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William J. (William James) Anderson.

The architecture of the renaissance in Italy; online

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'



1 1 i-liy



OF THE







LIBRARY

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

SANTA BARBARA



PRESENTED BY

ERIC GUGLES



THE

ARCHITECTURE OF THE RENAISSANCE

IN ITALY



In Preparation. By the same Author.
UNIFORM WITH THIS VOLUME.

THE ARCHITECTURE

OF

GREECE AND ROME

A SKETCH OF ITS HISTORIC DEVELOPMENT.

With numerous collotype plates and other illustrations.



SYNOPSIS OF PROBABLE CONTENTS. (i) The Mycenean Age in Greece.
(2) The Archaic Period in Asiatic Hellas. (3) The Archaic Period in
European Hellas. (4) The Coalescence and Culmination of Hellenic
Art in Attica. (5) The Alexandrian Period in Ionia, etc. (6) The
Decline in Greece. (7) Etruscan Rome and the Augustan Age.
(8) Culminating Period of Trajan and Hadrian. (9) Decline and Fall
of Roman Imperial Architecture.



'X








i



i, ***>**,









SOUTH AISLE WALL AND APSIDAL TRANSEPT OF THE
CATHEDKAL, COMO.



TOMMASO RODARI, Archt.



THE

ARCH ITECTURE



OF THE



IN



ITALY



A GENERAL VIEW
FOR THE USE OF STUDENTS AND OTHERS



BY WILLIAM J. ANDERSON
H

ARCHITECT

ASSOCIATE OF THE ROYAL INSTITUTE OF BRITISH ARCHITECTS

DIRECTOR OF ARCHITECTURE AND LECTURER AT

THE GLASGOW SCHOOL OF ART



SECOND EDITION, REVISED AND ENLARGED



WITH SIXTY-FOUR COLLOTYPE AND OTHER PLATES
And Ninety-eight Smaller Illustrations in the Text



LONDON

B. T. BATSFORD 94 HIGH HOLBORN
NEW YORK : CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS

MDCCCXCVIII



,



NOTE TO SECOND EDITION



IT may be desirable to state in a few words how I have made
use of the opportunity of revision, afforded by the practical
approval of this work which students of architecture have
signified. In the interval that has elapsed since I first wrote
on the subject, not only has my point of view changed, but
light from the study of kindred subjects has been shed upon it,
so changing its aspect to myself that I felt inclined to rewrite
the whole book, or at all events large parts of it. To this
temptation I might have yielded, had there been good reason
to suppose that I would so make it more useful or interesting.
It seemed to me, however, that it might then lose what value
it possesses as an impression of the works of the period, written
soon after I had studied and measured some of them ten years
ago, having at the time small acquaintance with the large
Continental literature of the subject. In this belief I have
thought it better not to reconstruct the book, but rather to
confine the changes to rendering my meaning clearer than in
the original, to the rectification of errors into which I had fallen,
and to additions which tend to the more complete statement
of my view of the matter. The second chapter has undergone
most alteration, as the account of Brunelleschi's work is
rewritten and extended, while notes are added on the Badia
Fiesolana, and the Church of the Carceri at Prato. A table
of the principal Renaissance buildings in Italy is appended ;
and it is hoped that this will render the book more useful to
the student, especially perhaps the traveller, who may wish
to examine the various works in a locality in something like
their order of erection, and so learn infinitely more than can
here be imparted regarding them. From any such student
I should be glad to receive corrections or additions to the list,
which cannot claim to be complete. Among the illustrations
are several plans of churches, which with the exception of the
largest (St. Peter's) and the smallest Florentine examples
(pages 17 and 40), are drawn to a uniform scale; and all of
them (except St. Peter's) are approximately " oriented," if the
top of the page be taken to represent a direction somewhat
East of North. I have pleasure in acknowledging Mr. Bradley
Batsford's valuable co-operation, and my appreciation of the
enterprise of the publisher in enabling me to extend so largely
the number of the illustrations, as well as in reproducing many
of the originals a second time in order to obtain the best results
possible on the necessarily small scale.

