William Jackson Hooker.

Curtis's botanical magazine online

. (page 10 of 11)
Online LibraryWilliam Jackson HookerCurtis's botanical magazine → online text (page 10 of 11)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


amongst Bignonias, Balsams, and Ferns.

The specimen here figured was raised from seed sent by
Dr. Kirk, which has been flowering in the Stove-house fi'om
the month of June till now, late in October. — J. D. H.



Fig. 1, Section of base of flower through the ovary ; 2 and 3, anthers and portion
of filaments ; 4, ovary and rudiments of epicalyx ; 5, top of staminal column and
stigmas ; 6, transverse section of ovary i—all enlarged.



Digitized by



Google



<o'6%^



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



Digitized by



Google



Tab. 6525.
crintjm purpurascens.

Native of West Tropical Africa.

Nat Ord. Amabyllidace^. — Tribe Amabtllidejs.
Genus Cbinuh, Linn, ; {Kunth JEnum. vol. v. p. 647.)



Cbinijm pnrpvrascens ; bnlbo parvo ovoideo brevicollo copiose stolonifero, foliis
multis loratis patulis angnstis undalatis lj-2-pedaliba8, scapo gracili foliis
dnplo brevioii, umbellis sessilibos 6-10-flori8, spatha valvis deltoideis, floribns
erectis albis extns pnrpurascentibus, tubo gracili 6-6-pollioari» segmentis
oblanceolatis acntis recurvatis tubo duplo brevioribus, filamentis arcuatis
saturate rubellis limbo distincte brevioribus, siylo filamentos superante stigmate
minuto capitato.

C. purpurascens, Herb, AmarylU p» 260 ; JSoem. Amaryll, p. 72 ; Kunth JEnum,
vol. V. p. 654,



This is a very distinct Crinum of the star-flowered set
from West Tropical Africa, remarkable for its dwarf slender
habit and very numerous spreading narrow imdulated
leaves. Its alliance is with the Himalayan 0. amcenum and
pratense^ and the New World G. americanum and erubescens.
It was introduced in the time of Dean Herbert, and is
carefully described in his classical work on the Ainarylli-
dacea^, but has never been previously figured. Our drawing
was made from a plant that flowered at Kew in June, 1879,
the bulb of which was sent by the Rev. H. Goldie, and we
have since had it from Messrs. Veitch, from bulbs brought
home by Mr. Kalbreyer. It grows at a low level by the
side of streams about Fernando Po and in Old Calabar,
and, of course, requires stove-heat for its successful
cultivation.

Desob. Bulb ovoid, about two inches in diameter, with a
short neck, and copious stolons. Leaves twenty or thirty,
cotemporary with the flowers, spreading, lorate, one and a
half or two feet long at the flowering-time, an inch broad,

NX)VEMBEB IST, 1880.



Digitized by



Google



thin in texture, dark green, much undulated towards the
edges. Scape slender, subterete, tinted with purple, under
a foot long, produced from the axis of one of the outer
leaves of the rosette. Umbel sessile, six- to ten-flowered ;
spathe-valves small, deltoid. Flowers rotate, faintly-
scented, white, tinted on the outside with purple, erect in
bud. Perianth tube slender, five or six inches long ; limb
about half as long as the tube, the oblanceolate acute
recurving segments a third or half an inch broad three-
quarters of the way up. Stamens arcuate, distinctly shorter
than the perianth-limb ; filaments bright red ; anthers
linear, half an inch long. Style overtopping the stamens,
bright red ; stigma minute, capitate. — J. O. Baker.



Digitized by



Google



fol>5.(c



Digitized by



Google



^6Z6



ABdd JKHbdiLith.



Digitize(



Tab. 6526.
scabiosa ptbeooephala.

Native of Greece.

Nat Ord. Dipsace-e.
Genus Scabiosa, Linn,; (Benth, et JELooTcf. Gen, PI, vol. ii. p. 169.)



ScABiosA pterocephala ; dense late csespitoea, sericeo-tomentosa, basi sufiruticosay
ramis procumoentibas novellis f oliosis, foliis confertis ovato-oblongis in petiolam
angustatis v. lyrato-pinnatifidis grosse crenato-serratis, lobis lateral ibns ore vibus
dentatis crenatisve, pedunculis brevinsculis, capitulis depressis, involacri bracteia
pluriseriatis lanceolatis floribus brevioribus v. seqaantibus, flonbas radiantibus
carneo-parpureis, involacello cylindraceo hirsuto obsolete coronulato, corona in
aristas breves v. elongatas abeunte, calycis aristis 15-16 involuoro mnltoties
longioribus.

