William Jackson Hooker.

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short and stout ; anther-cells reniform, adnate to the fila-
ment, bursting outwards. Ovary globose, three-lobed,
three-celled ; stigmas three, recurved, club-shaped, obtuse ;
ovules two in each cell, adnate to the middle of the inner
angle, anatropous, with ventral raphe and superior large
open micropyle. — J. D. H.



Fig. 1, Flower with three perianth-segments seen in front; 2, another with six
Been from the back ; 3, back and front view of stamen ; 4, OTarj ; 5, section of the
same ; 6, ovale : — all enlarged.



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Tab. 6511.

agave hoerida.

Native of Mexico.

Nat. Ord. Amabtllidacej2.— Sub-order AGAVEiB.
Genus Agave, Linn. ; (Kunth ^num, vol. v. p. 818.)



Aqaye (Littfiea) horrida ; acaulis, foliis 30-40 dense rosulatis ensiformibns sub-
pedalibus apice spina pungente corneo magna armatis margine lato comeo
griseo cinctis aculeis magnis distantibus inssqualibus armato, pedunculo foliis
3-4rplo superante, bracteis yacuis subulatis squarrosis, floribos in panioulam
subspicatam densam cylindricam aggregatis geminis breviter pednnculatis et
pedicellatis, bracteis parvis linearibus, ovario cylindrico-trigono, tubo brevi late
mfundibulari, segmentis oblon^is purpureo-viridibup, staminibus ad tubi faucem
insertis segmentis 2-3-plo longionbus, stylo demum filamentis sBquilongo.

A. horrida, Lemaire ; Jacohi Monog, pp. 43 and 207 ; Nachtrage, p. 16 ; K. Koch
in Wbchenschrijft, vol. xii. p. 177 ; Baker in Oard, Chron. n. s. vol. vii.
(1877), p. 621, fig. 99.

A. Kegel iana and Desmetiana, ITori, non Jacobi,



This is one of the best known of the smaller Agaves with
a distinct continuous horny border to the lea^ It was
introduced from Mexico by Verschaffelt in 1862, and is now
to be found in all the more complete collections, but usually
under the name either of Begeliana or Desmetiana^ both of
which rightfully belong to species of another section. I
am not aware that there is any record of its having flowered.
Our drawing was made from a plant in the collection so
Uberally lent to Kew by J. T. Peacock, Esq., of Hammer-
smith, which has been on exhibition for a considerable time
in the south wing of the Temperate House, where it flowered
in the spring of this present year. The flowers are notably
proterandrous, the style not reaching its full length, nor
the stigma becoming papillose, till long after the anthers of
the same flower are withered. I believe that A. triangularis,
grandidentatay and Maigretiana of Jacobi, and A. Gilheyi
of Haage and Schmidt, will all prove to be forms of this
species.

AUGUST IST, 1880.



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Descr. Acaulescent. Leaves thirty or forty in a dense
rosette, ensiform, about a foot long, two inches broad, rigid
in texture, flat and bright green on the face, duller green
on the back, the point armed with a large pungent spine,
the edges margined with a continuous distinct persistent
grey horny border, which is furnished with numerous irre-
gular large falcate brown horny prickles. Peduncle three
or four times as long as the leaves, furnished with abundant
subulate squarrose empty bracts. Splice cylindrical, about
as long as the peduncle, seven or eight inches in diameter
when the flowers are fully expanded ; flowers arranged in
pairs, each flower with a distinct pedicel, and each pair with
a short peduncle and small linear bract. Ovary green,
cylindrical-trigonous, under an inch long; tube funnel-
shaped, a quarter of an inch long ; segments oblong, green
tinged with claret-purple, as long as the ovary. Stamens
inserted at the throat of the perianth-tube ; filaments claret-
purple, two inches long ; anthers linear-oblong, half an inch
long. Style finally as long as the filaments, but not till
after the anthers have withered. — J. G. Baker.



Fig. 1, View of plant — much reduced ; 2 and 3, portions of leaves; 3, flowers;
-i, section of flower : — all of the natural size.



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Tab. 6512.

ORINUM KiRRii.

Native of East Tropical Africa.

Nat. Ord. Amabyllidacb^. — Tribe AiCABYLLiDEiE.
Genns Cbikuii, Linn.; (Kunth Enum, rol. t. p. 647.)



