William Jackson Hooker.

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attenuata, apice in peltam hexagonam dilatata, pelta subtus utrinque ovulo unioo
inverso foeta. Fruetm e carpidiis subdiscretis. Semina ovoideo-subglobosa ;
ieda ossea, epidermide teouiter carnosa cincta. Embryo inversus, in axi albu-
minia caniosi, radicula respectu racheos communis oentripeta. — ^Arbuscula in
America tropica^ imprimis in India Occidentalis Insulii obvia ; firondibus pinnaiis ;
pinnis hati caUo90<(mitrieti»^ muUinerviis ; nervis iimpUcibus indimsis, Endl,



Zakia Skinneri; caudioe erecto tereti cicatricato; frondibos pands erecto-paten-
tibns longe stipitatis pinnatis, stipitibns teretibus (rachibusque) aouleatis
basi yalde incrassatis, pinnis 7-11 oppositis yd altemis remotis oboyato-
elliptids coriaceis nitidis parallelo-multinenriis subito acuminatis dimidio
superiore spinuloso-serratis basi attenuatis sessilibus, strobilis (masoulis)
3-4-aggregatis pedunculatis cylindricis pubesoentibus ferrugineis basi mnlti-
bracteatis, squamis antheriferis subpeltatis, antheris subglobosis basi pau-
lulum^attenuatis semibivalvibus.

Zakia Skinneri. Waruew. in OUo et Dietrich Garten Fl, v. 19. p. 146, cum ie.
Bot Zeit. 1854, p, 27. Seemann, Bot. qf Herald, p. 202.



We received plants of this very distinct species of Zamia from
the eminent cultivator Mr. Borsing, of Berlin. It appears to
have been first detected at Veraguas, Isthmus of Panama, by M.
Warszewicz. Dr. Seemann subsequently found it in the Isthmus
of Darien, at Cape Corrientes, and a specimen from him without
fructification is in the Hookerian herbarium. It appears to be
described and figured by Warszewicz in the journal of Otto and
Dietrich above quoted, but whether or not any fructification is
noticed I am ignorant, as I have not the opportunity of seeing the
work. I should think not, for in the brief specific character copied
into the Bot. Zeitung, no mention is made of it. We have been
more fortunate ; for our plants in the stove of the Royal Gardens

APRIL, IST, 1861.

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of Kew produced a cluster of male strobili, which by their form
and colour added greatly to the interest and beauty of the plant.
It is the most distinct of all the species of Zamia known to us.

Descb. Od/udex or trunk of our largest plant erect, eighteen
inches high, six to eight in circumference, scarred transversely
from the fallen fronds. Frondi^^ika^ to three and a half feet long,
including the stipites, few (five to six), erect, patent, pmnateo.
Stipitea long, two to three feet, aculeate (as is the rachis), sub-
terete, grooved in front, singularly incrassated at the base. Pintue
few, seven to eleven, distant, opposite or alternate, nine to four-
teen inches long, four inches broad, coriaceous, elliptical-obovate,
suddenly acuminate, spinuloso-serrated towards the apex, atte-
nuated, sessile, and subdecurrent at the base, the surfsu^e very
glossy, closely striated *mth parallel veim. Male five to six
inches long, an inch and upwards broad, pedunculate, rich tawny
brown, downy, cylindricd, subacute, formed of copious sub-
cuneate coriaceo-camose sccdea^ peltate and subhexagonal at the
summit, bearing, in two depressions on the under side, the sub-
globose two-lipped anthers.



Fig. 1. Very much reduced male plaut. 2. Cluster of male catldus, md
8. Single leaf and portion of the rachis : — not. me. 4, 6, and 6, different views
of the anther-beanng scales, — nuignified.



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rosulate leaves, spreading out like rays, and by the long slender
erect scapes, bearing asecund raceme of small flowers/* but con-
spicuous by their deep purple colour. M. Flanchon, in his
admirable monograph above quoted, enumerates no less than
eighty-eight species of this singular genus, which has its repre-
sentatives in almost every temperate and warm coimtry through-
out the world. We have cultivated this species very successfully
for several years in a warm greenhouse.



Fig. 1. Upper, and 2, under side of a leaf. 8. Pedicellate gland, from the
same. 4. Flower. 5. Stamens and pistil : — aU more or less magn^ied.



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Tab. 5241.

CISTUS VAGINATUS.

Sheath'leaved Cistus.



