William Henry Rolph.

The Badminton magazine of sports and pastimes, Volume 21 online

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tastes and habits are known to thousands who recognise them in
the streets, thanks to the promise uousness of picture postcards.
Really the tired amateur responds right well. He plays the
game for all it is worth, submits to interviewers and autograph-
hunters, perhaps has six days of hard exertion divided, preceded, and
followed by long railway journeys ; possibly he has his signed
column to write, or else he gives someone else notes for it — and
this, four months in every twelve for several years in succession, is
all about a game ; whilst if he is foolish enough to care for popular
plaudits he will certainly get plenty, but can remember that his
disappearance from the team would not be commented on for more
than a fortnight, and after a year he would be forgotten.

All this as it may be, laying stress on the crumples in the rose-
leaves and noting the few superficial imperfections in cricket, which
is too great to be thereby materially troubled, the future of the
national game will assuredly be as brilliant as its past, and bat and
MO. cxxii. VOL. XXI. — September 1905 Z



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334 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

ball in first-class fixtures will regain what measure of popularity
they have temporarily lost. It is by suggesting the topic for dis-
cussion that the healing arts can be most rapidly applied.

One further point is that no star of the first magnitude has risen
on the firmament of cricket since the apparition of Mr. Victor
Trumper, and whilst quite agreeing with the view expressed that the
cricket public desire results rather than individuals, still some new
bowler of the rank of Mr. Spofforth or Lohmann, someone whose
wonderful balls for a while work havoc with opposing batsmen, would
give first-clsLSS cricket exactly the stimulus it needs. Unquestion-
ably such svicking Nelsons are to-day being coached at nets and will
soon appear, stimulating fresh interest in the finest of games, and
proving that each generation plays with the old zest, the old spirit,
and the genuine enthusiasm inspired by its undying popularity.



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BRIDGE

BY ** PORTLAND*'

Although less enjo^'able to the majority than the play of the
double hand, which every Bridge-player loves, the partnership
game, as a matter of fact, presents greater difficulty, and is conse-
quently more interesting. This is the department of the game
which most closely resembles whist, and in which the inexperienced
Bridgite, who, perhaps, never had any whist training, most con-
spicuously fails. The average man plays well enough when he has
the deal, but very badly when he is opposed to it ; and thus more
rubbers are thrown away through the carelessness of the non-
dealers than from any other ciuse. And yet we all play twice as
many hands with a partner as we do ** on our own." If we fail,
therefore, it is not from any lack of experience.

The fact is, that we are all inclined to treat the hands in which
we have not had the pleasure of making trumps as part of the
drudgery of the game, to be got through somehow with an eye to
the deal next time. This is a dire mistake. Care should be taken
when playing the partnership hands to repress the dealer with the
utmost sternness and curtail his trick-making opportunities by every
available means. It is not sufficient to save the game merely. He
must not be allowed to make one trick over and above those to
which he is legitimately entitled, and the more of these we can
snatch from him the better.

In playing with a partner there can be no doubt that an open,
straightforward game pays best. It does not do to be too ** foxey.*'
Desirable as it may be to mislead the dealer, it should always be
remembered that you have a partner. If he is able to rely upon
you to play correct Bridge he will give you all the help he can, but
OQce let him distrust the indications of your play and he will feel
compelled to play for his own hand. It is best, therefore, to tell
the truth upon all ordinary occasions, and only to lie when it is
obviously more important to deceive the enemy than to inform your
friend. In that case the latter will readily forgive you, especially if
your false card should prove successful.

Above all things, a selfish game should be avoided. The man
who plays thirteen cards only is seldom a match for the pla3cr of
twenty-six, and besides being bad business it is very fioor fikn for
-your partner if you ignore the possibilities of his bandi ' -



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336 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

It is an odd thing that it should gratify any grown-up person
more to take a trick with one of his own cards than to see the same
trick taken by his partner, but this is nevertheless the case with a
certain class of player. Although the fault was more obvious at
whist than at Bridge, there are many players of both games who
confine their strategy almost entirely to winning tricks with their
own cards. And the selfish man never scruples to put his partner
in a difficulty. Having a series of winning cards he will invariably
play them out to the bitter end, although he thereby puts his partner
to an awkward discard. If, for instance, he is left with four winning
hearts and a small spade, while his partner is marked with the best
spade and the best club, it never occurs to him to lighten the latter's
burden by putting him in with the spade at the twelfth trick.

