William Jackson Hooker.

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antberis dnplo longioribus, ovario oblongo-trigono, stigmatibus parvis.

T. iliensis, Begel in Act, Hort. Petrop, vol. vi. fiswo. ii. p. 301 ; Gartenfl, tab. 975,
^g. c, d ; tab. 982, fig. 4, 5, 6 ; Ihscr, fasc. vii. p. 220.



The two plants represented in this plate are amongst the
least showy species of the genus. T. biflora has been long
known, but is very seldom seen in cultivation. It is spread
from the Volga through the western half of Siberia. It is
notable in the genus for producing normally more than a
single flower. It has a woolly bulb, like montana^ but
otherwise its affinity is with sylvestris and anstralis. The
drawing was made from a plant sent up by Mr. George
Maw from his garden at Broseley.

T. iliensis is one of the numerous new species that have
lately been discovered by the Russian explorers in Central
Asia. Its alliance is close with T. triphyllay Bot. Mag.

OCTOBFB IST, 1880.



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tab. 6549. In their flowers and leaves these two resemble
cmstralis^ but the stamens are like those of Gesneriamje.
The drawing was made from a plant sent by Mr. P. W.
Burbidge, which flowered in the garden of Trinity College,
Dublin, last February. .

Descb. T. BiPLOBA. Btdb small, ovoid, the thin tunics
woolly inside. Stems under a foot long, slender, shghtly
pilose, bearing usually two or three, rarely four or five
flowers. Leaves two or three, linear, reaching in cultivation
a length of six or nine inches. Perianth in cultivation
.about an inch long, white inside, with a yellow throat,
tinted outside with green and purple ; segments lanceolate,
acute, the two rows nearly alike in shape. Stamens about
a third as long as the perianth ; filaments with a tuft of
hairs at the base; anthers small, linear-oblong. Ovary
oblong-cylindrical ; stigmas small, sessile.

T. iLiBNSis. Bulb small, ovoid, the tunics furnished with
a few adpressed hairs on the inside towards the tip. Stem
slender, one-flowered, under a foot long, slightly downy
upwards. Leaves three or four to a stem, linear, acuminate,
green, glabrous, six to twelve inches long, under half an
inch broad. Perianth an inch long, lemon-yellow ; outer
segments oblong, subacute ; inner obovate-cuneate obtuse.
Stamens about half as long as the perianth-segments;
filaments linear, glabrous, orange-yellow, twice as long as
the anthers. Ovary oblong-trigonous, badly developed in
the specimen drawn ; stigmas small. — J. G. Baker.



a. Fig. 1, Whole flower, in section, natural size ; 2, a single stamen, nutgnified,
b, Pig. 1, whole flower, in section, natural size.



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Tab. 6519.
prunus divaeicata.

Native of the Caiccasus.

Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Psukeje.
Genus Pbunus, Tourn,; (Benth. et Hooh,f. Gen. Fl, vol. i. p. 609.)



Pbunus divaricata; arbor parva, fere inermis, a basi ramosa, coma rotundata,
ramis yalde elongatis divarioatis inlerioribus borizontalibus fere prostratis,
ramulis glabris gracillimis, foliis pbinta florente elliptico-lanceoLitis acuminatiii
costa nervisqae subtos tomentosis glabratisve demum late ovatis ovato-corda-
tisve acaminatis sermlatis glabris, ^emmis floriferis 1-tforis, pedunculis brevibas

flabris, floribos ^-poll. diam., petalis rotundatis v..obovati8 concavis, ovariis 1-2,
nipa ellipsoidea v. globosa flava, putamine hsvi, ellipsoideo utrinque obtuso
oompresso sed targido.

P. divaricata, Ledeb. Ind. 8em, EorL Dorpat, 1824, SuppL p. 6 ; Fl, Alt. vol. ii.
p. 211, in nota ; Flor. Ross, vol. ii. p. 6 ; Ic. Fl, Jbtoss. i. 13 ; DC. Frodr,
vol. ii. p. 634 ; C. Koch, Dendrolog. vol. L p. 97 ; C, A. Meyer, Verz, Ffi.
Cauc. p. 165.

