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William Heard Kilpatrick.

Inauguration of the Statue of Liberty enlightening the world : by the president of the United States, on Bedlow's Island, New York, Thursday, October 28, 1886 online

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INAUGURATION OF

THE STATUE OF

LIBERTY ENLIGHTENING

THE WORLD

BY THE

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES



ON BEDLOW'S ISLAND, NEW YORK
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1886



Issued under the Authority of the Committee



NEW YORK

D. APPLETON AND COMPANY

1887



As it would seem that many thousand Americans
should wish to possess a memorial of the magnificent
ceremonial connected with the unveiling, by the Presi-
dent of the United States, of Bartholdi's famous statue
of " Liberty Enlightening the World," on Bedlow's Isl-
and, Thursday, October 28, 1886, the following account
of the proceedings, including the addresses in full, has
been prepared under the authority of the American
Committee. To the above have been added a brief
history of the statue, and the beautiful engraving which
was executed as the invitation-card to the historic cere-
monial, forming altogether a most attractive souvenir of
an event of national importance, and one tending to
form an enduring bond between the two great sister
republics, France and the United States.

New York, November, 1886.




/'••vox & AN
OATIOHS



LIBERTY
ENLIGHTENING THE WORLD.



JOINT RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE PRESIDENT
TO DESIGNATE AND SET APART A SITE FOR
THE COLOSSAL STATUE OF " LIBERTY EN-
LIGHTENING THE WORLD," AND TO PROVIDE
FOR THE PERMANENT MAINTENANCE AND
PRESERVATION THEREOF.

Whereas, The President has communicated to
Congress the information that citizens of the
French Republic propose to commemorate the one
hundredth anniversary of our independence by
erecting, at their own cost, a colossal bronze
statue of " Liberty Enlightening the World," upon
a pedestal of suitable proportions, to be built by
private subscriptions, upon one of the islands be-
longing to the United States, in the harbor of
New York ; and

Whereas, It is proper to provide for the care
and preservation of this grand monument of art,



6 INAUGURATION OF THE

and of the abiding friendship of our ancient ally ;
therefore

Be it Resolved by the Senate and House of Repre-
sentatives of the United States of America in Con-
gress assembled, That the President of the United
States be and he is hereby authorized and di-
rected to accept the colossal statue of " Liberty
Enlightening the World," when presented by
citizens of the French Republic, and to designate
and set apart for the erection thereof a suitable site
upon either Governor's or Bedlow's Island, in the
harbor of New York, and upon the completion
thereof shall cause the same to be inaugurated
with such ceremonies as will serve to testify the
gratitude of our people for this expressive and
felicitous memorial of the sympathy of the citizens
of our sister Republic; and he is hereby author-
ized to cause suitable regulations to be made for
its future maintenance as a beacon, and for the
permanent care and preservation thereof as a
monument of art, and of the continued good will
of the great nation which aided us in our struggle
for freedom.

Approved March 3, 1877.



STATUE OF LIBERTY.



PROCEEDINGS IN PARIS.

Americans who were so fortunate as to be
in Paris on the 4th of July, 1884, witnessed
perhaps the most notable celebration of the
day that has ever been held in the Old World.
The statue of " Liberty," by Bartholdi, cer-
tainly had much to do with the greatness of
the occasion. Appropriate addresses were made
by M. de Lesseps and Levi P. Morton, the
American Minister, and the following letter
was read :

Presidence du Conseil,

Paris, Friday, July 4.

My dear Mr. Morton: I have been, as per-
haps you know, seriously indisposed, and in order
to be equal to all my duties am obliged to care
for myself to an extent to which I have not
been accustomed. My labors of yesterday fa-
tigued me much, and I am recommended to take
to-day the most absolute repose.

The Government of the Republic will be repre-
sented to-day in j'our presence by several minis-
ters. For me will remain all the regret of not



8 INAUGURATION OF THE

being able to be present in person at this festival
in honor of the fraternity of two great republics ;
but you are assured that I shall be there in spirit,
heart, and soul.