S. pterocepbala, Linn, ^, PL 146 ; Sihih. Fl. Gneo, 1 113.

PTBB0CEPHALU8 Pamassi, Spren^, Syst. Veg, voL i. p. 384 ; Boits. Fl, OrienU
vol. iii. p. 148.

P. perennis, Vaill. in Act, Paris, 1722, p. 384.

P. bellidifolia, Boiss, Diagn, ser. 1, vol. ii. p. 109 (forma depauperata).



A densely-tufted perennial, forming large low cushions,
perfectly hardy, and, when in flower, very ornamental. It
has been long cultivated in Kew, in the open border of the
herbaceous ground, but I am not aware how or whence it
was procured. It is a native of the mountains of Greece,
growing in dry rocky places at elevations of 3000 to 6000
feet, and extends from the Ionian Islands (Mount Nero in
Cephalonia) to Mount Athos in Macedonia, and Parnassus
in Attica. At Kew it flowers in July and August.

Descr. Stems and branches woody, tortuous, procumbent,
sending up very numerous short leafing shoots, the whole
forming dense patches two to three feet in diameter; whole
plants densely hoary-pubescent. Leaves one to one and a
half inches long, narrowed into a stout petiole, blade simple
ovate obtuse and deeply crenate-toothed or lyrate-pinnatifid

NOVEMBER IST, 18S0.



Digitized by



Google



with the tennmal lobe ovate obovate or rounded and
crenate-toothed, the lateral lobes few short obtuse and
lobulate. Peduncle terminal, stout, solitary, erect, naked,
tomentose, shorter or longer than the leaves, rarely exceeding
three inches long. Heads depressed-hemispherical, one and
a half inches in diameter ; involucral-bracts rarely as long
as the flowers, lanceolate or elliptic-ovate, subacute. Flotaers
very many, one-third of an inch long, those of the ray
horizontal, limb oblique two-hpped, those of the disk erect,
regular, with a slender tube and campanulate five-fid limb ;
involucel cylindric, truncate, with plumose long or short
awns. Galycine awns 15-16, much longer than the invo-
lucel, plumose. Corolla of the ray nearly half an inch long,
tube pubescent, upper Up two-lobed, lobes short rounded
lobulate ; lower lip three-lobed, lobes ovate obtuse ; corolla
of the disk-flowers shorter, tube equalling the campanulate
four-lobed limb. Stamens with filaments twice as long as
the corolla-lobes. — /. D. H.



Fig. 1, Flower of disk ; 2, flower of ray ; 3, awn of calyx ; 4, anther ; 5, stigma :
-^all enlarged.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



(o'9%^



Digitized by



Google



MS del. J Ni-i'^^i^^Ui.



Digitized by



GofigLk.;



a.y&-SrnJE;?



Tab. 6527.
CALOOHORTUS pulchellus.

Native of Oalifomia,

Nat. Ord. LiLiACEiE. — Tribe Tulipe-e.
Geniifi Calochobtub, Pursh; (Baker in Joum, Linn, Soc. vol. xiv. p. 302.)



Calochortus (Macrodenns) pulchellus ; bulbo ovoideo, foliis basalibus 1-2 lineari-
bus vel lanceolatis finnis glabris. caule subpedali anperne ramoso, floribus 6-12
pendnlifi laze corymbosis, periantbii elobosi lutei segmentis exterioribus oblongis
acutis glabris, interioribos orbiculatis facie et margine pilosis conspicue foveo-
latis, staminibns periantbio duplo brevio^ibas antberis oblongis, capsulis
oblongis profunde trilobatis angulis doi-so alatis.

C. pulcbellas, Douffl. MSS. ; Wood in Proc. Acad, Phil. 1868, p. 168 ; Baker
in Joum, Linn, Soc, vol. xiv. p. 303; S, Wats, in Proc, Amer, Acad.
vol. xiv. p. 262.

Cjclobotbra pulobella, Benih, in Trans, Sort, Soc, n, s. vol. i. p. 416, tab. 14, fig. 1 ;
Lindl. in Bot, Reg. 1. 1662 ; Kunth Enum, vol. iv. p. 228 ; Regel Garten-
flora, tab. 802.