Nat. Ord. Cistacejc^Foltanbiiia Mokootnia.

Om. Ckar, Calyx, B-sepalns ; iepalU daplid serie dispositis, 2 externis iiue-
^nalibos, interdam nnllia. Petala 6, seqnalia, snbcuoeata, cadaca. Stamina oo
88Bpe e disoo glaodoloso exserta. S^lus filifonnis. I^upiia capitatmn. OapatUa
calyoe obtecta, lO-S-loculam, Talvis 10-6, medio septiferis. Semma OYato-an-
gulata. Embryo flifonnia, sprndis. — ^Frutioes, sufiratioeso^. Folia opposita,
exttifmluia^ inUgra vel iubdeiUiculaia. Pedonculi axiUare$, hm- aui wiuUiJtori.
DeCand.



CxsTDS (i EiyUurodstas) vagmatiu; foliis lanoeolatis aoutis irinerviia lunatis
subtus reticulatis petiolatiB, petiolis ban dilatatis margine piloeis Bulcatia
▼aginantibas, pedancalia axillaribiu l-8-flori8.

Cistus vaginatas. AU. Hori, Kew. ed. I. v. 2. p. 282, ed. 2. v. 8. p. 804.
Jacq. Sort. Sckombr. v. 8. p. 17. t. 28. BoL Beg. i. 225. Sioeei, OMim.
(.9. DeOnid.Frodr.v.l.p.2^b,

Cistus symphytifolins. Lam. Encycl. v. 2. p. 15.

Bhodocistus Bertholledantis. Spach^ Vegd. v. %,p. 88, and in WM^ Phgiogr.
Conor. V. 1. p. 125. 1. 12.

p. leucophyUui, S^h, L c; foliis viz pilosis, snbtos pnesertim nunulisque et
calyoe spedosissime dnereo-tomentosis, OTario toto tomentoso.

Cistus candidissimus. Don, in De Cand. Prodr. v. \.p. 264. Sweety Oittin. L 8*

Cistus ochreatns. Link, in Buck. Betchr. Conor, ha. p. 158.



It is much to be regretted, that masy very handsome and
easily cultivated plants, introduced to our gardens eighty and a
hundred years aso, are neglected and lost, in favour of new
plants which faU rar short of them m pomt of beauty. The pre-
sent is one among that number, a native of Teneriffe, cultivated
at Eew so kng ago as 1779, when seeds were sent by Frederic
Masson, and now scarcely to be found in collections at llie present
time, save in that of W. Wilson Saunders, Esq., at Reigate, a place
rich in rare plants of Teneriffe. To that island it is quite pecu-
Uar, growing in Pine-woods and Cistus-scrubs ('' in Pinetis et
Cisticetis ") according to Mr. Webb, at elevations upon the moun-

APBiL 1st, 1861.

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tains of from 1800 to 9000 feet. The flowers are particularly
large and handsome, and there is a very distinct character in the
union of the bases of the petioles into a very conspicuous elon-
gated striated sheath, surrounding the branch, whence the spe-
cific name is derived. Our drawing was made at Reigate, in
Jime 1860, when the plant was in great beauty.

Desce. a shrub y three to four feet high, with hairy and viscid
iteim and branches. Leaves opposite, broad-lanceolate, very
acute, nearly entire, three-nerved, reticulated (and rugose beneath)
very hairy, almost felted ; petioles united for a considerable por-
tion of the length into a compressed striated very hairy sheath.
Upper leaves small and bracteiform. Peduncles axillary, cymose,
one- to eight-flowered. Flowers large, drooping. Petals singu-
larly plicate or crisped, full rose-colour, yellowish at the base.
Stamens very numerous, collected into a cup around the pistil.
Ovary subglobose, arising from a crenulated fleshy disk. Style
long, subflexuose. Stiyma capitate.



Fig. 1. Leaf, with sheathing base, — nai, me. 2. Pistil, — magn^ed.



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Tab. 5242.

ZAMIA Skinneri.
Mr, Skinners Zamia.



Nat. Ord. Ctcadac£JB. — Dkecia.

