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William Jones Rhees.

An account of the Smithsonian Institution, its founder, building, operations, etc. prepared from the reports of Prof. Henry to the regents, and other authentic sources online

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excited, and frequently bet all the dressed deer-skins and buffalo-robes they possess

93. JOSE MARIA VIGIL ZUAZO. (Painted 1852.)

94. CARLOS VIGIL, EX-GOVERNOR OF PUEBLO. (Painted 1852.)

95. JUAN ANTONIO VIGIL. (Painted 1852.)

96. JOSE AHAYEA. (Painted 1852.)
97. JOSE 'DOMINGO HERURA. (Painted 1852.)

98. BLACK KNIFE. (Painted 1846.)

An Apache Chief, reconnoitring the command of General Kearney on his inarch from
Santa Fe to California.

99. VIEW ON THE GILA RIVER. (Painted 1851.)

" About two miles from camp, our course was traversed by a seam of yellowish-colored
igneous rock, shooting up into irregular spires and turrets, one or two thousand feet in
height. It ran at right angles to the rkrer, and extended to the north and south, in a
chain of mountains, as far as the eye could reach.

"One of these towers was capped with a substance many hundred feet thick, disposed in
horizontal strata of different colors, from deep red to light yellow. Partially disintegrated,
and lying at the foot of the chain of spires, was a yellowish calcareous sandstone, altered
by fire, in large amorphous masses. In one view could be seen clustered the Larrea Mex-
icanna, the Cactus, (King) Cactus, (Chandelier) Greenwood Acacia, Chamiza, Prosopis Odo-
rata, and a new variety of Sedge."

" For a better description of the Landscape, see the sketch by Mr. Stanley." Lieut. Col.
W. Emory 1 's report to the Secretary of War.

100. PIMO CHIEF. (Painted 1846.)

101. PIMO SQUAW. (Painted 1846.)

102. MARICOPA CHIEF AND INTERPRETER. (Painted 1846.)

103. SHASTE SQUAW. (Painted 1847.)
A slave to the Clackamus Indians.

104. ENAH-TE, OB WOLF. (Painted 1848.)
A young Umpqua Warrior.

105. TE-TO-KA-NIM. (Painted 1848.)
Klameth Chief.

106. ENISH-NIM . (Painted 1848.)
Wife of Te-to-ka-nim.

107. YELSTO. (Painted 1848.)

A Callapooya.

108. STOMAQUEA. (Painted 1848.)
Principal Chief of the Chinooks.

109. TEL-AL-LEK. (Painted 1048.)
Chinook Squaw.

110. QUATYKEN. (Painted 18W.)

111. DR. JOHN MCLAUGHLIN. (Painted 1848.)

Former Chief Factor of the Hon. Hudson's Bay Company, and founder of Oregon City.

112. QOV. P. S. OGDEX. (Painted 1848.)
Hon. Hudson's Bay Company, Oregon.



52 THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION.

113 OREGON CITY. (Painted 1848.)
114. WA-SHA-MUS. (Painted 1847.)
Principal Chief of the Willamette Falls Indians.

115 MARY AND ACHATA. (Painted 1847.)

Willamette Falls Squaws. This group belongs to the great family of Chinooks, or Flat-
Heads.

116 WILLAMETTE FALLS. (Painted 1848.)
117 CASINO. (Painted 1848.)

This Chief is one of the Tlickitack Tribe, and the principal Chief of all the Indians in-
habiting the Columbia River, from Astoria to the Cascades. In the plenitude of his power
he traveled in great state, and was often accompanied by a hundred slaves, obedient to his
slightest caprice. The bands over whom he presided paid him tribute on all the furs and
fish taken, as also upon the increase of their stock, to support him in this affluence.

He was the petted chief of the Hudson's Bay Company, and through him they are un-
doubtedly much indebted for the quiet ascendancy they always maintained over these
tribes.

It is said that on visiting Fort Vancouver, his slaves often carpeted the road, from the
landing to the fort, with beaver and other furs, a distance of a quarter of a mile ; and that
on his return, the officers of the Hudson Bay CoApany would take the furs, and carpet the
same distance with blankets and other Indian goods, as his recompense. He is now an old
man, having outlived his prosperity and posterity, to see a once numerous people reduced
to a few scattered lodges, which must soon disappear before the rapidly growing settlements
of the adventurous pioneers.

