Copyright
William Frederick Howat.

A standard history of Lake County, Indiana, and the Calumet region (Volume 1) online

. (page 1 of 44)
Online LibraryWilliam Frederick HowatA standard history of Lake County, Indiana, and the Calumet region (Volume 1) → online text (page 1 of 44)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


lm^ssm>mmmmmumiHH^tmilmlmuimHmi\iVs^A^Vri^iHrimili\iH\u^^^^



M. L



GENEALOGY COLLECTION



.iillili .

3 1833 02427 2491



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2009 with funding from

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center



http://www.archive.org/details/standardhistoryo01howa



A STANDARD HISTORY OF

Lake County, Indiana



AND THE



Calumet Region



Und(U- the Editorial Supervision of

WILLIAM FREDERICK HOWAT, M. D.

Hammond, Indiana



Assisted by
A. G. LiNDQiTisT A. M. Turner

C. 0. Holmes George AV. Lewis

Capt. H. S. Norton John J. Wheeler
Albert Maack



VOLUME



ILLUSTRATED



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK
1915



PREFACE 1159706



I



^



In many respects the territory, the people, the institutions and the
activities covered by this "History of Lake County and the Calumet
Region" constitute a remarkable exposition of American amalgamation
r\._ and development. In the Calumet Region, or Northern Lake County,
has occurred, within comparatively recent years, one of the greatest
industrial expansions of modern times, and, parallel with that magic
^Y growth, some of the most intelligent and original minds of the country
^ have promulgated systems of practical public education which have
been of untold benefit to thousands who come to that section from
many foreign lands. Not only have they been given employment and
abiding places, but they and their children have, at the very threshold
of their American experience, been taught the advantages of mental,
industrial and moral training. The two most striking features of the
Calumet Region center in its gigantic industries and in its public
~~— ^ schools, libraries and other uplifting institutions. If the melting pot
^"""J"^, was ever busy it is now turning out sturdy products, both of metal
and of men, in the Calumet Region, and it is no more wonderful that
$200,000,000 should have been drawn thither within a few years than
that 40,000 men should have been absorbed, not only without friction,
but with advantage to the communities at large.

What makes Lake County almost unique, also, is that outside of the
Calumet Region there seems to be such a distinct cleavage in the texture
of the population. With such towns as Crown Point and Lowell as
centers, the citizens and rural residents, many of them descendants of
the pioneers, are prone to be rather quiet and conservative in their
dispositions. A strong element in these rural communities, especially
in the western and southwestern sections of the county, is German and
Dutch; and it is a matter of universal history and present-day knowl-
edge that no nationalities in the world have furnished more substantial
colonists than those mentioned. Generally speaking, the old-time Ameri-
can settlers from the Eastern United States located in the central and
southern townships of Lake County. They are also more conservative

iii



iv PREFACE

than the business, financial and industrial leaders of the Calumet
Region ; or, it may be more correct to say, that the more enterprising
have drifted to Hammond, East Chicago, Indiana Harbor, Whiting
and Gary, and given their substantial talents, with those of Chicagoans
and other metropolitans, to the development of Northern Lake County.

All of these matters, with many more of like interest and diversity,
have been traced in detail in the work which is herewith issued; and
the total is such a large and complex subject that its thorough treat-
ment would require the services of a wonderful linguist, a deep judge
of human nature, an expert in all matters business, industrial, chemical,
sociological, educational and religious. Although we have not been
able to engage the services of such geniiLses, we have enjoyed the coopera-
tion of many faithful and able assistants, both as wdse advisers and
valued contributors. In that class we unqualifiedly place our advisory
editors, A. ^l. Turner of Hammond, Capt. H. S. Norton and C. 0.
Holmes of Gary, George W. Lewis of East Chicago, John J. Wheeler
and Albert Maack of Crown Point, and A. G. Lundquist of Indiana
Harbor.

Many outside of our "official staff" have been of much service, such
as Frank F. Heighway, Crown Point, county superintendent of schools ;
C. 31. McDaniel, Hammond's superintendent of schools; William A.
Wirt, superintendent of the Gary schools; W. W. Holliday, superin-
tendent of schools, Whiting; Carroll R. Woods, secretary of the Ham-
mond Chamber of Commerce ; S. E. Swaim, editor of the Hammond
News; Edwin H. Farr, of the AVhiting Call; A. J. Smith, Hobart
Gazette; Ray Seeley, Hammond, county surveyor; Dr. E. IM. Shanklin,
Hammond, and A. D. Schaeffer, secretary of the Gary Commercial Club.

