William Jackson Hooker.

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tubo spatbee a basi discedente et kteraliter aperiente primum obvallatse, lutes,
diu aistentes. SemtHa ortbotiopa, longe funiculata, oonico-ovoidea, epidermide
auoculenta craaaa lutea obdncta. Tnta ferruginea, yerraculosa. Sckott.



OONATAKTHUS BormetUoiUB.

OoNATANTHUs 8annento8U8. Unk, Kl. et Otto, Ic. Plant, Bar. Berl. p. 88. /. 14.
Sckott, Prodr. Syst, Aroid.p. 142.

Caladium sarmentoaum. Fiach. MS.



This pretty Aroideous plant was separated from the genus
Caladium, to which Dr. Fischer had referred it, by Dr. Klotzsch,
under the name of Ganatanthus, derived from the geniculated
character of the tube of the spatha ; and adopted by Schott in
his valuable works on Aroidea. As yet, however, the present
species alone is certainly known to belong to it ; and this is a
native of the Khasia and Himalaya Mountains, having been de-
tected there by Baron Hugel, and Drs. Hooker and Thomson.
Two dubious species, imperfectly noticed by Schott, are G.? or-
natm, Schott, also from Khasia (Hooker fil. and Thomson), and
G. GfiffitMi, Schott (Arum, ^. Griff. Notida, v. 3. p. 144, Icones,
v. 3. 1. 164), gathered in Burmah by Griffith. Our plants, re-
ceived from the Berlin Garden, flowered in the stove in May.

Descr. No stem. Root, or tuberous rAizotne, sparsely fibrous,

OCTOBER 1st, 1861.



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frequently sending oat siolonea, which bear sheathing scales, and
sometimes clusters of bulbs, which terminate in one to three long
slender filaments. These stolones are probably more freely pro-
duced from non-flowering plants. Our own plants have not yet
produced these : the former are represented by Klotzsch, I.e.; the
latter in Schott's 'Genera Aroidearum/ t. 39. Leaves ovate,
very acute, six to ten inches long, cordato-ovate, dark green
above, pale beneath, entire, penniveined, with slender veinlets
between, which meet and anastomose slightly : there is also an
intramarginal veinlet. Petiole longer than the leaf, peltately
inserted at some distance from the base. Spatha pedunculate,
tawny-yellow, a span to a foot long, subulato-lanceolate, convo-
lute, the very base tumid, then bent at an angle (geniculat^d),
above that also tumid, but partially open, so as to expose to view
the apex of the spadix. Spadix short, an inch and a half long,
clavate, the base beset with pistilsy the slender portion with im-
perfect anthers, the clubbed apex with perfect anthers of a purple
colour, each opening by four pores.



Fig. 1. Spadix, removed from the spatha. 2. Anther. 3. Transverse section
of ditto. 4. Pistil. 5. Transverse section of the ovary. 6. Vertical section of
the same : — more or less magnified.



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Tab. 5276.

IMPATIENS FLACCIDA.

Sofi-leaved Balsam.



Nat. Ord. BALSAMiNEis. — Pentandria Monogynia.

Gen, Char, CalycU pentaphylli colorati foliola ineequalia, posiicum maximam,
basi calcaraturo, lateralia minora, aniica minima vel obsoleta. Corolla petala 5,
hypogyna, calycis foliolis alterna, anticum maximum, suborbiculato-ooncavum,
postica cum lateralibus minoribus per paria connata. Stamina 5, hypogyna,
petalis alterna, ovarium arete cingentia ; filamenta superne ooalita ; anthera in-
trorsffi, biloculares, subconnatee, longitudinaliter debiscentes vel infra apicem
subtransversim ruptae. Ovarium sessile, oblongo-pentagonum v. teretiusculum,
quinqueloculare. ODula in loculis pluriroa vel pauca, angulo central! superpo-
sita, inserta, uniseriata. Stigma sessile, quinquedentatum vel quinqueiidum.
Capsula oblonga, pentagona v. teretiuscula, superne uni-, inferne quinque-locu-
laris, loculicide quinquevalvis ; valvis medio semiseptiferis, a columna persis-
tente elastice dissilientibus, sspissime septicide bifidis, ab apice ad basim in-
volutis, V. sursum revolutis, endocarpio cartilagineo. Sendna in loculis plnrima
V. pauca, rarissime abortu solitaria, inversa. Embryonis ezalbuminosi ortho-
tropi cotyledones piano-con vexse ; radicula obtusa, supera.— Herbae aapianme
annua, in Asia Orientali tropica et Bubtropica copiosa, in Capite Bona Spei,
America Boreali, Europa et Atia tanperata rara ; foliis altemis, opponiis v, ter-
natis, lineari- vel lato-lanceolalia, serralis v, dentatia, rarissime omnibus radicali-
bus Umge petiolatis, exstipulatis ; pedunculis axillaribus, solitariis v, aggregatis,
vet plurifloris, Endl,