118. PEO-PEO-MUX-MUX, OR YELLOW SERPENT. (Painted 1847.)

Principal Chief of the Walla- Wallas, commonly called by the Hudson's Bay Company,
Serpent Jaune.

119. TE-LO-KIKT, OR CRAW-FISH WALKING FORWARD.

Principal Chief of the Cayuses, and one of the principal actors in the inhuman butchery
of Wailetpu. Was hung at Oregon City, June 3d, 1850.

120. SHU-MA-HIC-CIE, OR PAINTED SHIRT. (Painted 1847.)

One of the chief Cayuse Braves, and son of Te-lo-kikt, and one of the active murderers of
the Mission family.

121. TUM-SUC-KEE.

Cayuse Brave. The great ringleader and first instigator of the Wailetpu massacre was
hung at Oregon City, June 3d, 1850.

122. WAIE-CAT-ONE THAT FLIES.

Cayuse Brave and son of Tum-suc-kee. This man, though young, was an active partici-
pator in the massacre of Dr. Whitman, and committed many atrocities upon the defenceless
captives. He escaped the ignominious death which awaited those not more guilty than
himself.

123.

Massacre of Dr. Whitman's family at the Wailetpu Mission, in Oregon, 29th of November,
1847.

124.

Abduction of Miss Bewley from Dr. Whitman's mission.

125. CASCADES OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER.

126. SALMON VISHERY ON THE HEAD-WATERS OF THE COLUMBIA.
127. MOUNT HOOD. (OREGON.)
.28. TIN-TIN-METZE. (Painted 1847.)
A Nez Perce" Chief.



THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. 53

129. KEOK-SOES-TEE. (Painted 1847.)

A Pelouse Brave.

130. VIEW ON THE PELOUSE RIVER.

131. PELOUSE FALLS.

This beautiful cascade is situated about nine miles from the junction of the Pelouse with
Snake River, and is estimated at three hundred feet in height. According to an old tra-
dition, the Great Spirit caused this barrier to rise, to prevent the salmon from passing to a
band of Indians living on its head-waters, with whom he was displeased.
132 VIEW IN THE CASCADE MOUNTAINS.

133. VIEW ON THE COLUMBIA.
135 THE ARTIST TRAVELING IN NORTHERN OREGON IN THE MONTH OF DECEMBER.

136. VIEW OF MOUNT HOOD.
137. CASCADES OF THE COLUMBIA.

138. THE GREAT DALLES BASIN. AND VIEW OF MOUNT HOOD.
139. SE-LIM-COOM-CLU-LOCK, OR RAVEN CHIEF. (Painted 1847.)

Commonly called Ugly Head. Principal Chief of the Spokanes, or Flat-Heads, residing on
the waters of the Spokane River.

140. KWIT-TEAL-CO-KOO-SUM. (Painted 1847.)

Big Star Chief, a medicine-man of the Spokanes. Whenever a person is sick, this tribe
supposes that the spirit has left the body, and hovers invisibly in the air, until it can be
charmed or brought back through the agency of the medicine-man. To accomplish this
end, the patient is placed in a sitting posture, enveloped in a buffalo-robe, or other covering,
having only the top of the head exposed.

The medicine-man then commences dancing and singing around the patient, gesticulating
mysteriously, and often clutching in the air with his hands, as if in the act of catching
something. The spirit is supposed to be attracted by the chant, and to hover near the
aperture at the top of the lodge ; and the dance is often continued for an hour before it
can be caught. It is then pressed and rubbed, as the medicine-man pretends, through the
patient's skull, whose recovery, if not soon effected, he supposes to be thwarted by his
having caught the spirit of some other person ; and it then becomes necessary to undo his
work by setting it at liberty, and repeating the performance until the right spirit is caught.
141. KAI-MISH-KON, OR MARKED HEAD.

Spokane Chief.

142. KAI-ME-TE-KIN, OB MARKED BACK.

Spokane Brave.

143. PA-SE-LIX.

Spokane Squaw.

144. TIN-TIN-MA-LI-KIN, OB STRONG BREAST.
145. HI-UP-EKAN.

Stony Island Brave.

146. LAH-KIES-TUM.
Stony Island Squaw.

147.-SO-HA-PE.
Stony Island Brave.

148. WAH-PUXE.

Chief of the Priest's Rapid.

149. KO-MAL-KAN, OB LONG HAIR.

An Okanagan Medicine-man.

