Copyright
William Jones Rhees.

An account of the Smithsonian Institution, its founder, building, operations, etc. prepared from the reports of Prof. Henry to the regents, and other authentic sources online

. (page 9 of 10)
Online LibraryWilliam Jones RheesAn account of the Smithsonian Institution, its founder, building, operations, etc. prepared from the reports of Prof. Henry to the regents, and other authentic sources → online text (page 9 of 10)
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skin.

The Clearance of Brig Argyle, of Baltimore, at Canton, 1889 a fair specimen of a Chi-
nese business paper. ..Chinese Umbrellas... Hat of Leaves. ..Shoes taken from the feet of a
Chinese Woman, at Macao, by Dr. Wessels, 1830.

All Chinese Women pride themselves on their goat-like hoofs, and have contempt for a natural foot. It is
difficult for strangers to get a sight of these deformities.

Chinese work in Stone House, Boat, &c... Chop-sticks, used to eat food.

In China, the poorer classes eat boiled rice only, mixed with dried fish. Dogs and cats are considered delica-
cies above the reach of the poor. Rats, mice, and other vermin are eagerly sought after.

Chinese Fans. ..Compass. ..Japanese Crape, Silk, Cotton. ..Cloak of Kangaroo Skin, worn
by the natives of New Holland. ..Cord from Kangaroo Hair. ..Japanese Gold and Silver
Coins. The smallest coin is called "Cash," in value one-twelfth of a cent. ..Japanese Letter
and Book, said to be an interesting novel.

Reading is a favorite occupation with both sexes, and books innumerable, profusely illustrated, are printed.

Japanese Pills.

MEDICINE. The famous Dosia Powder, which, when introduced into the ears, nostrils, and mouth of a rigid
corpse, renders the limbs perfectly flexible.

CASE 81.

WEST SIDE. East Indies. Model of a Malay Prao, or armed vessel, used by the Pirates
of Borneo. The Malays are mostly seamen. ..East Indian Arrows, poisoned with gum of
the Upas. ..Malay Blow-Pipe, a long tube employed for projecting poisoned arrows... Arrows
with Flint Heads, from Tierradel Fuego... Malay Daggers, great variety. ..Bows. ..Paddles...
Shields. ..Spears. ..Coins from the East Indies. ..Harp from Sooloo.

EAST SIDE. Leaf from a Brahmin's Book. ..Leaf from a Siamese Book. ..Ordinary Walk-
ing Dresses of the ladies of Lima, Peru.

However fitted this dress may be to cover intrigue, it is certainly not adapted to the display of beauty. A more
awkward and absurd dress cannot well be conceived. It is by no means indicative of the wearer's rank, for fre-
quently this disguise is ragged and tattered, and assumed, under its most forbidding aspect, to deceive or carry on
an intrigue, of which it is almost an effectual cloak. In this dress it is said a wife will pass her own husband
when she may be walking with her lover, and the husband may make love to his wife, without being
aware it is she.

Chilian Poncho, the common Pading Cloak of the Spanish Americans. ..Chilian Bridles,
Stirrups. ..Mexican Matchlock Gun. ..Mexican Spurs. ..Head-dress of Atahualpa... Earthen
Ware of the ancient Peruvians Jars, Bottles, &c. from the Temple of Pachacamac, near
Lima. ..Belts of Bark Cloth, from the Ascension Islands.

CASE 82.

WEST SIDE. Siam. EAST SIDE. Japan. Dresses, very handsome... .Gongs. ...Drums...
Flutes. ..Photograph of his Majesty, PHRA BARD SONDETH PHRA PARAMENDR, MNHA MONG-
KUT PHRA CHOMKLAN CHAUYDHUA, the Major King of Siam and its dependencies, ..Swords...
Daggers... Trays for fruit inlaid with Pearl.

The Japanese have the orange, lemon, fig, plum, cherry, and apricot.