This has been for many years one of the most conspicuous
spring ornaments of the Royal Gardens, where it forms a
dwarf tree, standing to the west of the Cactus House, near
the fine specimen of Pinus GouUeriy and so covered with
white flowers in March or April (according to the season)
as to appear as if snowed over. The flowers appear with
the half-developed leaves, but have never been succeeded by
fruit. Whether this should be considered as anything
. more than the wild form of the Myrobalan Plum, P. cerasi-
fera^ Ehr. (see tab. 5934), has been doubted by the excellent
observer 0. Koch, as I have stated under the latter plantj
and, indeed, the characters whereby most of the native
plums are separated, are not of very much moment. With
regard to P. divaricata^ however, its leaves, when full
grown, broadening at the base, and appearing with its
smaller flowers, and its fruit not being intruded at the
base, together with its remarkable habit, would appear to
constitute suflBciently marked diagnostic characters. The
petals which are almost orbicular in the Kew specimens are
more obovate in native ones from the Caucasus, collected

OCTOBBB 1st, 1880.



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bv Hohenacker, and in others from the Copenhagen
Gardens.

Prunus divaricata was introduced into England in 1822,
according to Loudon, probably from the Dorpat Gardens,
when under the direction of its describer Ledebour, and is
a small tree ten to twelve feet high and broad, forming a
hemispherical mass on the ground with a singularly grace-
ful ramification ; according to Boissier, it has a very wide
geographical range, from Macedonia to the Caucasus and
Northern Persia. The specimen at Kew was procured by
the late Curator, Mr. J. Smith, from Messrs. Osborne, of
Pulham, about thirty-eight years ago.

Descb. a small tree, ten to twelve feet high, branching
from the very base, the branches numerous, slender, wide-
spreading, the lower lying almost flat on the ground ; the
whole forming a hemispherical or rounded mass ; branchlets
slender, glabrous. Leaves appearing with the flowers,
when young lanceolate, acuminate, serrate, pubescent in
the midrib and nerves beneath, when fully formed two by
one and a half inch long and broad, more ovate and often
subcordate at the base, finely serrate, and glabrous beneath ;
petiole slender, glabrous. Flowers three-quarters of an
inch in diameter, solitary from the flowering buds, pe-
duncle short, glabrous. Calyx with ovate-lanceolate re-
curved lobes. Petals rounded, concave. Stamens white
with yellow anthers. Ovaries one or two. Fruit one inch
long, elUpsoid or globose, base not intruded, yellow ; stone
(from native specimens) half an inch long, broadly ellipsoid,
compressed but turgid, obtuse at both ends, subacute
along one margin, and with a sharp-edged groove along the
other; faces quite smooth. — J. D. H.



3, ^J^^:^'lnl^'' "'''' Pet-l— ved.showi„gWo ovaries ;



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Tab. 6520.
ALOE Gbebnii.

Native probably of the Cape.

Nat. Ord. Liliace-B.— Tribe Aloine«.
Genu8 Aloe, Idnn, ; (Kunth Enum. vol. iv. p. 492.)



Aloe Oreenii; breviter caulescens, caule simplici, foliis 10-12 dense rosulaiis
lanoeolatis sesqnipedalibns viridibus obscure yerticaliter lineatis et macalis
oopiosis oblongis albidis confluentibus irregulariter transversaliter «eriatis
decoratis, pedancnlo subpedali, paniculae ramis strictis 5-7, racemis oblongis
vel demam cylindricis, pedicellis flore subtriplo brevioribus, bracteis lanceolatis
acmninatis pedicello subequilongis, periantbu pallide rabri 15 lin. longi tabo
medio insigniter oonstricto, segmentis oblongis tnbo 2-3-plo bre^ribua,
genitalibas demam periantbio subsequilongis.

A. Gh*eenii, Baker in Joum. Linn. 8oe. ined.



This is a well-marked new species of Aloe of the group
Pidce, which we have for some time cultivated at Kew.
AH that I can make out for certain about its history is
that it was received under the name which I have adopted
from Mr. Wilson Saunders, and that this name was given
to it by Mr. T. Cooper, but that it is not one of the plants
which the latter collected in his travels in Cape Colony,
which yielded so many interesting discoveries in this set of
plants. In the Pwtce group of Aloes the present plant may
be readily distinguished by its elongated racemes and by
the strong construction of the perianth-tube at the middle.
Our plate was drawn from a specimen that flowered in the
Succulent House at Kew in October, 1879.