liiV ATiK^s faceida ; glabra herbacea, foliis alternis tenuiter membranaceis longe
petiolatis elliptico-oblongis acuminatis basi in petiolum attenuatis crenato-
serratis, petiolis parce gland uloso-setigeris, pedicellis solitariis binisve fili*
formibus folio breyioribus, sepalis lateralibus oblongo-lanceolatis anteriore
plus duplo brevioribus, posteriore petalis subaequali, calcare filiformi (mediq
crnssiore P) apice attenuato flore subduplo lougiore, capsula elliptico-oblonga
basi et apice attenuata glabra. Am.

Impatiens flaccida. Am, Ind, Bals, in Hook. Comp, to Bot, Mag, v,l, p. 32.
F^alp, Repert. Bot, v, I. p. 46S, Hook, fit, et Thorns. Balsamin, in Jojum,
qfLinn. Soc, 1860, p, 134. Thwaites, En. PI, Zeylan, p, 65.

Impatiens pulcberrima. Dah. in Bot, Mag, t, 4615?

Impatiens latifolia, var.? TAnn, Sp, PL p, 1328. An fFall, Cat, n, 4737 A ?
{Hook, f I, et Thorns.),

Impatiens lucida. Wall, Cat, n, 4738 {Herb, Henslow),



A lovely species, of a most lovely and, as now known to us,
very extensive genus, especially abounding in tropical India.
Linnaeus, in 17C4, enumerated seven species as all that were

OCTOBER IST, 1861.



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known to botanists. De Candolle^ so late as 1824, in his ^Fro«
dromus/ has only recorded thirty-one species, including Bat-
samina, now universally united with Impatiens. Dr. Arnott,
scarcely ten years later, added twenty new species from India
alone. Drs. Hooker and Thomson, in their valuable " Praecur-
sores ad Floram Indicam, in the fourth volume of the Journal of
the Proceedings of the Linnaean Society," have described ninety-
six inhabiting India. It is true the characters are mostly drawn
from dried specimens, and it must be confessed that the j9owers
of the Bakaminea suflFer much by the process of drying for
the herbarium. It is this circumstance which renders it so dif-
ficult to ascertain whether the present plant be a form of Lin-
naeus's /. latifolia, as intimated by Thwaites and Hooker fil.
and Thomson, or not. Even with the opportunity of examining
living specimens, so variable are many of the Balsams, that Dr.
Hooker hesitates whether to consider the Impatiens pidcherrima
of Dalzell in this work (/. c.) identical with our present species.
It is indeed a very near ally, if not specifically the same ; but, as
Dr. Hooker observes, the latter is altogether a larger plant, the
flowers much paler in colour, and with more of the lilac tint,
the fructiferous pedicels are erect, the stem and petioles green,
not a fine purple, as in our Lflaccida.

I.Jlaccida is a native of Ceylon, at elevations upon the moun-
tains of from 4000 to 6000 feet, collected by Mrs. General
Walker, Gardener, and Thwaites. A variety with slightly hairy
pedicels and capsules, is considered to be a native of the Malay
Islands and Moulmein ; and if Dalzell's L pulcAerrima be the
same, it is found in the Concan and perhaps other parts of the
Madras peninsula.



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Tab. 5277.
SPIRANTHES cernua.

Droopinff-flowered Spiranthes,



Nat. Ord. Obchidea. — Gynandria Monandria.

Oen. Char, Ferianthium ringens. Sepala lateralia labello snpposita, basi ob-
liqua et in ovarium decarrentia ; dorsale petalis subglutinatum. LabeUum pe-
diproductsB columnsB affixum, UDguiculatum, raro sessile, obloogum, ssepius
apice dilatatum, nunc trilobum, semper callis duobus infra medium instructum,
colnmnsB adpressum, eique marginibus inflexis arete adhserens. Columna basi
arcuata et ovarii apicem oblique terminans, in pede producta, teres ; siigmate
ovato, in roitellum acuminatum, demum bifidum, aut obtusum, emarginatum, raro
comeum, indivisum producto. Antkera dorsalis acuminata vel obtusa, nune
membrana apiculata, bilocularis; clinandrio utrinque membranaceo marginato.
FoUinia 2, ^ulverea, bipartita; glandula communi oblongse affixa. — Herbce,
utrinque orbts, ierreatrea, aapius parvjflora et glandutoeo-pubeKetUeB ; radicibua
/a9ciculatis. Folia radicaUa, nunc caulescentia^ textura Orchidis, nunc omnino
dejidentia. Mores epicatiy tpirales. Lindl,