Tea-service. ..Shears. ..Fans. ..Cloths... Silk. ..Loo-Choo Pipes, ..Cups and Saucers... Chow
Chow or Refreshment Boxes. ..Tobacco.

The Loo-Cboo islands belong to Japan. Tobacco is raised extensively, and smoking is a universal habit. Saki
is an intoxicating and strong liquor, distilled from rice, which is used as a drink. At a Loo Choo dinner there
are 24 courses, soup constituting eight.

Window Case. A Chinese Plow.

The plowing is done while the fields are flooded, and is only intended for breaking up alluvial ground. It is
drawn by the water ox or buffalo, the beast of burden in China.

CASE 83.

Japan. Silks, Crapes, &c., of every variety.
The silks are equal to any in the world. The finest are made by criminals of high rank, who are confined upon a



THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. 7*

small, rocky, and unproductive island, and made to support themselves by their labor. These silks cannot b*
exported. All their silks and calicoes are uniformly 18 inches in width.
They have no sheep or goats, and do not make woolen fabrics.

Waiters. ..Small Porcelain Polls . .Mirrors. ..Domestic Utensils : bowls, jars, cups, shovels,
ladles. ..Magnificent Spears. ..Swords; mountings of gold ; scabbards of shark's skin...Biche
de Mer... Mats... Nails... .Needles... Saws... .Chisels. ..Planes.... Agricultural Implements. ..Ja-
panese Shells. ..Japan Printing Implements, Blocks, Ink, &c.... Paper from the bark of the
Mulberry, exceedingly soft and flexible, used for handkerchiefs. It endures folding, and
lasts longer than ours. ..Models of Japanese Sanctuary, Houses, &c.
They upe no glass for windows, but oiled paper or cloth.
Umbrellas made of Bamboo, and covered with a vegetable oil.

These are perfectly water proof, and can be used for a long time without injury.

All the articles of superior quality are put by the Japanese" merchants into boxes of white cedar. Inferior
articles are wrapped in paper.

The Japanese possess one art in which they excell the world this is in lacquering wood work. In this op-
eration they select the finest wood of fir or cedar to be covered with varnish which is made from the gum of
the rhu* oemiao, a tree abundant in their country.

The Japanese also excell all other nations in the quality of their porcelain and swords.

They do not know how to cut or polish precious stones, but have a substitute, called syakfdo in which vari-
ous metals are so blended and combined that they resemble fine enamel. This is used for ornamenting
girdle clasps, sword hilts, boxes, <fcc.

CASE 84.

Amazon Expedition. Costumes of the Savages of Ucayali river, trimmed with feathers,
teeth, &c... Ants' Nest, used for spunk. ..Leg and Wing Bones of a Bird. ..Tobacco from river
Madeira. ..Tongue of a Fish. ..Necklace of Berries... Minerals, Woods, Gums, &c...Bats...
Lizards. ..Tiger Cats. ..Skins. ..Curious Brazilian Wasps' Nest, in which honey is stored up...
Birds. ..Axes. ..Drums... Grass from which the Guayaquil hats are made... Sarsaparilla Roots...
Blow-gun or Pucuna of the Indians.

It is made of any long, straight piece of wood, generally a species of palm. The pole is divided longitudi-
nally: a canal hollowed out along the centre of each part, which is well smoothed and polished; the two
parts are then fastened together with twine, and the whole covered with wax, mixed with some resin of the
forest, to make it hard. A couple of boar's teeth are fitted on each side at the mouth end, and one of the
curved front teeth of a small animal is placed on the top for a sight. The arrow is made ~f light wood the
wild cane, or the middle fibre of a species of palm leaf which is about a foot in length, and of the thickness
of an ordinary lucifer match. The end of the arrow which is placed next to the mouth is wrapped with a
light, delicate sort of wild cotton, and the other end, very sharply pointed, is dipped in a vegetable poison, pre-
pared from the juice of the creeper, mixed with strong red pepper. ^V ith this instrument the Indian will kill
a small bird at thirty or forty paces. They never discharge the pucuna at a snake, for fear of the gun being
made crooked like the reptile.

