William Jackson Hooker.

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both very inferior to it, are figured at Tabs. 1229 and 1410 ;
and I was further deceived by the name of G. gelida being
attached to it. On comparison with the published descrip-
tions of the gentians, I find that this is undoubtedly G. cor-
difolia of C. Koch, which is rightly reduced by Boissier to
a variety of septemfida^ from which latter, in all its forms,
G. gelida differs only in its ochroleucous flowers and the
entire or two-fid plaits between the lobes of the corolla, and
may be a mere variety of this. Both these species are
described as having the leaves scabrid on the margin, a
character which I do not observe in either the living or
Herbarium specimens. The corolla-lobes in the typical
forms vary from five to seven, whence the specific n^^me.
Gentiana septemfida has a wide range in distribution from

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Tauria and the Caucasus to Persia and the Altai mountains,
ascending to 9000 feet in the Caucasus, and the var. cordi-
folia inhabits the mountains of Armenia. 1 am, unfortu-
nately, unable to say whence the specimen here figured was
procured, the drawing, with notes attached, having been
lost in London after having been made use of by the
colourist; it is, however, a well-known cultivated plant
under the name of 0. gelida, but it does not at Kew arrive
at the stature of the specimen figured.

Desob. Stems several, ascending from a stout stock a
foot high, stout, leafy throughout. Leaves gradually larger
upwards, lowest a quarter of an inch long, upper one to
one and a half inch long, all ovate-cordate, subacute,
five-nerved, dark green above, spreading or deflexed,
coriaceous, the upper often forming a sort of involucre.
Flowers very numerous, in a compact rather elongate head,
sessile or very shortly pedicelled, nearly two inches long.
Calyx-lobes narrowly linear, equaUing or shorter than the
tubes. Corolla dark blue, clavate ; lobes five, small, ovate,
subacute, the membranous folds multifid. Stamens inserted
about the middle of the tube. Stigmas short, recurved.
Capsule shortly stalked. — J. D. H.



Fig. 1, corolla laid open ; 2, calyx and ovary : — both enlarged.



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Tab. 6498.

RUELLIA PoRTBLLj;.

Native of South Brazil.

Nat, Ord. AcAWTHACMB. - Tribe Ruxllib^.
Genus Rvxllia, Linn,; (Benth. et Rooh.f. Oen. PL vol. ii. p. 1077.)



BuxLLiA PortelliB; herbacea, erecta, ramosa, iota yelutino-tomeDtella, ramig
gracilibus teretibos, foliis obloDgo-oyatis sabacuiia ▼. obtnsis loDge petiolatis
basi acutis integerrimifl supra saturate viridibus costa nervisque albis, subtus
mbro-pnrpureis, floribus axillaribus solitariis sessilibus, bracteolis 2 foHaceis
calycem sequantibus, calvcis segmentis lanceolatis aouminatis, corollse bete rosesB
If-lf-poUicaris tubo piloso supra medium lente iucurvo dein sensim dilatato,
limbi pkoi lobis subquadrato-rotundatis 2-fidi8, staminibus subaquilongis,
filamentis filiformibus rectis per pana oontiguis, antheris breviter exsertis
auguste obloogis, oyario sessili piloeulo loculis 6-OTulatis.



To pronounce a species of Buellia as "hitherto un-
described*' is no light matter, for the genus contains
upwards of one hundred and fifty known species, which
are described under various generic names and in many
scattered works, often very imperfectly. Moreover, these
have been referred, as often wrongly as rightly, to no less
than fourteen genera, none of which should have been
separated from Buellia^ and some of them to other genera,
which have nothing to do with Buellia. I fail to match
it with the descriptions of any of the species of Buellia (or
JDipteracanthuSj now united with Buellia) in Martins' s Flora
Brasiliensis, where, if known in European Herbaria, this
pretty plant would no doubt have been described. I have
hence been compelled to give it a name, and have chosen
for the purpose that of the donor, Senor Francisco Portella
of Campos (Rio de Janeiro), who sent it in a ward's-case
with various other valuable living plants of Brazil. It appears
to be a very free-growing species, well adapted for winter
decoration as a stove plant ; and, like others of its order,
requiring to be kept quiet when flowering and fruiting are
over.

