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William L. (William Ladd) Chaffin.

History of the town of Easton, Massachusetts (Volume 3) online

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1872. Sarah Littlefield .

1879. Mrs. Rachel Blake

1S86. Mrs. Lavina WiUiams



1798. Mrs. Drusilla Kinsley

1802. Joseph Gilbert . . .

1805. Ebenezer Ames . .

1819. Mrs. Mary Jones . .

1836. Thomas Willis . . .

1839. Mrs. Martha Kingman
1844. Mrs. Susanna Phillips
1853- Jonas Howard .
1859. Mrs. Sally Drake .
1861. Mrs. Patience Shaw

1866. Mrs. Mary Goward
1879. Mrs. Annie Savage
1883. Alanson White . .

1794. Eleazer Keith . . .

1805. Mrs. Bethia Drake .

1852. Benjamin Buck . . .

1864. Mrs. Hannah Gilmore

1867. Mrs. Sally Godfrey .

1797. Mrs. Mehitable Perry

1805. Mrs. Susanna Perkins

1806. Mrs. Sarah Harvey
181 2. Mrs. Charity Drake
1825. Thornas Fling .

1840. John Lothrop . .
1863. Mrs. Anna Hayden
1867. Francis Williams .
187 1. Mrs. Hannah French



Age. a. d.
881.
882.



89
89
89



90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90

91
91
91
91
91

92
92
92
92
92
9.2

92
92
92



807.

824.
836.
838.

839-
844.

859.
883.



830.
865.
865.
867.
872.

874-
874.

798.

801.

835-

858.



Nathan Willis . . .
Mrs. Martha Lothrop

Mrs. Experience Allen
Abiel Drake . .
Zachariah Britton .
Mrs. Sarah Reed .
Seth Littlefield . .
Mrs. Sarah Lothrop
Mrs. Abigail Godfrey
Mrs. Hannah Drake

Mrs. Thankful Brett
Samuel Pool
John Pool . . .
Joshua Williams .
Francis Goward
Mrs. Esther Clapp
Mrs. Mary Gorman
Mrs. Sylvia Stone .



Mrs. Kezia Keith . .
Mrs. Catherine (?) Howard
Mrs. Tamar Randall .
Mrs. Sarah Ward . .



870. Mrs. Ann Donovan

775. Mrs. Sarah Drake

835. Mrs. Ruth Pool .

834. Timothy Manley .

836. David Thompson .

867. Mrs. Melatiah Buck

']']']. Mrs. Mercy Manley

828, Mrs. Mary Drake .

838. Jonathan Knowles

805. Jonathan Thayer .

877. Constantine Kerley



Age.
92
92

93
93
93
93
93
93
93
93

94
94
94
94
94
94
94
94

95
95
95
95

96

97
97



98

99

100
100
100

102
102



VOTERS IN 1749.

We give below a list of the voters of Easton for the year 1749.
It is not inclusive of all the male inhabitants, for all could not
vote at this period on account of the property qualification



STATISTICS OF POPULATION AND INDUSTRY. 673



required, which was not abolished until 1820. A fuller list, made
eight years later and including all liable to bear arms, may be
found on pages 507, 508 of this History. The writer has ven-
tured to change the spelling of a few names in copying this list,
but he has done so only in cases where he knew that errors had
been made. The names are given here in alphabetical order,
though not so written on the original document: —



Nathaniel Alger.
Thomas Alger.
Ebenezer Ames.
John Austin.
Seth Babbitt.
William Babbitt.
Josiah Churchill.
Joseph Crossman, Sr.
John Dailey.
James Dean,
Benjamin Drake.
Joseph Drake, 2d.
Richard Drake.
Robert Drake.
Thomas Drake
George Ferguson.
Benjamin Fobes.
Joseph Gilbert.
Timothy Gilbert.
James Gilmore.
David Gurney.
Jacob Hanks.
Benjamin Harvey.



Edward Hayward.
William Hayward.
Ephraim Hewitt.
Henry Howard.
Joshua Howard.
Eleazer Keith.
Josiah Keith.
Mark Keith.
George Keyzar.
Josiah Kingman.
Benjamin Kinsley.
Nathan Kinsley.
Eliphalet Leonard.
Mark Lothrop.
Abiah Manley.
Daniel Manley.
Ichabod Manley.
John Manley.
Thomas Manley.
William Manley.
Jonah Newland.
Daniel Niles.
Joseph Packard, Sr.



Nathaniel Perry.
Benjamin Pettengill.
John Phillips.
John Phillips.
James Pratt.
James Pratt.
Thomas Pratt.
Ephraim Randall.
Israel Randall.
Israel Randall.
John Randall.
Samuel Randall.
Thomas Randall.
John Selee.
Benaijah Smith.
Samuel Stone.
John Whitman.
Benjamin Williams.
Daniel Williams.
John Williams.
Silas Williams.
Timothy Williams.
Israel Woodward.