Hammock made of the fibres of the budding top of a species of palm.

The tree is very hard, and is defended with long, sharp thorns, so that it is a labor of a day to cut a top,
split the leaves into strips of convenient breadth, and strip off the fibres, which are the outer covering of the
leaves. One top usually yields about half a pound of fibres : and when it is considered that these fibres have to
be twisted, a portion of them dyed, and then woven, it will be seen that the Indian is poorly paid when he re-
ceives tor a hammock 12 cents.

Hymeneal Bracelets.

An Indian cnnnot take a wife until he has passed his arms at least ten times through long stalks of the
palm tree filled intentionally with large, venomous ants. When muffled in these terrible mittens, the Indian
is obliged to siug and dance before every cabin.

India Rubber.

Gathered between July and January.

The tree is tall, straight, and has a smooth bark. It is sometimes eighteen inches in diameter. The milk is
white and tasteless, and may be swallowed with impunity. A gash is made in the bark, and a small clay cup
stuck to the tree beneath the gash. In about four hours the milk ceases to run, and each wound has given
from 3 to 5 table-spoonsfull. The milk is then poured into earthen vessels and smoked. After it is prepared,
it is nearly as white as milk, and gets its color from age. An industrious man can make 16 pounds of rubber
a day.

CASE 85.

Monrovia, Africa. Specimens of Negro Manufactures: Cloths, Bags, Hammocks,
Paddles, Head-Dresses, Fans, Bricks, Shoes, &c... Water Jars, used by the women of
Cape Palmas... Native Harp. ..Amulets.

CASE 86.

Unoccupied.

Attached to the iron railing, designed and manufactured expressly for this Institution at
the well-known establishment of E. W. SHIPPED, 3022 Market street, Philadelphia, which
protects the upper gallery, is a splendid collection of Horns and Antlers of Elks, Deer, &c.



CATALOGUE OF WOEKS OF AET.

WEST WING, FIRST FLOOR, BETWEEN THE MUSEUM AND THE LIBRARY.



COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE ROOM.

t. PORTRAIT OP JOHN TYLER, President of the U. S., born 29th March, 1790. By Healy

2. MASSACRE OF THE INNOCENTS. Artist unknown.

3. CHRIST HEALING THE SICK. Etching by Rembrandt.

4. FULL-LENGTH PORTRAIT OF GUIZOT, Prime Minister of Louis Phillippe, a celebrated

French Statesman. Painted by Healy from life.

5. PORTRAIT OF HON. WM. C. PRESTON, of S. C. By Healy.

6. GROUP IN PLASTER, designed to ornament U. S. Capitol, but not used. By F. Pettrich.

7. UNFINISHED PORTRAIT OF GEN. ZACHARY TAYLOR, President of the U. S., born 24th

Nov., 1784, died 9th July, 1850. This was commenced a few days before Gen. Tay-
lor's death, and is the last sketch taken of him. By Vanderwort.

8. BUST OF HON. JAMES L. ORR, born 12th May, 1822. Speaker of the House of Repre-

sentatives, 35th Congress.

9. GIRL FISHING. By F. Pettrich.

10. BUST OF BENJ. HALLOWELL, for many years Principal of a noted Boys' School in Alex-

andria, Va. By Bailey, a pupil of the school.

11. F. PETTRICH, ARTIST, AND HIS FAMILY.

12. BUST OF CLARK MILLS, the artist who designed and cast the Jackson Statue and the

Washington Statue, in the city of Washington.

