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GIFT OF

R.D .LlNQUii>T





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ELSON
GEAMMAR SCHOOL READER

book: threej



BT

WILLIAM H. ELSON



CHRISTINE KECK

PBINCIFAI. or SIOSBBB SCHOOL, O&INO Bif IDS, MICK.



SCOTT, FORESMAN AND COMPANY
CHICAGO NEW YORK



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Copyright, 1910
SCOTT, FOBESMAN AND COBiPAlIT



Gift

EDUCATION DEPT.

.D .LlNQUiST



ft



ROBCRT O. LAW COMPANY,
PRINTERS AND BINDERS CHICAGO.



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TABLE OF CONTENTS

PABT I — Patriotic SelectioiiB and Nature Poems

TATBIOTISM: PAOl

What Constitutes a State! Sir William Jones 15

A Song op the Camp Bayard Taylor 17

The Flag Goes By Henry H, Bennett 20

Abraham Lincoln Bichard Henry Stoddard. . 22

Chabacter of Columbus Archbishop Corrigan 23

NoETH American Indlans Charles Sprague 25

The Landing of the Pilgrim Fath-

EEts Felicia Eemans 27

The Character of Washington .... Thomas Jeferson 29

The American Flag Henry Ward Beecher 32

Nolan's Speech Edward Everett Hale 34

Tales op a Grandfather Sir Walter Scott

The Story of Sir William Wallace 35

BoBERT the Bruce 43

The Battle of Bannockburn 55

The Exploits op Douglas and Eandolph 61

BIBBS:

To A Skylark William Wordsworth 70

The Throstle Alfred Lord Tennyson 70

To THE Cuckoo William Wordsworth 72

The Sandpiper Celia Thaxter 74

The Belfry Pigeon Nathaniel Parker Willis. . . 76

BoBERT OF Lincoln William Cullen Bryant 79

The Birds' Orchestra Celia Thaxter 82

FLOWEBS:

ViolbtI Sweet Violet James Bussell Lowell 83

Sweet Peas John Keats 85

To A Mountain Daisy Bohert Burns 86

To the Dandelion James Bussell Lowell 89

To the Fringed Gentian William Cullen Bryant. ... 92

The Daffodils William Wordsworth 93

The Use of Flowers Mary Eowitt 95

Chorus of Flowers Leigh Hunt 97

WINTEB:

The Frost Spirit John Greenleaf Whittier. . 101

The Frost Hannah Flagg Gould 103

Snow-Flakes Henry W. Longfellow 105

The Snow Storm Balph Waldo Emerson 106

Midwinter John T. Trowbridge 108



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^ Table of Contents

SHAKESPEABE SONGS: PAGB

Under the Greenwood Tree HO

Hark, Hark, the Lark • • • HI

Orpheus with His Lute 112

Come Unto These Yellow Sands H^

Over Hill, Over Dale 114

Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind 114

When Icicles Hang by the Wall 116

Scrooge's Christmas. Adapted from Dickens's Christmas CaroL . 117

PART n— King Axthur Stories

Introduction 145

The Coming op Arthur 148

The Story of Gareth 168

The Peerless Knight Lancelot 186

The Passing op Arthur 211

The Coming of Arthur. . ) Selections ( Alfred Lord Tennyson 232

iThb Passing of Arthur. ) from ( Alfred Lord Tennyson, . . . 236

PAET ni — Great American Authors

Biographies 245

Washington Irving

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow 257

William Cullen Bryant

Song op Marion's Men 291

The Hurricane 294

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The Courtship op Miles Standish •. 297

The Builders 341

The Skeleton in Armor 344

The Arsenal at Springfield : 351

The Day is Done 353

Balph Waldo Emerson

Hymn 356

Forbearance 357

Nathaniel Hawthorne

A Bill from the Town-Pump 358

The Pine- Tree Shillings 365

James Eussell Lowell

The Heritage 370

The Fatherland 373

The Shepherd of King Admetus 375

John Greenleaf Whittier

Maud Muller 378

Oliver Wendell Holmes

The Flower of Liberty 385

The Height op the Eidiculous 387

Edgar Allan Poe

The Island op the Fay 389

Sidney Lanier

From Morn Till Night on a Florida Eiveb 393



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COURSE OF READING

In the EL80N READERS selections are grouped according to theme or
authorship. This arrangement, however, is not intended to fix an order for
reading in class; its purpose is to emphasize classification, facilitate compari-
son, and enable pupils to appreciate similarities and contrasts in the treat-
ment of like themes "by different authors.