It would be inexcusable to omit indebtedness to the publications of
the late Rev. T. H. Ball — especially to his "Lake County History of
1884," his "Northwest Indiana of 1900" and his "Lake County His-
tory of 1904." Certain reports of the Old Settler and Historical
Association have also been of assistance. The municipal officers of both
Hammond and Gary have been most courteous and have furnished
much invaluable information. Of the publications issued within recent
years there is none upon which we have more relied than upon "The
Calumet Survey," published by the Northwest Indiana Conference of
the ]\Iethodist Episcopal Church. The title of that publication is inade-
quate — that is, from a glance at the title page one would be misled as to
its scope, which is remarkably broad ; and the generous plan of the work
has been well and practically developed.

Finally, we wash to thank the clerg\'men of Lake County as a class
for their prompt responses to our requests for information. If sketches



PREFACE V

of certain churches or other organizations are not found in the pages
of this work, the explanation cannot be traced to any negligence on our
part, but to the fact that, despite our efforts, we have not been able to
obtain the data from the principals themselves.

That the work may display some errors is not to be denied ; it is but
another evidence of human fallibility; but that the number of these
errors has been reduced to a minimum is largely due to the indefatigable
efforts of H. G. Cutler. He has been painstaking and conscientious, and
through his experience the work has progressed much more smoothly
than if it had been left entirely to our editorial labors.

We have every reason to believe that the conclusion of our labors,
which is the history itself, will be received with the same good will
which has been continuously extended to its representatives in the
progress of their work.

W. F. HOWAT,

Supervising Editor.



CONTENTS



CHAPTER I
NATURE IN LAKE COUNTY

Distinct Physical Features — The Grand and Little Calumet — •
Ball's Description of the Calumet Region — The Magic Hand
OP I\Ian — The Woodlands of Lake County — The Groves — The
Prairies and Their Products — Flowers of Bright and Varied
Hue — Grasses of the County — Lake Prairie, Gem of the County
— The Watershed — The Kankakee Region — The Passing op the
Water Fowl — The Coming of the Sportsmen — Drainage and
Ditches — Denuded op Timber 1



CHAPTER II

RELATED GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY

An Historic Short-Cut — Indlin Trails Through the County — La
Salle and His Braves — History and Conjecture — The Potta-
watomies in a Majority — Shaubenee, the Great — Robinson, the
Trader Chief — Peaceful Indian Life of the Calumet — Mc-
Gwinn's Indian Village — Burial and Dancing Grounds — How
They Lived, Dressed and Moved — Lost Interest in Economy —
Pioneer Stores in the ILinkakee Region — Remains of First Set-
tlers and Travelers — ^Yielding Skeletons and History — Was This
a Message from La Salle? — Relics and Collections — The
Cheshire and Youche Antiquities 13



viii CONTENTS

CHAPTER III

PIONEER BUILDING

The White Trapper Supplants the Red — Extent op the Fur Trade
— The Kankakee Trapping Region — Calumet Muskrats and Ducks
— Crops Which Crowded Out the Fur Trade — Home Builders
Displace White Trappers — Lake Shore Routes and Travelers —
Through Northern Lake County in 1834 — Virginian-Afraid-of-
the-Lake — The Famous Long Pole Bridge — Old Baillytown —
Other Early Stage Routes — Traveler Settles Into Solid Citizen
— Another Traveler Finds the First Resident Farmer — Inn
Keepers Along the Beach — Ross, the First Substantial Pioneer
— James Adams, Noted Government Messenger — Public Lands
Surveyed — Settlers of 1834 — Solon Robinson and Crown Point —
The Original Butler Claims — A Hamlet Born — ]\Iain Street
Lined Out — Disappearance of the Old Robinson House — Founder
OF Wiggins Point — Plowing Up the Old Indian Cemetery — The
Bryant Settlement and Pleasant Grove — Other Settlers in
1835 — Solon Robinson's Historical Synopsis — Lake Courthouse
PosTOFFicB — County Organized — Indiana City — Liverpool
Founded — George Earle, a Real Promoter — The John B. Chap-
man Titles — John Wood and Woodvale — Settlers Around Red
Cedar Lake — Hervey Ball — Baptist Pioneers of Lake County —
First Baptist Society Formed — Lewis Warriner — Recognized as
Cedar Lake Baptist Church — First Methodist IMission — Crown
Point Methodist Church Founded — The Churches, Cutlers and
Rockvv'Ells — 1837, Also a Busy Year — Ebenezer Saxton Succeeds
Jere Wiggins — IMerrillville Founded — The Browns of Eagle
Creek — Settlement of the West Creek Neighborhood — Some
English Settlers — German Catholics of St. Johns Township — ■
German Lutherans of Hanover Township — Early Sawmills and
Bridges — 1838, First Year of Bridge-Building — Coming op Samuel
Turner and AVife — Judge David Turner — Squatters' Union
Protects Settlers 25