150. SIN-PAH-SOX-TIN.

Okanagan Squaw.

151. VIEW ON THE SPOKANE RIVER.
152. J. M. STANLEY, THE ARTIST. Painted by A. B. Moore, 1851.



54



THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION.



LIST OF INDIAN TRIBES REPRESENTED.



Nos.

SEMINOLES 1-9

CREEKS 10-18

CHEROKEES 19-33

CHICKASAWS 34

POTOWATOMIES , 35-37

STOCKBRIDGES 38

MUNSEES 39

OTTOWAS 40

CHIPPEWAS 41

DELAWARES 42-47

WEEAHS 48

SHAWNEES , 49-51

SACS AND FOXES 52-58

BLACK FEET 59-61

OSAGES 62-68

QUAPAWS 69

IOWAS 70

WlCHETAWS, OR PAWNEE PlCTS 71-73

CADDOES 74-77

ANANDARKOES 78

WACOES 79

NATCHITOCHES... 80



Nos.



TOWOCCONIES 81-82

MEECHIES 83-85

COMANCHES 86-92

PUEBLOS 93-97

APACHES 98-99

PIMOS 100-101

MARICOPAS

SHASTES 103

UMPQUAS

KLAMBTHS 105-106

CALLAPOOYAS 107

CHINOOKS 108-109

CLACKMUS 110-113

WILLAMETTE FALLS INDIANS 114-116

TLICKITACKS 117

WALLA-WALLAS 118

CAYUSES 119-127

NEZPERCES

PELOUSES 129-138

SPOKANES 139-144

STONY ISLAND INDIANS 145-147

OKANAGANS 148-151




CATALOGUE OF INDIAN PAINTINGS

BELONGING TO THE

GOVEBNMENT COLLECTION.*



1. STING IOWAY

2. SHING-YAW-BA-WUS-SEN, The Figured Stone

3. MISH-SHA-QUAT, The Clear Sky Chippeway Chief.

Painted by C. B. King from a drawing by Lewis, 1827.

4. PE-A-JUK A Chippeway (King from Lewis, 1827.)

5.

6. AM-EIQUON, Wooden Ladle (King from Lewis, 1826.)

7. MO-NEE- KAW, He who goes under ground

8.

9. TU-GO-NIS-CO-TE-YEH, Black Fox Cherokee Chief (King, 1828.)

10. EESH-TAH-HUM-LEAH, Sleepy Eye Sioux Chief, from the band called the Sipsetongs.

11. MOOS-E-OM-O-NEE, The Walking Iron Wah-pee-ton Sioux (By S. M. Charles, 1837.)

12. LA-KEE-TOO-ME-RA-SHA, Little Chief Pawnee (King, 1837.)

13. WAH-RO-NE-SAH, The SurrounderOtoe (King, 1837.)

14. WAH-KE-ON-TAW-KAH, Big Thunder Chief of the MedanaKanton Sioux. ..(King, 1837.)

15. HAW-CHE-KE-ONG-GA, He who kills Osages Missouri (King, 1837.)

16. O-WAN-ICK-KOH, Little Elk Winnebago (A. Ford from Lewis, 1826.)

17.

18. , Chippeway Chief (King from Lewis, 1827.)

19. GA-DE-GE-WE, Spotted Second Chief of the Chippeways, 54 years old (King, 1835.)

20. WAA-KANN-SEE-KAA, Rattlesnake Winnebago (Ford from Lewis, 1826.)

21. NAA-GAR-NEP, The one who sits at the head Chippeway Chief.. (King from Lewis, 1827.)

22. [See 42.] GENERAL PUSH-MA-TA-HA Choctaw Chief

23. MENAWEE A great Warrior and Creek Chief

This chief commanded the party that killed Gen. Mclntosh, and was one of the few that saved themselves
from the defeat at the Horse-shoe, by swimming the river, after being badly wounded in the head.

24. MISTEPE Yoholo Mice's son, a Creek (King, 1825.)

25. NAA-SHE-O-SHUCK, Roaring thunder Sac of Mississippi, son of Black Hawk.

(King, 1837.)

26. YOOSTO, Spring Frog

27. YOHOLO-MICO Creek Chief M (King, 1825.)

28. A Creek warrior

29. - A Chippeway Chief (King from Lewis, 1827.)