To give variety, to meet the interests at different seasons and festivals,
and to go from prose to poetry and from long to short selections, a care-
fully planned order of reading should he followed. Such an order of reading
calls for a full consideration of all the factors mentioned above. The Course
here offered meets these ends hut may easily he varied to fit local conditions,

FIRST HALF-YEAR

BIOGRAPHT OF HAWTHORNE (250)

THE PINE-TREE SHILLINGS (3<iO)

A RILL FROM THE TOWN PDMP (358)

THE BELFRY PIGEON (76)

INTRODUCTION KINO ARTHUR STORIES (145)

THE COMING OF ARTHUR (148)

THE COMING OF ARTHUR (232)

THE STORY OF GARETH (162)

BIOGRAPHY OF POE (254)

THE ISLAND OF THE FAY (389)

CHARACTER OF COLUMBUS (23) COLUMBUS'S BIRTHDAY, OCT. 12

BIOGRAPHY OF HOLMES (253)

THE FLOWER OF LIBERTY (385)

THE HEIGHT OF THE RIDICULOUS (387)

NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS (25)

BIOGRAPHY OF BRYANT (247)

ROBERT OF LINCOLN (79)

TO THE FRINGED GENTIAN (92)

SONG OF MARION'S MEN (291)

THE HURRICANE (294)

THE LANDING OF THE PILGRIM FATHERS (27) THANKSGIVING

BIOGRAPHY OF WHITTIER (252) WHITTIER'S BIRTHDAY, DEC. 17

MAUD MULLER (378)

SCROOGE'S CHRISTMAS (117) CHRISTMAS

THE FROST SPIRIT (101)

THE FROST (103)

SNOW-FLAKES (105)

THE SNOW STORM (106)

MIDWINTER (108)

BLOW, BLOW, THOU WINTER WIND (114)

WHEN ICICLES HANG BY THE WALL (116) ^

THE PEERLESS KNIGHT LANCELOT (186)

THE PASSING OP ARTHUR (211)

THE PASSING OF ARTHUR (236)

5



.BRYANT'S BIRTHDAY, NOV. 3



. WINTER



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Course of Reading



. LONGFELLOW'S BIRTHDAY, FEB. 27



SECOND HALF-TEAR

WHAT CONSTITUTES A STATE? (15)
A SONG OF THE CAMP (17)
THE AMERICAN FLAG (32)
THE FLAG GOES BY (20)
NOLAN'S SPEECH (34)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN (22) LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY, FEB. 12

THE CHARACTER OF WASHINGTON (29) WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY, FEB. 22

BIOGRAPHY OF JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL (251) 1

THE HERITAGE (370) }-. .LOWELL'S BIRTHDAY, FEB. 22

THE FATHERLAND (373) J

THE SHEPHERD OF KING ADMETUS (375)

THE BIOGRAPHY OF LONGFELLOW (249)

THE BUILDERS (341)

THE SKELETON IN ARMOR (344)

THE ARSENAL AT SPRINGFIELD (351)

THE DAY IS DONE (353)

THE COURTSHIP OF MILES STANDISH (297)

BIOGRAPHY OF IRVING (245) ^ TRVTNa's utrtwhay aputt ^

THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW (257) j IRVING S BIRTHDAY, APRIL 3

BIOGRAPHY OF EMERPON (250) EMERSON'S BIRTHDAY, MAY 25

HYMN (356) (APRIL 19)

FORBEARANCE (357)

UNDER THE GREENWOOD TREE (110) ]

HARK, HARK, THE I.ARK (111)

ORPHEUS WITH HIS LUTE (112) >-. SHAKESPEARE'S BIRTHDAY, APRIL 23

COME UNTO THESE YELLOW SANDS (113)