Accept, my dear Mr. Morton, my entire de-
votion. Jules Ferry.



THE PROCES-VERBAL.

The following is a translation of the pro-
ccs-verbal of the proceedings at the presenta-
tion, which was contained in a box, in itself
a marvelous specimen of the French gold-
smith's art.

The 4th of July, 1884, anniversary day of
American Independence.

In the presence of M. Jules Ferry, Minister
of Foreign Affairs of France, and President of the
Council of Ministers.

Count Ferdinand de Lesseps, in the name of
the Committee of the Franco-American Union,
and of the national manifestation of which that
committee has been the organ, has presented the
colossal statue of " Liberty Enlightening the



STATUE OF LIBERTY. 9

World," the work of the sculptor Bartholdi, to
his Excellency Mr. Morton, United States Minister
at Paris, praying- him to be the interpreter of the
national sentiment of which this work is the ex-
pression.

Mr. Morton, in the name of his compatriots,
thanks the French-American Union for this testi-
mony of sympathy from the French people ; he
declares that in virtue of the powers conferred
upon him by the President of the United States,
and the committee of the work in America, repre-
sented by its honorable President, Mr. William M.
Evarts, he accepts the statue, and that it shall be
erected in conformity with the vote of Congress
of the 22d of February, 1877, in the harbor of
New York as a souvenir of the unalterable friend-
ship of two nations.

In faith of which there have signed :
In the name of France,

M. Jules Ferry,

Minister of Foreign Affairs.
In the name of the United States,
Mr. Morton,

Minister of the United States.
In the name of the French-American Committee,
M. Ferdinand de Lesseps.



IO INAUGURATION OF THE

This proces-verbal was taken to M. Jules
Ferry in order to obtain his signature, he, as
previously stated, being unable to be present.



The French frigate I sere arrived in the
Lower Bay of New York, on Wednesday,
June 17, 1885, and two days later she was
escorted, with imposing ceremonies, by a large
American squadron, to Bedlow's Island, where
Bartholdi's famous statue of Liberty was safely
landed on the afternoon of June 19th. The
naval display, with the advantage of perfect
weather, was brilliant and successful. Admiral
Lacombe and his staff witnessed a fine military
and civic procession in honor of the occasion,
and were officially received by the mayor of the
city of New York.



STATUE OF LIBERTY. \\



War Department,
Washington City, September 27, 1886.



\

General: Among the requirements of the
Joint Resolution of Congress, approved March 3,
1877, authorizing the President to assign and set
apart a site on which to erect the colossal statue
of " Liberty Enlightening the World," is one that,
after the completion of certain preliminaries, the
President shall cause the statue to be inaugurated
with such ceremonies " as will serve to testify the
gratitude of our people," etc.

As the proper performance of this duty would
require of the President frequent personal confer-
ences with the Committee charged with making
arrangements for the inauguration of the statue, of
which the conveniences of the public business re-
quiring his personal attention would not admit, he
has designated you to represent him on the occa-
sion of the inauguration of the statue, and desires
you to consult freely with the Committee having
charge of the ceremonies, and act in accord
with their views and wishes in carrying out the
programme which that Committee may agree
upon.

As the use of the military force in the harbor of
New York may be asked to take part in the cere-
monies of the occasion, you are at liberty to give



I2 INAUGURATION OF THE

orders to all troops, whether under your command
as Division Commander or not, to participate to
the extent required of them.
Very respectfully,

Your obedient servant,
(Signed) R. C. Drum,

Acting Secretary of War.

Major-General J. M. Schofield,

Commanding- Division of the Atiantic,

Governor 's Island, New York Harbor.



INAUGURATION CEREMONIES.