Cbinum Kirkii; bulbo magno ^loboso collo elongato, foliis lorato-lanceolatis
acuminatis 3-4-pedalibu8 viridibas recnrvatis margine distincte ciliatis, scapo
orasso oompreHSO sesquipedali, umbellis sessilibns 12-15-floris, spathse valvis
roagnis rabellis, perianthii ^lO-pollicaris tubo cylindrico viridulo curvato,
limbi cemui segmentis oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis tubo paulo lontcioribus
albis dorso carind distincta coccinea deooratis, staminibus limbo distincte
brevioribus, stylo staminibus longiori stigmate capitato.



This is a very fine new Grinum of the omatum group, of
which the bulb was sent home about two years ago by
Dr. Kirk from Zanzibar. It flowered for the first time at
Kew in the autumn of 1879. Its nearest ally is G. Forbes-
ianurrij from Delagoa Bay, which was lost for a long time,
but which we have again lately received and flowered.
The present plant has flowers as large and as brightly
coloured as in the finest forms of omatum^ but may be
recognized at a glance by its short very stout peduticle
and very large acuminate leaves, with a distinctly ciliated
edge.

Desor. Bulb globose, six or seven inches in diameter,
with membranous pale-brown outer tunics and a neck half
a foot long and about three inches in diameter. Learns
about a dozen to a rosette, developed at the same time as
the flowers, lorate, acuminate, three or four feet long, four
or four and a half inches broad in the lower half, narrowed
gradually from the middle to the point, bright green, re-
flexing in an early stage, undulated towards the margin
and conspicuously ciliated with minute white bristles.
Peduncles two or three to a bulb, compressed^ about a foot

8EFTBHBEB IST, 1880.



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and a half long, an inch in diameter. Flowers twelve to
fifteen in a sessile centripetal umbel ; spathe-valves deltoid,
red-brown, membranous, three or four inches long. Perianth,
nine or ten inches long ; tube cylindrical, suberect, curved,
greenish, rather shorter than the cemuous Umb, the seg-
ments of which are oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, an inch
or an inch and a quarter broad at the middle, pure white,
with a very distinct broad crimson stripe down the keel.
Stamens declinate, more than an inch shorter than the
perianth segments ; anthers linear, versatile, half an inch
long. Style overtopping the stamens ; stigma small, capi-
tate. — /. Q. Baker.



Fig. 1, Whole plant, much reduced in size ; 2, margin of leaf, magnified.



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Tab. 6513.

CITRUS TRIFOLTATA.
Native of Japan.

Nat Ord. RuTACBa.— Tribe Aubantibjb.
Genus Citbu8, Louriero; (Benth, et Hooh.f, Qen. PL vol. i. p. 305 et 992.)



CiTBUS trifoliata; glaberrima, spinoRa, foliolis ellipticis subacatiH v. obtusis
crennlatis, floribus subsessilibus soUtariin 4r-5-meris, sepali^ oblongo-ovatis
ooncavis, petalis multo loD^oribos obovatis concavis, filamentis sabsequalibos
basi dilatatis, disco annulan.

C. trifoliata, Linn. 8p, PL 1101 ; Franch, et 8av. PL Jap, vol. i. p. 74.

C. trifolia, Tkunb, FL Jap, p. 294.

.^le sepiaria, DC, Prodr, vol. i. p. 538.

Psendsegle sepiaria, Miq, in Ann. Mus. Lugd, Bat. vol. ii. p. 83 ; Kampf. AnuBn.
p. 801, t. 802.



This singular and free-flowering shrub is much less
known than it deserves to be, it being, in fact, almost un-
known in English gardens, though perfectly hardy, free-
flowering, and sweet-scented. It has stood unprotected in
the open border of the Arboretum of Kew for several years,
and hitherto has been quite uninjured, even the tender
young shoots resisting the early frosts and long-protracted
cold of the last two inclement seasons ; a fact the more
singular when it is considered that the whole plant is ever-
green in respect of leaves, branches, and spines, though the
leaves are deciduous.

G. trifoliata is a native of Japan, where it is much culti-
vated both as a garden plant and for fences ; its fruit,
which resembles a small orange, is described as very bitter,
and having laxative properties. As an early-flowering and
sweet-scented hardy shrub, this Citrus is likely to prove a
favourite, and should it be eventually unable to withstand a
winter of unusual severity in the open border, it may still be
safe on a wall with or without protection. The flowers

SEFTEMBBB IST, 1880.