Descr. a slender much-branched erect herb, a foot
high, all parts covered with a fine velvety pubescence;

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branches slender, terete green. Leaves two to three inches
long, very uniform, elliptic-ovate subacute, narrowed into
a slender petiole half their own length, deep green above
with a white band along the midrib and nerves, red-purple
beneath. Flowers axillary, solitary, sessile. Calyx one-
third to half of an inch long ; segments narrowly lanceolate,
acuminate, hairy. Corolla one and a half to one and three-
quarters of an inch long, hairy externally, bright rose-
pink; tube slender, gradually dilated from above the
middle, where it is gently incurved ; limb flat, an inch in
diameter, of five nearly subquadrately rounded bifid seg-
ments. Stamens in contiguous nearly equal pairs, filaments
slender quite straight; anthers linear-oblong, shortly ex-
serted. Ovary ovoid, hairy; style slender, stigma shortly
exserted.— J". D. H.



Fig. 1, portion of corolla and stamens ; 2, anthers ; 3, stigma ; 4, base of calyx
and ovary ; 6, ovary cut longitudinally : — all enlarged.



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Tab. 6499.
LYTHRUM Gejeffbri.

Native of Southern Europe.

Nat Ord. Lythbabiejb.— Tribe Ltthbbjs.
Genus Ltthbttm, Linn. ; {Bentk. ei Hooh. /. Oen. PL vol. i. p. 779.)



Lythbum Qrafferi ; glabram* caulibns grftcilibus elongatis erectU y. diffbsis acute
angulatis foliosis, foliis ssepius alternis inferioribas lineaii- ▼. rarius oyato-
oblongis acutis ▼. obtnsis basi rotuDdatis y.oordatis superioribtis lineari-oblongis
lanceolaiisye, floribus axillariboa solitariis 10-12 meris, bracteolis 2 miDutis
lineari-sabalatis, caljcis deDtiboa triangnlariboa 6 mi^oribas erectis, petalia
oboyatis oalyce duplo longioriba^, staminibos longioribos exsertis.

L. Grefferi, Tenore FL Nap, Frodr, SuppL yol. ii. p. 27 ; loon, Fl, Nap. i, 142 ;
DC. Prodr. yol. iii. p. 82 ; Baisa, Fl. Orient, yol. ii. p. 739.

L. thymifolia, Allioni Fl. Fed. yol. ii. p. 168, non Linn.

L. acutangulam, Lagasc. Oen. et dp. p. 16.

L. flcxuoeum, Lagasc. I. c. ; f Begel Qarienfi. vol. xix, p 289, t. 664.

L. Preslii, Quss. PL rar. p. 188.

L. janceam, Sol. ms$. ex Trans, Camb. Phil. Soc, vol. iy. p. 32 ; Walp. Bep.
yol. ii. p. 106.

L. OrcBfferi is a South European plant, with a very ex-
tended geographical distribution, from the Azores and
Canaries to Portugal and Morocco, and thence eastward to
Asia Minor and Northei-n Syria. It does not occur anywhere
north of the Alps except in Western France, but has been
introduced into South America and other countries. It
affects wet places, and when grown in a pot standing in a
tank or pan of water, it forms a strikingly ornamental plant
from the profusion of its bright pink blossoms, which stud
the numerous slender branches, and which appear in suc-
cession for several weeks. The figure published as L. Orcef'
ferii in Loddige*s Botanical Cabinet is unrecognizable, and
from the small flowers and opposite leaves probably repre-
sents L. hypopifoliunij L. The figure of L. flexuosum. Lag.,
in RegeVs Gartenflora, again, has most of the leaves opposite,
and the petals very narrow, not like those of L. Orcefferi.

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I have retained the well-known and hitherto universally
adopted name for this plant, though it can hardly be
doubted that one of the earlier ones of Lagasca (fiexuosum
and acvtangulum)y published in 1814, is of earlier date.
The descriptions, however, of Lagasca are very unsatisfac-
tory, and he made two species out of the one. The
Royal Gardens are indebted to Mr. Joad, F.L.S., of
Wimbledon, for plants which flowered profusely during the
month of August.