W. J. A.

CATHCART, GLASGOW,
June i, 1898.



PREFACE



THE full title perhaps sufficiently sets forth the subject
of this book, and what I conceive to be its proper des-
tination. But it may be well to explain that it owes its
existence to the Governors of the School of Art in this city,
who some years ago requested me to prepare a series of lectures
on the subject, which were duly delivered in the Corporation
Galleries. Of these lectures, seven in number, the present
volume comprises five, the introductory discourses on Ancient
Rome and Mediaeval Italy being relinquished, and their place
supplied by a short introductory chapter. In delivery, while
primarily intended for students of the school, they were not
confined to this class, and a rudimentary and semi-popular
character may still linger in the work, which has undergone
only the changes that seemed essential to its new form. That
it may be acceptable to the wider circle is my hope, believing
that a public which is interested in Italy, its painting, its litera-
ture, its history, cannot be, and is not wholly indifferent to
those works which, apart from their attraction of beauty, give
of all others the most impressive view of the genius of a people ;
and, when understood, clothe with the most realisable character
the daily life and work and thought of a bygone race. Much
has been urged against the teaching of architectural history
to students, but only by those who have failed to grasp the
true inwardness of the development. For where the work
of modern architects takes a high place among that of other
art workers, it is largely because they are more thoroughly
and effectively steeped in the traditions of an art which is
greater than man's little span of life and achievement. Hence,
while deeply conscious of the feebleness of my slight sketch,
I feel convinced that no reasonable objection can be taken to



PREFACE. Vll

its purpose as a contribution to the teaching of the traditions
of the Western arts of design, as these took form in Italy.
In this traditional sense, we are all Romans, as our language,
religion, and law, as well as our arts, remind us ; and have besides
a large community of interest with the country which has been
the leader and teacher of civilization to modern Europe.

Students whose researches have led them into the study of
particular buildings, particular architects, or particular periods,
will find the treatment of their special subject inadequate, but
will recognise that more thorough analysis had to be subordi-
nate to the principal aim of giving a view of the whole, suited
to the needs of the average English-speaking young architect.
I have often been asked to recommend such a book, and felt
the need of it myself not so many years ago, when endeavouring
to form some conception of what was meant by Renaissance
architecture, and to distinguish its different phases. Should
my studies be the means of smoothing the path or saving
the time of any student it will be a source of gratification to
me ; believing that since the study of the historical styles of
architecture, or of its accumulated experience, has assumed a
rightful place as an essential branch of an architect's elementary
education, it is important that inexpensive books dealing with
each department concisely, yet in sufficient detail, should be
accessible to him. The extent and variety of his whole train-
ing is so great that a special or complete study of a style
by travel or by consultation of numerous authorities, is im-
possible in most cases. In Mr. Batsford I was fortunate in
finding a publisher in agreement with my viev/s, especially as
to the necessity for a full illustration of the subject ; and the
liberality with which this most important part of the scheme
has been carried out gives me a measure of confidence in
the work, and a satisfaction that I do not possess in the
other part of it. Many of the plates and blocks are reduc-
tions of my own drawings, some from measurements taken in
Italy, which have already appeared in a small folio volume.
The drawings of the entrance loggia of the Palazzo Massimi,



Vlll PREFACE.

measured by myself in Rome, have been specially prepared
for this book. Others have been borrowed from various large
folio works, the source being duly acknowledged, while the
majority are photographs from the buildings themselves, the
most satisfactory presentments of architecture. Readers whose
tastes or circumstances incline them to a more extended study
of the numberless works of the age, or of any period of it, will
find ample material in the second division of the appended
list of selected books, should even a few of these be within
reach.