Spiranthes cernua ; tuberibus elongatis fasciculatis, foliis radicalibus spathulato-
lanceolatis obscure 8-5-nerviis patentibus, caulinis sensin minoribus lanceo-
latis basi vaginatis, spica oblonga densa multiflora, bracteis flores eequanti-
. bus, floribus trifariam spiraliter tortis, sepalis pubescenti-glandulosis in
unum ovatum cucullatum oohserentibus petala oblongo-spathiQata includen-
tibus, labello oblongo obscure trilobo basi biglanduloso, lobo medio lato
sinuato reflexo, columna ovata birostrata basi glanduloso-barbata, ovario^
pynformi triquetro glanduloso.

Spiranthes cernua. Rich. Orchid, Annot. p. 87. ffook.Fl. Bor. Am. v. 2.
p. 202. Lindl. Bot. Beg. t. 823. Gen. et Sp. Orchid, p. 467. BaHngton
in Trans. Linn. Soc. v. 19. p. 262. t. 32. Aea Gray, Man. Bot. N. U. St.
Illuetr. p. 448. Elliott, Fl. of 8. Carolina, v. 2. p. 492. Chapman, Fl. S.
U. St. p. 402. IWrey, Fl. of N. York, p. 283. Tab. 129.

Ophrys cernua. Linn. Sp. PI. p. 1340.

Neottia cernua. WiUd. Sp. PI. v. 4. p. 75. Sims, Bot. Mag. t. 1568. Sweet,
Brit. Fl. Card. v. 1. p. 42. ffook. et Am. Brit. Ficra, ed. 7. p. 430.

Neottia gemmipara. Sm. Eng. Fl. v. 4. p. 36. Engl. Bot. Suppl. t. 2786.

Spiranthes gemmipara. lAndL Sgn. Br. Fl. p. 257. Hook, et Am. Brit. Fl.
ed. S.p. 431. Beichenb. Orchid, in Fl. Germ. t. 477. /. t. (copied from
Engl. Bot.)



Perhaps na Orchideous plant has remained so long in a state of

OOTOBER 1st, 1861.



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doubt and uncertainty as the Neottia gemmipara of Sir James
Smith. It was discovered rather more than half a century ago,
that is, in August 1810, "near Castletown, opposite to Bear-
haven, on the northern side of Bantry Bay, county of Cork, Ire-
land," by Mr. James Drummond, at that time Curator of the
Cork Botanic Garden, and the same who so eminently distin-
guished himself by his botanical researches in Western Australia.
We are not aware that another European locality has ever been
detected. Strange to say, it appears to have attracted no pubUc
attention till 1828, when Sir James Smith described it in his Eng-
lish Flora, v. 4. p. 36, under the name of Neottia gemmipara, so
called from some " buds, destined to flower the following year,
formed among the leaves at the bottom of the flower-stalk."
Lindley, in his * Synopsis to the British Flora,' referred the
plant correctly to Spiranthea, preserving the specific name, and
sanctioning the species. A very unsatisfactory figure appeared
in 1834, in the Supplement to ' English Botany,' t. 2786, from an
imperfectly developed and probably dried specimen. In 1844,
Mr. Babington read an excellent paper " On the Neottia gem*
mipara of Smith " to the Linnaean Society. In the preparation
of that memoir, that gentleman consulted the Hookerian Her-
barium, and I directed bis attention to my numerous specimens
of the North American Spiranthea cemua (Ophrys, Z.), as pro-
bably identical with our Irish plant ; and the result of his exami-
nation confirmed that opinion, and, as I had hoped, settled the
question. Dr. Lindley, however, in a very able paper, read be-
fore the Linnsean Society in 1857, controverted this opinion,
alluding to its close affinity with S. Bomamoffiana''^ (so near that
they may possibly be identical), retaining it however as a dis-
tint species, peculiar to the south-east of Ireland, under the ori-
ginal name, gemmipara, observing, that " we must require very
strong proof that a plant hitherto unknown, except in the south-
east of Ireland, is the same as a common North American
species." In reference to this remark, I may observe, that
Najasflemlis, a plant "common in ponds and slow streams in