The following general outline of a plan fcr
the ceremonies attending the inauguration of the
statue of " Liberty Enlightening the World " has
been approved by Major-General Schofield, to take
place Thursday, October 28, 1886:

First.— A military, naval, and civic parade in
New York City. The march of the column to ter-
minate at the Battery, and at other piers in the
lower part of the city, where steamers will be taken
for Bedlow's Island. The positions of the various
organizations in the column will be such that, in
turning off to the piers from which they are to em-



STATUE OF LIBERTY.



13



bark, there will be no crossing of columns or delay
in the march.

Second. — At a given signal the steamers, pre-
ceded by such ships of war as may be present, will
move in a prescribed order to Bedlow's Island, and
will occupy their designated positions.

Note. — The limited area and wharfage of the island will only-
permit of the landing of a comparatively small proportion of those
who may wish to take part in the ceremonies. Hence, the lead-
ing steamers only will touch at the wharf, while all the others will
be assigned positions from which the ceremonies may be seen.

Third. — Appropriate ceremonies at the base of
the statue to be concluded near the hour of sun-
set.

Fourth. — A national salute from all the batteries
in the harbor, ashore and afloat. During the sa-
lute the guests and others on the island will re-
embark, and the vessels of the fleet will return to
their wharves.

Fifth. — The ceremonies will be concluded by
the illumination of the statue.

All military, naval, and civic societies and or-
ganizations which desire to take part in the parade
will make early application to the American Com-
mittee, at No. 33 Mercer Street, New York City,
or to the Grand Marshal, No. 1 Broadway, so that
places may be assigned them in the column, and



I4 INAUGURATION OF THE

the detailed programme of the parade made public
in due time.

The Committee will furnish transportation only
for those who are to take part in the ceremonies at
the statue, and those guests who are provided with
tickets admitting them to seats upon the platform.
All others who may wish to take passage upon the
bay will provide their own transportation.

Approved :

(Signed) J. M. Schofield,

Major- General.

Published by order of the American Committee
of the Statue of Liberty.

(Signed) Richard Butler,

Secretary.

General Charles P. Stone has been appointed
Grand Marshal of the parade to take place in the
City of New York.

The senior officer of the U. S. Navy who may
be present is expected to act as Admiral of the
Fleet, and direct the movements of all vessels tak-
ing part in the parade upon the bay.

Official: J. P. Sanger,

Brevet Major U. S. Army,
Aide-de-Camp,



STATUE OF LIBERTY. I5

MEMBERS OF THE FRENCH DELEGATION
PRESENT AT THE CEREMONIES.

Mr. le Comte Ferdinand de Lesseps,

President du Comite' de I 'Union Franco- Amir icaine.

Mr. and Mme. Aug. Bartholdi.
Mr. l'Amiral Jaures, Senateur,

Mr. le General Pelissier, Senateur,

De'ligues par le Senat.

Mr. E. Spuller, Depute,

Mr. DESMONS, Depute,

DelSguis par la Chambre des De'putis.

Mr. Villegente, Lieut, de Vaisseau,

Aide-de-camp du Ministre de la Marine.

Mr. le Colonel Bureau de Pusy,

Delegue" par le Ministre de la Guerre.

Mr. le Colonel Laussedat,

Directeur de V Ecole des Arts et Metiers.

Mr. Leon Robert,

Chef de Cabinet du Ministre de I 'Instruction Publique.

Mr. Deschamps,

Vice-President du Conseil Municipal de Paris.
Mr. HlELARD,

Meinbre delegue de la Chambre de Commerce de Paris.



1 6 INAUGURATION OF THE

Mr. GlROUD,

Ancien Depute, deUgue" du Ministre du Commerce.

Mr. Charles Bigot,

Ddldgui par la presse de Paris.

Mr. Napoleon Ney,

President de la Societi de Geographie Commercials

Mr. Leon Meunier,

Membre correspondant de I' Union Franco-Americaine.