English writers who treat of the Italian Renaissance archi-
tecture, by a curious process of unnatural selection, concern
themselves chiefly with the later periods. Fergusson, for
instance, in his notable History of the Modern Styles of Archi-
tecture, devotes the greater part of his criticism and about
half of the illustrations to the works of the time of Vignola
and thereafter, while the history in Gwilt's Encyclopedia of
Architecture contains not a single word which would lead one
to believe in the existence of one of the buildings described
in Chapter III. of this book. In view of this, I have been
led in another direction, and, while relegating Vignola and
Palladio and the barocco school to the last chapter, have
devoted four-fifths of the space at my disposal to the early
and culminating periods : a division that appeared to me to
be most advantageous for purposes which are more descriptive
and historical than critical.

W. J. A.

GLASGOW,

September i2th, 1896.



CONTENTS

CHAPTER I.
INTRODUCTORY.

PAGE

The Ethnographic significance of the Renaissance The architec-
tural type which characterises the Latino-Teutonic race The
tide of revival fullest and clearest in the home country of the
Roman Empire The influence of mediaeval practice The art
of the epoch in the aspect of a petrifaction of history The con-
tinuity and identity of European art The Renaissance not a
phenomenon unparalleled nor out of the course of nature Its
art an essentially truthful picture of the tendency of the time
Roman principles adopted, but great originality shown in their
application The artist and his relation to surrounding con-
ditions The environment The personality .... i 7



EARLY PERIOD 14201525.

CHAPTER II.
THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY IN FLORENCE (14011500).

Origin of Renaissance art discovered by some in, the naturalistic
sculpture of the fourteenth century Brunelleschi's first work
the natural line of demarcation The intellectual eminence of
Florence Incidents of its history during fifteenth century
How it came to dominate Rome The famous competition for
the Baptistery doors Brunelleschi studies in Rome with Dona-
tello The dome of S. Maria del Fiore The deeper foundations
of the revival The earliest neo-classical building The methods
of Brunelleschi, illustrated by Pazzi Chapel and Sacristy of
S. Lorenzo The churches of S. Lorenzo, Badia di Fiesole and
S. Spirito Loggia of SS. Annunziata and Foundling Hospital,
examples of Florentine columnar arcade The Palazzi Pitti,
Antinori, Medici, and Strozzi The bottega of the Italian artists
Nature of the training afforded Influence of jewel forms and
goldsmith work Goldsmith sculptors Jacopo della Quercia



CONTENTS.

PAGE

Ghiberti and his gates Luca della Robbia's vitrified earthen-
ware Donatello's sculpture Succeeding school of sculptor-
architects and their works Pulpit at S. Croce Lorenzo de'
Medici's academy of the antique and its distinguished pupils
Leon Battista Alberti His Latin proclivities The Pal. Rucellai
and other works Greek cross model of S. Maria delle Carceri
at Prato Sacristy of S. Spirito and its vestibule Vasari's
criticism thereof Andrea Sansovino S. Salvator del Monte
Its rusticity The Florentine work as a .whole Affected by
Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic An arcuated style More
an Etruscan revival than a Roman one Grecian sense of
refinement Rejection of colour effects Sgraffito decoration
Florentine influence at Rome and Siena . . . . 8 45



CHAPTER III.
THE EARLY RENAISSANCE OUT OF FLORENCE (14571525).

Reasons for classification of centres and division of subject
Divisions of the country Relations of the states at the middle
of fifteenth century Milan the first great centre out of Florence
Bramante da Urbino The advent of painter-architects
Fa9ade of Certosa di Pavia and Como Cathedral, examples
of a transitional style S. Maria delle Grazie S. Satiro The
chancel The sacristy Decoration of the pilaster The
peculiar position of Venice A new Rome Assimilates the art
of the Milanese Lateness of appearance of Renaissance Some
reasons for this reluctant adoption Gradual grafting of classic
details upon essentially mediaeval work Doges' Palace Porta
della Carta and Quadrangle S. Maria dei Miracoli Suggested
by Byzantine buildings, but with classic technic Scuola
di San Marco Perspective reliefs Ruskin's classification
Interior of S. Maria dei Miracoli Venetian character in orna-
ment The domestic architecture of Venice Pal. Cornaro
Spinelli, its blending of Florentine methods with Venetian
Gothic Pal. Vendramini, a step towards classicism The
grouping of the central windows Confraternita di S. Rocco
Pal. Contarini delle Figure Verona Ornament in S. Anas-
tasia and S. Maria in Organo Pal. Consiglio Brescia La
Loggia and S. Maria dei Miracoli Bologna Pal. Bevilacqua
and Fava The general character of Bolognese Renaissance
and of the early North Italian work Sumptuous detail and
fantastic composition Tentative, but fruitful of results in time
succeeding 4678