Oen. Ckar, Flobes hasculi : Jnthera apertse, in strobilos terminales pedan-
ctdatos ooUectse, undique rachi oommuni insertae, singulse oToidese, basi in stipi-
tem attenuattti apice incrassato peltiformi subbilobce, lobis snbtos poUiniferis.
FiiOB. Fam.; Qnrpidia plorima, monophylla, aperta, in strobilos terminales
pedancqlatos coUeota, racbi communi undique inserta, singula basi in stipiiem
attenuata, apioe in pdtam bexagonam dilatata, pelta subtus utrinque ovulo unico
inveno foeta. Fruetui e carpidiis subdiscretis. Semina ovoideo-subglobosa ;
testa ossea, epidennide teouiter carnosa cincta. Embryo inversua, in axi albu-
minia caniosi, radicula respecin raobeos communis centripeta. — ^Arbuscula i»
America tropica, imprimis in India Occidentalie Ineulie obvia ; frondibus pinnatia ;
pinnis basi eaUow^constrieUe, muUmerviie ; nervis simpUcibue indivisia. Endl,



Zamia 8ki$uieri; caudioe eiecto tereti dcatricato; ^ndibns pauds erecto-paten-
tibns longe stipitatis pinnaiis, stipitibus teretibns (racbibusque) aculeatis
basi valde incrassatis, pinnis 7-11 oppositis vd ahemis remotis obo?ato-
ellipticis coriaceis nitidis paralldo-multinerviis subito acuminatis dimidio
snperiore spinuloso-serratis basi attennatis sessilibus, strobilis (masculis)
3-4-aggregati8 pedunculatis cylindricis pubescentibus ferrngineis basi multi-
bracteatis, squamis antberiferis subpeltatis» antberis subglobosis basi pau-
lulum.attenuatis semibifalvibus.

Zamia Skinneri. Warezew. in Otto et Dietrich Oarten Fl, v, 19. /?. 146, cum to,
Bot. Zeit, 1864, p. 27. Seemann, Bot. qf Herald, p. 202.



We received plants of this very distinct species of Zamia fSpom
the eminent cultivator Mr. Borsing, of Berlin. It appears to
have been first detected at Veraguas, Isthmus of Panama, by M.
Warszewicz. Dr. Seemann subsequently found it in the Istnmus
of Darien, at Cape Corrientes, and a specimen from him without
fructification is in the Hookerian herbarium. It appears to be
described and figured by Warszewicz in the journal of Otto and
Dietrich above quoted, but whether or not any fructification is
noticed I am ignorant, as I have not the opportunity of seeing the
work. I should think not, for in the brief specific character copied
into the Bot. Zeitung, no mention is made of it. We have been
more fortunate ; for our plants in the stove of the Royal Gardens

APRIL, IST, 1861.



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of Kew produced a cluster of male strobili, wluch by their form
and colour added greatly to the interest and beauty of the plant.
It is the most distinct of all the species of Zamia known to us.

Descb. Oaudew or trunk of our largest plant erect, eighteen
inches hiffh, six to eight in circumference, scarred transversely
from the fallen fronds. Frond^^e^ to three and a half feet Ions,
including the stipites, few (five to six), erect, patent, pinnated.
Stipitea long, two to three feet, aculeate (as is the rachis), sub-
terete, grooved in front, singularly incrassated at the base. JPinfue
few, seven to eleven, distant, opposite or alternate, nine to four-
teen inches long, four inches broad, coriaceous, eUiptical-obovate,
suddenly acuminate, spinuloso-serrated towards the apex, atte-
nuated, sessile, and suodecurrent at the base, the surface very
flossy, closely striated *with parallel veins. Male five to six
mches long, an inch and upwards broad, pedimculate, rich tawny
brown, downy, cylindricd, subacute, formed of copious sub-
cuneate coriaceo-camose scales, peltate and subhexagonal at the
summit, bearing, in two depressions on the under side, the sub-
globose two-lipped anthers.



'Big. 1. Yeiy mncli redaced male plant. 2. Cluster of male catkins, and
8. Single leaf and portion of the rachis : — not, size. 4, 5, and 6, different views
of the anther-beanng scales, — magmfied.



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Tab. 524a
CONVOLVULUS Mauritanious.

Mauritanian Bindweed.



Nat. Ord. Conyoltulacbjs. — ^Pbhtanpria Mokootmia.

Om. Char, Sepala 6. (hroUa campanulata, SiyUu 1. SUgmata 2, lineari-
cylindrica, ssepe re?olata. Ovartitiii biloculare, bioyulatum. Cb|Wtf2a bilocularis. —
Herto aui soffiratioes. De Cand.