OVER HILL, OVER DALE (114)

TO A SKYLARK (70)

THE THROSTLE (70)

TO THE CUCKOO (72)

THE SANDPIPER (74)

THE BIRDS' ORCHESTRA (82)

TALES OF A GRANDFATHER (35)

VIOLET, SWEET VIOLET (83)

SWEET PEAS (85)

TO A MOUNTAIN DAISY (86)

BIOGRAPHY OF LANIER (255) LANIER'S BIRTHDAY, FEB. 3

FROM MORN TILL NIGHT ON A FLORIDA RIVER (393)

TO THE DANDELION (89)

THE DAFFODILS (93)

THE USE OF FLOWERS (95)

CHORUS OF FLOWERS (97)



. SPRING



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INTEODIJCTIOlf.

This book is designed to furnish a rich and varied supply of
reading matter suited to the interests and needs of children in
the latter part of their grammar school work. The selections,
chosen from among the masterpieces of English and American
literature, are offered because of their beauty and worth —
because they are good to read and to re-read. The groupings
into separate parts will aid both teachers and pupils in classify-
ing the material, indicating at a glance the range and variety of
literature included.

Part One includes both poetry and prose, and the selections
offered are of superior excellence. The stirring notes of patriot-
ism from our American authors find fitting supplement in the
captivating stories of Sir Walter Scott, which have delighted
old and young for many generations. These furnish a basis in
enthusiasm for the appeal to heroism and devotion. The series of
nature poems and songs from Shakespeare fittingly complete a
group of literary creations, notable for their beauty of expression
and their clearness of thought and imagery.

Part Two contains some of the romances of King Arthur
and his Knights of the Round Table. These beautiful legends
of adventure and chivalry which have charmed old and young
for countless generations furnish exceptional materials for in-
culcating some fundamental qualities of human character. For
the lesson of these brave knights going forth to render loving
service to others, overcoming evil in the pursuit of good, de-
veloping in themselves the divine qualities of purity, benevolence,
and good-will, must make powerfully for righteousness in the
youthful reader, the would-be knight of the present.

Part Three is given to a study of the great American authors,
and no apology is needed either for the choice of material or
for the list of names included. They represent the makers of ouj:

7

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8 Elson Grammar School Reader Book Three

American literature and the selections chosen, both prose and
poetry, are from the best of the authors^ writings. From Irving
to Holmes, the spirit and thoughts of our developing nation are
portrayed in a distinctively American literature, and some of
the choicest treasures of that creative period are here brought
together. Through these, the children may become familiar with
the life of the past and may be made conscious of some of its
lessons for the present and the future.

The biographies are intended to acquaint the children with
the personal characteristics and lives of the authors, making them
more interesting and real to the children, giving them the human
touch and incidentally furnishing helpful data for interpreting
their writings. The Biographical Introduction to Part III gives
a related story of the lives of the American authors from whose
writings selections have been made in this book. "Helps to
Study'' include questions and notes designed to stimulate inquiry
on the part of pupils and to suggest fruitful lines of study. Only
a, ihw points are suggested, to indicate the way, and no attempt
is made to cover the ground in all directions; this remains for
the teacher to do.

It is not expected that the order of selections will be followed.
On the contrary, each teacher will follow the order which will
best suit his own plans and purposes. While there is much
material in the book that will reenf orce lessons in history, geog-
raphy, and nature study, yet it is not for this that these selec-
tions should be studied, but rather for the pleasure that comes
from reading beautiful thoughts beautifully expressed. The
reading lesson should therefore be a study of literature, and it
should lead the children to find beauty of thought and feeling,
fitness in figures of speech, and delicate shades of meaning in
words. Literature is an art, and the chief aim of the reading
lesson is to discover and interpret its art qualities. In this way
children learn how to read books and are enabled to appreciate
the literary treasures of the race. The business of the reading
book is to furnish the best available material for this purpose.