Desor. Well-grown plants furnished with a short simple
stem below the rosette of leaves. Leaves twelve or fifteen
in a dense rosette, lanceolate, fifteen to eighteen inches
long, three inches broad in the lower part, narrowed
gradually from two-thirds of the way down to a long point,
flat in the lower half on the face to a late stage, a quarter
or a third of an inch thick in the centre, bright green, with

OCTOBER IST, 1880.



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obscure vertical whitish lines and broad irregular trans-
verse bands of confluent oblong whitish spots, the crowded
deltoid-cuspidate ascending marginal prickles an eighth or
a sixth of an inch long, connected by a very narrow homy
line. Peduncle stiflBy erect, about a foot long. Panicle
about as long as the peduncle, with five or seven branches ;
racemes oblong or finallv oblong-cylindrical, four to nine
inches long, three inches in diameter when fully expanded ;
lower pedicels about half an inch long ; bracts lanceolate
acuminate, as long as the pedicels. Perianth pale red, an
inch and a quarter long; tube globose at the base and
very much constricted at the middle ; segments oblong, a
third or half as long as the tube. Longer stamens and
style finally as long as the perianth. Style twice as long as
the oblong ovary. — J. O. Baker.



A. Whole plant, much reduced. Fig. 1, a flower, cut open ; 2, stamens, showing
back and face ; 3, pistil ; 4, horizontal section of ovary : — all magnified.



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Tab. 6521,

STELIS Beuokmullbbi.
Native of the Ande^

Nat Ord. Obchidbjb.— Tribe Plbtjbothalle^.
Genus Stelis, Swariz / (lAndl, Oen. et Sp, Orchid, p. 11.)



Stblis BruehTmilleri ; osespitosa, glaberrima, folio elliptico-lanceolato in petiolam
angostato apice 2-fido conyezo medio profonde canalicnlato, racemo solitario
filiforme fobo dnplo longiore ereoto moltifloro, floribus numerosis diflsitis
nndiqne spectantibafl, bracteis infundibnlaribas ore valde obli<}no infimis
parvis racuis, perianthio i-jM)]!. diam., sepalis se<}aalibu8 late ovatis snbacntis
basi connatis piallide pnipareis intos longe Rparse pilosis, petalis dolabriformibus,
labio panro peltatim stipitato stipite genicolato, lamina ovato-oblonga obtusa
basi tnmcata medio longitadinaliter alata, oolnmna apice utrinqne late anricnlata
anricnlis patentibns obovato-rotnndatis.

S. Briickmiilleri, Beickb.f. in Sort. Veitch.



This singular little orchid resembles the green-flowered
Stelis oppioglossoides of Swartz, a West Indian plant,
figured in the Botanical Register (tab. 935), but has smaller
leaves and flowers, and the latter are of a purple colour
and hairy inside ; the bracts too are different, those of the
species here figured resembling funnel-shaped cups with
very oblique mouths. Like all the other species of the
genus, it is of botanical interest rather than horticultural.

The specimen here figured flowered in the Royal Gardens
in December of last year from plants presented by Messrs.
Veitch, of the Royal Exotic Nurseries, Chelsea, and was
named as above by Professor Reichenbach, but I do not
find it described anywhere. It is probably a native of the
Mexican Andes.

Dbscb. Tufted. Leaves one and a half to two inches
long, exclusive of the petiole, which is as long, one-half
to two-thirds of an inch broad, elliptic-lanceolate, rather
narrower at the base than at the bifid tip, convex above

OCTOBBB 1st, 1880.



