William F. Denning.

Telescopic Work for Starlight Evenings online

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Changes, Lunar, 120.

—— on Jupiter, 182.

—— on Mars, 163.

—— on Saturn, 206.

Charts of Mars, 158.

Cheapness of Telescopes, 57.

Choice of Telescopes, 38.

Clark, Alvan, & Sons, make large object-glasses, 18.

——, discovers the companion to Sirius, 307.

Cleaning lenses, 59.

Clusters of Stars, 317.

Coggia’s Comet of 1874, 233.

Colour of Jupiter, 171.

—— of Mars, 155.

—— of Saturn, 195.

—— of Uranus, 217.

Colouring of the eclipsed Moon, 119.

Colours of Stars, 315.

Coma Berenices, 317.

COMETS AND COMET-SEEKING, 227.
Ideas concerning Comets, 227.
Appearance of Comets, 228.
Large number visible, 228.
Nature of apparition, 229.
Tenuity, 229.
Differences of orbit, 230.
Discoveries of Comets, 230.
Large Comets, 231.
Periodical Comets, 234.
Halley’s Comet, 236.
Encke’s Comet, 236.
Biela’s Comet, 238.
Brooks’s double Comet, 239.
Brorsen’s Comet, 239.
Faye’s Comet, 240.
D’Arrest’s Comet, 240.
Pons-Winnecke’s Comet, 240.
Tuttle’s Comet, 241.
Grouping of Periodical Comets, 241.
Further Observations required, 243.
Nomenclature of Comets, 246.
Curiosities of Comets, 248.
Naked-eye Comets, 248.
Comet-seeking, 249.
English weather and Comet-seeking, 251.
Aperture and Power required, 252.
Annual rate of discovery, 255.
Telescopic Comets, 256.
Ascertaining positions, 257.
Dr. Doberck’s hints, 258.
Prizes for Discoveries, 258.

Common, His large Reflectors, 15;
Their performance, 28.

Computation of a Meteor’s real path, 278.

Conjunctions, Planetary, 225.

Constellation figures, The, 290.

Cooke & Sons mount a 24·8-inch refractor, 18;
Its barren record, 25.

Copernicus, 127.

Course of the Milky Way, 296.

“Crab” Nebula in Taurus (M. 1), 336.

Crape-ring of Saturn, 202.

Crucis κ, Cluster at, 318.

Curiosities of Comets, 248.

Cyclonic action in Sun-spots, 108.

Cygnus, Nebulous streams in, 339.


Dallmeyer on Dividing power, 293.

D’Arrest’s Comet, 240.

Dawes’s observations of Jupiter, 173.

—— observations of Saturn’s Crape-ring, 202.

——, On Dividing power, 292.

—— Solar Eyepiece, 92.

Definition in towns, 81.

Deimos, Outer Satellite of Mars, 165.

Democritus explains the Milky Way, 2.

Dennett announces the Red Spot on Jupiter, 173.

Denning’s Comet, 243.

Denza on the Meteors of Nov. 27, 272.

Derham, his list of Nebulæ, 327.

Description of Nebulæ and Clusters of Stars, 333.

Determination of the Sun’s rotation-period, 104.

Detonating Fireballs, 267.

Dewing of Mirrors, 62.

Diffraction-rings, 293.

Dimensions of Nebulæ and Scar-clusters, 332.

—— of Sun-spots, 94.

Disappearance of Saturn’s ring, 205.

Discordant observations of Saturn, 204.

Discoveries of Comets, 230.

—— of Nebulæ, 341.

Discovery of Neptune, 221.

—— of Planetoids, 167.

—— of Uranus, 215.

Distance of the stars, 299.

Distinction between Nebulæ and Star-clusters, 324.

Distribution of Nebulæ in R.A., 326.

Disturbances, Recurrent solar, 110.

Dividing power, 292.

Divisions in outer ring of Saturn, 201.

Doberck, Dr., On the Invention of the Telescope, 5.

——, On Comet-seeking, 258.

Dollond patents his Achromatic Telescope, 12.

——, His object-glasses, 16.

Donati’s Comet of 1858, 233.

Dörfel mountains, 131.

Double Comets:—
Biela’s, 238.
Brooks’s, 239.

—— Nebulæ, 332.

—— Stars, 300, 302.

Draco, planetary nebula in, 335.

Drawing, 73.

Drawings of Jupiter, 185.

Dumb-bell Nebula (M. 27), 337.