The Calochorti, of which between twenty and thirty
species are now known, belong exclusively to California,
British Columbia, the Rocky Mountains, and Mexico, and
one and all seem to require greater heat than an English
summer gives them to mature their bulbs properly. The
present species and C. albus are well marked from all the
others by their more robust habit and numerous large
drooping globose flowers, which never expand fiilly and are
much less fugitive than in the more brilliantly-coloured
C. venustus and its neighbours. Calochortus and Gyclo-
bothra slide into one another so gradually that it is not
worth keeping them up as distinct genera.

The present plant was one of those introduced by
Douglas about 1830, when travelling for the Royal Horti-
cultural Society, and was originally described and figured
by Mr. Bentham half a century ago. Our drawing was
made from a specimen that flowered at Kew in the summer
of 1879.

HOVEMBBB IST, 1880.



Digitized by



Google



Descr. Bulb long, narrow, ovoid, with loose vertically
striated firm brown outer tunics. Basal leaves one or two,
linear or lanceolate, about a foot long, under an inch broad,
firm in texture, glabrous, narrowed from the middle to
the base and an acute point. Stem erect, a foot or more
long, branched in the upper half, each fork subtended
by one or more reduced leaves. Flowers six to twelve
to a stem, bright yellow, drooping, on peduncles two or
three times as long as themselves. Perianth globose, about
an inch in length and diameter; outer segments rather
more membranous in texture than the inner, tinted with
green in the bud, oblong, acute, glabrous; three inner
segments orbicular, more or less pilose on the face, minutely
cihated round the margin, furnished above the naked claw
with a large saccate foveole, with a ridge of bristly hairs
incurved over it from above. Stamens half as long as the
perianth-segments ; anthers oblong, pale yellow, obtuse or
minutely apiculate, rather shorter than their flattened fila-
ments. Ooary oblong, triquetrous ; stigmas three, falcate,
linear, sessile, deeply channelled down the face. Capsule
oblong, an inch long, deeply three-lobed, its cells promi-
nently winged on the back. — J. 0. Baker.



Fig. 1, Inner segment of perianth, natural size ; 2, margin of inner segment of
perianth ; 3, a stamen ; 4, tne pistil ; 6, horizontal section of ovary -.^all more or
cess magnified.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



4.52,S



Digitized by



Google



6SZi.



r



A B ■)p]..JM-iUih l.ith



Digitized by



T P.«»« t. r'OT^,J —



Q^gl^.,



lar&Sonloic



Tab. 6528.

ARCTOTIS ASPERA, var. arborescens.
Native of South Africa.



Nat. Ord. Compositjb. — Tribe AHCTOTiDEiE.
Genus Abctotis, Linn.; (Benth. et Rook, f. Gen. PL vol. ii. p. 458.)



Abctotis (Euarctotis) aspera ; Buffruticopa, ramosa, hispido-pilosa, ramis validis
siilcatis ascendent! bus, tbliis oblongis lineari-oblongisvepinnatifidis inferioribus
petiolatis superioribus sessilibus auriculato-semi-amplexicaulibus, costa crassa,
segmentis lato-ovatis oblongisve basi lata decurrentibus grosse irregulariter
acute dentatis undulatisque supra hispidis glabratisve subtus plus minusve
cano-tomentosis, capitulis ma^rnis, involucri late bemispberici squamis exteri-
oribns ovatis berbaceis bispidis, intimis panduratis truncatis coriaceis, ligulis
pollicaribus obtusis, acbeniis basi sericeis, pappi squamis interioribus oblongis
cuneatisve apice rotundatis v. 2-3-fidi8.

A. aspera, Linn. 8p. PL 1307 ; DC. Prodr. vol. vi. p. 488 ; Rarv. et Sond, FJ.
Cap, vol. iii. p. 453.

Var. ABBOBK8CEK8, DC. L c. 488 ; ramis foliisqne subtus tomentosis, pedunculis
nigro-pilosis, ligulis extus roseis intus niveis basi aurantiaciH.— A. arborescens
Jacq. HorL Schcenh, vol. ii. tab. 171.



The genus Ardotis is little known to horticulturists,
although one species, the present, of the thirty described,
has long been known in botanic gardens, and no less than
thirteen are figured in Jacquin's ** Hortus Schoenbrunensis,"
from specimens that flowered in the Imperial Botanic
Garden of Vienna during the last century. Sixteen (ex-
clusive of one referred to Vcnidium) are enumerated in
the "Hortus Kewensis*' as being in cultivation in 1813,
and there are five others enumerated as species in that
work which are now regarded as varieties. The present is
one of the most beautiful of the genus ; it was cultivated
in England before 1710, and in Holland much earlier, for it is
described in Johan Commelyn's " Hortus Medicus Amstelo-
damensis," published in 1697, as " Anemolospermos
Africana, foliis Cardui Benedicti, florum radiis intus sul-
phureis."