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with a deep median groove, very coriaceous, bright green ;
petiole enclosed for half its length in a membranous brown
ribbed sheath with a truncate mouth. Bacemes very
shortly peduncled, solitary from each leaf-sheath, two or
three times as long as the leaf, erect, very slender, clothed
at intervals with bracts from near the base to the summit ;
bracts one- tenth of an inch long, between cup- and funnel-
shaped, with a very oblique mouth, lowest smaller and
narrower without flowers, uppermost with an acute lip.
Flotuers at intervals of one-sixth of an inch along the
rachis, about one-sixth of an inch in diameter, inserted all
round the rachis. Perianth subcampanulate, trigonous in
bud, yellowish purple without, pale purple within. Sepals
broadly ovate, acute, united at the base, three-nerved;
clothed with long flexuous spreading hairs within. Petals
very minute, axe-shaped with an incurved edge. Lip
minute, peltately attached to a curved stipes, undivided,
cordate-oblong, obtuse, with a longitudinally rather
thickened disk. Column with a large spreading auricle on
each side at the top. — J. D. H.



Fi^. 1, Side view of flower ; 2, front view of the same with the sepals remoyed,
showing the two petals, lip, and spreading auricles of the column ; 3, sepal; 4, petal;
6, lip; 6, side view of column and lip ; 7, external, and, 8, internal view of anther-
case ; 9, pollen : — all greatly enlarged.



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Tab. 6522.

LATHYRUS eotundipolius;

Native of South Russia and Asia Minor.



Nat. Ord. Lbovminosb^. — Tribe ViciBiB.
Genus Lathtbfs, Linn,; (Benth, et RooTcf, Oen. PL vol. i. p. 626.)



Lathtbus roiundifolius ; glaberrimas, caule elato late alato ramoso, foliis l-jagis,
foliolis elliptico- y. obovato-rotandatis 3-5-neryiis obtusis subacatisve apiculatis,
stipnlis semisagittatis oblongis lanceolatisve acatis petiolum vix ssquantibns,
peaunculis folio sublongioribos, racerais 6-7-flori8, caljcis lobis triant^alaribus
acatis tabo brevioribas, corolla rosea, legamine longe Hneari subincuryo paulo
compresso basi subattenaato dorso carinato, seminibus oblongis reticalatis.

L. rotundifolius, Willd. 8p. PL vol. iii. p. 1088; Bieherst FL Taur, Cauc, vol. ii.
p. 156»; Cent Plant Bar. Boss. vol. i. t. 22 ; DC. Prodr. vol ii. p. 370;
Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. ii. p. 612.

L. miniatos, 8tev. Verz. Taur. p. 140.

L. peduncularis, Poir. BncycL SuppL vol. ii. p. 776.



This very beautiful plant has been long cultivated in
England, though when and how introduced is not certain.
It is not described in Aiton's Hortus Kewensis, nor, up to
this time, cultivated at Kew ; it is not included in Mamaout
and Decaisne's *^ Flore Elementaire des Jardins et des
Champs/' which is the fullest work of the kind known to
me, nor do I find it in the more accessible works devoted
to English out-of-door gardening; yet I observed it last
summer growing in the gardener's cottage at Lytchett, and
it probably occurs elsewhere, though overlooked as too like
an Everlasting Pea to be worth notice. Nevertheless it is
one of the most charming plants of its ^kind, perfectly
hardy, a fi:ee flowerer, and for the brilliancy and delicacy
of its rose«coloured flowers, it ought to be a favourite.
Like its near ally, the Everlasting Pea, it is scentless.

A variety of this plant, L. rotundifolius^ var. ellipticus^ which
is figured in the Botanical Register, tab. 333, is a very
inferior plant, with much smaller and darker-coloured, more

OCTOBES l8T, 1880.



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purple flowers ; it appears to have been cultivated in the
Birmingham Botanic Gardens in 1836.

L. rotundifolius has a wide range; we have examined
specimens in the Herbarium from Roumelia, the Crimea,
Asia Minor, and the Caucasus, and according to Boissier it
extends eastwards to Northern Persia. I am indebted to
Mr. Corderoy, of Blewbury, near Didcot, a valued corre-
spondent and cultivator of succulent plants, for the specimen
here figured, which flowered in his garden in June of the
present year.