Duration of meteor-flights, 282.

Duration of Silver-on-glass films, 60.

Dynamometer, Berthon’s, 50.


Early observations of Jupiter, 172.

—— —— of nebulæ and star-clusters, 326.

—— —— of Neptune, 222.

—— —— of Saturn, 197.

—— —— of the Sun, 88.

—— —— of Uranus, 216.

—— —— of Venus, 147.

Earthshine on the Moon, 116.

Eccentric position of Saturn’s rings, 204.

Eclipses of Jupiter’s satellites, 189.

—— of the Moon, 118.

—— of the Sun, 97.

Elger’s lunar observations, 127, 131.

—— Drawings of lunar objects, 129, 130, 132.

Ellipse, 230.

—— on Jupiter, Gledhill’s, 173.

Elliptical nebulæ, 338.

Elongations of Mercury, 138.

—— of Venus, 145.

Encke’s Comet, 236.

—— division in Saturn’s ring, 202, 208.

English weather and Comet-seeking, 251.

Equatoreal spots on Jupiter, Bright, 175, 181.

—— ——, Dark, 181.

Equatoreals, Advantage of, 54.

Exceptional position of Sun-spots, 111.

Eyepiece, Field of, 50.

Eyepieces, 46.

——, Single-lens, 47.


Fabricius observes Sun-spots, 89.

Faculæ, Sudden outburst of, 108.

Faint objects, Observation of, 72.

Faintness of the markings on Venus, 150.

Falls of stone and iron, 266.

Faye’s Comet, 240.

Field of eyepiece, Diameter of, 50.

Figures, The Constellation, 290.

Fireball of Nov. 23, 1877, 267.

Fireballs, 267.

——, Heights of, 268.

First view of Mercury, Amateur’s, 139.

Formations, Lunar, 123.

Foucault parabolizes and silvers glass Speculæ, 15.

Fracastor, His remarks on lenses in 1538, 4.

Friendly Indulgences, 74.

Future, Past and, 84.

Future eclipses of the Moon, 118.

—— —— of the Sun, 98.


Galaxy, or Milky Way, The, 295.

Galilei and the invention of the Telescope, 2, 4, 5.

——, Discovery of Jupiter’s satellites, 187.

——, His first instrument and discoveries, 6, 7.

Galle observes Saturn’s crape-ring, 202.

—— observes Neptune, 222.

Geminids, 276.

Glass, Opera, 61.

Gledhill’s ellipse on Jupiter, 173.

Globe, Celestial, 63.

Globular clusters. 338.

—— ——, List of, 344.

Gore, Diameter of α Centauri, 299.

——, Dimensions of a Star-cluster, 332.

——, Stellar distribution, 294.

Greek alphabet, 287.

Gregory invents a reflecting-Telescope, 10.

Grimaldi, 129.

Grouping of periodical Comets, 241.

Groups of Stars, 316.

Grubb, Maker of a 4-foot Cassegrainian reflector, 14;
Performance of, 25.

——, Maker of a 27-inch refractor, 18;
Performance of, 27.


Hall, Chester More, invents achromatic Object-glass, 11.

Hall, Prof., discovers a white spot on Saturn, 199.

——, Observations of Saturn’s satellites, 213.

—— on the great Washington refractor, 26.

——, Remarks on large and small telescopes, 31.

Halley’s Comet, 236.

—— list of Nebulæ in 1716, 326.

Harriot, Early observer of Sun-spots, 89, 90.

Hartwig, Discovers a new Star in Andromeda, 315.

Heights of Fireballs, 268;
of Meteors, 277.

Heis, His labours in Meteoric astronomy, 262.

Hencke, Discoverer of Planetoids, 167.

Henry, Bros., make a 30-inch refractor, 18;
Performance of, 27.

—— observe the belts on Uranus, 218.

Herschel, Prof. A. S., observes meteors, 262.

Herschel, Sir J., Comet of 1861, 233.

——, Description of k Crucis, 318.

——, Disappearance of Saturn’s ring, 205.

——, Rediscovers Uranus, 219.

——, Satellites of Uranus, 220,

——, Texture of Comets, 229.

——, Thickness of Saturn’s ring, 205.

——, Trapezium of Orion, 318, 320.

Herschel, Sir W., and Cometary discovery, 231.

——, His discovery of Nebulæ, 327.

——, His discovery of nebulous Stars, 330.

——, His discovery of Uranus, 215;
of Satellites, 220.