According to De Candolle A. aspera is a very variable

DECEMBEH IflT, 1880.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



plant, of which he enumerates five varieties, the last being
the subject of the present plate, distinguished by the white
under-surface of the leaf, and colours of the Hgules. This
variety is omitted in Harvey and Bonder's " Flora Capensis,"
as is all notice of Jacquin's beautiful figure, although the
arhorescens of Willdenow, another variety (var. scabra of
Berg, A. maculata^ Jacq. 1. c. t. 379) which must not be
confounded with it, is there taken up.

I am indebted to Mr. Lynch, Curator of the Cambridge
University Botanical Gardens, for the specimen of this
beautiful and interesting plant, which he informs me was
formerly grown at Cambridge under the name of A. alba
(an unpublished one). Mr. Lynch adds that it has made
a most attractive bed during the past summer, its flowers
having been very profuse and charming in colour.

Desce. An undershrub, one to three feet high, with
stout grooved hispid ascending branches. Leaves five to
eight inches long, pinnatifid ; radical petioled ; cauline
sessile with broad auricled semi-amplexicaul bases, a very
stout grooved midrib and nerves beneath ; segments ovate
or ovate - oblong, acute, decurrent, lobulate and coarsely
toothed with waved edges, dark green above and hispid or
glabrate, tomentose or cottony beneath. Heads two and
a half inches in diameter, on stout peduncles clothed with
blackish hairs. Involucre broadly campanulate; outer
bracts ovate, subacute, herbaceous ; inner much longer,
panduriform, truncate, very coriaceous. Ligule^ about
twenty, quite horizontal, obtuse, one to one and a half
inches long, bright red outside, white within, but orange
towards the base. Disk-flmvers brownish. Arhenes silky at
the base ; inner scales of pappus cuneate-oblong, obtusely
lobed or entire at the tip. — J. D. II.



Fig. 1, Kaj-floret ; 2, disk-floret ; 3, ditto, laid open ; 4, ditto, unopened ;
5, inner pappus-scales ; 6, ntigma of ray-florets ; 7, stigma of disk-florets ; 8, recep-
tacle ; 9, inner bract of ditto ; 10, flower-bud :— a// hut figs. 8 to 10 enlarged.



Digitized by



Google



(c'S^'\



Digitized by



Google



e-.4



A.B ,i«lJK Fudxl.uii



\?ne«nt Brooks D«y tSor. h-



. R.-.eve k J"' i..vin«r.



Digitized by



Goog



Tah. 6529.
disa megaceras.

Native of South Africa.



Nat. Ord. OBCHIDEJ^.-Tribo OPHBYDEiE.

Genus Disa, Ber^; (EndL Gen, PI. p. 211.)



DiSA (Repandra) megareras ; elata, robusta, caule folioso, foliis lanceolatis acami-
ratis, spica multi flora, bracteis lanceolatis longe acuminatis floris brevioribus
V. longioribu.s floribus magnis albis purpureo inaculatia, galea postica conica in
cornu pollicari recto v. K^nte curvo tenui producta, sepalis decurvis oblongo-
lanceoUtis apiculatis, petalis late oblique ovatis recurvis acutis, libello anguste
lingolato glabro apice acuto recurvo v. revoluto, anthera sopina loculia
elongatis fere rectis.

D. macrantha, Hori.

It is not without great consideration that I have been com-
pelled to give a new name to the little-known Disa macrantha
of the gardens, nor would I have done so were I not well
assured that the true D. macrantha is a very different plant,
coming indeed from a very different part of the South
African continent from that inhabited by the present
species. It is true that of D. macrantha very little is cer-
tainly known ; it is a species of Thunberg's, described in
his " Flora Capensis '' (p. 33) as having the spur conical,
shorter than the hood, the petals small, hidden under the
hood, rounded at the base, falcately recurved in the middle,
angled posteriorly, dilated retuse and crenulate at the end,
the lip oblong acute keeled suberect, and the anther &c.
as in D. comuta^ than which the flowers are rather larger. —
Now if the figure of the plant here given is compared with
this description, and with the plate of D. cornuta in
this work (t. 4091), it will be seen that in all those points
in which D. macrantha differs from D. megareras^ it agrees
with D. cornuta^ notably in the short spur, in the small
petals falcately recurved, dilated at the apex, and hidden
under the hood ; in the oblong lip and very small broad
anther : to which must be added that D. macrantha is a
western plant of the Cape district itself, whereas P. meyaceras
is an eastern one, of which there are in the Kew Herbaria

DBCBMBEB IST, 1880.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



specimens from Kalberg on the Eastern frontier (from Mr.
Henry Ilutton), from Natal (Mrs. Fannier), Somerset,
Kaffraria (Mr. Cooper), and from the top of Bosch berg,
alt. 4500 feet (Mr. MacOwan.)