The two cardinal rules for playing against the deal are to lead
through strength and up to weakness, and to play to the score.
Every canon of Bridge play — no matter how essential it may be to
the theory of the game — gives way before these two considerations
of paramount importance.

The score is always the guide at Bridge in doubtful cases. The
first object of the dealer's adversaries should be to save the game,
their second to win the odd trick, and their third to win the game-
assuming that this last is a possibility having regard to call and
score. It is a too common error, however, to suppose that they
must always act on the defensive. Whenever the dealer makes no-
trumps and his partner puts him down a really weak hand, the
adversaries should anticipate winning the game from the first trick,
and if they attack with sufficient elan will often do so. Moreover,
the advantage of winning your first game in the rubber on an
opponent's deal is so great that, with that end in view, it is often
right to take a risk of losing it.

Sometimes you can see that unless your partner holds certain
cards the game must be lost. When this is so you should place
those cards in his hand and play accordingly. If you lose an extra
trick or two in this way, as you sometimes must, it is of small
account. You are taking the only possible chance of saving the
game, and may depart freely from rule in doing so.

A player who always leads through strength and up to weakness,
and keeps his eye upon the score, cannot be a very bad partner at
Bridge. Simple as the advice may appear, it is too often neglected
by all but the very best.



The following is a rather interesting hand, in which the dealer
quite justifiably made no-trumps although not holding an ace. It



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BRIDGE



Zd^7



W\)X be seen that he secures the odd trick by forcing his left-hand
opponent to lead up to him in spades at the eleventh trick.



ILLUSTRATIVE HAND

A and B are partners against Y and Z. Score: i8 all. Z deals, and
declares no-trumps.



Hearts
Diamonds .
Clubs
Spades



Y*s hand (dummy).

. Kve 8 7 6
. A loS
.. 876



Trick i.



o
o






o
o
o



542

Trick 2.



Z's hand (dealer).
Hearts K32



Diamonds
Clubs ...
Spades...





Z
Tricks : A B, o ; Y Z, i.



B



®



Y


1



Tricks : A B, I ; Y Z,



... K765
... K102
... KQio



Trick 3.



r^i






Z



B



Tricks: A B, 2 ; YZ, i.



Trick 4-



A '**♦
4- ♦






! ♦






z

Tricks : A B, 3 ; Y Z, I.



Trick 7.



Y
O



t



o o

O
O 01





^-_o



Trick 5.



I



A 4.

.» 4*






Tricks : A B, 4 ; Y Z, I,
Trick 8.



Trick 6.



"^ ^



g; ^



♦ 4-



4-



B



Tricks : A B, 4 ; Y Z, 3.






9 ^









Tricks : A B, 4 ; Y Z, 4-



Z

Tricks : A B, 4 ; Y Z, 2.

Trick 9.








10^0






o|







i



Tricks : A B, 4 ; Y Z, 5.



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THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

I Thick 12.



TkiCK II.

I Y



I






1^ *









I



n I



Tricks : A B, 5 ; V Z, 5. ' Tricks : A U, 5 ; Y Z, 6.

Trick 13.




Tricks : A B, 5 ; Y Z, 7.





Y










^yl


9 9


H^


^m


S?


'^^


■t


9





B



Tricks ; A B, 6 ; Y Z, 7.

Thus Y Z win the odd trick, and game.

Remarks ;—

Trick I. — Z makes a lucky bid for the trick with dummy's ten.

Trick 2. — Z is compelled to open spades although short in the suit. If the
ace is to his right he will make both king and queen, and if to lis
left he may still hold a fourchettc over the knave.

Trick 3. — A, seeing that the dealer holds ace and king of diamonds, tries a
strengthening heart.

Trick 6. — This is a disastrous discard for A, as it prevents him putting B
in with a heart later.

Trick 10. — B is marked with the remaining heart and clubs. Z has, there-
fore, only to put A in with his losing diamond, and he must lead
up to him in spades.