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appeared in the middle of May of this very backward year,
but no fruit has been formed; the leaves were not fully
developed till the end of June. It need hardly be stated
that the jfive-petalled variety is much more attractive than
the four-petaUed.

Descr. a glabrous shrub, three to five feet high, with
stout spreading terete smooth green shining branches, and
strong straight thorns an inch long and upwards. Leaves
appearing after the flowers, three-foliolate ; petiole about
half an inch long, flattened ; leaflets elliptic, sessile, crenu-
late, obtuse, emarginate, coriaceous, dotted with pellucid
oil-glands ; lateral often oblique, about one inch, the
terminal one and a half inch long. Flowers solitary in the
axils of the spines, very shortly pedicelled, about one inch
in diameter. Sepals four or five, small, oblong, concave,
deciduous. Petals four or five, two-thirds of an inch
long, obovate, almost clawed, concave, incurved, snow-
white. Stamens eight, or ten, inserted in a thick annular
pubescent disk, filaments flattened, connate at the base,
reddish below the middle ; anthers oblong. Ovary globose,
two or more celled pubescent ; and stigma very short,
crenate ; ovules one in each cell. Fruit a small orange. —
J. D. K



Fig. 1, Vertical section of flower ; 2, stamen ; 3, disk and ovary ; 4, vertical
section of the same ; 5, transverse section of ovary : — all enlarged.



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Tab. 6514.
GBNTIANA oenata.
Native of the Himalaya.

Nat. Ord. Gbntianb-b.— Tribe Sweeties.
Genus Gentiana, Linn.f {Benth. et Rook, f. Gen. PI. vol. ii. p. 816.)



GEiniANA (Pneamonantbe) omata ; caalibus e radice perennanti decnmbentibos
gracilibos foliosis, foliuj parvis ovato- v. oblongo-lanceolatis linearibusve
margine oartilagineis laBvissimis, floribus sessilibus terminalibus solitariis,
caljcis 6-fidi lobis ovato- v. lineari-lanceolatis oorollam dimidiam sequantibus,
corolla coBFulea, tubo aubcylindraceo inflato v. subinfundibulari striate, lobis 5
parvis triang^lari-ovatis acutis plicis triangularibus obtasis integris multo
longioribus, antberis liberis, capsula fusiformi pedicellate corollse sequilonga,
seminis testa lamellato-rugosa exalata.

G. omata. Wall. Cat. n. 4386 ; Chriseh. in DC. Prodr. vol. ix. p. 110.

Pneumonantbe omata, Don Qard. Diet vol. iv. p. 194.



This beautifiil little Gentian is a native of the rich alpine
meadows of the Himalaya, where it represents the G.frigidd
of the Hungarian Alps, and from which it differs itx the
cartilaginous margins of the leaves, and the absence of the
filamentous remains of old stems on the summit of the
root-stock, as also in the colour of the corolla, which is of an
intense blue, not white, like the European species.

The O. ornata is confined to the central and eas^rn
Himalaya; it was discovered by Wallich's collectors in
Central Nepal, and I have gathered it abundantly il^ Sikkim
at elevations of 13,000 to 16,000 feet.

I am indebted to Mr. Sadler, of the Edinburgh Botanical
Gardens, for sending the specimen here figured, which
flowered in May. Some of the native specimens have much
longer, narrower, and acuminate leaves, and more funnel-
shaped corollas.

Dbsob. Steins numerous, three to five inches long,
spreading from the root-stock, decumbent with ascending

SBFTEMBES IST, 1880.



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tips, sparingly branclied, slender, leafy, red. Leaves half
an incn long, ovate-lanceolate or linear-lanceolate, acute,
acuminate or obtuse, deep green with a pale midrib, margin
narrowly cartilaginous, quite smooth. Flowers solitary and
sessile at the ends of the branches, an inch long. Calyx-tube
narrowly campanulate; lobes five, similar to the leaves,
half as long as the corolla, spreading stellately. Corolla'
tube subcylindric, a Uttle inflated, whitish striped with blue ;
lobes five, small, triangular-ovate, acute, intensely blue,
much longer than the small entire obtuse folds. Stameus
inserted about the middle of the tube; anthers free. Ovary
fusiform, stipitate, stigmas revolute. Capsule fusiform,
enclosed in the coroUa-tube, and as long as it is. Seeds
with a lamellate rugose testa, not winged. — J. D. H.