13. SLEEPING CHILD. Design by F. Pettrich.

14. BUST OF WM. NORRIS, the locomotive and engine builder, in Philadelphia.

15. BUST OF FRANCIS P. BLAIR, formerly editor of the " Congressional Globe." By C. Mills.

16. BUST OF CHARLES DICKENS, the celebrated novelist.

17. PORTRAIT OF CAPT. JOHN EVANS, one of the earliest American merchants. Painted by

Copley.

18. A BISHOP OF ENGLAND IN OLDEN TIME. Name and artist unknown.

19. MOORISH BATTLE PIECE. Artist unknown.

20. BUST OF DANIEL WEBSTER, the illustrious statesman, born 18th January, 1782, died

24th October, 1852.

21. BUST OF MARTIN VAN BUREN, President of the U. S. Pettrich, artist.

22. BUST OF HON. JOHN C. SPENCER.

23. SLEEPING GIRL. Pettrich.

24. BUST Miss FAIRFIELD. By C. Mills.

25. BUST Miss HAMPTON. By C. Mills.

26. BOY HUNTER. Pettrich.

27. BUST OF DR. WM. DARLINGTON, of Westchester, Pa. One of the most noted American

botanists.

28. DESIGN FOR CAPITOL.



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mum



OFFICE, 11J3 <3c




0fM^toforh






CAPITAL STOCK, (all paid in)
SURPLUS, over, - - - -



$1,000,000
400,000



This Company continues to Insure Buildings, Merchandise, Ships in Port and their Cargoes,
Household Furniture and Personal Property generally, against loss or damage by Fire*
on favorable terms.

LOSSES EQUITABLY ADJUSTED AND PROMPTLY PAID.



THIS COMPANY HAS AGENTS IN ALL THE PRINCIPAL CITIES AND TOWNS IN THE UNITED STATES,



IDIIREOTOIElSi

CHARLES J. MARTIN President.

A. F. WILLMARTH Vice President.

WILLIAM G. LAMBERT Firm of A. & A. Lawrence & Co.

GEORGE C. COLLINS " Sherman, Collins & Co.

DANFORD N. BARNEY " Wells, Fargo & Co.

LUCIUS HOPKINS President Importers' and Traders' Bank.

THOMAS MESSENGER Firm of T. & H. Messenger.

WILLIAM H. MELLEN " Claflin, Mellen & Co.

CHARLES B. HATCH " C. B. Hatch & Co.

B. WATSON BULL " Haskell, Merrick & Bull.

HOMER MORGAN

LEVI P. STONE

JAMES HUMPHREY late

GEORGE PEARCE

WARD A. WORK

JAMES LOW

I. H. FROTHINGHAM late

CHARLES A. BULKLEY

CEPHAS H. NORTON

ROE LOCKWOOD

THEODORE McNAMEE late

RICHARD BIGELOW

CURTIS NOBLE

GEORGE D. MORGAN

OLIVER E. WOOD

ALFRED S. BARNES

GEORGE BLISS

AMOS T. DWIGHT

LYMAN COOKE

LEVI P. MORTON

JOHN B. HUTCHINSON

CHARLES P. BALDWIN

JOHN G. NELSON late

HENRY A. HURLBUT

JESSE HOYT

WM. STURGIS,JR

JOHN R. FORD

SIDNEY MAPON , late

<iKO T. STEDMAN

CYRUS YALE, JR

WM. 11. FOSD1CK

DAVID I. BOYD

F. II. COSSITT

LEWIS ROBERTS

SAMUEL B. CALDWELL



J. MILTON SMITH, Secretary.
JOHN McGEE, Asst. Secretary.



Stone, Starr & Co.

Barney, Humphrey & Butler.

' George Pearce & Co.

[ Ward A. Work & Son.

1 James Low & Co., Louisville.

' I. H. Frothingham & Co.

' Bulkley & Co.

; Norton & Jewett.

' R. Lockwood & Son.

' Bowen. McNamee & Co.

' Doan, King & Co., St. Louis.

Condit & Noble.

' E. D. Morgan & Co.