CHAPTER IV

PIONEER MEMORIES

Bartlett Woods — A Pioneer Picture — The Cabin and Its Furniture
— Fellow Feeling that ]\Iade Us Wondrous Kind — Marvelous In-



CONTENTS ix

DUSTRY — KeaSONS FOR SlOW GrOWTH — LacK OP TRANSPORTATION —

First Free Soil Meeting — Historic Relics of Lake County
Pioneers Presented by T. H. Ball, ]\Irs. M. J. Dinwiddie, T. A.
MuzzALL, Lewis G. Little, Mrs. M. J. Hyde and Others— Con-
densed Account of the Semi-Centennial — AVhat of the 1934
Gathering? — Mrs. S. J. Monteith's Memories — A Lonesome
Pioneer Sister — Honey Exchanged for Apples — An Old Letter
OF 1843 — The Immortal " Thanatopsis " — Aunt Susan Turner-
Recollections OF James H. Luther — The Old Stage Routes —
First of the Calumet Industrial Region — First County Elec-
tions — North Township Bounded — Early Figures for North and
Hobart Townships — Six Early Ykirs Covered by T. H. Ball — Dis-
covery of Robinson's Prairie — The First Colony at Crown Point
— Turning of the First Furrow — Additions to Original Colony —
Hamlet Growing into a Village — Postoffice op Lake Court House
, — Town Site Regularly Purchased — Lake Court House, the
County Seat — Named Crown Point — Settlers around Red Cedar
Lake — The Hervey Ball Place — The Von Hollen and Herlitz
Families — The Taylors — David Agnew Frozen to Death 60

CHAPTER V

PIONEER MOTHERS OF THE COUNTY

Affection and Admiration, Both — Mrs. Harriet Warner Holton —
Lake County's First Teacher — Mrs. Maria Robinson — Mrs.
Thomas Childers and Mrs. William Clark — Mrs. Luman A.
Fowler — Mrs. Jane A. H. Ball, Teacher and Doctor — "Toiling
FOR THE Good op All" — ^Mrs. George A. Woodbridge — Mrs. Nancy
Agnew, Stanch Widow — Margaret Jane Dinwiddie, Cool and
Courageous — Mrs. Margaret Dinwiddie (nee Perkins), Educator
— Christian and Methodist Church Workers — Leading Women
of Foreign Birth — Typical New England Women — Mrs. Ben-
jamin McCarty — Mrs. Belshaw and Mrs. Hackley — ''Aunt
Susan" Turner — Mrs. J. Higgins— Mothers of Large Families —
Like the Patriarchal Times— Mrs. Samuel Turner — Mothers
that Were ^Iothers 88

CHAPTER VI

COUNTY ORGANIZATION

First Election of County Officers— First Commissioners' Meeting
— The Rout of the Timber Thieves— Divided into Three Town-



CONTENTS

SHIPS — Temporary Courthouse Built — A "Prison" Fitted Up —
Old Court Room of Historic Memories— Jail Becomes a Temper-
ance Hall — Crown Point Wins County Seat Fight — Benjamin
McCarty — Pioneer Promoters of Crown Point — Creation of the
Present Townships — Other County Buildings — Agitation for
Better Courthouse — The Courthouse of 1880 — The Care op the
County Poor — Courthouse Remodeled and Enlarged — Judicial
AND Official Accommodations at Hammond — Late Attempts to
Remove County Seat — Rather a Discouraging Decade — Miscel-
laneous Figures for 1847 — Prosperous Era, 1850-60 — Another
Decade of "Hard Times" — A Great Railroad Period — Religious
Statistics — Large Land Owners — Comparative Population in
1910, 1900 and 1890 — North Township, Center of Population —
Cities in the Calumet Region — The Finances of Lake County
— Value of Real Estate and Personal Property — Taxable Capac-
ity — The Roads of Lake County — Bonded Indebtedness — Finan-
cial Status of Different Roads (by Townships) 100