——, His method of observing Sun-spots, 91.

——, His observations of Jupiter, 182.

——, His observations of Mercury, 142.

——, His observations of Saturn, 199.

——, His observations of Venus, 149.

——, Nucleus of Comet of 1811, 232.

—— observes Binary Stars, 300, 306.

——, Performance of 4-ft. reflector, 21.

——, Remarks on eyepieces, 47.

——, Rotation of Jupiter’s Satellites, 189.

——, Singular figure of Saturn, 196.

Herschel’s, Sir W., Telescopes, 12, 13, 39.

Hevelius, diameter of his object-glasses, 9.

Hind, Discoverer of a new Star in 1848, 314.

——, Discoverer of Planetoids, 167.

——, Discoverer of a variable Nebula, 328.

Hipparchus forms a Star-catalogue, 312.

Hoek on the origin of Comets, 243.

Hooke’s observations of Jupiter, 172.

Hough’s observations of Jupiter, 174, 182.

Howlett’s observations of Sun-spots, 101, 102.

Huygens on the invention of the Telescope, 2.

——, Discoveries on Saturn, 8, 198.

——, Length of his instruments, 8.

Huygens’s Negative eyepiece, 8, 46.

Hyginus, The rill or cleft of, 130.

Hyperbola, 230.


Identity of Meteors and Comets, 262.

Increasing number of Telescopes, 57.

Intra-Mercurial Planet, 137.


Jansen, Zachariah, Inventor of the Telescope, 4.

Johnson’s projections of Solar Eclipses, 99.

Juno, 168.

JUPITER, 170.
An interesting object, 170.
Brightness and position, 170.
Period &c., 171.
Belts and spots, 172.
Observations of Hooke, Cassini, and others, 172.
The “Ellipse” of 1869-70, 173.
The red spot, 173.
Rotation of red spot, 175.
Rotation of bright equatoreal spots, 175.
Rotation of dark spots in N. hemisphere, 175.
Rotation-period, 176.
Nature of the red spot, 177.
Bright equatoreal spots, 181.
Dark equatoreal spots, 181.
New belts, 182.
Changes on the planet, 182.
Further observations required, 183.
Occultations by the Moon, 185.
The four satellites, 187.
Their eclipses, occultations, and transits, 189.
The planet without visible satellites, 192.
Spots on the Satellites, 193.
Occultation of a Star by Jupiter, 193.


Keeler, White spots and canals on Mars, 348.

Kitchiner, The inutility of large Telescopes, 35.

——, Singular form of Saturn, 196.

Klein’s supposed new crater near Hyginus, 122.


Large and small telescopes compared, 20.

—— Comets, 231.

—— number of Comets, 228.

—— refractor intended for California, 36, 347.

Lassell, His large reflecting-telescopes, 14;
Their performance, 24.

—— discovers the satellite of Neptune, 224.

—— glimpses a belt on Uranus, 217.

Leander McCormick refractor, 26.

Learning the names of the Stars, 287.

Leibnitz mountains, 131.

Le Mairean or Herschelian telescope, 13.

Lenses, Cleaning, 59.

—— out of centre, 55.

Leonids, 276.

Lescarbault rediscovers Saturn, 350.

Le Verrier, Theoretical discoverer of Neptune, 222.

Lick, James, Founder of the Lick Observatory, 18.

Lick refractor, Performance of the, 27.

Light of Comets, Fluctuating, 245.

Limited means no obstacle, 51.

Lippersheim, Hans, Inventor of the telescope, 4, 5.

Lunar changes, 120.

—— formations, 123.

Lyræ α, 308.

Lyrids, 275.


Mädler’s observations of Lunar objects, 127, 131.

—— —— of Mars, 158.

—— —— of Venus, 149.

Magellanic clouds, 331.

Magnitudes of Stars, 294.

Marius, Simon, observes Jupiter’s satellites, 6.

—— observes Nebula in Andromeda, 326.

Markings on Mercury, Surface-, 142.

—— on Venus, 147.

—— ——, Faintness of, 150.

MARS, Appearance of, 155.
Period &c., 155.
Phase, 156.
Surface-configuration, 156.
Charts and nomenclature, 158.
Discovery of satellites and canal-shaped markings, 159.
Summary of observations, 160.
Rotation, 161.
Further observations required, 162.
Changes on the Planet, 163.
Satellites, 164.
Occultations by the Moon, 166.