30. I-AU-BEANU A Chippeway (King from Lewis, 1826.)

31. PAH-GUE-SAH-AH Son of Tecumseh (Shaw.)

32. TAH-COL-A-QUOT A Sac

33. [See 77.] KEOKUK, Watchful Fox Chiocook Sac

34. PAW-A-SHICK, To dash the icater off A Fox Chief (Cooke, 1837.)

35. COL. JOHN STEDMAN or STIDHAM King, 1825.)

36. WEA-MATLA Seminole War Chief (King, 1826.)

37. KEE-SHESWA, The Sun Fox warrior (King.)

* These Paintings are arranged on the east and southeast walls of the Picture Gallery.



56 THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION.

38. TAH-RO-HOTJ, Plenty of meat loway (King, 1837^

39. AP-PA-NOOSE-O-KE-MAW, A chief when a child Sac (Cooke, 1837.)

40. CA-TA-NE-CAS-SA, Black Hoof Shawnee Chief.

41. PAH-SHE-PAH-HOW, Stabber First Chief of the Sankys ; a Sac (King.)

42. [See 22.] GENERAL PUSH-MA-TA-HAW Choctaw Chief.

43.

44. KAI-POL-E-QUAH, White-nosed Fox A Fox Chief

45. ZE-WA-DIN, The North TFtwZ Chippew ay Chief.. (King from Lewis, 1827.)

46. WA-CHA-MON-NE, Partisan loway (King, 1837.)

47. WHESH-LAUB, The Sweet (King from Lewis, 1826.)

48. TIA-MAH, The bear whose scream makes the rocks tremble Fox Chief.

49. WAU-TOP-E-NOT, The Eagle's Bill Fox (King from Lewis, 1826.)

50. NAHETLUC-HOPIE, Little Doctor Creek Chief (King, 1825.)

The red spots on his dress mark the balls that he received when he was surprised in his hut. The three
lower balls were lower than marked in the picture. The paint on the face is commemorative of the
same event, as the blood ran from his nostrils and mouth.

51. COOSA-TUSTENUGGA Creek Chief (King, 1825.)

52. KEE-ME-ONE, Rain A Chippeway (King, 1827.)

53. OpOTHLE-YoHOLO Principal Chief of the Creek deputation to Washington in 1825.

(King, 1825.)

54. AT-TE-COURE, The Young Reindeer Chippeway Chief (King from Lewis, 1827.)

55. O-TYA-WA-NIM-EE-HEE, Yellow Thunder Chippeway Chief (King from Lewis, 1827.)

56. A-NA-CAM-O-GUSH-IA Chippeway Chief from Rainy Lake (King from Lewis, 1827.)

57. WAA-KAWN, The Snake Winnebago (Ford from Lewis, 1826.)

58. HOO-WAU-NEE-KAW, Little Elk Winnebago orator of the Car-ray-mau-nee family.

59. O-CHEE-NA-SHINK-KAA, The man that stands and strikes Winnebago.

(Ford from Lewis, 1826.)

60. PA-SHE-NINE, The good marksman Chippeway Chief (King from Lewis, 1827.)

61. WA-HE-KANS-HE-KAI Winnebago (King from Lewis, 1826.)

62. WADTZ-HE-DOO-KAANA Chief of the Winnebagos ,....(Ford from Lewis, 1826.)

63. MI-CO-A-NA-PAS Second Chief of Seminoles ; owns 70 slaves (King.)

64. NO-WAY-KE-SUG-GA, He who strikes two at once Otoe (King, 1837.)

65. WAI-KEE-CHAI, Crouching Eagle Sanky Chief ; Fox (King.)

66. CAW-TAA-WAA-BEE-TA, The Snagled Tooth .'

67. YAHA-HAJO, Mad Wolf Creek Chief (King, 1825.)

68. FOLKE-TUSTE-NAJO, Craggy Black Clay Seminole War Chief (King, 1826.)

69. JOHR RIDGE Cherokee Chief. Secretary to the Creek delegation to Washington, 1825.

(King.)

70. SELOTA Creek Chief; a distinguished warrior ; fought under General Jackson.

(King, 1825.)

71. TUSKIE-HU-TUSTENUGGE, Little Prince Creek Chief (King, 1825.)

72. JACK-O-PA, The Six Chippeway Chief (King from Lewis, 1827.)

73.