CHAPTER VII

CALUMET TOWNSHIP

Early Industry of Calumet Township — Tolleston, the Old Part of
Gary — ^Wonderful Rise of Gary — Griffith, Grand Railway Cross-
ing — Clarke Station — Ross — The Hornors, David and Amos —
Rev. George A. Woodbridge 128



CHAPTER VIII

CEDAR CREEK TOWNSHIP

Beautiful Laive Prairie — The Taylors — Lowell as a Timber and
Mill Seat — M. A. Halsted, Founder of Lowell — The New Hamp-
shire Settlement — Thomas and Joseph A. Little — Abiel Gerrish
— Samuel and Edward P. Ames — Recollections of ]\Irs. Nannie
W. Ames — First Settlers — The New Hampshire Settlers —
Shelby — Richard Fuller — Creston — A Patriarch Indeed. . . .134



CONTENTS xi

CHAPTER IX

CENTER TOWNSHIP

Varied and Beautiful — First Settlement — The AVarriners — Cedar
Lake's Early Fame — The Taylors and Their Connections — Cal-
vin LiLLEY AND HiS HOTEL DoCTOR LiLLEY iVND AdONIJAH TaYLOR,

Partners — Neighborhood Extends Southward — The Knicker-
bockers AND Westbrook Family — The Dilles and Warriners —
Eastern Settlement Grows — Education and Religion — The
McCartys and West Point — Lewis Warringer and Family — West
Point Abandoned — Graytown Also a Failure — Commencement of
THE "Resort" Business — Young America Is Launched — Other
Improvements — Richard Fancher and the Fair Grounds 144

CHAPTER X

EAGLE CREEK TOWNSHIP

Southeast Grove — Present Eagle Creek Township — First Settlers
— Southeast Grove Cemetery Society — Grove Schoolhouses —
Literary Wrestlings — The Turners, Dinwiddies and Pearces.156

CHAPTER XI

HANOVER TOAVNSHIP

Advance German Colonists — Henry Sasse, Sr. — Henry Von Hollen
— Lewis Herlitz — Herman Doescher — H. Klass and Klassville —
John H. Meyer, Father and Son — Founder of Hanover Center
AND Brunswick — German Lutherans, Methodists and Evangeli-
cals—Other Churches and Schools 162

CHAPTER XII

HOBART TOWNSHIP

Industrial Center Forced Westward — First Township Pioneers-
Liverpool, THE First Town— Hobart in the Rough— Lake Station
As A Good Shipping Point— Miller 's Station— New Chicago. .168



xii CONTENTS

CHAPTER XIII

NORTH TOWNSHIP

Only a General View — Another West Point — Joseph Hess and
Gibson — Hessville and Hammond — i\IuNSTER, American-Dutch
Settlement — Dutch Settlers op 1855 — Highland — Whiting and
the "Standard" — East Chicago and Indiana Harbor 173

CHAPTER XIV

ROSS TOWNSHIP

Unjust Trick of Fate — Woodvale (Deep River) — The Wood Settle-
ment AND Descendants — Lone Jere Wiggins — Saxton Absorbs the
Wiggins Claim — Merrillville Succeeds Centerville — Ainsworth
and Lottaville — More Rur.vl than Urban ISO

CHAPTER XV

ST. JOHN TOWNSHIP

In the Route of a Great Western Road — John Hack, Pioneer Ger-
man—Other Pioneer Catpiolics — Death as a Leveler of Creeds —
Church of St. John the Evangelist — Descendants of the Pioneer
German Catholics — St. John, the Village — Francis P. Keilman>j
— Dyer and A. N. Hart — ]\Ir. Hart's Death — George F. Davis,
Raiser of Fine Live Stock — Dyer of Today — Hartsdale— Nichols
Scherer and Schererville . . . '. 185