Martin’s 4-foot reflector at Paris, 15;
Its performance, 25.

—— 29-inch refractor at Paris, 18.

Maunder on Sun-spots, 93.

Maxima and minima of Sun-spots, 100.

Means of measurement, 290.

MERCURY, 137.
Supposed planet Vulcan, 137.
Visibility, 138.
Period &c., 138.
Elongations, 138.
Amateur’s first view, 139.
Phases, 139.
Atmosphere, 139.
Telescopic observations, 140.
Schiaparelli’s results, 141.
Observations of Schröter and W. Herschel, 142.
Surface-markings, 142.
Transits across the Sun, 143.
Occultations, 144.

Messier, The Comet-hunter, 249.

Messier’s lists of Nebulæ, 327.

—— large Comet of 1769, 232.

METEORS AND METEORIC OBSERVATIONS, 260.
Ancient ideas, 260.
Meteoric apparitions, 261.
Radiation of Meteors, 262.
Identity of Meteors and Comets, 262.
Aerolites, 264.
Fireballs, 267.
Heights of Fireballs, 268.
Meteorite from Biela’s Comet, 270.
Differences of motion, 271.
Nomenclature of Meteor-systems, 271.
Meteor-storms, 271.
Telescopic Meteors, 272.
Meteor-showers, 274.
Varieties of Meteors, 276.
Meteor of Dec. 28, 1888, 277.
Average heights of Meteors, 277.
Computation of Meteor-heights, 278.
Meteoric observations, 279.
Meteors and terrestrial objects, 284.
—— and gales of wind, 285.

Method, 78.

Milky Way or Galaxy, 2, 295.

Minimum of Sun-spots, 347.

Mirrors, Dewing of, 62.

MOON, Attractive aspect of the, 113.
Diameter and distance, 114.
Crateriform aspect, 114.
Absence of air and water, 115.
Only one hemisphere visible, 115.
Earthshine, 116.
Telescopic observations, 116.
Eclipses, 118.
Physical changes, 120.
Active volcanoes, 120.
Crater Aristarchus, 120.
—— Linné, 121.
—— near Hyginus, 122.
General description of formations, 123.
Description of special objects, 125-132.
Objects near terminator, 133.
Occultation of Stars, 135.
Visibility of new and old Moon, 136.

Moonlight and planetary definition, 187.

Motion of light, 190.

Motion of Stars in the line of sight, 300.

—— of Sun-spots, Proper, 106.

Mounting of Telescopes, 45.


Naked-eye views of Comets, 248.

—— —— of Jupiter in daylight, 170.

—— —— of Jupiter’s satellites, 188.

—— —— of Mercury, 139.

—— —— of Sun-spots, 89.

—— —— of Uranus, 217.

—— —— of Venus in transit, 105.

—— —— of Vesta, 168.

Names of the Stars, Learning the, 287.

Nasmyth and Carpenter describe Plato, 126.

Nasmyth’s Telescopes, 16.

—— “Willow-leaves,” 101.

Nature of Cometary apparitions, 229.

—— of the red spot on Jupiter, 177.

NEBULÆ AND CLUSTERS OF STARS, 324.
Distinction, 324.
Large number visible, 324.
Varieties of form and grouping, 325.
Distribution in R.A., 326.
Early observations, 326.
Variable Nebulæ, 327.
Nebulous Stars, 330.
The Magellanic Clouds, 331.
Double Nebulæ, 332.
Real dimensions of Nebulæ and Clusters, 332.
Round Nebulæ and Clusters, 332.
Description of Nebulæ and Clusters, 333.
Great Nebula in Andromeda, 334.
—— —— in Orion, 334.
Planetary Nebulæ, 334.
Spiral Nebula, 335.
Crab Nebula in Taurus, 336.
Dumb-bell Nebula, 337.
Ring Nebula in Lyra, 337.
Elliptical Nebulæ, 338.
Globular Clusters, 338.
Further observations, 339.
Discovery of new Nebulæ, 341.
New Nebulæ discovered at Bristol, 342.
List of Clusters of Stars, 343.
—— of globular Clusters, 344.
—— of Nebulæ, 345.

Nebulous Stars, 330.

Neison, Lunar observations, 128, 129.

NEPTUNE, Discovery of, 221.
Observations in 1795, 222.
Period &c., 223.
Observations, 223.
Supposed ring, 223.
The satellite, 223.

New or temporary Stars, 312.

Newton, 128.