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BOOKS ON SPORT

Betting and Gambling: A National Evil. Edited by B. Seebohm

Rowntree. London : Macmillan & Co. 1905.
It is sad to find well-meaning people so carried away by their
prejudices that they fail to discriminate between fact and fiction,
and by the acceptance and advocacy of misleading statements do
their cause more harm than good. Mr. Rowntree is convinced that
betting is the ** national evil/* and this book is the outcome of the
conviction. Now there is very little indeed to be said in favour of
betting, and there is a vast deal to be said against it; the unfortunate
thing about Mr. Rowntree's book being that he says it in the wrong
way. We are inclined, from long experience of racing, to believe
firmly that out of every hundred people who bet habitually ninety
lose money; ten, perhaps, are ruined; thirty are hard hit, and at
one time or another gravely inconvenienced ; fifty— these figures
must necessarily be in the nature of guesses — fluctuate, having good
times and bad times, winning and losing, with a larger or smaller
balance against them in the long run ; eight, by a rare combination
of luck, knowledge, and judgment, win well-nigh consistently, with
at intervals an awkward period; the remaining two find it a
remunerative profession. The losers obtain as some sort of com-
pensation a considerable amount of excitement, an abiding interest
in the sport, a diversion from the cares and worries of daily life.
They wonder what is going to win, and there is the satisfaction
(sometimes) of seeing. If they "go racing" they have change,
fresh air, and companionship.

It would be easy to show what a bad game betting is — to
emphasise, for instance, the heavy expenses bookmakers so willingly
incur and the handsome incomes most of them make ; to dwell on
the way they eagerly advertise for clients; to note who pays the
rent ot their handsome offices, and so on. Mr. Rowntree, however.



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340 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

begins by drawing highly-coloured pictures of racecourse ruffianism
at some two or three meetings. On one course he declares that to
insist on payment of a bet meant "a split skull dealt from behind"
— how do people deal split skulls from behind ? — " a scuffle and
robbery." Some men go racing day after day, year after year, and
see nothing of the kind. What they do see is ready-money bettors
presenting their tickets and being paid, frequently with a civil
"Thank you "or a friendly remark; but Mr. Rowntree supposes
that backing horses is the root of all evil, and declares that ** it
would be interesting to trace how many of the unhappy people
figuring in the Divorce Court have been connected with the Turf."

It is impossible not to be a little sceptical about the genuineness
of the ** Bookmaker " who wrote a chapter entitled " The Deluded
Sportsman." He says, for instance, " Let me candidly and truth-
fully tell you that I have never known a backer of horses to per-
manently succeed." This is an admission that he has never heard
of Captain Machell for one, of the late Fred Swindell for another,
and indeed of several other men, for the most part owners of horses,
who, starting in life with nothing, have accumulated fortunes.
They are exceedingly few, and of course men who made — or are
now making, for everybody who is a little behind the scenes could
name half a dozen offhand — a profession of the Turf; but they have
existed and do exist, though Mr. Rowntree's contributor does not
know it. This person, too, writes as if all backers adopted the same
course. " The backer," he says, " diligently studies all kinds of
plans and systems ; he also fools his money away with * tipsters,*
who have been described as a set of racecourse harpies; every
system, all of them of course certain and sure. He tries 'first
favourites,* * second favourites,' 'first and second favourites,' 'news-
paper tips,* 'newspaper naps,' 'jockeys' mounts,* and numbers of
other plans and systems — some his own particular fancy, and some
other people's. He gloats over sporting news, and talks of owners,
trainers, and jockeys in a most familiar style, as though they were
his own personal friends ! "

Some backers do these foolish things, not satisfied with the
experiences of their predecessors ; others do nothing of the sort. He
appears to think, again, that if all backers really had owners, trainers,
and jockeys among their personal friends, they would do better. He
does not seem to understand in what a huge majority of cases owners,
trainers, and jockeys are absurdly astray in their conclusions. The
bookmaker quotes with approval the idiotic remarks — in many cases
a cruel libel — of the judge of the Clerkenwell County Court, who said,
" I don't profess to be any authority on horse-racing, but I know it
depends upon what the odds are and what the jockeys have been paid



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BOOKS ON SPORT 341

as to which horse wins" (laughter). To say this is to imply that
owners, trainers, and stewards are fools who cannot see what is going
on before their eyes. Of course, trickeries are perpetrated at times —
no one doubts that ; but the foolish judge, confessing his ignorance
)f the subject, practically asserted that no races were honestly run —
A'hich of course Mr. Rowntree most potently believes. He might
lave made out an infinitely stronger case if he had understood his
•.ubject. As it is, the exaggerations, false deductions, and absurdities
>f the book are so prominent that it can convince no one who was
lot convinced before he began to read it.

OiVERSiONS Day by Day. By E. F. Benson and Eustace H. Miles.
Illustrated. London: Hurst & Blackett. 1905.