CHAPTER XVI

AVEST CREEK AND AVINFIELD TOWNSHIPS

General Features — First Settlers of AVest Creek Township —
— Joseph Jackson and the First Store — First School — The Hay-
dens AND Hatha WAYS — Pioneer Church — Northeastern Settle-
ments — The Belshaws — Elder Morrison Unmated — Pioneer
ScHooLHousEs — Early Times IN West Creek Township — Reclaim-
ing THE Swamp Lands — Winfield Township — Leroy and Palmer —
Dennis Palmer 193



CONTENTS xiii

CHAPTER XVII

SCHOOLS OF LAKE COUNTY

Mongrel Schools — First School in the County — Death of ]Mrs.
Harriet W. Holton — Mrs, Hervey (Jane A. H.) Ball — The Ball
Boarding School — First Literary Societies — East Cedar Lake
Teachers — An Old-Time Schoolhouse — School Finances — Two
Distinguished Graduates — Rev. William Townley's School — Miss
Mary E. Parsons and Mrs. Sarah J. Robinson — Other Select
Schools — Laws Affecting Lake County Schools — First Teach-
ers' Institute — William W. Cheshire— School Examiners op the
County — First Normal School — Lake County Gymnasium and
Normal School — Normal Schools Conducted by County Superin-
tendents — School and Total Population — Present-Day Field op
County Education — Outdoor Improvement of Country Schools —
Indoor Improvement — Teaching Children How to Play — Agri-
cultural Education — Wide Usefulness of Consolidated Schools
— Improving the TexVCHing Force — Statistics, 1912-14 202



CHAPTER XVIII

PROFESSIONAL REPRESENTATIVES

The Pioneer Legal Field — Judge AVilliam Clark — Judge Hervey
Ball — Doctor and Judge H. D. Palmer— First Practicing Lawyer
— Other Pioneer "Judges" — Welcome to the Marriage Feast —
I^Iartin Wood and His Good Works — Timothy Cleveland — Hon.
Thaddeus S. Fancher— a Founder of the Drainage System—
Elihu Griffin — Charles S. Griffin, Secretary of State— Hon.
J. W. YoucHE — The Late J. Frank Meeker — Hon. Johannes
Kopelke — Present-Day Judiciary — Hon. J. H. Gillett — Hon. Wil-
lis C. ]\IcMahan— Hon. Virgil S. Reiter— Hon. Lawrence Becker
—Hon. Charles E. Greenwald— James A. Patterson— Father
of the Superior Courthouse— United States Courts at Hammond
— Present Bar of High Grade— Hon. E. C. Field — Peter Crum-
PACKER— A. F. Knotts— Frank N. Gavit— Lake County Bar Asso-
ciation—Congressional AND Legislative Districts— Hon. Thomas
J. Wood— Represented the Old Colfax District— Hon. John B.

Peterson The First Two Physicians— Not Outdone by Any

Indian— Drs. Yeoman and Farrington— Dr. A. J. Pratt— Dr.



CONTENTS

Harvey Pettibone — Dr. Henry Pettibone — Dr. John Higgins —
Other Early Physicians of Crown Point — Drs. P. P.
AND Edward R. Gordon — Other Hob art Physicians — Coro-
ner Frank W. Smith — Dr. H. L. Iddings, Merrillville
— Lake County ]\Iedical Association — Dr. W. F. Howat — Crown
Point, Earliest Newspaper Center — Fathers of Lake County
Journalism — Crown Point Register Appears — Colonel John
Wheeler — Zerah F. Summers — John Millikan, Veteran — Lake
County Star and John J. Wheeler — The Press of Hammond —
East Chicago — The Call, of Whiting — Lowell Newspapers — The
Press of Hobart — Gary Fertile in Newspapers 226



CHAPTER XIX

THE MILITIA AND WAR

The Mexican War — Joseph P. Smith Raises Company — The Civil
War Record — Honored Dead — Nashville as a Graveyard —
Charles Ball and Stillman A. Robbins — Other Deaths of Lake
County Soldiers — Capt. John M. Foster — Sketch of the Twelfth
Cavalry — Capt. W. S. Babbitt — Lieut. John P. Merrill — Vet-
eran OF Mexican and Civil Wars — How the Women Aided — Two
Grand War Nurses — Soldiers' Monument for Southern Lake
County — Memorial Unveiled — Mrs. Abbie Cutler — Spanish-Amer-
ican War 254