As to Disa macrantha of Thunberg, it is clearly a species
very near to D. cornuta^ if not a variety of that plant ; there
are numerous specimens thus named in the Kew Herbaria,
amongst them one from the sands about Salt river, near
Capetown, collected by Dr. Harvey, who has appended to
it a ticket with ** D. macrantha of Thunberg. DiflTers from
D. cornuia merely in its labellum. I consider it only a
variety, yet its habit is different." Whatever the difference
of habit is, it is lost in the drying ; for the specimen is in
this state undistinguishable from D. cornuta^ and, like it,
has flowers not half the size of those of D. megaceras, with
minute included petals.

I am indebted to Mr. Elwes for the fine flowering speci-
men of M. megaceras here figured, which flowered with him
to August of the present year.

Descb. Stem one to two feet high, often as thick as the
thumb, robust, leafy. Leaves six to eight inches long,
lanceolate, long-acuminate, concave. Spike dense or lax,
six to twelve inches long, few- or many-flowered; bracts
leaf-like, usually much exceeding the flowers. Floioers very
large, one and a half to one and three-quarters of an inch
broad from the tip of the hood to that of the lip, and three
inches from the tip of the hood to that of the spur, white
blotched inside with pale purple. Upper sepal (hood)
conical, with an oblique mouth, acute above, slightly curved,
undulate, ending in a greenish straight slender spur as long
as itself ; lateral sepals decurved, oblong-lanceolate, with a
short recurved spur behind the tip. Petals broadly obovate,
nearly as wide as the hood is broad, the dilated acute end
exserted and recurved. Lip two-thirds of an inch long,
narrowly tongue- shaped, with a revolute tip, glabrous,
smooth. Anther reflexed, one-third of an inch long ; cells
contiguous, parallel, very narrow, tip obtuse. Stigma very
short, hemispheric. Ovarii one and a half inches long. —
J. D. H. ' •

Fig. 1, Top ol ovary, lip, stigma, and anther; 2, column seen io front; 3, pollen-
mass :—all enL rged.



Digitized by



Google



(oSao



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



Ni :-'w.-i. 1 N?itx-i;:.iij.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



Tab. 6530.

BRIGERON MDLTIRADIATDS.
Native of the Himalaya Mountains.

Nat Ord. Compo8ITJ£.— Tribe Asteboidbjb.
Genus Ebiobron, Idnn. ; {Benih, et Hook,f. Oen, PL vol. ii. p. 279.)



Ebioeron (Phenactis) multiradiatus ; pubescens v. hirsutas, caale simpHci y.
paroe raraoso gracili v. robusto ssepias monocephalo, foliis radioalibus null is v.
lon^ petiolatis elliptico-Ianceolatis y. oblanceolatis obtnsis acutisve in petiolum
decnrrentibos inWris y. pauoidentatis, caulinis breyibus patentibus nasi lata
nmnlexicaoli sessiUbns oyato-lanoeolatis acutis y. acuminatis, capitnlis magnis
2-2^ poll, diam., inyolacri late oampanulati bracteis lineari-lanceolatis acominatis
puhe8centibti8 et ciliatis, floribus glabris, ligulis nnmerosissirais 2-3 BerialibuA
iiivolucro daplo longioribus angnstis purpureis, acheniis oblongis sabsericeis,
pappi setis paticis scabridis externis breyissimiit.

E. Tnnltiradiatas, Benth, in Gen, PL yol. ii. p. 280 (sub Sect. Phenactis); Clarke
Compos, Ind. 66.

Aster multiradiatus, WalL Cat 2909.

A. inuloides, Don Prodr, Fl. Nip, p. 178.

Diplopappus Roylei, DC, Prodr. vol. y. p. 276 P

Stenactis multiradiatus, LindL in DC. Prodr, vol. v. p. 299.