Newton, Sir Isaac, Experiments on Colours, 9.

——, His reflecting-telescope, 11.

——, On mountainous sites for telescopes, 347.

Noble, Occultation of Jupiter, 186.

——, Occultation of Saturn, 210.

—— on observations of Mercury and Venus, 348.

Nomenclature of Comets, 246.

—— of Lunar formations, 123.

—— of Mars, 158.

—— of Meteor-systems, 271.

Number of Comets visible, Large, 228.

—— of Nebulæ and Star-clusters, 324.

—— of Planetoids, 167.

—— of Stars, 293.


Observations of Neptune, 223.

—— required of the Sun, 97.

—— —— of the Moon, 116.

—— —— of Mercury, 143.

—— —— of Venus, 152.

—— —— of Mars, 162.

—— —— of Jupiter, 183.

—— —— of Saturn, 205.

—— —— of Uranus, 219.

—— —— of Comets, 243.

—— —— of Meteors, 279.

—— —— of Stars, 320.

—— —— of Nebulæ, 339.

——, Solar, 88.

Observatories, 64.

Observer’s aims, 42.

Observing, Open-air, 75.

Observing-seats, 53.

Occultations of Jupiter, 185.

—— of Jupiter’s satellites, 189, 190.

—— of Mars, 166.

—— of Mercury, 144.

—— of Regulus by Venus, 154.

—— of Saturn, 209.

—— of Star by Jupiter, 193.

—— of Venus, 153.

—— of Vesta, 169.

Olbers discovers Pallas and Vesta, 167.

——, His Comet of 1815, 235, 241.

——, Observer of Comets, 250.

Open-air observing, 75.

Opera-glass, 61.

Orbits of Comets, Differences in, 230.

Orion, Great Nebula in, 334.

——, The constellation, 289.

Orionids, 275.

Orionis β, 307.

—— θ, 318.

—— σ, 318.

Outbursts of Faculæ, 108.


Palisa, Discoverer of Planetoids, 167.

Palitzch, Discoverer of Halley’s Comet, 236.

Pallas, 168.

Parabola, 230.

Past and future work, 84.

Periodical Comets, 234.

—— ——, Grouping of, 241.

Periodicity of Jupiter’s markings, 184.

—— of Sun-spots, 100.

Perrotin observes the belts on Uranus, 218.

—— —— the canals on Mars, 27, 160.

—— on work with a 30-inch refractor, 347.

Perry on drawing Sun-spots, 93.

—— observes veiled Sun-spots, 110.

Persei β (Algol), 310.

—— χ, 317.

Perseids, 275.

——, Their shifting radiant-point, 283.

Perseverance, 79.

Petavius, 128.

Peters, Discoverer of Planetoids, 167.

Phase, Epochs of similar, 117.

—— of Jupiter, 172.

—— of Mars, 156.

Phases of Mercury, 139.

—— of Venus, 147.

Phobos, Inner Satellite of Mars, 165.

Photography, 82.

Photometric measures of Starlight, 295.

Physical aspects of Comets, 244.

—— changes on the Moon, 120.

Pickering on the canals of Mars, 348.

Planetary bodies on the Sun, 105.

—— conjunctions, 225.

—— Nebula, 334.

Planetoid, The 308th, 349.

PLANETOIDS, Number of, 167.
History of their discovery, 167.
Occultation of Vesta, 167.
Dimensions and brightness, 168.

Plato, 125.

Polaris, 308.

Pons, Discoverer of many Comets, 250.

Pons’s Comet of 1812, 241, 242, 245.

Pons-Winnecke’s Comet, 240.

Powers, Method of determining, 49.

——, Overstating, 49.

——, Requisite magnifying, 48.

Præsepe, 317.

Preparation of the observer, 66.

Princeton refractor, Performance of, 26.

Prizes for Cometary discoveries, 258.

Proctor on Amateur observers, 163.

—— on Sun-ejected Meteors, 349.

Projection of satellites of Jupiter, 190.

—— of Stars on the Moon, 135.

Prominences, Solar, 111.

Proper motion of spots on Jupiter, 173.

—— —— of Stars, 299.

—— —— of Sun-spots, 106.

Publications, Astronomical, 83.

Pulkowa, The 30-inch refractor at, 27.


Quadrantids, 274.


Radiation of Meteors, 262.

Ramsden’s positive eyepiece, 47.

Ranyard, Absorption of light by object-glasses, 37.