CHAPTER XX

MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION

Effect of the Railroads on Primitive Life — The Yoke Removed from
THE Oxen — The Passing of the Old Order — First Railroads in
Lake County — Pioneer Railway Stations — Hobart and Tolleston
— The Pan Handle Comes — The Baltimore & Ohio — The Grand
Trunk's IMiek Train — The Nickel Plate, Erie and Monon Lines
— The I. I. I. — Railroads of Thirty Years Ago — Early Road
Building in the Kankakee Marshes — Calumet Region Asserts
Itself — East Chicago Arises — ^Whiting and the Standard Oil
Company — Hammond Forges Ahead — The Wabash Line — Pros-
perous Exposition Year — Local Phases of Great Railroad Strike



CONTENTS XV

— The Two Hammond Factions — First Electric Line — Building
OF Gravel Koads — The Belt Lines — State Line Interlocking
Plant — Expansion of Electric Systems — Gary & Interurban
Railway — Chicago, Lake Shore & South Bend — Hammond, Whit-
ing & East Chicago Line — Railroad Yards and Works — Notable
Feature of the Present 263

CHAPTER XXI

CALUMET REGION INDUSTRIES

The Hohmans of Hammond — Other Pioneer Families — Rise of the
Fresh Beef Business — Shipping Company Formed — State Line
Slaughter House Founded — The Hohman Boarding House —
Start of Hammond — Marcus H. Towle — First Shipment of Re-
frigerated Beef — ]\Ir. Towle and ]Mr. Hammond Differ — Thomas
Hammond Enters Business — A Big, Warm Man — Burning op
Slaughter House — James N. Young — The W. B. Conkey Plant
— Simplex Railway Appliance Company — Standard Steel Car
Works — Illinois Car and Equipment Company — Fitz Hugh
Luther Company — Northern Indiana Gas and Electric Works
— F. S. Betz Manufactory — American Maize Company — Food
Products of Reid, Murdoch & Company — Champion Potato Ma-
chines — Staube Piano Plant — The Hammond Distillery — The
Hammond Elevator — Enterprise Bed Company — East Chicago
Founded — The Inland Steel Company's Works — Indiana Har-
bor Industries — American Steel Foundries — Other Steel Plants
— Green Engineering Company — Aluminum Factory — Refining
Companies — Utilization of Tin "Waste" — The Grasselli Chem-
ical Works — Cudahy Products — East Chicago Docks — Inter-
state Iron and Steel Plant — Hubbard Steel Foundries — The
Limbert Works — Republic Iron and Steel Works — Makers of
Steel Tanks — Asphalt Electric Conduits — Electric Power
Plant — Rivet and Bolt Manufactory — A Large Subject — Stand-
ard Oil Plant at Whiting — Historical and Descriptive — Orig-
.inal Owners of the Whiting Plat — First Builders of the Oil
Plant — Oil Cloth and Asphalt Factories— Gary, Young But
Quite Finished — Transportation by Land and Water — The Face
OF Nature Changed— Some Big Facts About the Steel Mills-
American Sheet and Tin Plate Plant — Universal Portland
Cement Company — American Bridge Company, Ambridge — Gary
Bolt and Screw Works — Industries of the Future — Industrial
Summary 285



xvi CONTENTS

CHAPTER XXII

BANKS AND BANKERS

In Honor of John Brown — Thei Speakers — First National Bank of
Crown Point — Personal Side of John Brown — Second Bank in
THE County — First National Bank of Hammond — Founded by
]\Iessrs. Towle and Hammond — Reorganized by Messrs. Turner
AND Belman — First Trust Company — Other Financial Pioneers
— Absorption of the Commercial Bank — Lake County Savings
AND Trust Company — Citizens German National — State National
Bank of Lowell — Bank of Whitlkg — First National, of Whit-
ing — East Chicago Bank — First National, of East Chicago — In-
diana Harbor National Bank — First Calumet Trust and Savings
Bank — First State Bank of Tolleston — First National Bank op
Gary — Gary State Bank — Northern State Bank — South Side
Trust and Savings Bank — Other Late Banks and Trust Compa-
nies — Commercial and Peoples State Banks, Crown Point —
Lowell National Bank — First National Bank, Dyer — Farmers
AND Merchants Bank, Highland 325



CHAPTER XXIII

HAMMOND AS A CORPORATION

Short Town Regime — Municipal Incorporation — Growth by AYards



Online LibraryWilliam Frederick HowatA standard history of Lake County, Indiana, and the Calumet region (Volume 1) → online text (page 1 of 44)