GoKYOLYULUS Momriiamcui ; toias pallide (breviter) hinntus, radioe pereimi
sublignosa molticanli, caulibus non volubilibus prostratis foliosis parte su-
periori breviter ramosis, foliis omnibas ovatis obtosis mucronulatis breviter
petiolatis, floribus 1-2 ad ramonim extremitatem sitis pedioello calycem
snbaeqaante saffoltis, bracteis linearibus calycem eequantibaa, sepidis lan-
oeolatis acutis hirsatia longe dliatis corolla rosea vel yiolacea triplo breyi-
oribns. Boiss,

CoNYOLTiTLns Maoritamoas. Bow. FkuUea fEtpagne^p, 418. i. cxxii. A.



A very pretty and little known species of Convolvulus^ de-
tected in tne interior of northern Africa, near Constantine, com-
municated to M. Boissier by M. Sejourne, and published in a note
in the botany of M. Boissier's interesting * Voyage en Espagne.'
It is distinguished from C. Sictdus and C. jpentopetaloidea by its
woody and perennial root, its leaves never cordate, shortly pe-
tiolate, and by the size of its flowers : from C. tricolor by some
of the same characters, the leaves not attenuated upon the pe-
tioles, its many-flowered peduncles, the length of the bracteae
and of the sepals. The C. suffrutricosus, Desf., and C. Canta*
brica, L., which are also perennial, have the leaves lanceolate or
linear, the peduncles much elongated, etc.

Our flowering specimen was received from the garden of Mr.
William Thompson, of Ipswich, where it blossomed in the open
air, in October I860.

Desce. Boot perennial, sublignose, branched, about the
thickness of a goose-quill. This throws out several slender,
almost filiform, prostrate, flexuose etems, which are simple,

AFIUL IST, 1861.



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rarely branched ; these are pilose with short, soft, white hairs,
as is almost every part of the plant, scarcely perceptible to the
naked eye. Leaves alternate, distichous, on sHiort petioles two
lines long, suborbicular (especially below) or ovate, obtuse or
acute, one to one and a half inch long. Peduncles axillary,
solitwy, one- to three-flowered, twice or more longer than the
leaves, slender, filiform, bibracteate at the setting-on of the
pedicels, and the intermediate flower has two dracteoles, all of
them linear, patulous. Caly^p of five, linear-oblong, villous se-
palsy two a little smaller than the rest. Corolla twice as long
as the calyx ; the limb patent, nearly entire, purpUsh-blue ; the
fauof or tube white. Stamens included. Filaments subulate,

I)ubescent at the base, two longer than the rest. Anthers ob-
ong. Ovary ovate, seated on a fleshy disi, tapering into a
slender, filiform style, with two very slender, linear stiymas.



Fig. 1. Calyx, inclading the pistil. 2. Base of the corolla open, with sta-
mens. 8. Pistil: — magn^ied.



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Tab. 5244.
BELOPERONE violacea.

VioleUpyuoered Beloperone.



Nat. Ord. Aoanthacba. — Diandeia Monogtnia.

Gen, Char, Cal^x profunde qninquefidus ; laciniis sequalibus, latis v. latiuscolis ;
tubo angusto. CoroUa ringens, tubo labioque superiore concavo-conids, rectis,
inferiore labio trifido asquali, disco IsBvi. Stamina duo, tubo infra medium in-
serta. Jnthera biloculares ; loculia basi calcaratis, in connectivo semisagittato-
oyali oblique distantibus, altera altiore. SHgma subulatum (in specie anomala
obtusum). Capsula a basi ad medium compresso-unguiculata, aspenna, apioe
tetrasperma. Setnina colorata. — ^Frutioes America tropica (rartM herbse) epeciosi ;
oorallis ehngoHij purpureis vel caruleis; bracteis sape coloraHs, Spicae aanllarei
terminalesque, brevet, aecunda. Flores altemi ; hr^x^x^ patuUs bracteolisque sape
aqualibus, Umgie, Unearibua lanceolatieve, Nees.



BsLOFSBONB violocea ; snffraticosa, ramis berbaoeis glabris ad nodos incras-
satis, foliis brevi-petiolatis ovatis acuminatis integerrimis pilosulis ciliolatis,
floribus terminalibus capitatis bracteatis, bracteis oblongo-lanceolatis paten-
tibus foliaceis Tiridibos calyce brevioribus, calyds profunde 5-partitis, laoi-
niis SBqualibus oblongis erectiusculis integerrimis ciliatis, coroUa calyoe sub-
quadruplo longiore speciosa purpurea, labio inferiore amplo pulcherrime albo-
lineato.