74. LE-SHAW-LOO-LA-LE-HOO, Big Chief Pawnee Loup (King, 1837.)

75. NAU-KAW, Wood Of the Cor-ray-mau-nee family. Principal Chief of Winnebago dep-

utation, 94 years old

76. DON VINOENTE GUERRERO, former President of the Mexican Republic a distinguished

chieftain

77. [See 33.] KEO-KUK, Watchful Fox First Chief of Sankys (King, 1829.)

78.

79. PEE-CHE-KER, Buffalo Chief of Chippeways

80. APAULI-TUSTENUGGE Creek Chief. (King, 1825.)



THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. 57

81. MOU-KA-USH-KA, Trembling Earth Sioux of Missouri ; died in Baltimore Oct. 25, 1837

(Cooke, 1837.)

82. A-MISK-QFEW, The Spoon Menomina War Chief (King.)

83. A Chippeway Chief. (King from Lewis, 1827.)

84. OLOE, Ox Mahara

85. TO-CA-COU, He that gives the first wound Sioux of Missouri (Cooke, 1837.)

86. HA-SA-ZA, Elk's Horn Sioux of Missouri (Cooke, 1837.)

87. AMMOI, He that comes for something Yancton Sioux (King, 1837.)

88. MAH-XE-HAH-NAH, Great Walker loway Chief (King.)

89. PES-KE-LECARO Chief of the Republican Panis

90. AU-PANTAX-GA, Big Elk Mohas Chief; a great orator

91. MAN-CHOUSIA, White Plume Kansas Chief. (King.)

92. TERRE-KI-TAN-AHU

93. IS-CA-TA-PE, Wicked Chief Great Panis (King.)

94. CHOU-CAPE-OTOS, Half Chief . (King.)

95. A-SHE-AU-KOU, SunfishSa.G Chief (King, 1837.)

96. MAR-KO-ME-TA, Bear's Oil '

97. RAUT-CHE-WAIME

98. [See 143.] RED JACKET Seneca Chief (King, 1828.)

99. TEUS-QUA-TA-WA, Open Door

100. (Cooke.)

101. NE-O-MOU-NE, Walking Rain loway (King, 1837.)

102. WAA-PUA-TAA, Playing Fox Prince of the Foxes (Ford from Lewis, 1826.)

103. NAU-CHE-WING-GA, No Heart loway (King, 1837.)

104. PEE-MASH-KA, Fox winding in his course Chief of the Foxes ; (King;)

105. WAH-BAWN-SEE, Causer of Paleness Principal Chief of the Potawotamies. (King, 1835.)

106. WA-PELLA, The Prince fox (King, 1837.)

107. HOLATO-MICO, Blue King Seminole War Chief. (King, 1826.)

108. WE-KE-ROO-TAU, He who exchanges ,

109. COR-BA-MAP-PA, Wet Mouth Chippeway Chief (King from Lewis, 1827.)

110. MA-HOXG-GA Osage (King, 1830.)

111. HEHO-TUSTEMJGGE, Deer Warrior Seminole Partisan War Chief (King, 1826.)

112. ES-ME-BOIN Chippeway Chief (King from Lewis, 1827.)

113. CUT-TAA-TASE-TIA Fox (Ford from Lewis, 1826.)

114. PA-NAN-SE, Shedding ElkS&c (King, 1827.)

115. CATOOUSE Chippeway Chief (King from Lewis, 1827.)

116. A Sioux Chief

117. O-KEE-MA-KEE-GUID, The chief that speaks A Chippeway

118. GOVERNOR HICKS Head Chief of the Seminoles (King, 1826.)

119. WAA-XA-TAA Grand Chief of the Sioux (King, 1826.)

120. KIS-TE-KOSH, One leg off Fox brave (Cooke, 1837.)

121. A Fox Chief (King from Lewis, 1826.)

122. OCAN-GEE-WACK Chippeway Chief (King from Lewis, 1827.)

123. KAI-KEE-KAI-MAIH, All fish Chief of Sankys (King.)

124. OCHIO-FIXICO, (war name,) CHARLES CONXELLO, (English name) Creek Chief.

(King, 1825.)