Descr. a tall, very slender, much-branched diffuse or
erect glabrous herb, a foot to a yard high ; branches strict,
acutely angled, leafy throughout. Leaves one-fourth to
one inch long, all alternate or the lower opposite, more or
less oblong or linear-oblong, the lower usually broader and
sometimes cordate at the base, acute or obtuse, upper nar-
rowly oblong. Flowers solitary in the axils of all the upper
leaves, shortly pedicelled, two-bracteolate, six- rarely five-
merous ; bracteoles small, narrowly subulate. Galyx about
a quarter of an inch long ; tube slender and cylindric below
the middle, then funnel-shaped; lobes twelve, six larger
triangular acute erect, six interposed minute subulate
spreading. Petals longer than the calyx, obovate, subacute,
bright pink, nearly equal. Stamens twelve, the six longer
exserted, the shorter included. Ovary slender, glabrous. —
J. D. H.



Fig. 1, flower ; 2, the same cut loDgitadiDallj ; 3, stamens ; 4, pistil ; 5, trans-
verse section of ditto : — all enlarged.



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Tab. 6500.

POLYGONCM AMPLEXICAULE.
Native of the Himalaya Mountains,

Nat. Ord. Poltgonbjb. — Tribe Eupolyoonbje.
Genus Polygonum, Linn,; (Benth. et Rooh,f. Gen. PL vol. ii. p. 97.)



Polygonum (Bistorta) amplexicaule ; caule elongate gracili erecto parce ramose,
foliis radicalibus et inferioribus longe petiolatis eordato-ovatis -lanceolatisve
caudato-acuminatis minute crenulatis conta nervisque subtus minutissime
papilloeis supremis sessilibus amplexicaulibus, racemis solitariis v. 2-niA
spiciformibus gracilibus elongatis densifloris, bracteis ovatis acuminatis imbri-
catis scariosis, perianthii segmentis oblongis obtusLs, staminibus 8, antheris
exBertis, stylis 3 capillaribus, fructibuR trigonis.

P. amplexicaule, Don. Prodr. Fl. Nep. p. 70 ; Meissn. Monog. Polyg. in Wall. PI.
As, rar. vol. iii. p. 64; Bahingt. in Trans, Linn. S')C. vol. xviii. p. 96 ; Lindl.
in Bot. Reg. 1838, Misc. no. 117, et 1839, t. 46; Meissn. in DC. Prodr.
vol. xiv. pars 1, p. 126.

P. speciosuro. Wall. Cat. n. 1716 ; Meissn, II. cc.

P. ambignum, Meissn. in Wall, PI. As. rar. vol. iii. p. 64, et in DC. Prodr. I. c. ;
Wight, Ic, PI. Ind. Or. t. 1797.

P. oxyphyllum. Wall. Cat. n. 1715 ; Meissn, II, cc.

P. petiolatum, Don. I. c. p. 70, teste Bahingt.



The Himalaya Mountains are as remarkable in a botanical
point of view for the beauty of the colouring of the flowers
of their Polygonums, as Japan is for the stature and noble
foliage of some of the species of the same genus which it
contains. Amongst the Himalayan kinds none exceeds P.
amplexicaule^ which is unrivalled for graceful habit, foliage,
and colouring combined, and it is further a plant of such easy
cultivation, that it ought to be a garden favourite. It
occurs under two varieties, a white- and a red-flowered, of
which the white has usually a longer and more slender
raceme, with more distant flowers. These two varieties
do not correspond to any two of the five species which
have been founded on dried specimens of the plant, and

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which I agree with Dr. Lindlej in considering to be un-
worthy of varietal rank.

P. amplexiraule extends through the whole range of the
Himalaya, from Murree in the extreme north-west, where
it ranges from 6000 to 8000 feet of elevation, to Sikkim,
where it reaches 11,000 feet and upwards; it does not
occur in the Bhotan collections of Griffith, nor has it been
found in the Kharia range. It was introduced into the
Horticultural Society's gardens from those of Tahurunpore,
by Dr. Falconer, in 1835 or 1836; but our figures are
made from plants raised at Kew from seeds sent by Dr.
Aitchieson, and it flowers in September and October.

Desor. Stems two to three feet high from a strong
woody underground root-stock, very slender, green,
sparingly leafy. Leaves cordate-ovate or- lanceolate, long-
acuminate, the lower long-petioled, the upper sessile and
amplexicaul, all minutely crenulate, glabrous above, be-
neath minutely papillar, especially on the midrib and nerves ;
ochreaB long, lacerate. Racemes solitary or two, on slender
strict peduncles, strict erect, two to six inches long;
bracteoles ovate, acuminate, scarious. Flowers crowded,
bright rose-red or white, about one-third of an inch in
diameter when expanded. Perianth segments oblong, sub-
acute. Stamens eight ; anthers exserted. Styles three,
slender. Ovary three-gonous.— /. D. H.