One of the most beautiful of the alpine Himalayan Com-
positae, but very variable and diflBcult to distinguish from
form of neighbouring species, especially of E. alptnusy to
which small states of it approach very closely. E. multu
radiatus is, however, in its normal state a much larger and
handsomer plant, with the heads usually at least two inches
in diameter, and of a fine bright purple colour. In rich
moist soil old plants grow two feet high and branch very
considerably, and the radical leaves disappear early, giving
the plant a very diflFerent appearance from that of its younger
state, in which the habit is scapigerous, and the radical
leaves copious.

E. multiradiatus is a native of grassy wet pastures along
the whole length of the Himalayan range, from Kashmir, where
it inhabits elevations of 7000 to 9000 feet, to Sikkim, where

DECBMBBB IST, 1880.



Digitized by



Google



it ascends to 12,000 feet. The specimens drawn were
raised from Sikkim seed communicated by Dr. King, of the
Calcutta Botanical Gardens, and flowered at Kew in June
of the present year.

Desck. a pubescent or hirsute herb, in a small state
either six to ten inches high, with simple scape-like leafy
stems, and numerous radical leaves ; or tall, often two feet
high, with no radical leaves and a branched leafy stem.
Leaves^ radical when present usually four to eight inches
long, oblanceolate, narrowed into a rather long petiole,
distantly toothed, three- to five-nerved; cauhne ovate-
lanceolate from a broad sessile and often subauricled or
semi-amplexicaul base, acuminate, erect or recurved. Heads
solitary on the ends of long peduncles, two to two and a
half inches in diameter, very bright purple, disk yellow.
Involucre broadly hemispherical ; bracts slender, pubescent
or tomentose, ciliate. Ligules three-fourths to one inch
long, in two or three series, very slender, tube glabrous.
Dislc'flower glabrous. Achenes small, flattened, slightly
silky ; pappus scanty, hairs scabrid, with an obscure ring
of small outer ones. — J. D. H.



Fig. 1, Raj-flower ; 2, its style-arms ; 3, disk-flower ; 4, hair of pappus ; 5, stjrle-
arm8 of disk-flower; 6, involucre cut open showing the receptacle:— a// but Jig, 1
enlarged.



Digitized by



Google



(d^3I



Digitized by



Google



M.S del JXFitdvLiih



Digitized by VjOOQIC

"Ui «,.««♦ D— »•»— d. I o



Tab. G531.

WORMIA BuiiBiDGEi.

Native of Borneo,

Nat Ord. Dillbniaceje. — Tribe Dillknie^.
Genus WoBMiA, EoUb.; (Benih. et Hook.f. Gen. PL vol. i. p. 13.)



WofiMiA Burhidgei ; frutex, foliis late ellipticis in petiolum compresso-alatum
amplexicaulem decurrentibus oblongis obtusis integerrimis v. subsinuatis
crasse conaceis nervoBis, costa nervisqae utrinque 18-20 paten tibus sublus
crassis, pedunculis axillaribus et terminalibns cymoso-paucifloris floribus
breviter pedicellatis amplis aureis 3-poll. diam., sepalis orbiculatis concavis
insBqualibufl, petalis obovato-oblongis disco ooncavis niarginibus late sub-
crispato-nndulatis, staminibus albidis interioribus longioribos eztimis brevibus
ttetiibrmibus imperfectis, carpellis ad 7 stylis filiformibus.



The genus Woi'mia^ a near ally of the familiar Hibbertias
of our greenhouses, consists of about ten species of shrubs
or trees with usually very handsome flowers and foliage,
which extend from tropical Australia through the Malay
Islands and Southern India to the Seychelles. Though
known in Indian Botanic Gardens, the present is the only
one that to our knowledge has ever flowered in Europe. It
is closely allied to W. suhsessilu of Miquel, figured in the
Annals of the Leyden Botanical Museum (vol. i. p. 315,
Tab. IX.), but that has larger toothed leaves, flowers five
inches in diameter, and very broadly obovate petals without
the hollow disk and broad crenate margins of this. Coming
from the same country, I was at first disposed to regard
ihese species as identical, but as the dried specimens from
Banka, sent from the Leyden Museum to Kew Herbarium,
and others gathered in Borneo confirm the accuracy of
Miquel' s plate, which is, moreover, copied from a drawing
taken from life, I am compelled to keep them distinct.

W. Burhidgei is a native of Northern Borneo, where it
was discovered by the intelligent and successful collector
whose name it bears when exploring the Bornean forests

DECEMBEB IST, 1880.



Digitized by


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10

Online LibraryWilliam Jackson HookerCurtis's botanical magazine → online text (page 10 of 11)