Recording Meteor-tracks, 280.

Records, 72.

Recurrent disturbances on the Sun, 110.

—— forms on the Sun, 111.

Red spot on Jupiter, Appearance of, 173;
Rotation of, 175;
Nature of, 177.

Refracting-lenses or burning-glasses, 3.

Refracting-telescope, 12.

Refractors and Reflectors, 39.

Rheita, Valley near, 131.

Rigel, 307.

Ring nebula in Lyra, 337.

—— of Neptune, Supposed, 223.

—— of Saturn, Division in the outer, 201.

—— ——, The Crape, 202.

Rings of Saturn, 201.

—— ——, Aspect of the, 204.

—— ——, Eccentric position of the, 204.

—— ——, Thickness, 205.

Roberts’s photographs of the Nebula in Andromeda, 334, 351.

—— —— of Nebulæ in Ursa Major, 338.

Rosse, Lord, Large reflecting-telescopes, 14;
Their performance, 21.

Rotation of Comets, Visible evidences of, 246.

—— of Jupiter, 176, 348.

—— of Mars, 161, 348.

—— of Mercury, 142.

—— of Saturn, 199.

—— of the Sun, 103.

—— of Uranus, 217.

—— of Venus, 149.

Round Nebulæ and Clusters, 332.


Safarik on Telescopic Meteors, 273.

Saros, The, 99.

Satellite of Neptune, 223.

—— of Venus, Alleged, 152.

Satellites of Jupiter, 187.

—— of Mars, 164.

—— of Saturn, 211.

—— of Uranus, 220.

SATURN, 195.
Apparent lustre, 195.
Period &c., 196.
“Square-shouldered” aspect, 196.
Early observations, 197.
His belts and spots, 199.
Rotation-period, 199.
The Rings, 201.
Divisions in outer ring, 201.
Crape-ring, 202.
Discordant observations, 204.
Eccentric position of rings, 204.
Aspect of the rings, 204.
Further observations, 205.
Occultations of Saturn, 209.
The Satellites, 211.
Transits of shadow of Titan, 213.
Occultations of Stars by Saturn, 214.

Scheiner’s early observations of Sun-spots, 89.

Schiaparelli, Observations of Mars, 159.

——, Observations of Mercury, 141.

—— associates Comets and Meteors, 264.

Schmidt announces change in a lunar crater, 121.

——, Discoverer of a new Star, 315.

Schröter’s observations of Mercury, 142.

—— —— of Saturn, 200.

—— —— of Venus, 148.

Scintillation of Stars, 297.

Scorpii α, 309.

Shadows cast by Faculæ, 109.

Short’s reflectors, 12.

Showers of Meteors, 274.

Sidereal work, 286.

Silver-on-glass films, Duration of, 60.

Sirius, 300, 307.

Small telescopes, 31.

—— —— and Mars, 160.

—— —— and Solar work, 90.

Solar Eclipse of Aug. 19, 1887, 98.

—— Eclipses visible in England, 98.

—— observations, 88.

—— Prominences, 111.

Southern Comets, Large, 233, 234.

Spiral Nebula, 335.

Spitaler’s Comet of 1890, 349.

“Square-shouldered” aspect of Saturn, 196.

Star-disks, 298.

Stars, Nebulous, 330.

——, Occultation of, 135.

—— visible through Comets, 246.

STARS, THE, 286.
Sidereal work, 286.
Greek Alphabet, 287.
Learning the names of the Stars, 287.
The constellation Orion, 289.
The constellation Figures, 290.
Means of Measurement, 290.
Dividing power, 292.
Number of Stars, 293.
Magnitudes, 294.
The Milky Way, 295.
Scintillation of Stars, 297.
Star-disks, 298.
Distance of the Stars, 299.
Proper motions of Stars, 299.
Double Stars and binary systems, 300.
List of Double Stars, 302-5.
α Canis Majoris, 307.
β Orionis, 307.
α Lyræ, 308.
α Ursæ Minoris, 308.
α Scorpii, 309.
Variable Stars, 309.
ο Ceti and β Persei, 310.
List of Variable Stars, 311.
New or temporary Stars, 312.
Description of temporary Stars, 312.
Star-colours, 315.
Groups of Stars, 316.
Coma Berenices, 317.
The Pleiades, 317.
Præsepe, 317.
χ Persei, 317.
κ Crucis, 318.
ζ Ursæ Majoris, 318.
σ Orionis, 318.



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