Fig. I, Flower vertioally cut open, with two uppermost lesveA of the branch
2, stamen ; 3, lip of ovary and stigmas ; 4, ovules : — all enlarged.



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Tab. 6515.
HELICHETSUM pbigiddm.
Native of Corsica.

Nat. Ord. Compositjb. — Tribe Inuloidbje.
Genus Helichbysum, Ocertn,; (Benth, et Hoohf. Qen. PL vol. ii. p. 309.)



Heuchbtstjh (Xerocb1seQa)yHytc2ttm; perenne, herbaceum, pumilum, ceespitosum,
ramitt deoumbentibus molliter, argenteo-serioeis, foliis laxe imbricatis lineari-
oblongis obtusis integerrimis, capitulis terminalibus solitariis sessilibos basi
tomeDtosis, involucri bracteis lineari-obloDgiB obtusis, interioribus albis elongatis
stellatim patentibus, acbseniis sericeis, pappi setis paucis 1-seriatis Bcabernlis.

H. frigidum, Willd, Sjp. PL vol. iiL p. 1908, and DC. Fl. Franc, vol. iv. p. 131 ;
Prodr. vol. vi. p. 177 ; Ghen. et Oodr, Fl, Franc, vol. ii. p. 186.

Gnapbalium bellidifloram, Viv, Fragm, p. 16, 1. 19.

Xeranthemum frigidum, Lab, PL Syr, Dec. vol. ii. p. 9, t. 4.



A very remarkable and scarce little alpine plant, found
hitherto nowhere but in the mountains of Corsica, at ele-
vations reaching to 6000 feet. It was long supposed to
be also a native of Syria, it being described and figured by
the Syrian traveller Labillardiere (under the name of
Xeranthemum frigidum) as being found by him on Mount
Lebanon as well as in Corsica, and we have in the Kew
Herbarium a specimen of it fi*om Labillardiere*s own
herbarium, conoimunicated by the late Mr. Webb, who
obtained the herbarium by purchase, and left it by will to
Florence, but it is not stated whether it is from Corsica or
Lebanon; as however it is identical with specimens from the
first-named country, it may be assumed to be a copatriot.
Boissier, in his Mora Orientalis (vol. iii. p. 239), states
under H. Billardieri (a Lebanon species and very different
from H. frigidum) that H. frigidum is erroneously ascribed
to the Lebanon, and this is the general and, no doubt, correct
opinion.

I am indebted to Messrs. Backhouse for the opportunity

8EFTEMBEB IST, 1880.



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of figuring this beautiful little plant, which flowered at the
York Nurseries in May^ 1879.

Descb. a tufted low herb ; stems three to four inches
long, decumbent, slender, spreading from the perennial
root, then ascending, clothed with soft silky silvery hairs.
Leaves one-fourth to one-third of an inch long, lower
much shorter, loosely imbricating all round the stem and
branches from their bases to their tips. Heads solitary,
terminal, sessile, one-third to two-thirds of an inch in
diameter. Involucre obconic ; bracts linear-oblong, obtuse,
imbricate in many series, woolly, the innermost half an
inch long and spreading, opaque and white for half their
length. Receptacles conical, smooth, naked. Flowers of the
ray in several series, tubular, slender, three-toothed; of
the disk larger, narrowly funnel-shaped, five-lobed, gla-
brous. Anther-cells with slender tails. Style-arms truncate.
Pappus-hairs few, in one series, very slightly thickened
towards the tip, scabrid. — J. D. H.



Fig. 1, Receptacle with an inner involncral bract and flower of ray and of the
disk ; 2, flower of ray and, 3, of the disk ; 4, stamen ; 5, style-arms ; 6, hair of
pappus :—aZ/ enlarged.



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Tab. 6516.
lacuna speotabilis.

Native of Mexico.