* With regard to the Spiranthes Eomanzoffiana, io point of locality, it may be
ranked with what has been hitherto known of the 8. gemmipara, that is, that
only one station has been recorded for it, and only one person has been fortu-
nate enough to see it, growing " in alveo turfoso convallium infimorum insnlse
Unalashcse,*' and that is Yon Chamisso himself, to whom I am indebted for well-
dried specimens. I could not undertake from them to say whether the plant be
specifically distinct or not. They are smaller than 8, cemua, and of much less
robust habit ; the flowers are still smaller in proportion, and narrower, more cy-
lindrical, and the bracteas always much exceed the flowers in length. Ledebour,
indeed, observes, " Habitus ob spicse densitatem et bractearum magnitudinem in
hoc genere maxime singularis.*' Reichenbach's three figures (l.c) are very satis-
factory representations of the natural size ; but the analysis, being all done from
the dried, cannot perhaps be so much depended upon.



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the States and Canada, but which is exceedingly scarce in Eu-
rope," was discovered by Professor Oliver to be a native of
Connemara, Ireland; and Eriocaulon aeptatiffulare, peculiar in
Europe to the west of Ireland and of Scotland, is abundant in
North America. Such views, entertained by so distinguished
a botanist as Dr. Lindley, led Mr. Bentham, Dr. Hooker, and
myself, to a further examination of the SpiranlAes in question,
on my receiving some living native specimens last year by the
kindness of Lord Bandon. The result is, that the Irish S. gem-
mipara and the North-American 8. cemua are identical in all
particulars, as the accompanying figures of the Irish plant will
testify.

In North America S, cemua has a most extensive range. I
possess numerous specimens from Newfoundland in the east,
on the mainland through the whole plains of the Saskatchawan,
and the Lake of the Woods ; across the Rocky Mountains to
British Columbia and Vancouver's Island ; from all the northern
and middle United States ; and it is recorded in the Floras of
South Carolina and Georgia, and of the Southern States ge-
nerally. If 8. Romanzoffiana should prove to be identical with
8. cernua, then its north geographical limit is Unalashka, in the
Russian dominions, but geographically pertaining to America.



Tab. 5277. Spiranthea cemua. Rich., drawn from a living plant from Ireland.
Fig. 1. Side, and ^%, 2. front view of a flower. 3. Flower, from which the se-
pals and petals are removed. 4. Column, with anther, and base of the labellum.
5. View of column, from above. 6. Column, seen from beneath. 7. Side view
of a column. 8 and 9. Pollen-masses : — aU more or less magnified.



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Tab. 5278.
STANHOPEA Bucephalus.

BuU-homed Stanhopea.



Nat. Ord. Obchide-s. — Gtnandbia Monakdria.

Oen. Char, Perianlhium membranaceum, patentissimum, reflexum. Sepala
libera, sabundulata, mole saa ruentia. Fetala conformia, angustiora. LabeUwn
liberum, anticum; dimidio superiore (epichilio) convexo, inferiore (hypochilio)
excavato. Columna longisaima, petaloideo-marginata. Anthera bilocularis. Pol-
Unia 2, elongate, fissa, caudicula cum glandula biloba stipitete breviore. — ^^i-
iphyUd pseudobulbosa. 'FolitL plicata. Scsiipi radicaUa, voffinaii, pauciflori, Flores
fnaxmi, magU minuwe maculati. Zindl,



Stanhope A Bucephalua; bracteis ovario subsequalibus, hypochilio unguiculato
cymbiformi antice intruso apice carnoso aperte sulcato mutico basi longe
angusteto ecorni intus Isevi extus bicarinato, epichilio subrotundato-ovato
caspidato integro breviore, comibus gracilibus teretibus brevioribus, columna
basi angustissima sursum alate. LindL

Stanhope A Bucephalus. lAndl, Gen. et Sp. Orchid, n. 2. Bot. Beg. 1843, 9ub
i. 44, et V. 81. t 24.

Epidbndbum grandiflorum. Humb. et Bonpl. PL JSquinoct. p. 94. t. 27.

Anguloa grandiflora. Humb. Bo/ipl. et Kth. Nov. Oen. et Sp. Am. v.\. p. 845.