< Willard, Wood & Co.
' A. S. Barnes & Co.

' Phelps, Bliss & Co.

[ Trowbridge, Dwight & Co.

Cooke, Dowd, Baker & Co.

1 Morton, Grinnell & Co.

J. C. Howe & Co., Boston.

' Baldwin, Starr & Co.

Nelson & Co.

Swift, Hurlbut & Co.

' Jesse Hoyt & Co.

' Sturgis, Shaw & Co.

' Ford Rubber Co.

' Mason & Thompson.

' Stedman, Carlile & Shaw. Cincinnati.

' Cyrus Yale, Jr., & Co., New Orleans.

Wm. R. & Chas. B. Fosdick.

< Boyd Brothers & Co., Albany, N. Y.

< Cowsitt, Hill & Talmadge, Memphis. .
L. Roberts & Co.

' Brewer & Caldwell.

CHARLES J. MARTIN, President.
A. F. WILLMARTH, Vice Pratt.



Ifye Sirobei*



GROVER & BAKER'S



CELEBRATED
3UE I




HAVING GREATLY INCREASED THEIR FACILITIES FOR MANUFACTURING THEIR CELEBRATED



WITH ALL THE RECENT IMPROVEMENTS, OFFER FOR 8ALB

NEW STYLES, AT REDUCED PRICES.



It is no longer questioned that these Machines are the best in use for Family Sewing.

They

HE^E, FEnLH,., G-^TIHIEIR,., .A-HXTD S TITOS,

In the most superior manner, and are the only machines in the market that are so well and
simply made, that they may be sent into families with no other instructions than are con-
tained in a circular which accompanies each machine, and from which



May readily learn how to use them, and keep them in order. They make upwards of
Ufiftoeia. lEXvizaLclx-ecSL Stitc3btos A. 3VEiaa.TJ.to,

And will do the sewing of a family cheaper than a seamstress can do it, even if she works

at the rate of

OAK CENT AN HOUR.

Is there a husband, father, or brother in the United States, who will permit the drudgery
of hand sewing in his family, when a Grover & Baker Machine will do it better, more expc-
ditiously, and cheaper than can possibly be done by hand ?

Offices of Exhibition and Sale. 495 Broadway, New York; 18 Summer st.,
Boston; 730 Chestnut street, Philadelphia; 181 Baltimore street, Baltimore ;
58 West Fourth street, Cincinnati; 336 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington,
D. C.

Agencies in all the principal Cities and Towns of the

States.



SEND FOR A CIRCULAR.



" My object is to call attention to the fact, that a Policy of Life Insurance is the cheapest and safest mode of
making a certain provision for one's family." BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.

" One should insure in health, as sickness may suddenly overtake the most robust, and disqualify him for
insurance."

' Life Insurance the best investment. If long lived, the insured obtains a good interest on the premium
paid, in cash dividends, and in most instances a very large return for a small outlay. In case of death, there is
a great advantage over Savings Banks."

" The average length of human life is only thirty-three years. Of 500 persons, only one lives 80 years : and
of 100, only 6 live 65 years."



ZSTEW ENGLAND

tm mstnuutoe

BOSTON, MASS. PTJKELY MUTUAL.



BRANCH OFFICE, 110 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY.



Accumulated Capital $1,110,622.21

After paying Losses over 600,000.00

And Dividends (in cash) over- - - - 500,000.00



WILLARD PHILLIPS, PRESIDENT.

DIRECTORS:

CHARLES P. CURTIS. SEWELL TAPPAN A. W. THAXTER, JR.

MARSHALL P. WILDER. CHARLES HUBBARD. GEORGE H. FOLGER.

THOS. A. DEXTER. WILLIAM B. REYNOLDS. PATRICK T. JACKSON.