Nat. Ord. Oechidbj?.— Tribe Vandb^
Genus Lacuna, Lindl,; {Walp, Ann. vol. vi. p. 612.)



liACiENA hicolor ; psendobnlbis oblon^o-ovoideis compressis Iseyibns, foliis magnis
petic^tis elliptico-lanceolatis plicatis nenrosis, pedunculo basi pseudobulbi
enato, racemo pnberulo pendulo 8-10 floro, bracteis oblongia ovario brevioribiw,
perianthio galeatopallide roseov.albopunoticulis rubro-pnrpnreis aeperso, sepalis
Bubseanalibus orbiculari-ovatis obtnsis concavis, petalis brevioribns unfi^iculatis
tralliformibus obtusis oonniventibus, labello ungaiculato basi artiouiato lobis
1 ateralibns rotnadatis iBcurvis, terminali trollifonni uD^nicxilato retnso pnrpnreo
dense punctnlato, disco inter lobos laterales cornuto, colnmna superne ampliata,
l^oUiniis 2 pjrifoimibns, stipite lineari sttperne dilatato, glandnla parva.

L. Bpectabilis, Beichh.f, in Bonpland. vol. ii. p. 92 ; Walp. Ann, vol. vL p. 612.

Nauenia spectabilis, Klotzsch in Otto et Dietr. Allg. Qartz. 1853, 193.



A veiy little-known genus, of whicli only two species
have been discovered, the present and L. hicolor, on which
the genus was founded by Lindley (Bot. Reg. 1844, t. 50),
and which is a native of Guatemala. The present is by
very much the handsomer species of the two, and is re-
markable for the delicate colouring of the perianth, which
in L. hicolor is of a greenish-yellow hue, and not speckled
in the lip. The two species differ widely, this having a
much longer claw, a horn, concave in front, between the
lateral lobes, and a stipitate mid-lobe; whilst that of L.
hicolor has a very short claw, a beard between the lateral
lobes, and an almost sessile mid-lobe.

Lindley, who named the genus, called it by one of the
names of Helen (Lacssna), because of its beauty ; a com-
pliment which the Botanical Register's representative of
L. hicolor does not at all merit ; he adds, however, that it
may also be derived from Xa/ct9, a cleft, in allusion to the
divisions of the lip.

L. spectahilis flowered at Kew in the spring of this year ;

8BPTBMBBS IST, 1880.



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the Royal Gardens are indebted to Dr. Wendland, of the
Royal Gardens of Herrnhausen, Hanover, for the plant.

Detsob. PseudO'hulhs narrowly ovoid, three to four inches
long, smooth (till aged), compressed. Leaves elliptic-
lanceolate, acuminate at both ends, nerved, plaited. Pe-
duncle from the base of the pseudo-bulb, ascending, then
decurved with a pendulous raceme of nine or more flowers,
stout, pubescent; bracts half an inch long, oblong, ap pressed
to the pubescent ovary, and shorter than it. Perianth
galeate, one inch in diameter, white suffused with pink,
sprinkled with minute purple specks. Sepals orbicular-
ovate, obtuse, concave. Petals smaller, clawed, trulliform,
obtuse, connivent. Lip equalling the petals, clawed ; claw
slender, articulate with the base of the column ; lateral
lobes rounded, incurved, disk between them with a promi-
nent horn that is concave in front ; mid-lobe stipitate,
trulliform, closely speckled with purple. Column winged,
hooded at the top. Pollen-Amasses two, narrowly pyriform ;
pedicel linear, dilated upwards, gland very small. — /. D. H.



Fig. 1, Front view of flowers with the sepals spread out ; 2, ditto of ooloma and
lip ; % side view of oolomn and lip ; 4 and 5, front and back view of poUinia ;
6, anther : — all but Jiff. 1 enlarged.



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Tab. 6517.
salvia huns.

Native of Kashmir.

Naf. Ord. Labiatjb.— Tribe Monabdeje.
Genus Salvia, Linn,; {Benth, et HooJcf, Oen, PL vol. ii. p. 1194.)



Salvia (Drymosphace) Mans ; herbacea, erecta, villosa, caule robusto 4rgono, foliis
longe petiolatis deltoideo-ovatis basi trnncatis v. bastatis acutis v. acuminatis
crenato-dentatis ragosis, raceinis simplicibus v. compositis, verticillastris G-floiis,
caljcis campanrdati striati colorati glutinosi labio superiore integro truncato,
icferiore seqailongo dentibus triangulari-ovatis acntis, corolla aznrea tabo
calyce tri^lo longiore subinflato, limbo brevi hiante, labio superiore brevi 2-]obo
lobis acatis, inferioris lobis lateralibos brevibus reflexis, intermedio late obcor-
dato pubescente.