Pig. A, white-flowered variety — of natural size ; 1, flower cut longitadinallj ;
2 and 3, outer and inner perianui segments ; 4, stamens ; 5, pistil ; 6, ovules i^all
efUarged. Fig. B, red-flowered variety — of natural size; tne numbers represent
corresponding parts to those of A : — all enlarged.



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Tab. 6501.
BIGNONIA CAPREOLATA, vav. atro-sanguinea.

Native of the Southern United States.



Nat Ord. BiGNONiACKiE.— Tribe Bignonib^.
Genas Biononia, Linn.; (Benth, et Hooh.f, Gen. PL vol. ii. p. 1033.)



BieNONiA capreolata, Linn. Sp. PI. 870 ; Bot. Masf. t. 864 ; DC. Prodr. yol. ix.
p. 146; Jaca. Hort. Schoenbr. t. 363; Chapm. Plor. S. U. States, p. 286;
A. Gray, Fl. li. U. States, ed. 6, p. 321.

B. crucigera, Walt. Flor. Carolin. 169.

Yar. atrosanffuiHea ; f oliolis longioribus angastioribus, corolla intus et extos atro-
parparea, lobis brevibns triangulari-ovatis acutis.



This very remarkable and handsome variety of the well-
known Cross-vine of the Southern United States has been
long cultivated in the conservatory at Kew, and differs so
widely from the typical form of the species, that but for
numerous intermediates, of which we possess Herbarium
specimens, it might be assumed to be a different species.
The leaflets are both longer and narrower than is usual,
but as these vary from those figured here to broadly oblong,
no importance can be attached to the form of these organs.
In the corolla the divergence from the type is more marked ;
in most of both wild and cultivated forms this organ is
usually shorter, with five broad rounded and often notched
widely-spreading lobes, so that the limb is an inch and a
half in diameter, the colour being orange-yellow with red-
purple on the tube ; here, on the other hand, the corolla is
wholly of a dark red-purple, with the tube nearly two
inches long, and the lobes short, triangular-ovate, acute,
and not one-third of an inch in breadth and length.

Now that attention has been called to the variation of
this plant, no doubt other as great deviations from the
type will be introduced into cultivation. Of these I have
seen dried specimens of one, sent from Kentucky, which

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has the corolla-tube one and a half inch long by f uUy two-
thirds of an inch broad, and swollen like a campanula;
another form has the corolla curved nearly into a quadrant.
Bignonia capreolata is one of the loftiest climbers in the
forests of the Southern United States, from Virginia to
Florida and westwards to the Mississippi, where it orna-
ments the rocks and trees by its luxuriant foliage and
(usually) orange-yellow flowers. The American name of
Cross-vine is given in reference to the wood of the stem,
which on a transverse section presents the form of a cross. —
J. D. E.



Fig. 1, Flower cut longitudinally ; 2, anthers ; 3, stigma ; 4, vertical section of
ovary : — all enlarged.



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Tab. 6502.
ODONTOGLOSSUM odoeatum.

Native of Venezuela.

Nat. Ord. Obchidejr — Tribe Vakde*.
Genus Odontoqlossum, iJ. B, et K, ; {LiridL FoL Orchid, Odontoglossum,)



Odontoolossum (Euodontoglossum) odoratum ; pseudobalbis ovoideis compressis
mar^inibus aeutia sulcatis, foliis angoste ensiformibas pergamaceis, panicula
amplissima multiflonv, bracteis parvis, floribus 1 J-2 poll, expans. luteia rubro-
fasco inacalatis, sepalis petalisqae consimilibus an^^nste laDceoIatis longe
acuminatis incurvis undulatis v. subcrinpatis, labello hantato lobis lateralibus
brevibns rotundatis intermedio elongate late subulato longe attenuate puberulo
disco 4-dentato, columna supra medium anguste alata alls dentatis apice cirrhis
2 divaricatis iucurvis margine inferiore 1-dentatis aucta.