BsLOPBROKB violacea. PUmch, et lAnd, Hort, Linden, n. 5.



The genus Beloperone is formed by Nees von Esenbeck, at the
expense of the old and overgrown genus Justicia, but how far
with judgment must be left for Dr. Anderson to decide, who is
preparing a treatise on Acanthacete with all the care and atten-
tion that so difficult a subject demands. No less than thirty-
one species^ are referred to it, all natives of tropical America, and
all having elongated conspicuous purple flowers, with numerous
foliaceous green bracts at their base. In the present instance
the white line in the disk of the lower lip, with its many short
branches, has a pretty effect on the purple corolla.

Beloperone violacea was introduced to gardens in Europe
from New Granada, by Mr. Linden, to whom we are indebted for
our plant. It is treated with us as an ordinary stove plant, and
is easily cultivated. Linden indeed says it succeeds perfectly

APRIL l8T, 1861.



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'' dans la serre temperee, et mSme dans la serre froide ; mais
elle prospere encore mieux en pleine terre> ou elle atteint la taille
d'un arbrisseau de deux a trois pieds de haut, tandis qu'en serre
elle acquiert a peine la moitie de cette hauteur. Flusieurs ex-
emplaires, plantes en pleine terre de bruyere, a Tair libre, vers
les premiers jours de mai, se sont developpes avec une vigeur
peu commune, et ont donne une floraison parfaite et d'un effet
charmant, qui a dure jusque bien avant dans Tautomne/"

The author justly considers it an important acquisition for the
ornamentation of our parterres, especially in summer and autumn.
But I should fear the powerfi^ summer Continental heats would
be required, in which we are so deficient in England ; and which
is the cause of Cannas and other tropical ornamental plants not
succeeding in the open air with us in summer, as they do with
our neighbours.



Fig. 1. Calyx, with pistil and bracts. 2. Stamens. 8. Ovary and hypogynons
cup : — magnified.



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Tab. 5245.

PARltlUM ELATUM.

Lofty Paritium, or Cuba Bast.



Nat. Ord. MALVACEiB. — Monadelfhia Poltandbia.

Gen. Char. Involucellum decem-duodecim-fidom v. •dentatum. Calys quinque-
fidas, laciniis eestivatione valvatis. Corolla pttala 5, hypogyna, expansa, ungui-
bus into tubo stamiDeo adnata, aestivatioDO convolutiva. TubuB Biamineut co-
luronsBformis, infra apicem quinquedentatum, nudum ; Jtlamenta plurima, brevia
exserens ; antkera reniformes. Ovarium sessile, simplex, quinqneloculare, loeuUt
septo secundario parietali verticali incomplete bilocellatis. Ooula in loculis pluria,
angulo centrali inserta, adscendentia. Slylus terminalis apice exserto quinque-
fidus ; stigmata capitellata. CapmUa quinquelocularis, loculia incomplete bilocel-
latis, loculidde per septa incompleta bilaroellata quinqueval?is, vtUvit margine in-
troflexis, medio septa completa gerentibus. Semina abortn pauca, testa Crustacea,
sinu umbilicata, nuda. Embryo intra albumen parcissimum mucilaginosum ho-
rootrope arcuatus; cotyledonidue foliaceis, plicato-convolutis, radiatla infera. —
Arbores vel frutices, inter tropicos totius orbU creaceniee; foliis altemis, petiolatit,
integrity subtu$ ad banm nervi primarii glandulom ; stipulis laieraUbut gemimSy
talis, dedduis; pedunoulis uni/hris, axiUaribus vet terminaliius ei tunc stipulator
bibracteatis : corollis lutescentibus vel purpuraseentibus. Endl.



Pabitiuh elatum: arbor 60-60-pedaHs, foliis amplis orbioulari-cordatis rarius
subangulatis subito brevi-acuminatis integris vel brevi-dentatis submembra-
naceis subtns incanis vel minute pubescentibus concoloribus, floribus maxi-
mis pedunculatis terminalibus axillaribus, junioribus bibracteatis, bracteis
cymbifonnibus amplis, petalis obo?ato- vel oblongo-spathulatis unguiculatis,
capsolis lateritiis ovato-globosis, seminibus villosis.

Pabitiuh elatum. Don, Oard. Diet. v. 1. p. 485. Eichard, Fl. Cub. v. 1. p. 146.
Oriseb. FL Br. fF. Ind.p. 86. JFalp. Report, v. 1. p. 311.