CONTENTS. Xi

CENTRAL PERIOD 15061550.

CHAPTER IV.
THE CULMINATION IN ROME (15061540).

PAGE

Causes tending to the culmination of the Renaissance in Rome
Contemporary events The Transitional buildings Bramante's
influence and methods The attempted fusion of Greek and
Roman construction The shaking off of lingering mediaeval
traditions Renaissance contrasted with latter-day revivals
Bramante's Tempietto The success of the revival Its con-
summation in Rome both appropriate and natural An European
influence Masters of the period Antonio Sangallo, Peruzzi,
Raffaello, Michelangelo Pal. Farnese The astylar character
of its exterior Cortile an example of combined construction
characteristic of Central Period Pal. Massimi Its Grecian
flavour House in Via Giulia Church at Montepulciano
St. Peter's, Rome Early progress and interruptions Schemes
of Bramante, Raffaello, Peruzzi, Sangallo Michelangelo's work
Historic significance of St. Peter's Effect of the interior
Actual dimensions Character of culminating period as a whole
Attention to proportion and tout ensemble Detail subordinate
Revival of Greek methods Preference for rectangular out-
lines Passion for figure design and decoration High ideals of
Renaissance art .......... 79 113



CHAPTER V.

THE ROMAN INFLUENCE IN THE NORTH OF ITALY

(15291550).

Comparison and distinction of work of Peruzzi, Sanmicheli, and
Sansovino Peruzzi and Sanmicheli the leaders Sansovino the
follower Peruzzi Birth and training His first patron The
Villa Chigi or Farnesina Other commissions Appointment
as architect of St. Peter's Organ and houses in Siena Pal.
Albergati at Bologna Doorways of Pal. Prosperi, Ferrara
Death of Peruzzi Character of his work Sanmicheli Fortifi-
cation building Pal. Pompei Bevilacqua Porta del Palio and
Nuova Pal. Grimani at Venice Schools of Venetian Renais-
sance Sansovino His early Roman career Pal. Cornaro della
Ca' Grande The Zecca, its relation to Sanmicheli's work The
Loggetta Sansovino's sculpture The Libreria Vecchia High
attainment of the work of this period 114 137



Xli CONTENTS.

LATE PERIOD 1550 TO i8TH CENTURY.

CHAPTER VI.
PALLADIO AND THE DECLINE.

PAGE

A characteristic tendency of revivals towards literal reproduction
and earlier phases of the prototype Some of the causes of the
decadence The literal worship of the text of Vitruvius Serlio
on his " infallible directions " The decisive cause of decay
Michelangelo's architectural works Paliadio His popularity
in this country His real merits in making best of small oppor-
tunities and inferior material The Basilica, Vicenza His own
opinion of it His judgment in its design Pal. Prefettizio,
Valmarana, Barbarano Teatro Olimpico Casa del Diavolo
II Redentore, Venice, a stately interior Vignola, a follower of
Peruzzi Some of his works Michelangelo again St. Peter's
at his death Dome completed Carlo Maderna extends the
nave The ill-fated eastern campanili Bernini's peristyle
and baldachino Borromini and his productions A Lombard
resurrection of the grotesque The time of obelisks, pillars,
and fountains The Lateran portico S. Maria Maggiore
Genoa Alessi's works Interior of SS. Annunziata Scamozzi
Venice Procuratie Nuove S. Maria della Salute A third
stage in octagon interior treatment The Barocco style expres-
sive of ostentation Tomb of Doge Valier Pal. Pesaro The
last word of Italian art Tendencies of the decadent period
Conclusion 138 164