B. F. STEVENS, SECRETARY.



The surplus is divided among all the policy holders, in CASH, thus affording a
good and certain rate of interest upon the outlay of premiums, and avoiding the
large and unnecessary accumulations of unpaid dividends of uncertain tendency,
and erroneously called capital.

One-half of the first five annual premiums on life policies loaned to insurers if
desired ; the remaining half may be paid quarterly.

The premiums are as low as those of any reliable Company.

1^" This is the oldest American Mutual Life Insurance
Company, and one of the most successful, and is purely Mutual,
dividing all the Surplus Profits among all the Insured.

Insurance may be effected for the benefit of married women, beyond the reach
of their husbands' creditors. Creditors may insure the lives of debtors.

Blank forms of application for Insurance, or the Company's Pamphlet, con-
taining the charter, rules and regulations, also the annual reports, showing the
condition of the Company, and information concerning Life Insurance generally,
will be furnished by addressing the



Metropolitan Bank Building^ HO Broadway, cor. Pine St.

JOHN HOPPER,

Agent and Attorney.

THIS COMPANY HAS JUST DECLARED A DIVIDEND OF $335,763, PAYABLE
(IN CASH) TO ALL HOLDING POLICIES.



I. M, SINGER & CO.'S

IMPROVED



8SWIM




iEOi^x

r-A-iNriA

(UNDER THE NATIONAL HOTEL,)



388



These Machines are superior for all manufacturing pur-
poses. They are more desirable for all kinds of family
sewing ; capable of doing a greater variety of work ; per-
fectly simple, easily kept in order, and are much cheaper,
because they earn more money. They are just the machines
for every family. We invite all to call at our Office, No. 388
Pennsylvania Avenue, and examine them and their work.
The great economy in using such a machine will at once
become apparent. Explanations given to all.

Circulars, illustrating all of SINGER'S SEWING MACHINES,
with specimens of their work, furnished to all or sent to
any address.

A good assortment of THREAD, NEEDLES, TWIST, and
other machine findings kept on hand by

I. M. SINGER & CO.,

Central Office, 458 Broadway ', New York.
WILLIAM H. GLOVER, AGENT,

Washington City, D. C.

SAMUEL P. HOOVER'S

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

BOOT, SHOE, AND TRUNK




No. 320 Fenna, Av., between 9th and 10th sts.
WASHITOTOF, B. G,



AT ALL TIMES ON HAND



OF



ALSO,



Ladies 7 and Gentlemen's Traveling Trunks,

VALISES, CARPET AND LEATHER BAGS, ALL QUALITIES, CHEAP FOR THE
CASH, AND CASH ONLY.



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HORACE WATERS, Agent,

No. 333 BROADWAY, N. Y.,




PIANOS, MELODEONS, ALEXANDRE ORGANS,

Organ Accordeons, Martin's celebrated and other Guitars, Violins, Tenor Viols, Violincellos,

Accordeons, Flutinas, Flutes, Fifes, Clarionets, Triangles, Tuning Forks, Pipes and

Hammers, Violin Bows, best Italian Strings, Brass Instruments for bands,

Piano Stools and Covers, and all kinds of Musical Instruments.

SHEET MUSIC, from all the publishers in the United States ; Bertini's, Huntin's, and
Modern School, and all kinds of Instruction Books for the above Instruments; Church
Music Books; Music elegantly bound; Music Paper, and all kinds of Music Merchandise,

AT THE LOWEST PRICES.

NEW PIANOS, at $175, $200, $225, $250, and up to $800; SECOND HAND PIANOS,
from $25 up to $160 ; NEW MELODEONS, $45, $60, $75, $100, and up to $200 ; SEC-
OND HAND MELODEONS, from $30 to $80 ; ALEXANDRE ORGANS, with five stops,
$160; nine stops, $185 and $255; thirteen stops, $250, $275, and $300; fifteen stops,
$320 and $375. A liberal discount to Clergymen, Churches, Sabbath Schools, Seminaries,
and Teachers. The Trade supplied at the usual trade discounts.