ORDER OF EXERCISES, ON BEDLOWS ISLAND,
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1886.

I. Music during the landing and seating of
the assembly.

II. Signal-gun.

III. Prayer by Rev. Richard S. Storrs, D. D.

IV. Count Ferdinand de Lesseps, on behalf

of Franco-American Union.

V. Presentation Address, Hon. William M.
Evarts.

VI. Unveiling.



VII. Salute. A salvo from all the guns in the
harl

VIII. Music.



harbor.



STATUE OF LIBERTY. jy

IX. Acceptance of the Statue by the President.

X. Representative on behalf of the Republic
of France, le Ministre Plenipotentiaire,
Delegue Extraordinaire, A. Lefaivre.

XL Music.

XII. Commemorative Address, Hon. Chauncey
M. Depew.

XIII. Music. Doxology — Tune, Old Hundred — in

which the assembly is invited to join.

Praise God, from whom all blessings flow ;
Praise Him, all creatures here below ;
Praise Him above, ye heavenly host ;
Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. — Amen.

XIV. Benediction, Right Rev. Henry C. Pot-

ter, D. D.

The assembly upon the island will be dismissed with
the Benediction, and will re-embark upon the steam-
ers, which will return to their piers in the city, join-
ing with the batteries in the general salute.

XV. National salute. To be fired simultane-
ously from all the batteries in the har-
bor, ashore and afloat.

XVI. Illumination of the Statue, with fireworks
on Bedlow's and Governor's Islands,
and the Battery.

The music by Gilmore's Twenty-second Regiment

Band. P. S. GlLMORK, Musical Director.
2



1 8 INAUGURATION OF THE

After the arrival of the President of the
United States, accompanied by Hon. T. F.
Bayard, Secretary of State, Hon, William C.
Whitney, Secretary of the Navy, Hon. Will-
iam C. Endicott, Secretary of War, Hon. L
Q. C. Lamar, Secretary of the Interior, and
the French visitors and other distinguished
guests, the meeting was called to order by
General Schofield, who presided during the
ceremonial. This was followed by the



PRAYER OF REV. RICHARD S. STORRS, D. D.

Almighty God, our Heavenly Father, who art
of an infinite majesty and mercy, by whose counsel
and might the courses of the worlds are wisely or-
dained and irresistibly established, yet who takest
thought of the children of men, and to whom our
homage in all our works is justly due : We bless
and praise Thee for the knowledge and under-
standing which Thou bestowest upon man, and for
the spirit of constancy and courage born within
him of Thy inspiration. We glorify Thee for the
command which Thou dost give him over treas-
ures of the mine and the strength of the hills, that



STATUE OF LIBERTY.



19



he may make them the ministers of lessons of a gra-
cious significance ; and we humbly and gratefully
recognize Thy presence in all which he achieves of
beauty and power. The mind to devise, and the
will to accomplish, both are of Thee. From Thee
cometh the artificer's skill ; and to Thee the pa-
tience of faithful workmen, in whatever dexterous
labor of the hands, equally renders laud and
praise.

It is in Thy favor, and through the operation of
the Gospel of Thy grace, that cities stand in quiet
prosperity ; that peaceful commerce covers the
seas ; that peoples and nations separated by oceans
are not severed in spirit, but continue allied, in
common desire and in mutual regard, with happy
recollections and with happier hopes. It is in the
benign appointment of Thy will that Liberty and
Light, attending each other, advance always to a
surer supremacy, amid the manifold tumult of the
world, and that the time comes constantly nearer
when the earth shall rest in righteousness and
peace.

We give Thee thanks and praise this day for
the lofty memorial here set up of the kindly affec-
tion of one great people for another ; for the sym-
pathies which prompted, and the skill which has
wrought it, and for all which it signifies of remem-



20 INAUGURATION OF THE

brance and of promise. We pray that Thou, who
enablest man to mold the metal and make light-
nings his servants, wilt accept the dedication of this
monument to Thee; and that here it may abide,
undisturbed by tempest, its munition of rocks not
shaken by earthquake, while waters encircle it, and
the light of the morning returns to greet it.

