 184, 201.
Iyéyas[)u], 91, 100, 132, 134, 204, 205, 338, 342, 357, 358.
Izanagi and Izanami, 52, 63, 64, 207, 218.

Jade, 292.
Jains, 166.
Japan, area, 9.
Census, 9.
Ethnology, 43, 44.
Geography, 9, 43, 44.
Government, 40.
History, 10, 37, 44, 109.
Origins, 43.
Population, 8, 9.
Various names of, 73.
Japanese Bride, The, 125, 149.
Japanese characteristics, 112, 285, 361.
Language, 113, 116, 135.
Writing, 200.
Jataka tales, 169.
Jealousy, 124.
Jesuits, 247, 329, 337, 341, 342.
Jesus, 76, 97, 100, 117.
Jimmu Tenn[=o], 389,
Jin Gi Kuan, 49, 94, 390-392.
Jizo, 247, 305.
J[=o] d[=o] sect, 250, 275.
John, 2, 60.
J[=o]-jitsu sect, 181, 235.
Joss, 23.
Jun-shi, 68, 76, 119.
Ju-r[)u]-jin, 218.

Kaburagi, 36, 60.
Kada Adzumar[=o], 91.
Kamui, 30.
Kami-dana, 86, 88, 295.
Kamui, 30.
Kana, 199, 200, 274.
Kanda, Dai Mi[=o]-Jin, 205.
Karma, 162, 169, 186, 234, 258.
Kato Kyomasa, 278, 334, 339.
Ké-gon sect, 242-244.
Kéichu, 91.
Kern, Prof. H., 155, 239.
Ki[=o]to, 183, 296, 330, 336.
Kirin, 19.
Kishimoto, Mr. Nobuta., 11.
Kiushiu, 339.
Kiyomori, 120.
Knos, Dr. George Wm., 182, 228, 288, 385.
Kobayashi, Rev. Zé-jun, 425.
K[=o]b[=o], 89, 197, 205, 248, 250.
Kojiki, 29, 32, 40, 41, 52, 74, 82-90, 149, 195, 197.
Ko-ken, Empress, 310.
Kompira, 204.
Konishi, 334, 335.
Korea, 9, 21, 26, 40, 41, 74, 106, 107, 168, 179, 180, 292, 310, 328,
332, 333, 334, 355, 368.
Kosatsu, 368.
Ku-ya, 198.
Kumi, Prof., 76-82.
Kun-shin, 111, 113, 116, 117, 213.
Ku-sha sutra, 232, 233.
Kwannon, 181, 207, 247, 319.
Ky[=u]so, 132, 144.

Lamaism, 107.
Language of China, 237.
of England, 295.
of Holland, 364, 365.
of Japan, 39, 113, 116, 134, 265, 295, 299, 364.



Online LibraryWilliam Elliot GriffisThe Religions of Japan From the Dawn of History to the Era of Méiji → online text (page 30 of 31)