This is perhaps the richest-coloured of all the species of the
fine genus Stanhopea^ having the ground-colour of a rich tawny-
orange, marked with deep blood-coloured spots ; it yields, too,
like so many other of its congeners, a powerful fragrance, which
would certainly be too strong for the drawing-room. To this
species, no doubt. Dr. Lindley properly refers the Bpidendrum
grandificyrum of the PI. ^quinoct. (Anguloa, H. B. JT.), though
in his Gen. et Sp. Orchid, he had considered that plant as sy-
nonymous with my 8. insipiis (Bot. Mag. t. 2948, 2949). Its
nearest affinity is doubtless with 8. oculata (Lindl. Bot. Reg.
t. 1800), not yet figured in this work, " from which it diflfers in
the form of the lip, and especially in the very short ovaries."

The species is a native of Ecuador, and was first detected by

NOVEMBER IST, ISGl.



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Humboldt and Bonpland at CueD9a. Hartweg found it at
Paccha, a small village in the Andes, on the ascent from Guaya-
quil to Loxa, at an elevation of 6000 feet above the level of the
sea, and by him it was sent to the Koyal Horticultural Society
of London, and secured to our orchid-houses. It flowered with
us in August of the present year.



Fig. Column and lip, — slightly magnified.



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Tab. 5279.
VACCINIUM Imrayi.

Dr. Imraya Vaccinium.



Nat. Ord. Vi^ciNiACBiE. — Ogtandbia Monogynia.

G«i. Char, Calyx ovario adnatas ; Umbo libero 4-5-partito, rarius subintegro,
partitionibus dent^ormibus. Corolla campanulata aut urceolata, Umbo ^-S-fido.
Stamina libera, corollee lobis nnmero dnpla, partim ima basi corollse, partim
limbo calycis inserta. Anthera biloculares, bitnbulosae, dorso biaristatse aut
mutics, antice ad apicem tantum dehiscentes. Stylus erectus, strictus. Stigma
truDcatam. Oermen inferum, dUco epigyno piano aut convexo, Isevo, limboque
calycino coronatum, 4-5-loculare, hculis multiovnlatis. Bacea pulposa aut
exsucca, calycia Umbo vestita, subglobosa, 4-5-loculari8, loculu oligo- aut poly-
spermia. Semina parva, aubangulata, fusca aut flavida. — ^Frutices aut suffrutices.
Folia sparaa, caduca aut persistentia. Flores axillares, soUtarU, gemini, temi,
/amculati aut racemoH, CorollsB albida (vtrescentes) aut coccinea. Klotzwh,



Vaccinium (§ Scytantbemum) Imrayi; fmticosum glaberrimnm, foliis brevi-
petiolatis sempervirentibus ovatis acuminatis integerrimis Tel obsolete ser-
ratis penninerviis, corymbis multifloris axillaribus vel terminalibus, floribus
lulescenti-viridibus, calyoibus 6-6-dentatis, corollis crassissimis B-6-fidi8,
laciniis ovatis erectis, marginibus involutis, antheris muticis.

Vaccinhim Imrayi. Hook. Ic. Plant, Bar, v. 8. t, 292. Walp, Repert, v, 2-
p, 723 ; Annal, v, 2. p. 1100. Klotz9ch in Linnaa, v, 24. p. 61.



This is a remarkable-looking Vaccinium^ native of the island
of Dominica (not " St. Domingo/* as stated by mistake by Dr.
Klotzsch), and was sent to our garden, along with good speci-
mens for the herbarium, by Dr. Imray of that island, its dis-
coverer. Dr. Klotzsch, in his memoir on the Linnaean class
Bicomea, published in the ' Linnaea,' /. c, has deemed it worthy
to form a section or group of the genus Vaccinium to which he
has given the name Sct/tanthemum. It is a handsome evergreen
shruby two and a half to three feet high, with glossy coriaceous
leaves, often three inches long. H:\iQjlower8 are large for the
genus, and remarkable for their uniform yeUow-green colour,
unusual in this genus, and for the very carnoso-coriaceous tex-

NOTEMBBK IST, 1861.



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ture of the corollas. These flowers form rather compact termi-
nal or lateral leafy corymbs. Six is the ordinary number of
divisions in the flower. The stamens and style are included.
The anthers are of an orange-colour, muticous, upon broad fila-
ments.



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Pistil: — nlightly magnified, 3. Two of the Btamens, —
more magnified.



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Tab. 5280.

HIGGINSIA REGALIS.
Royal Hiffffinsia,



Nat. Ord. Rubiacejb (HBDYoriDEiE).— Teteandbia Monootnia.