We pray that the Liberty which it represents
may continue to enlighten with beneficent instruc-
tion, and to bless with majestic and wide bene-
diction, the nations which have part in this work
of renown ; that it may stand a symbol of per-
petual concord between them ; and that walking
in the paths of knowledge and freedom they may
constantly advance in the wisdom of their coun-
cils, in magnanimous enterprise, and in the noble
and salutary arts which are cherished by peace.

We pray for those who bear office in these
nations ; that ruling in Thy faith and fear they
may partake of the fullness of Thy favor ; that in
all things personal, prosperity may attend them ;
and that whatsoever in public affairs they do or
design may be so guided and furthered in Thy
providence that what before has been beautiful
and fruitful in the history of these nations, while
joyfully remembered, shall be also continually
surpassed.



STATUE OF LIBERTY. 2 \

We pray for all the nations of the earth ; that
in equity and charity their sure foundations may
be established ; that in piety and wisdom they
may find a true welfare, in obedience to Thee
glory and praise ; and that, in all the enlarge-
ments of their power, they may be ever the joyful
servants of Him to whose holy dominion and
kingdom shall be no end.

Finally, be pleased, we humbly beseech Thee,
to grant Thy blessing unto the cities, with the
multitudes of their households, before which arises
this monument of peace ; and unto us, from dif-
ferent lands and of various tongues, who are here
gathered ; that all our doings, being moved by
Thy spirit and submitted to Thy governance, may
be crowned with Thy favor ; and that, having
walked in gladness and faithfulness in the light
which Thou givest, through nature and art and
man's device, and most of all through the Word
of Thy truth, we may come in Thy grace to the
perfect light and the glorious liberty of the Heav-
enly estate.

We offer all praises, and seek all blessings,
with contrite confession of our sins and short-
comings, in the Name of Him who loved us and
sought us, and who Himself hath taught us to
pray, saying :



22 INAUGURATION OF THE

Our Father, who art in Heaven, Hallowed be
Thy Name ; Thy Kingdom come ; Thy Will be
done on earth, as it is in Heaven ; Give us this
day our daily bread ; And forgive us our tres-
passes, as we forgive those who trespass against
us ; And lead us not into temptation ; But deliver
us from evil ; For thine is the Kingdom, and the
Power, and the Glory, forever and ever, Amen.



COUNT FERDINAND DE LESSEPS, ON BEHALF OF
FRANCO-AMERICAN UNION.

Count Ferdinand de Lesseps was then pre-
sented to the audience, and was received with
great enthusiasm. As the venerable but alert
and handsome old man, with head uncovered,
although raining, stepped forward to address
the vast assemblage, the noise of whistles in-
creased and became deafening. M. de Lesseps
waved his hand as if to stop the noise, and
laughingly remarked, " Steam was invented as
a benefit, and its progress is wonderful, but at
present it is an evil and retards the progress
of my speech." Great applause followed this



STATUE OF LIBERTY. 23

mot, and as soon as the steam-whistles of the
tugs and steamers had subsided, M. de Les-
seps said :

Citizens of America! I have hastened to ac-
cept the gracious invitation accorded me by the
Government of the great American Republic, to
be present to-day. It was a generous thought of
those who presided at the erection of the Statue
of Liberty. She has honored equally those who
have conceived this spirit of hospitality and those
who took great pleasure in accepting it. " Lib-
erty Enlightening the World ! " A grand beacon
raised in the midst of the waves at the threshold
of free America !

In landing under the rays of her kindly light
we know that we have reached the country where
the individual initiative is developed in all its
power ; where progress is religion ; where large
fortunes become the property of the people, to
endow charities, to encourage education, to de-
velop science, and to sow for the future seeds of


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