Desob. a perfectly glabrous climbing Everiasting Pea;
branches broadly winged. Leaves with a short petiole,
one pair of leaflets, and a filiform branched tendril ; leaflets
two to two and a half inches long, orbicular or broadly-
elliptical or subovate, obtuse with a short apiculus, pade
green, three- to five-nerved; petiole shorter than the leaflets,
winged ; stipules large, hastate with acute tips and basal
lobes. Racemes on a slender peduncle equalling the leaves,
many-flowered; bracts minute. Flowers three-quarters to
one inch in diameter, bright rose-pink. Calyx with tri-
angular acute lobes. Standard orbicular, rather contracted
towards the claw, bifid ; wings small, obtuse. Pod elon-
gate, linear, turgid, somewhat compressed, keeled at the
back. Seeds oblong, reticulated. — J. D. H.



Fig. 1, Section of calyx, stamiDal tube and ovary ; 2, standard ; 3, wings ; 4, keel;
5, stamens ; 6, ovary ; 7, Stigma : — all but Jiff, b of the natural size.



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Tab. 6523.
DRACONTITTM Carderi.

Native of the United States of Columbia,



Nai Ord. Aboidba— Tribe Lasioidea.
Genus Dbacontiuh, Linn. ; (JSngler in A. DC. Monog. Phaneroff. vol. ii. p. 282.)



Dbaconthth Carderi; petiolo gracili Isevi glaberrimo marmorato, lamina yiridi
3-partita segmento medio 2-fido lateralibus indivisis y. 2-fidi8, omnibus pallide
viridibus infra medium pinnati-partitis supra medium pinnatifidis, pinnis
lobisque membranaceis multinerviis circumscriptione yalde irreeularibas aliis
elliptico-oyatis oblongisye acutis sequi- y. insequilateris, aliis majonbus irregu-
lariter lobulatis v. rariua pertusis, pedunculo gracili stricto folio duplo longiore
lieyi glaberrimo, spatba pedali lanceolata acuminata eztus luride yiridi costis
fdsco-rubris, intus rubro-purpurea, spadice li-pollicari breyiter crasse stipitato
cjlindraceo obtuso yiolaceo, perianthii folioiis 5 spatbulatis apice incrassatis
fomicatis cucullatis, staminibus ad 8, oyario 3-loculari loculis l-ov alatis in stigma
ffiquilongum robustum attenuato, stigpnate punctiforme, ovulis ba^ilaribus erectis.



The genus Dracontium, as restricted by Engler in his recent
monograph of the AroidecBy includes the wonderful Godioinia
Gigas (tab. nostr. 6048), of Nicaragua, and consists of
this and two other species, natives of N. Brazil and Guiana ;
to these must be added the subject of the present plate,
which extends the geographical range of the genus to the
United States of Columbia, and which differs from its con-
geners in the smooth petiole and very long peduncle. A sup-
posed fifth species has been fully and carefully described and
figured by Dr. Masters in the Gardeners^ Chronicle for 1870
(p. 344, tab. 58) as D. elatum^ which differs from Engler's
generic character in the ovules being attached to the
middle of the septum of the ovary, a character by which
Schott separated Ophione fi'om Vracontium^ very unna-
turally as it appears to me. This D. elatum is taken up in
the index of Engler's monograph, where the name is
printed in italic type, indicating its being a synonym ; but
the reference to a page is omitted, and I have failed to
to trace it anywhere in the body of the work. Mr. Baker,

NoyEMBEB 1st, 1880.



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in a note in Saunders' Refugium (vol. iv. tab. 282),
suggests that it is only V. asperum^ and tliat the locality
of Sierra Leone is an error.

I am indebted to Mr. Bull, F.L.S., for the means
of figuring this interesting plant, and take the present
opportunity of recording my sense of the signal service
which this ardent horticulturist has rendered to botanical
science, by the introduction and cultivation of so many fine
plants of this family ; plants which cannot be satisfactorily
investigated except in a living state, and which, from their
brief duration, lurid colours, and often foetid odour, offfer
no attraction to the lovers of other than rare and curious
plants. ]). Garderi was discovered by the traveller whose
name it bears, and was imported by Mr. Bull, who flowered
it at his establishment in Chelsea in April, 1879.