O. odoratum, Lindl. Orchid, Linden, No. 86 ; FoL Orchid, Odontoolossum, p. 3.



A many-flowered sweet-scented species of Odontoglossum,
discovered in the humid and gloomy forests of the Sierra
Nevada of Merida, at an elevation of 7000 to 8000 feet,
by Linden. It belongs to the section with 0. Halliiy Lindl. ;
0. ncevium^ Lindl. ; and others which constitute the genus
Odontoglossum as first known and described. All have
slender spreading ears at the top of the column, which
sometimes end in bristle-like appendages. The specimen
figured flowers in the Royal Gardens in March, and,
though not previously figured, is well known in cultivation.

Descr. Pseudo-bulbs two to three inches long, narrowly
ovoid, compressed, two-edged, grooved. Leaves a foot
long and under, by one inch broad, narrowly ensiform,
acute, hardly coriaceous, rather the consistence of parch-
ment, pale green. Panicle stalked, sometimes three feet
long by one and a half broad, copiously branched, many-
flowered ; bracts small, membranous. Flowers one and a
half to two inches broad, dull golden-yellow, blotched with
brownish-red. Sepals and petals similar, narrowly lanceo-

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late, finely acuminate, incurved, waved or almost crisped.
Lip as long as the sepals, hastate; lateral lobes short,
rounded ; terminal broadly subulate, narrowed to a fine
point, pubescent, waved, its disk with two pair of longi-
tudinal obtuse erect teeth. Column with very narrow
toothed wings above the middle, and two long incurved
spur-like appendages from the apex, which end in very fine
subulate points, and have a single tooth on the lower
margin. — J. D. E.



Fig. 1, Lip and column ; 2, front view of column ; 3, anther-case ; 4 and 5,
lateral and fjn>nt views of column i^all enlarged.



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Tab. 6503.
POLYGONUM cuspiDATUM.

Native of Japan.



Nat Ord. Poltgonace^. — Tribe £npoLTOONBJE.
Genus Polygonum, Linn, ; (Benth. et Hooh.f, Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 97.)



PoLYOONTJM (Pleoroptems) cuspidatum ; glaberrimam, caulibus e rhizomato sub-
terraiieo perplnnmis f asciculatis elatis robastis inclinatis foliosis, foliis petiolatis
late cordat(M)vati8 v. ovatis basi late trancata acaminatis ntrinqne elevato-
reticnlatis, ochreis brevissimis deciduis, racemis axillaribus folio brevioribas
sessilibus solitariis Bimplicibus v. basi ramosis v. panicalatis ramis divaricatis,
bracteis ovatis obtnsis 1-plarifloris rachique paberulis, pedicellis capillaribus
infra medium articulatis, caljce fructifero obcordato late 3-alato, stylis 3
breyibns.

P. cnspidatam, Sieb, et Zucc, Ft. Jap, Fam. Nat. 2, p. 84 ; Meissn, in DC, Prodr,
XIV. pars 1, p. 136 ; RegeU Qartenil, voL ix. p. 162, t. 291 ; Oroenl. in Rev.
Horttc. 1858, p. 30, cumic,; Mtq. Prolus. Fl. Jap, p. 300; Franch, et
Savat. En, PI. Jap, vol. i. p. 404.

P. Sieboldi, de Vriese in Ned, Kruidh. Arch. vol. ii. p. 264, et in Jahrh, Kon,
Ned. Maattch. 1860, cum Ic, ; Lindl. et Paxt, Mag, Bot. vol. i. p. 137,
cum Ic. ; Fl. Oard. 1862, part i. p. 137, f. 90.



Under P. compactum^ figured at Tab. 6476 of this volume,
I have alluded to that plant as possibly a form of P. cus-
jpidatuTriy difiering verymuch in habit ; but a re-examination
of the Garden and Herbarium specimens tends to show
them to be specifically distinct, especially in the form of
the fruiting calyx, which in P. cuspidatum is obcordate and
much narrowed at the base, but in the native specimen of
P. compactum is almost orbicular, and abruptly narrowed
into the pedicel ; the crisped margins of the leaves, too, are
apparently a permanent character of the latter-named
species. There is still a third species of this group to
figure, the P. sachaliense, the largest of all, and of which a
drawing is prepared for this work.