PIAJSFOS, MELOBEOSFS, AOT OR&AFS.

The HORACE WATERS PIANOS AND MELODEONS, for depth, purity of tone, and
durability, are unsurpassed. Prices reasonable. Second Hand Pianos and Melodeons from
$25 to $150.

" The Horace Waters Pianos are known as among the very best." Evangelist. " We can
speak of their merits from personal knowledge." Christian Intelligencer. "Waters' Pianos
and Melodeons challenge comparison with the finest made any where in the country." Home
Journal.

" We have two of Waters' Pianos in use in our Seminary, one of which has been severely
tested for three years, and we can testify to their good quality and durability." WOOD
& GREGORY, Mount Carroll, III.

" H. WATERS, Esq. Dear Sir : Having used one of your Piano-Fortes for two years past,
I have found it a very superior instrument. ALONZO GRAY,

Principal Brooklyn Heights Seminary.''

" The Piano I received from you continues to give satisfaction. I regard it as one of the
best instruments in the place." JAMES L. CLARK, Charlestown, Va.

" Your Piano pleases us well. It is the best one in our county." THOMAS A.
LATHAM, Campbellton, Ga.

The Horace Waters Pianos are built of the best and most thoroughly seasoned material.
We have no doubt that buyers can do as well, perhaps better, at this than at any other
house in the Union." Advocate and Journal.

11 Our friends will find at Mr. Waters' store the very best assortment of Music and of
Pianos to be found in the United States, and we urge our southern and western friends to
give him a call whenever they go to New York." Graham's Magazine.

WAREROOMS, 333 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.



SCHOOL, BELL.



77,000 issued in seven months! The unprecedented sale of this book has induced the publisher to add some
36 new tunes and hymns to its present size, without extra charge, except on the cheap edition. Among the
many beautiful tunes and hymns added maybe found: " I ought to love my mother." " Oh, I'll be a good
child, indeed I will." These, and eight others from the Bell, were sung at the Sunday-School Anniversary of
the M. E. Church, at the Academy of Music, with great applause. The Bell contains nearly 200 tunes and
hymns, and is one of the best collections ever issued. Price 12c ; $10 per hundred, postage 2 cents; bound 20
cents: $15 per 100, postage 4 cents. Elegantly bound, embossed guilt, 25 cents; $20 per 100. It has been intro-
duced into many of the Public Schools.

The BELL is published in small numbers, entitled Anniversary and Sunday School Music Books, Nos. 1,2,3, and 4,
in order to accommodate the million. Price s2 and .<3 per 100. No. 5 will soon be issued commencement of
another book. Also, Revival Music Books. Nos. 1 and 2, price'>l and 2 per 100, postage 1 cent. More than
300,000 copies of the above books have been issued the past eighteen months, and the demand is rapidly increas-
ing. Published by

HORACE WATERS, Ag't, 333 Broadway, N. Y.




PUBLIC BUILDINGS

AND

STATUES OF WASHINGTON CITY,



THIS COLLECTION CONSISTS OF
EMBRACING

EVERYTHING OF INTEREST TO A STRANGER,

With a description of the same, neatly put up in a gilt case, which can be found at any of

our Bookstores.

THIS WORK NO STRANGER SHOULD BE WITHOUT.

1600 PICTORIAL ILLUSTRATIONS ! ! !



UNABRIDGED





DICTIONARY.



ipB fitted



IjOO Pictorial Illustrations.

We have just issued a new edition of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, containing Fif-
teen Hundred Pictorial Illustrations, beautifully executed.
9,000 TO 10,000 NEW WORDS IN THE VOCABULARY, TABLE OF SYNONYMS, BY


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9

Online LibraryWilliam Jones RheesAn account of the Smithsonian Institution, its founder, building, operations, etc. prepared from the reports of Prof. Henry to the regents, and other authentic sources → online text (page 9 of 10)