This book cannot escapee the charge of being rather puerile.
The authors in their introduction picture a stupid person who
when in London does all sorts of foolish things in the way of diet^
clothing, and omission of exercise, and they show how he might
benefit his health. One of the two writers speaks of his ** secret
sillinesses," and there appears no good reason to find fault with the
description. One of his diversions is to tread on coal plates ; if
the plate clangs it counts a point to the player. There is actually
a picture of this and of yet another "game," which consists of
"treading either on the joints between paving-stones or on the
paving-stones without letting any part of the foot come over a
joint." There are games for indoors also ; for example, Badminton
played over a string, fastened to the walls, covered with a paper ;
or " lawn tennis, over the same string lowered to some eighteen
inches from the ground." Drawings of these and similar diversions
are provided. Games for larger spaces and for the country are
added; and some ** solitary exercises" which may really prove
beneficial are included.

How TO Build or Buy a Country Cottage and Fit it Up.
By ** Home Counties." London : William Heinemann. 1905.

During the last few monl sa great deal has been heard about
country cottages, the basis of the inquiry usually being the price at
which they can be erected. It appears that many persons, seeing how
cheaply structures may be run up, have hit on the idea of building
themselves "week-end " cottages or bungalows; and this very use-
ful book has been published as a guide to those so inclined. It is
full of plans, sections, elevations, and perspectives, showing how
little habitations can be built for £*I30 to 3^1,300. The best bricks,
pointed with Portland cement, with freestone windows, are not, of
course, the materials used ; and no doubt it is difficult, if not

MO. cxxii. VOL. XXI. ^September 1905 A A



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342 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

impossible, to obtain picturesque results with concrete blocks or
cement slabs ; but for a seaside residence one might surely be
perfectly well contented with the wooden bungalow on page 63,
which could be put up for 3^460, or with Mr. Potter's steel and
plaster bungalow, estimated to cost a trifle less. Brickwork buildings
can be had for the same money, but they are less roomy. Many
persons who see the book will probably be tempted to consider the
question of a little week-end home, and if they have jf i.ooo to spare
they will be likely to pause and wonder if they can improve upon
that Brighton chalet facing page 52 — nominal cost ;f 900 ; but it is
always desirable to allow margin.

Motors and Motoring. By Henry J. Spooner, C.E. London:
T. C. & E. C. Jack. 1905.
Professor Spooner begins by saying truly enough that no one
can fail to notice the growing interest the typical " man in the
street " is taking in Motors and Motoring. " His eyes instinctively
turn to view critically each passing car ; he knows that a peculiar
ticking noise is a sure indication of the approach of an electric
carriage, and light puffs of steam from underneath a car a certain
sign that it is a steam vehicle, whilst his ear is so delicately attuned
to the wide range of detonations, due to the working of petrol motors,
that he is rarely at fault in placing such cars in the right category."
The man who knows nothing of motors must indeed often be
astonished at the knowledge of his friends, who have rapidly
acquired information, and nowadays understand all about a car
at a glance. It is for the purpose of instructing the ignorant that
Professor Spooner has compiled this convenient little handbook,
using technical language as seldom as possible, and it should well
answer its purpose.

How TO Use a Camera. By Clive Holland. London : George
Routledge & Sons. 1905.

The hundreds of pictures which arrive monthly for the com-
petition in this magazine show that many readers are greatly
interested in photography, and all but experts may derive useful
hints from this little handbook. The examples are not always quite
what they might be, but this is perhaps the result of indifferent
printing. A really excellent photograph not seldom comes out badly
from this cause, and some of those here included — the black-headed
gull returning to nest, for instance — are decidedly good.



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A PRIZE COMPETITION
The Proprietors of the Badminton Magazine offer a prize or prizes
to the value of Ten Guineas each month for the best original photo-
P"aph or photographs sent in representing any sporting subject.
Competitors may also send any photographs they have by them on
two conditions : that they have been taken by the sender, and that
they have never been previously published. A few lines explaining
when and where the photographs were taken should accompany
each subject. Residents in the country who have access to shooting,
parties, or who chance to be in the neighbourhood when hounds are
running, will doubtless find interesting subjects ; these will also be
provided at football or cricket matches, and wherever golf, cycling,
fishing, skating, polo, or athletics are practised. Racing and steeple-
chasing, including Hunt Meetings and Point-to-point contests,
should also supply excellent material. Photographs of Public School
interest will be specially welcome.

The size of the prints, the number of subjects sent, the date of
sending, the method of toning, printing, and mounting, are all
matters left entirely to the competitors.

The Proprietors are unable to return any rejected matter
except under special circumstances, and they reserve the right of
using anything of interest that may be sent in, even if it should not
receive a prize. They also reserve to themselves the copyright in
all photographs which shall receive a prize, and it is understood that
all photographs sent are offered on this condition.