Oen, Char, Calycis iubM brevis, obovatus ; IMm ad basin 4-dentatus^ persis-
tens. CoroUa infundibuliforxnis, subcampanulata, tubo brevi, limbo 4-partito
patente, fauce nnda. Stamina medio tubo inserta, Jllamentis brevibus, aniherU
OTatis indusis. Stigmata 2, exserta. Bacca oblonga, subtetrag^na, bisulca, bilo-
cularis, calyce coronata. Placenta septo adnatae. Semina in looulo quoque plu-
rima, parva, aptera. — Sufrotices S-A-pedales, ramis obtuse tetragmis. Folia
opposita aut verticiUaia, obavata aut oblonga, acuta. Stipulse vtrinque eolitaria,
parrxBy acuta, decidua. Pedanculi asnllares, racemosi^ pedicellis brembui, unila-
teralibue, Corollee rubentes. Be Cand,



HiooiNSiA regalis; firutioosa robusta, ramis sabsucculentis obtuse tetragonis,
foliis Totundato-ovatis subcoriaceis acuminatis integerrimis subarcte plicato-
penninerviis glabris nitidis atro-viridibus subtus purpureo-rubris, stipulis
triangularibus deciduis^ floribus aggregatis subsessilibus.

Camptlobotbys regalis. ffort. Belg,



In 1850 we received from Fans, and published at Tab. 4530
of this work, a South American plant under the name of Cam-
pylobotrys discolor^ and not being able then to refer it with cer-
tainty to any known Rubiaceous genus, we retained the name
as we received it, and drew up a character as well as our ma-
terials would permit. Sincfe that has appeared, our friend Mr.
Planehon has referred the Campylobotrya discolor to Higginsia
(see Walpers's Annales Bot. Syst. v. 2. p. 792), and probably cor-
rectly so. We have now, from Mr. Linden, of the Belgian Gar-
dens, received the beautiful plant here figured, with the name of
" Campylohotrys regalis^' but unfortunately with no mention of its
native country nor indication of its being anywhere described or
published. No plant better deserves to be known or is better
worthy of cultivation in the stove. As it is evidently of the
same genus as the Higginsia discolor of Planchon, we transfer it
thither, only lamenting we have so little of its history to give.

MOVEMBEB IST, 1861.



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True, the name appears in Linden's Catalogue, n. 15, 1860,
p. 3, but the notice accompanying it only relates to the beauty
of the individual; — "Cette plante merveilleuse est consideree
comme une de nos meilleures introductions, et ce n'est pas peu
de dire, lorsqu'on cite parmi celles-ci des plantes comme le Cya-
nophyllum magnificamy le Begonia Bex^ le Gemeria cinnabarina,
etc. Nous ne craignons meme pas d'etre taxe d'exageration
en aflBrmant que ce Campylobotrys eclipse le Cyanophyllum mag-
nificum lui-meme, par la beaute extraordinaire des feuilles, que
nous ne saurions mieux comparer qu'a celles des plus splendides
AntBchtochilusy — It blossomed in our stove in August, 1861,
but the flowers are very unattractive as compared with the
foliage.

We have species of Higgirma^ in our herbarium, from New
Grenada, but none that exactly corresponds with it.



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Corolla, laid open. 8. Calyx and pistil: — all MgUly
tnaffnified.



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Tab. 5281.

ECHINACEA angustifolia.

Narrow-leaved Echinacea.



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Stngenbsia Fbustbanba.

Oen, Char, Ca/nV^Znm multiflorum, beterogamum;/. rAifttneutriSylonge ligu-
latis, 1-serialibus ; ^^»ci hermapbroditis, regulariter S-fidis ; tubo subnullo, fauce
nuda ; limbi dentibus erectis. Involucrum 3-8eriale, squamis lanceolatis oiliatis.
Recepiaculum ovatum ; paleiB rigidis, superne cartilagineis ; florei disci superaQ-
tibus ODUstum. Slaminum filamenta ex ima corolla orta. Styli rami appendi-
culis semilanceolatis superati. Achenia tetragona, obpyramidata, crassa, pappo
irregulariter lacero subcoroniformi decidue coronata. — Herbae Boreali- Americana,
perennea. Folia radicalia j^e^io^oto, caulina aUema, Beanlia, aerrata aut miegerrima,
Kami tupeme nudi, monocephali. Capitula ampla ; ligalis purpureU^ %-Z-dentati9t
1-2 poU, hngk ; fl. disci obscure virescentibus, De Oand,


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Online LibraryWilliam Jackson HookerCurtis's botanical magazine → online text (page 9 of 10)