LIST OF PLATES xiii xv

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN TEXT xvi xyiii

CHART OF THE CHIEF BUILDINGS OF THE ITALIAN RENAIS-
SANCE 165 177

LIST OF SELECTED BOOKS RELATING TO THE ITALIAN

RENAISSANCE 178 180

INDEX, &c 181185



LIST OF PLATES



SOUTH AISLE WALL AND APSIDAL TRANSEPT OF THE

CATHEDRAL, COMO Frontispiece

FACING
PLATES PAGE

I. PART OF THE PULPIT IN SIENA CATHEDRAL, WITH

RENAISSANCE STAIR 10

II. BRONZE NORTH DOOR OF THE BAPTISTERY \

OF ST. JOHN, FLORENCE ... ,

J v between 12 and 13

III. BRONZE EAST DOOR OF THE BAPTISTERY [
OF ST. JOHN, FLORENCE /

IV. SANTA MARIA DEL FIORE (THE CATHEDRAL), FLORENCE 14

V. THE PAZZI CHAPEL, SANTA CROCE, FLORENCE . . 16

VI. INTERIOR OF SAN LORENZO, FLORENCE. ... 19

VII. CHURCH OF THE BADIA DI FIESOLE, NEAR

FLORENCE

f. between 20 and 21
VIII. DOOR AND WINDOWS IN CLOISTER OF THE

BADIA DI FIESOLE, NEAR FLORENCE

IX. INTERIOR OF SANTO SPIRITO, FLORENCE ... 23

PORTICO OF SANTISSIMA ANNUNZIATA, FLORENCE



SPEDALE DEGLI INNOCENTI, FLORENCE . . . .]

( PALAZZO STROZZI, FLORENCE ]

' [ PALAZZO MEDICI (RICCARDI), FLORENCE . . .j
I SYMBOL OF MARK THE EVANGELIST, SANT' ANTQNIO,]

XII. -j PADUA 29

( SYMBOL OF JOHN THE EVANGELIST, SANT' ANTONIO, PADUA)
XIII. LOWER PART OF PULPIT IN SANTA CROCE, FLORENCE 33

XIV. SANT' ANDREA, MANTUA 35

XV. INTERIOR OF SANTA MARIA DELLE CARCERI, PRATO . 37

XVI. VESTIBULE TO SACRISTY, SANTO SPIRITO, FLORENCE . 38



XIV LIST OF PLATES.

FACING

PLATES PAGE

XVII. SANTO SALVATOR, FLORENCE, DETAIL OF A BAY

OF THE NAVE 40

XVIII. ORNAMENT IN PILASTERS, SANT' AGOSTINO, ROME 44

XIX. TOMB OF BISHOP TOMMASO PICCOLOMINI, SIENA . 44

XX. FACADE OF CERTOSA DI PAVIA . . . . 51

XXI. SOUTH DOOR OF THE CATHEDRAL, COMO . . 53

XXII. SANTA MARIA DELLE GRAZIE, MILAN ... 55

XXIII. SACRISTY OF SANTA MARIA NEAR SAN SATIRO, MILAN 56

XXIV. SCUOLA DI SAN MARCO, VENICE .... 64

XXV. MARBLE PILASTER, CAPELLA GESU, SANT' ANAS-

TASIA, VERONA 67

XXVI. PALAZZO VENDRAMINI, VENICE 69

XXVII. CONFRATERNITA DI SAN ROCCO, VENICE . . 70

XXVIII. THE LOGGIA, BRESCIA 72

XXIX. LA MADONNA DEI MIRACOLI, BRESCIA ... 72
XXX. CORTILE OF THE PALAZZO BEVILACQUA-VlNCENZI,

BOLOGNA 74

XXXI. THE CANCELLERIA PALACE, ROME .... 83
XXXII. WINDOW AND BALCONY FROM THE CANCELLERIA

PALACE, ROME 84

XXXIII. SIBYL AND THE EMPEROR AUGUSTUS ... gi
XXXIV. PLAN OF THE GROUND FLOOR OF THE \

FARNESE PALACE, ROME .