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Introduction 9

It is worth while to make a thorough study of a few well-
chosen selections. Through the power gained in this way
children are enabled to interpret and enjoy other selections with-
out the aid of the teacher. If the class work is for the most part
of the intensive kind, the pupil will read the remaining lessons
alone for the pleasure of it, which is at once the secret and goal
of good teaching in literature. Moreover, he will be led to
exercise discriminating taste and judgment in his choice' of
reading matter. To love good literature, to find pleasure in read-
ing it and to gain power to choose it with discrimination are the
supreme ends to be attained by the reading lesson. For this rea-
son, some selections should be read many times for the pleasure
they give the children. In music the teacher sometimes calls for
expressions of preference among songs: "What song shall we
sing, children ?'^ So in reading, "What selection shall we read ?'^
is a good question for the teacher to ask frequently. Thus children
come to make familiar friends of some of the stories and poems,
and find genuine enjoyment in reading these again and again.

Good results may also be obtained by assigning to a pupil a
particular lesson which he is expected to prepare. On a given
day he will read to the class the selection assigned to him. The
pupil who can read one selection well has gone a long way to-
ward being a good reader. The teacher who said to her pupils,
"I shall read to you tomorrow,^^ recognized the value of an occa-
sional exercise of this kind in arousing the interest of her pupils.
Good pedagogy approves of a judicious use of methods of imi-
tation in teaching reading.

A. T. Quiller-Couch says: "I believe that if, for one-half
hour a day; a teacher were to read good poetry aloud with his
pupils, not fretting them with comments, not harrying then}
with too frequent questions, but doing his best by voice and
manner to hold their attention, and encourage them to read
in their turn, pausing only at some salient beauty, or some un-
usual difficulty, above all giving the poetry time to sink in — I
believe thoroughly he would find himself rewarded beyond all



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10 Elson Grammar School Reader Booh Three

calculations. For a child^s mind is a wonderful worker if we
only trust it. A child's imagination is as susceptible of im-
provement by exercise as his judgment or memory. Can we
not so persuade our schoolmasters that our children may hear
this music more clearly and more constantly than we?"

While placing emphasis primarily on the thought-getting
process the formalities of thought-giving must not be overlooked.
The technique of reading, though always subordinate and
secondary to the mastery of the thought, nevertheless claims con-
stant and careful attention. Good reading requires clear enun-
ciation and correct pronunciation, and these can be secured only
when the teacher steadily insists upon them. The increase of
foreign elements in our school population and the influence of
these upon clearness and accuracy of speech furnish added reason
for attention to these details. Special drill exercises should be
given and the habit of using the dictionary freely should be
firmly established in pupils. The ready use of the dictionary
flnd other reference books for pronunciation and meaning of
words, for historical and mythical allusions should be steadily
cultivated. Without doubt much of the reading accepted in
the public schools is seriously deficient in these particulars. The
art of good reading can be cultivated by judicious training and
the school should spare no pains to realize this result.

Professor Clark, in his book on "How to Teach Eeading,''
sets forth clearly the situation. We quote a few of the sen-
tences from his treatment of these important topics:

Appreciation of the meaning and beauty of literature is the first
requisite of a successful teacher of reading; and yet in many parts
of the country there are a surprising number who are called upon to
teach with scarcely more than an elementary training in literature. Ab
a result too many teachers have no love for literature.

OBJECTS TO BE ATTAINED.

It may be asked, what objects are to be attained as a result of
reading lessons? First, the power to extract thought from the printed
page. After we leave school, our information is gained from books;
and what we get from these is largely determined by our school
training. Our system of education has much to answer for in failing



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Introduction 11

to provide this training. The value of vocal expression is not to be
depreciated, but of the utmost importance is the ability to get the
author's meaning. Our teaching, from the primary grade to the
university, should never lose sight of its responsibility in this regard.
In the words of Carlyle: '*What the universities can mainly do for
you, what I have found the university did for me, was, that it taught
me to read." This remark, of course, applies to silent reading. A
well-known college professor, in response to a school superintendent's
question as to what would better the preparation of students for col-
lege, replied: ** Teach them how to read." Another college instructor
— a learned authority on geology — remarks that he finds occasion to
say to his classes about once a month, ''It's a great thing to be abl«
to read a page of English." No one who examines the reading ib
our schools can fail to be impressed, not so much with the absence of
expressive power, as with the absence of mental grasp. We are so
anxious to get on that we are content with skimming the surface, and
do not take the time to get beneath it. The reading lesson should be^
primarily, a thinking lesson, and every shade of thought should bf
carefullj^ distinguished, no matter how long a time may be consumed.
The habit of hurrying over the page, which is so prevalent, is clearly
an outgrowth of schoolroom methods. Careless of all the future, we
are too prone to push the pupil along, ignoring the simplest and most
evident of psychological laws, that thought comes by thinking, and
thinking takes time. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ And there is no better way to de-
velop such a thinking person than by that thought analysis which is
the first and indispensable step to true oral expression. ♦ ♦ ♦ •
Training in thought-getting is, then, the first result to be expected
from the reading lesson. The second is the power of adequate vocal
expression.