P. cuspidatum is a native of Japan, and there is in the
Herbarium a very similar plant firom North China, collected
by Dr. G. Shearer at Kieu Kiang; the specimens of this

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are, however, not sufficiently good to pronounce upon, and
the racemes from which the flowers have fallen are much
shorter and more fascicled.

This species was introduced into England many years
ago ; it has been cultivated for a quarter of a century at
Kew, to which it was, I believe, sent from Holland. Like
ih/d rest of the half-shrubby species, it flowers very late in
the season, and is dioeceous.

Desor. a tall glabrous bushy herb, six feet high, with
innumerable stout branching angular red-brown leafy stems
rising in a tuft from an underground root-stock which
sends out innumerable runners. Leaves three to four
inches long and sometimes almost as broad, usually broadly
ovate-cordate, and abruptly acuminate, sometimes almost
orbicular, often truncate at the base with rounded angles,
firm, reticulated, dark green, paler beneath ; petiole one
quarter to one inch long ; ochreas short, caducous. Racemes
puberulous, axillary, sessile or subsessile, shorter than the
leaves, usually paniculately branched at the base, the
branches spreading and given off so low down that the
racemes appear fascicled; bracts small, obtuse; pedicels
slender, jointed below the middle. Flowers dioeceous,
white. Perianth one quarter of an inch in diameter ;
segments broadly elliptic, obtuse, concave. Stamens six or
seven, imperfect in the female flower. Styles three, short,
cuneate. Fruiting perianth obcordate, three outer sepals
broadly winged, about one-third of an inch long, gradually
narrowed into the capillary pedicel. Nut small, trigonous,
shining. — /. D. H.



Fig. 1, Female flower ; 2» longitudinal section of the same : — both enlarged.



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Tab. 6504.

CAMPANULA fragilis.

Native of South Italy.

Nat. Ord. Campanulaceje. — Tribe Campanulea.
Genus Campanula, Linn, ; (Benth, et HooJc.f. Gen, Plant, vol. ii. p. 661.)



Campanula (Euoodon) fra<til%s ; glabra pilosa v. pabescens, caulibas gracilibas
diffusis, foliis loDge petiolatis cordato-ovatis v. summis ovatis grosse crenato-
dentatis, floribos axillaribos v. apices versus ramorum laxe corymbosis, lobis
caljcinis lineari-lanceolatis acuminatis corollam subsequantibus integris siuubus
nudis, corolla late explanata ad medium 5-fida, lobis late ovatis acutis, stylo
elongato, stigmatibus 3.

C. fragilis, tyrill. Plant, fasc. i. p. 32, t. 11, f. 2; Tenore Fl. Nap. t. 119;
A. DC, Monog, Campan, p. 306 ; Prodr, vol. vii. p. 476 ; Lindl, in Bot.
Reg, t. 1738.

C. diffusa, Vahl Symb, p. 18.
C. cochlearifolia, Vahl 1. c. p. 18.

C crassifolia, Nees Sgll. Ratisb. i. p. 6 ; et Amoen, Bot, fasc. 2, p. 9, t. 4.
C. Cavolini, var, a, Tenore SylL p. 94.
C. Barrelieri, Presl, Symb, Bot, p. 30, t. 19.
C. saxatilis rotundifolia, Ac, Barr, PL Obs, p. 10, t. 453.

C. rotundifolia Cajetana, Ac, Cup, Pamph, vol. i. t. 192 ; Bocc. Ic. rar. p. 54,
t. 27.



It is somewhat singular that so long-known and beautiful
a herbaceous plant as the subject of the present plate should
be seldom seen in cultivation. The only figure of it given
in an English work is that of a smaller flowered more hairy
variety by Lindley in the '* Botanical Register," who says
of it : " In its native stations it is one of the most lovely
objects imaginable. Often have we heard travellers from
Italy expatiating upon the beauty of the spots which are
enamelled with the bright blue flowers of this interesting
stranger, but it was never our good fortune to see it alive,
till we met with it in the garden of Mrs. Marryatt at
Wimbledon."

The specimen here figured is of a large-flowered form,
which I found in the garden of Miss Wedgwood, at Down,

JULY IST, 1880.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



in Kent. According to Alphonse De OandoUe, it is a native


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Online LibraryWilliam Jackson HookerCurtis's botanical magazine → online text (page 6 of 11)