r between 92 and 93
XXXV. PLAN OF THE FIRST FLOOR OF THE '



FARNESE PALACE, ROME .

XXXVI. THE FARNESE PALACE, ROME 94

XXXVII. CORTILE OF THE FARNESE PALACE, ROME . . 94
XXXVIII. PLAN OF THE ENTRANCE LOGGIA OF THE PALAZZO

MASSIMI ALLE COLONNE, ROME ... 96

XXXIX. EXTERIOR ELEVATION OF THE ENTRANCE LOGGIA
OF THE PALAZZO MASSIMI ALLE COLONNE,

ROME g6

XL. INTERIOR ELEVATION OF THE ENTRANCE LOGGIA

OF THE PALAZZO MASSIMI ALLE COLONNE, ROME 96
XLI. CORTILE OF THE PALAZZO MASSIMI ALLE COLONNE,

ROME 98

XLII. DETAIL OF THE CORTILE OF THE PALAZZO MASSIMI

ALLE COLONNE, ROME ..... 98
XLIII. PRINCIPAL APARTMENT OF THE PALAZZO MASSIMI

ALLE COLONNE, ROME 100

XLIV. SECTION OF ST. PETER'S, ROME .... 106
XLV. INTERIOR OF ST. PETER'S, ROME . . . 108



LIST OF PLATES. XV



FACING
PAGE



XLVI. ELEVATION OF THE VILLA CHIGI

(FARNESINA), ROME . . . ,

VT } between 116 and 117

XLVII. ELEVATION OF THE PALAZZO AL- '



J



BERGATI, BOLOGNA
XLVI 1 1. ORGAN IN CHIESA DEL' OSPEDALE, SIENA . . 118
XLIX. DETAIL ELEVATION OF THE PALAZZO

ALBERGATI, BOLOGNA
L. MOULDINGS OF THE PALAZZO AL-
BERGATI, BOLOGNA

[DOORWAY OF SAN MICHELE IN Bosco, BOLOGNA
LI. -I DOORWAY OF THE PALAZZO SACRATI (PROSPERI), j- 122

FERRARA

LII. THE GRIMANI PALACE, VENICE .... 128
LIII. PLAN OF FIRST FLOOR OF THE PALAZZO CORNARO

DELLA CA' GRANDE, VENICE .... 131
LIV, SECTION OF THE PALAZZO CORNARO DELLA CA'

GRANDE, VENICE 132

LV. THE LIBRERIA VECCHIA AND LOGGETTA, VENICE . 134
LVI. PART ELEVATION OF THE LIBRERIA VECCHIA,

VENICE 136

LVII. TOMB OF LORENZO DE' MEDICI, FLORENCE . . 142

LVI 1 1. THE BASILICA PALLADIANA, VICENZA . . . 145

( CASA DEL DIAVOLO, VICENZA )