S. hians, Royle et Benth. in Hook, Bot, Misc, vol. iii. p. 373 ; HI, HimaL Bot.
i, 767; Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1841, t. 39 ; Benth. in DC. Frodr, xii. 276.

S. macrophylla, Tausch in Flora, 1842, p. 282(?).



A very handsome perennial, of which seeds, collected in
Kashmir, were sent to Kew by Dr. Aitchison in 1877.
He describes it as growing profusely in grassy marshes,
at elevations of from 8,500 to 11,000 feet, and flowering in
July and August. It was first found by Royle's collectors,
sent from the Saharunpore Gardens to Kashmir, and
flowered at the Royal Horticultural Society's Gardens in
1840, whence the figure in the Botanical Register was
made ; but neither this figure, nor Royle's, gives any idea of
the intense sapphire-blue of the corolla. It has also been
collected in Kashmir by Jacquemont and Falconer, and, as
one of the most beautiful plants of that botanically rich
valley, it can hardly escape the notice of future collectors.
Dr. Lindley describes it as " one of the gayest of our
perennials, in consequence of the striking contrast between
the white and blue of its large flowers."

The specimen here figured flowered in the herbaceous
grounds at Kew in June of the present year.

OCTOBER IST, 1880.



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Descr. a villous perennial, two to three feet high, with
stout erect four-angled stems. Leaves three to five inches
long, long-petioled, deltoid-ovate, acute or acuminate, base
truncate with rounded lobes or hastate with acute spreading
lobes, rugose, pubescent on both surfaces ; petiole' four to
eight inches long. Raceme simple or branched at the base,
eight to twelve inches long, very villous ; lower whorls of
flowers distant, with leafy bracts; false-whorls six-flowered;
flowers shortly pedicelled. Calyx half an inch long, gluti-
nous, subcampanulate, green below, dark above ; lips short,
broad, acute, lobes bifid. Corolla large, one inch long
and nearly as broad across the mouth, bright blue, except
the white mid-lobe of the lip ; tube three times as long as
the calyx, broad, rather inflated ; upper lip short, bifid,
with acute lobes ; lower with broad short revolute side
lobes, and a large broadly-obcordate pendulous mid-lobe.
Anthers exserted ; connective of sterile anther-cells short.
Style slender, much exserted. — /. D. H.



Fig. 1, Vertical section of flower ; 2, portion of corolla and stamen : — both ^ little
enlarged.



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Tab. 6518.

a. TULIPA BIFLOBA.

b. TULIPA iLiBNSis.
Natives of Siberia and Turkestan.



Nat. Ord. Liiiacejb. — Tribe T^LiPBiB.
Genus Tulipa, Linn. ; (Baker in Joum, Linn, Soc, vol. xiv. p. 275.)



TuuPA h\flora; bulbo parvo ovoideo tunicis intns lanosiB, caolibus gracilibus
puberulis ssepissime 2-3-flon8, foliis 2-3 linearibus, periantbii parvi segmentis
lanceolatis acutis subconformibus intus albidis basi luteis dorso viridulo et pur-
pureo tioctis, staminibus perianthio triplo brevioribu8, filamentis basi pilosis,
antheris parvis, ovario oblongo-trigono, stigmatibus parvb.

T. biflora, Unn, SuppL p. 106 ; Pallas Iter App, no. 86, tab. D, fig. 3 ; Lindl.
Bot, Beg, t. 535 ; Itegel in Act, Hort, Petrop, vol. ii. p. 444 ; Baker in
Joum, Linn, Soc, vol. xiv. p. 292.

Orithyia biflora, Kunth Enum, vol. iv. p. 227.

Tulipa tUensis ; bulbo parvo ovoideo tunicis intus sursum parce setosis, caulibus
gracilibus unifloris sursum puberulis, foliis 3-4 linearibus viridibus glabris,
periantbii parvi citreni segmentis exterioribus oblongis subacutis intenoribus
obovatis obtusis, staminibus perianthio subduplo brevioribus, filamentis glabris


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