Hibiscus elatus. Sw. Fl. Ind. Dec. p. 1218. HtFad. Fl. Jam. v. 1. p. 68.

De Cand. Frodr. v. 1. p. 464.
Hibiscus abutiloides. WtUd. Enum. p. 736. De Cand. Frodr. v. 1. p. 454.
Hibiscus arboreus, etc. Broume, Jam. p. 84.

Malya arboreo folio rotundato, flore liliaceo. Shane, Jam. v. 1. p, 215. t. 134.
/. 1, 2, 8.



This is a noble Malvaceous tree, with ample, cordato-rotundate
foliage and large flowers, both in bud, and, when expanded, of a
bright brick-red colour, of which no figure has been given save
the very incomplete one of Sloane, /. c, consisting of a single

HAT IST, 1861.



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leaf aod flower, which flower, however, Swartz refers to P. tilia*
ceum (a species figured on the same plate), but I scarcely see
why. It is true the two are not only, nearly allied to each other,
but are often confounded in herbaria. The tiliaceum is of uni-
versal distribution in all tropical parts of the world, and is every-
where spoken of as yielding a valuable and very strong fibre ;
while the Paritium elatum, though certainly not yielding to P.
tiliaceum in the quaUty of its fibre, is, as far as I know, wholly
confined to Jamaica and to Cuba, and does not appear to be
very common. M'Fadyen tells us that it inhabits the lower hills
and plains of the interior ; but in Cuba only one locality is men-
tioned by Don Ramon de Sagra, " crescit in Insula Cuba, loco
dicto * Vuelto de Abajo \ " and he makes no mention of its eco-
nomical properties ; and, what is remarkable, the Flora of Cuba
does not mclude at all the allied species P. tiliaceum, which in
Jamaica is " common by the sea-shore."

Dr. M'Fadyen (whose notices of the properties of plants are
deserving of imitation by all authors of local Floras) tells us that
our P. datum " affords a very valuable timber, much prized, es-
pecially by cabinet-makers, having, when worked up and polished,
the appearance of dark-green variegated " (often called " green
ebony," JF. T. March, Esq,) ; " that the bark is the material
employed by the Negroes in making the better description of
ropes ; and that young shoots and leaves yield abundantly a fine
mucilage, which has been employed with advantage, infused in
boiling water, as a substitute for the vattylo, or zezegary, in dy-
sentery."

Till recently no one has hinted at any connection between the
substance of Cuba Bast, — so well known in commerce for the
beauty of its network-Uke fibre of the inner bark, resembling
lace-bark of Lagetta linteariay extensively used as a substitute
for the bast of the Lime-tree during our war with Russia, — and
this plant. At length my valued friend, Heniy Christy, Esq.,
enabled us to settle the question by sending specimens and seeds
from Cuba, which proved to be the tree now under considera-
tion, and from which our figure is taken (see also a notice on
this subject in the * Kew Garden Miscellany,' vol. viii. p. 347).
Thus a tree till lately supposed to be peculiar to Jamaica, is
proved in Cuba to be the Bast of the latter island ; and this is
confirmed also by seeds since sent thence by Mr. Scharfenberg.
Mr. N. Wilson, of the Jamaica Botanic Garden, has extracted
exactly the same fibre from the Paritium elatum of Jamaica.

Whether the P. elatum (mountain Mahoe) and P. tiliaceum
(sea-side Mahoe) are distinct or not, may perhaps still be consi-
dered sub judice. It is true that Patrick Browne, Sloane,
M'Fadyen, De CandoUe, and Grisebach maintain the two species.



Digitized by



Googk



but I think the marks of distinction given are very unsatisfac-
tory, and assuredly very variable. If, indeed, the figure of Fa-
ritium iiliaceum, as given in the * Botanical Register, t. 282, be
compared with our present figure of P. elatum, they may, on the
first aspect, be considered distinct enough ; while in reality the
main difference is in the size of the leaves and flowers, and the
colour of the latter, yellow (as it is always described in tilia-
ceum\ bright brick-red in our elatum; while Grisebach describes
its '' petals in the early morning of a pale primrose-coloiu*, then
becoming orange-colour and deep-red as the day advances." No
such change took place in the nowers of our living plant. In
these, too, the petals are very broad-obovate and clawed : in our
dried native specimen most of the petals are narrow and oblong


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