Descr. Petiole two to three feet high, slender, terete,
mottled with bands of dirty green; lamina two feet in
diameter, three-sect to the base ; divisions horizontal and
drooping at the ends, undivided or forked at or below the
middle, pinnatisect below the middle, pinnatifid beyond it ;
pinnules or lobes very unequal, the lower contracted or not
at the base, oblong or obovate, acute or acuminate, some
two to three inches long and undivided, others six to eight
inches and lobed or split, or perforated, all pale green,
membranous, with many arching nerves. Peduncle twice
as long as the petiole, as slender and similarly coloured.
Spathe a foot long, lanceolate, acuminate, dirty green
outside with reddish brown raised nerves, dark purple
inside. Spadix one and a half inch long, on a very short
stout stipes, cylindric, obtuse, violet blue ; flowers (unex-
panded) about one-sixteenth of an inch in diameter ;
perianth-segments five, spathulate, with incurved cucuUate
tips ; stamens about eight ; ovary ,three-celled, contracted
into a stout columnar style with a very small three-lobed
terminal stigma. — J. D. H.



Fi^. 1, Whole plant, ^r<?a% reduced; 2, spadir, of the natural size; 3, unex-
panded flower ; 4 and 5, perianth-segments ; 6, anthers (immature) ; 7, sectiou of
ovary ; 8, ovule : — all enlarged.



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Tab.. 6524.
hibiscus sohizopetalus.

Native of Uastem Tropical Africa.

Nat. Ord. Malvaoeje. — Tribe Hibisceje.
Genus Hibiscus, Linn.; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. PI. vol. L p. 207.)



Hftiscus schizopeialus ; glaber, f mticosns, foliis petiolatis ovatis ellipticisve acutis
groBse serratia basin versus integerrimis 3-nerviiR, floribus solitariis longe
pedunculatis pendulis peduneulo medio articulato, involucello v. minimo, caljce
ejlindraceo spathac^o apice obtuse 3-lobo demum fisso, petalis amplis longe
unguiculatis flabellatim multifidis lobis linearibus obtusis, tubo stamineo lon-
gissimo pendulo, antheris spamis longe stipitatis, stjli ramis 5 filiforraibus ascen-
dentibua, stigmatibus globosis, capsula btai calyce spatbaceo inclusa oblongo-
cjlindracea obtusa obscure 6-loba torulosa, seminibus brunneis glabria.

H. Eosa Sinensis var. scbizopetalus, Masters in Oard. Chron. 1879, p. 282;
Boulger, I, c. p. 372.

Hibiscus sp. Kirk and Oliver in Journ Linn. 8oc. vol. xv. p. 478.



Tliis singular and beautiful plant has attracted much
attention, on account both of its horticultural and botanical
interest ; differing as it does from all other species in the
remarkable character of its petals, and yet presenting so
many points of resemblance to a world-wide garden
favourite whose native country is unknown (the jff. Bosa
Sinensis)^ as to have suggested its specific identity with
that plant. The differences, however, between this and
B. Bosa Sinensis are a great deal too many and too impor-
tant to render the idea of this being a sport or variety
of that plant tenable. They are, firstly, the petals, which,
however, might have originated as a sport; then the
pendulous flower, the suppression of the epicalyx, the
longer tubular calyx with obtuse lobes; above all, the
long fruit with small smooth seeds. I have examined
specimens of H. Bosa Sinensis from thirty different localities,
and found, none approaching B. schizopetahis in any of the
above characters. Too much importance should not be
attributed to the supposition that the native country of

KOVEMBEB IST, 1880.



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H. Bosa Sinensis is not well known; Loureireiro states
that it is indigenous in both China and Cochinchina, and it
has certainly been for long cultivated in China, and it
occurs in so many of the Pacific Islands as to render it
very probable that it is a native of the Pacific ; on the other
hand, its two nearest allies, the present plant and H.
liliiflorusj being natives, the one of East Africa, and the
other of the Mascarene Islands, suggests the probability of
Africa being the parent country of H. Bosa Sinensis.

For the discovery of this fine plant we are indebted to
our indefatigable correspondent, Dr. Kirk, H.B.M. Consul
at Zanzibar, who found it first in 1874 on the coast hills
at Mombasa, in lat. 4'' S. ; in 1877 at Kilwa, in 7** 4(y S. ;
and, lastly, at Lindi, in 10"* S. It grows both in dry rocky
slopes and in damp mountain glens, in dense shade,


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