TEAIN THE IMAGINATION.

The most important fact to be borne in mind in endeavoring to
develop the pupil's sympathy with what he describes is this: imita»
tion of sounds, and of gestures, and of movement, is a very low order
of 'irt. "We cannot imitate thunder, but we can show in our voices
the awe that it inspires. When we unconsciously hurry our reading
under the impulse the imagination receives from contemplating, let
us say, the rapid movement of a cavalry charge, we do so not in imita°
tion of, but in sympathy with, the picture. This is noi? primarily a
question of art, but of nature. It is only ignorant teaching that says
to a pupil, '*Is that the way the thunder roars?" or "Read more
rapidly; don't you see that you are describing the flight of the
horses?" Furthermore, if we read slowly a passage describing a
funeral procession, there is no conscious imitation of slowness, out
a sympathy with the solemnity, stateliness and dignity of the occa-
sion.

A very little observation will show us whether the imitation it
conscious or sympathetic. In the former case, th* Toice will be
expressing merely speed or sloYmess. In the latter, there will be speed
or slowness, too, but accompanied by an indefinable and yet recog^
nizable quality of voice, which is the expression of our sympathy,
This is an infallible criterion.



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12 Elson Orammar School Reader Booh Three

Lastly, it must be urged that we give more time to this work.
The imagination cannot be developed in a week or a month; and
unless there is imagination, there can be no sympathy. It is dif-
ficult to restrain one's self and not dwell longer on the value of the
training of the imagination. We have no hesitation in saying that
that feature of education is the most neglected. Such training as is
here suggested will, in many cases, xo much to bring about a more
favorable condition of affairs. But it takes time, and plenty of it.
The teacher should read to the class quite often such passages as are
likely to stimulate the imagination. Make the class follow attentively
and get them to give back the picture, as far as possible, in minutest
detail. Do this again and again and improvement must follow. Just
in proportion as the imagination is stimulated may we hope for a
better class of reading. We have no time to teach any subject poorly!
♦ * * * It should be impressed upon pupils from the outset that
they are studying the thoughts and feelings of others that find ex-
pression in words upon the printed page. They must discover the
thoughts behind the words and then express them; that is all there
is to reading.

THINGS TO AVOID.

Avoid, and the admonition is repeated once more, talking to the
pupils about inflection, pause, and the like. These are instinctive
manifestations of mental states, and will appear when the conditions
are right.

Let the teacher not follow slavishly the order of lessons in the
regular reading book. Let him choose such selections or parts of
them as offer the best opportunity for practice where the class most
needs it. Let him further find extracts from outside sources for class
use. They may be written on the board or mimeographed.

It has been said that we must have a technique if we would read.
This may be granted; but it is equally to be granted that the principal
technique is mental, and, moreover, that, in the public schools, our
aim is to produce simple, natural, expressive readers, not artistic
actors and orators. There is, then, no necessity for drills on in-
flection, time, modulation, and the like, as such. Give the pupil all
the drill that is necessary on the states of mind producing these effects,
but let us never separate the technique from the mental condition that
will find instinctive expression in that technique. Expression grows
through expressing. If we will bear this in mind, and present the
right thoughts and emotions to be expressed, at the right time, there
should and will be no difficulty.

The best way to learn to love good literature is to study only good



Online LibraryWilliam H ElsonElson grammar school readers. Books 1-4 → online text (page 1 of 31)