The result of the September competition will be announced in
the November issue.

THE JULY COMPETITION
The Prize in the July competition has been divided among
the following competitors: — Mr. Philip T. Oyler, Durie, Leven,
Fife ; Mr. F. M. Reginald Cobb, Margate ; M. Romdenne, Brussels ;
Mr. R. W. Cole, Wickham Avenue, Bexhill-on-Sea ; Mr. A. M.
Anson, Streatham, S.W. ; Miss G. L. Murray, Holmains, Welling-
ton Square, Cheltenham; Mr. F. Cecil Cobb, Margate; Mr. Harold
T. Palmer, Rosebery Square, E.C. ; Mr. Leopold Pickering,
Northesk House, Stone, Staffordshire; and Mr. A. Abrahams,
Emmanuel College, Cambridge.

A A 2



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344 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



P. H. THOMAS (stroke) AND R. H. NELSON (BOW), WINNERS OF THE
SILVER GOBLETS AT HENLEY, I905

Photograph by Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College, Cambridge



LAWN TENNIS AT MONTE CARLO— MISS BROOKSMITH GETTING OP
A HARD RETURN

Photograph by Mr. Philip T. Oyler, Durie, Levsn, Fife



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PRIZE COMPETITION



345



A CLBVBR JUMPER

Photograph by Mr. F, M. Reginald Cobb, Margate



WELL OVER

Photograph by Mr. F. M. Reginald Cobb, Margate



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346 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



HEXHAM SUMMER STEKPLECHASES, I905

Photosraph by Mr. J. H. Nicholson, Halliwell Dene, Hexham



CROVVHURST OTTER HOUNDS — A SOLID MARK

PhotOf:ra/-h by Mr. l\\ J. Abrey, Tonbridge



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PRIZE COMPETITION 347



DUMFRIESSHIRE OTTER HOUNDS ON THE TWEED

Photograph by Mr. A. Macgregor, Kelso



A FALL

Photograph by M. Romdenne, Brussels



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348 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



CURLING AT ST. MORITZ

Photograph by Miss K. L. Dalton, CummersdaU, Carlisle



FULL SPEED AHEAD

Photograph by Mr. R. IV. Cole, Wickham Aventie, Bexhillon-Sea



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349



RACING IN EGYPT — CAPTAIN LOCKEIT, R.A., LEAVING THE PADDOCK AT
HELOUAN ON THE ARAB PONY FITZ

PhotoQrath h\ Mr. //. E, Daunt, Kobe, Japan



LADYSMITH
Born In Ladysmith during the Siege
Photograph by Captain P. E. Vaughan, 12th Sudanese Egyptian Army, ^^ Oheid^ Sudan



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350 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



ERIDGE HUNT STEEPLECHASE

Photograph by Mr. A. M. Anson, Streatham, S.W.



FKTERHOROUGH HOUND SHOW— THE COLLECTING RING, MR. GEORGE FITZWILLIAM
AND W. BARNARD MAKING INQUIRIES

rhoto^raph by Mr. John C. Smith, Lincoln



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351



CHELTENHAM LAWN TENNIS TOURNAMENT — A FLYING LEAF ; NEITHER OF
THE lady's FEET IS TOUCHING THE GROUND

Photograph by Miss G. L. Mutray. Ho'niains, Wellington Square, Cheltenham






TWO GOOD DIVERS

Photograph by Mr. F. Cecil Cobb, Margate



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352 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



NIPPON RACE CLUB SPRING MEETING, YOKOHAMA, JAPAN

The photograph shows the lawn in front of the grand stand and the course, with the China ponies
getting ready for the start of the Chlua Griffins' Handicap— distance one mile

Photograph by Mr. G. N. Fairhurst, Yokohama, Japan



HENLEY REGATTA, I905 — LEANDER EIGHT COMING IN AFTER WINNING THE
GRAND CHALLENGE CUP

Photograph bv Mr. F. G. Callcott, Teddington



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PRIZE COMPETITION 353



RESCUING A BOLTER, AT THORPE, LINCOLNSHIRE

Photograph by Mr. Harold T. Palmer, Rosebery Square, London, E.C



BOYS DIVING FOR COINS IN THE HARBOUR AT BARBADOES

Photograph by Mr. Leopold Pickering, Northesk House, Stone, Staffordshire



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354



THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



Online LibraryWilliam Henry RolphThe Badminton magazine of sports and pastimes, Volume 21 → online text (page 28 of 55)