125. SHE-TAH-WAH-COE-WAH-MEXE, The sparrow that hunts as he walks A Sioux (King.)

126. TSHI-ZHUN-KAU-KAW, He who runs with the deer Of the Day-kau-ray family. Winne-

bago Chief

127. WAU-KAUN-HAH-KAW, Snake Skin Of the Day-kau-ray family

128. ARTOWAY, PADDY CARR Creek Boy



58 THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION.

129. NO-DIN, Wind Chief of Chippeways (King.)

130. CHOU-MAN-I-CASE Otoe, half chief; husband of Eagle of Delight

131. RANT-CHE-WAI-ME, MA-HA-KA, Female Flying Pigeon, Eagle of Delight

132. WA-EM-BOUSH-HAA Chippeway from Sandy Lake

133. MUCH-A-TAI-ME-SHE-KA-KAIK, Black Hawk (King, 1837.)

134. IOWAY

135. MAJOR TIMPOOCHY BARNARD A Creek Chief (King, 1825.)

136. MAUCH-COO-MAIM loway (King from Lewis, 1826.)

137. KI-HE-GA-MAW-SIIE-SHE, Brave Chief Omahaw. (King, 1837.)

138. LEDAGIE Creek Chief (King, 1835.)

139. WE-KE-ROO-TAW, He who exchanges Otoe (King, 1837.)

140. KAA-KAA-HUXE, Little Crow (King from Lewis, 1826.)

141.

142. TOMA-HAKE-TAKE, The warrior who speaks first (1826.)

143. [See 98.] RED JACKET Seneca Chief.

144. KEOKUK, Watchful Fox, and Mu- SEN-WONT, son of Keokuk, Long-haired Fox.

(King, 1827.)

145. CHIPPEWAY SQUAWS (1826.)

146. CHIPPEWAY SQUAW AND CHILD (King from Lewis, 1827.)

147. TSCHUSICK (King, 1827.)



OTHER PAINTINGS.

M. GUIZOT, the celebrated statesman of France, painted by Healy.

A BATTLE SCENE.

THE MASSACRE OF THE INNOCENTS.

A CARDINAL.

CAPTAIN JOHN EVANS.

A TURKISH SULTAN.

The Paintings in the Apparatus Room are rough sketches to illustrate lectures. The
largest represents an ancient Indian mound near Marietta, Ohio ; another the Mosque of
St. Sophia, at Constantinople ; another the English Houses of Parliament ; and scenes in
Egypt, Turkey, &c., &c.



LIST OF BUSTS DEPOSITED IN THE INSTITUTION.

ROGER B. TANEY, JOHN MILTON, WILLIAM NORRIS,

ROBERT FULTON, BENJAMIN HALLOWELL, CLARK MILLS,

STEPHEN DECATUR, THORWALSDEN, AMOS KENDALL,

JOEL BARLOW, FRANCIS P. BLAIR, Miss FAIRFIELD,

THOMAS JEFFERSON, JOHN C. SPENCER, Miss HAMPTON.

DANIEL WEBSTER, MARTIN VAN BUREN,



GUIDE TO THE MUSEUM.



Museums are collections of miscellaneous objects and relics capable of illustrating the
distant or the past. The word is of Greek origin, and literally signifies a place sacred to
the Muses the patron deities among the ancients of the various arts and sciences.

The British Museum, the largest in the world, was opened to the public on the 15th of
January, 1759, and is therefore a century old. It has been the recipient, however, of im-
mense donations from the Government, and numerous bequests from individuals.

The collection now in the Smithsonian Institution is of very recent origin, and is remark-
able for its extent and value, considering that no special appropriation has ever been made
by the Government for its increase. All that has been done has been to pay the necessary
expenses of keeping it in order, and for the preservation of the specimens. The objects
have been chiefly collected under the direction of the officers of the various Exploring and
Surveying Expeditions, and have formed only an incidental part of their duties. A large
number, however, have been presented by the correspondents of the Institution.

The collections made by the U. S. Exploring Expedition under Capt. Wilkes, U. S. N.,
1838-42, are supposed greatly to exceed those of any other of similar character ever fitted
out by a foreign government, no published series of results comparing at all in magnitude
with that issued under the direction of the Joint Library Committee of Congress.

A full list of all the Expeditions from which specimens have been received will be found
in the Smithsonian Report for 1858, (page 52,) copies of which are furnished gratuitously
by the Secretary to those specially interested in the subject.

In the arrangement of the specimens, strict scientific accuracy has been sacrificed to
convenience, and this remark will apply to this work, which is intended only for the popu-
lar reader. Catalogues which will give descriptions and scientific names of all the articles
of natural history, will be published in due time by the Institution. The student will find
in the volumes of the Report of the Pacific Railroad and Mexican Boundary Surveys, espe-
cially, accurate accounts of most of the specimens here exhibited.