\ PALAZZO DEL CONSIGLIO (PREFETTIZIO), VICENZA j

( PALAZZO PORTO BARBARANO, VICENZA . . )
LX. -! t- 148

( PALAZZO VALMARANA, VICENZA J

LXI. THE TEATRO OLIMPICO, VICENZA .... 152

LXII. INTERIOR OF SANTISSIMA ANNUNZIATA, GENOA . 156

LXI II. THE PALAZZO PESARO, VENICE .... 162



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN TEXT



PAGE

View of Central Part of Florence 10

Pazzi Chapel, Florence; Loggia . . 16

>t Plan 17

,, ,, Section 17

,, ,, Capital and Medallion . . . . 18

Old Sacristy, San Lorenzo, Florence 19

San Lorenzo, Florence ; Plan ........ 20

Badia di Fiesole ; Pulpit in Refectory 21

Santa Croce, Florence ; Door in Cloister 22

Church of Santo Spirito, Florence ; Plan 23

,, ,, ,, ,, Campanile .... 24

San Lorenzo, Florence ; Window in Cloister ..... 25

Palazzo Pitti, Florence 26

Palazzo Antinori, Florence 27

Palazzo Strozzi, Florence ; Plan 28

Sant' Antonio, Padua ; Bronze Panel 30

5? * ) ...... 3^

Spedale degli Innocenti, Florence; Lunette 32

Santa Croce, Florence ; Bracket of the Pulpit .... 33

Ospedale del Ceppo, Pistoja 34

Palazzo Rucellai, Florence ; Window 35

,, ,, Exterior 36

Sant' Andrea at Mantua ; Plan . 37

Santa Maria Novella, Florence 38

Sacristy of Church of Santo Spirito, Florence . . . . 39

Church of Santo Salvator del Monte, Florence ; Plan ... 40

View ... 41

Palazzo Ducale, Urbino; Cortile 43

Palazzo Venezia, Rome ; Door 45

Certosa di Pavia ; Central Spire 52

,, ,, Door of Old Sacristy 53

Como Cathedral ; View of East End 54

The Porta della Carta, Doges' Palace, Venice ; Detail . . . 60

Doges' Palace, Venice ; The Giants' Staircase . 61

Cortile of the Doges' Palace, Venice ; Window .... 62



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN TEXT. Xvii

PAGE

Santa Maria del Miracoli, Venice ; Exterior of Chancel . . 63

,, ,, ,, ,, Fa9ade 64

,, ,, ,, ,, Interior 65

,, ,, ,, ,, Capital and Entablature . . 66

Doges' Palace, Venice ; Entablature over Door .... 67

,, ,, ,, Details of Marble Chimney-piece . . 68

Palazzo Cornaro-Spinelli, Venice 69

Palazzo Contarini delle Figure, Venice . . . . . . 71

Santa Maria in Organo, Verona ; Church Furniture ... 72

Palazzo Consiglio, Verona ........ 73

Santa Maria Maggiore, Bergamo ; Apse of the Church, with

Renaissance Chapel ......... 74

Palazzo Fava, Bologna ; Cortile 75

,, ,, ,, Arcade on Brackets in Cortile ... 76

Casa Tacconi, Bologna 77

Church of Santo Salvatore, Venice ; Plan ..... 78

Triumphal Arch of Alphonso, Naples 78

Santa Maria della Pace, Rome ; Cloister 84

Palazzo Giraud (Torlonia), Rome ....... 85

Motifs leading up to the Central Period 85

San Pietro in Montorio, Rome ; Chapel in Cloisters ... 87

Rome from Sant' Onofrio 88

Farnese Palace, Rome ; Garden Front 93

Palazzo Massimi, Rome ......... 97

,, ,, ,, Cross Section of the Entrance Loggia . 98

,, ,, Moulding Profiles 99

House in the Via Giulia, Rome . . . . . . . 100

,, ,, ,, ,, View of Cortile from Vestibule . 101

Church at Montepulciano ......... 102

Bramante's Design for Dome of St. Peter's ..... 103

St. Peter's, Rome ; Raffaello's Plan 104

,, ,, Peruzzi's Plan 105

,, ,, with the Piazza ; Plan as now standing . . 106

,, ,, East Elevation no

Palazzo Spada alia Regola, Rome ; Cortile in

Sibyl from the Vault of the Sistine Chapel, Rome . . . . 112

Casa Pollini, Siena 118


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Online LibraryWilliam J. (William James) AndersonThe architecture of the renaissance in Italy; → online text (page 1 of 16)