The notes in relation to the specimens are from the highest authorities the reports of
the various Expeditions having been consulted, as well as the guides to the British Museum,
&c., &c.



On entering the hall, turn to the left, and examine

CASE 1.

This contains a number of interesting animals. No. 41 is the Prairie Wolf or Coyote,
from the Colorado.

These animals are able to mate an incredible amount of noise, -which has no resemblance to the bark of a dog.
They sneak about during the day, but at night there are no bounds to their impudence. They will steal pro-
visions literally from under your nose. They do not attack men unless wounded.

Nos. 42, 43, 44, Foxes. ..45, Wolf.. .46, Common Fox. ..47, Jackall...48, Chili Fox. ..49 and 50,
California Porcupine. ..51, Arkansas Fox. ..52, Egyptian Porcupine. ..53, Fox. ..54, Cross
Fox. ..55, Cross Fox from Salt Lake. ..56, Prairie Wolf, Platte River. ..57, Fox of Tierra del
Fuego, very bold and fierce. ..58, Fox. ..59, Gray Wolf.. .60, Gray Wolf, Platte River, the
common Wolf of North America. .61 and 66, Peccaries or Mexican Hogs. This animal is rarely
found alone. It emits an odor like that of the skunk. ..62, 63, 64, and 65, Ant Bears, or
Ant-eaters, from the Cape of Good Hope, etc.

The Ant-eaters are remarkable for their long cylindrical tongues, covered with a glutinous saliva, by means
of which they entrap and devour the insects upon which they live. The tongue is nearly twice the length of



60 THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION.

the whole head and muzzle together, and when not extended is kept doubled up in the mouth, with the point
directed backward. It is very slothful and solitary. The female bears but a single young one at a birth. They
are Very rare, and seldom seen even in their native regions. The Indians eat their flesh.

CASE 2.

Fishes. Among these are the Sticklebacks, which the California Indians catch in sum-
mer, and dry for winter use.. ..Trout, or River Bass.. ..Sun fishes.

CASE 3.

Upper Shelf. The many-colored Wrens of Chili. ..The Diamond Bird, very valuable on
account of its skin. ..Robins from Australia. ..Blue Birds from India... Red-crested Manakin
of Brazil. In the middle of the shelf is the Superb Warbler of Australia.. .The Gold-crested
Wren... The Black Cock and the Crowned Cock of Malacca.

Middle Shelf. Cocks from Malacca. Notice especially the Wild or Jungle Cock of Asia.

Lower Shelf. The Silver Pheasant of China.

This Pheasant is remarkable for the extraordinary leugth of its tail feathers, which no visitor can fail to
admire. This noble bird is considered a rarity even in Pekin, its native district being one of the coldest and
most mountainous provinces of China.

English Pheasants. ..Australian Turkeys. ..The Argus Pheasant of Malacca. ..The Lyre-tailed
Pheasant of Australia. ..The Helmeted Hornbill...The Rhinoceros Hornbill of Malacca.

This strange horny excresence is in reality extremely light, being cellular. The Horn bills feed on mice, small
birds, reptiles, &c., which, throwing them in the air and catching them in the throat, they swallow whole.

CASE 4.

Against the Wall. Fishes from California, Mexico, &c.

CASE 5.

EAST SIDE Upper Shelf. Pigeons and Doves.

WEST SIDE Middle Shelf. Here are some of the choicest specimens in the whole Museum,
nnd worthy of special attention. The rare Birds of British Guiana, South America :
Among these, No. 6, the Bearded Manakin. ..9, Black Headed Creeper. ..5, Mocking Bird...
11, King Humming Bird. On another stand, notice No. 4, the Bell Bird, the rarest in the
collection. ..No. 5, the Quya....No. 12, Female Amethyst Humming Bird with nest....
No. 11, the Tucan... The Emerald, Sapphire, Longbill, and other Humming Birds.

There is no group of birds so interesting to the ornithologist or to the casual observer as the humming birds;
at once the smallest in size, the most gorgeously beautiful in color, and almost the most abundant in species of
any single family of birds. They are strictly confined to the continent and islands of America, and are most


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Online LibraryWilliam Jones RheesAn account of the Smithsonian Institution, its founder, building, operations, etc. prepared from the reports of Prof. Henry to the regents, and other authentic sources → online text (page 6 of 10)