A list of the voters in the town of Easton taken by us the subscribers in
the year 1749.

Eliphalet Leonard, ) Selectmen
John Williams, V ■'^^^^^jr

Benjamin Kinsley, } Easton.^



STATISTICAL TABLE OF POLLS, HOUSES, ETC.

The following table has been compiled by the writer from
various sources ; and it will show to those who are interested
in such matters the successive changes which have taken place

1 State Archives, vol. xiii. p. 701.



674



HISTORY OF EASTON.



from time to time in regard to the ratable polls and the various
species of property named. Most of these figures are taken from
the valuations and statistics of the assessors of Easton : —



Years.


Polls.


Houses.


Bams.


Horses.


Oxen.


Cows.


Sheep.


Swine.


I771I


249


144




109


140


380


993


23


I781


254


156


112


119


178


51


1470


136


1 791


270


163


113


94


198


559




261


180I


278


178


136


137


220


577




246


181I


286


195


143


117


181


551




189


182I


292


229


170


124


197


556




294


183I


443


274


198


156


193


533


356


233


1841


414


267


179


160


100


307


156


259


1851


828


86


274


242


IIO


399


31


152


1861


835


511


276


245


106


440


26


153


1870


lOOI


632


301


290


78


395


45


178


1880


103 1


699


373


384


48


409


I


152



In 1885 the number of ratable polls in Easton was 1,151 ; of
these 851 were voters, 49 not voters, and 251 aliens. Of the
851 voters 705 were native born, and 146 were foreign-born nat-
uralized citizens, who live mainly in North Easton village.^

In the above table the numbers of polls at the different periods
prior to 1861 are not exactly the same as those reported to the
State, which are in every instance larger. They are simply the
ratable polls, and the figures are copied from the tax-lists of
the town. In the numbers reported to the State there seemed
in some cases to be mistakes, and the writer judged it safer to
adhere to the Easton tax-lists, which, as the names of the per-
sons rated are given, were likely to be correct.

It is worth while to call attention to a few particulars in this
table. One noticeable fact is that the gain from 1771 to 1791

- In the statistics for 1771, which were elaborately and carefully made out by
Timothy Randall, selectman, the notation of the fractions presented a curious puzzle
until the writer discovered the clew that solved it. Instead of being expressed ac-
cording to our method, the numerators and denominators were inverted. Thus ^
was written x, and other fractions were expressed in the same way. This method
seems to have been original with the paston selectmen; their inventiveness supplied
the lack of knowledge, and they managed to reach correct results.

2 See forthcoming Census of Massachusetts, Population and Sex, p. 104.



STATISTICS OF POPULATION AND INDUSTRY. 675



was very slight. The polls number only twenty-one more at
the later date, and the difference is small in the other items.
This was of course owing to the unsettled condition of things,
especially of the currency, consequent upon the long war whh
Great Britain. It was a period of great financial distress in
Easton. Failures were numerous, lawsuits were almost an epi-
demic, and indeed few people seemed to thrive except the
lawyers. There was however a gradual improvement up to
1831. But the decade following— from 1831 to 1841 —showed
no progress, and there was an actual loss in nearly all the items
noted : it included the great financial distress of 1837. For the
next ten years the gain was a rapid one, and there was consid-
erable increase until 1870, since which time there has not been
much growth of business or population here.

One notices with interest the dechne of sheep culture in
Easton. In 1781 the number of sheep in town was, 1,470; in
1880 the assessors reported 07ie sheep! This solitary creature
was a child's pet. In earlier days sheep were needed to provide
the material for the homespun clothing then almost universally
worn. But when this necessity no longer existed, it was found
that sheep-raising did not pay.

It is interesting also to note the substitution of horses for
oxen for draught purposes. The number of oxen in town in
1 78 1 was one hundred and seventy-eight; but a century later, in
1880, the number was but fortv-eight.



VALUATIONS.



The valuations of the town, so far as ascertainable, at different
periods are represented by the following figures : —



n 1767 ;^4i79o

^n^ ^11,773'

I79I ;^2,2I3

I80I 19,852

I8II $11,717

I82I $13,963



In 1831 $340,036

„ 1841 $421,385

„ 1851 $1,064,221

„ 1861 $1,162,538

„ 1870 $2,274,278

„ 1880 $3,192,957



The next figures are taken from the report of the selectmen
and assessors of Easton for 1885.

1 The currency, when this amount was reported, had much depreciated.



676 HISTORY OF EASTON.



Valuatioti as Assessed m May 1, 1885.

Value of real estate $1,210,918

,, of personal property 2,196,523

Total $3,407,441

Increase of real estate for one year $95>85

,, of personal estate for one year 95754

Total increase $19)339

Rate of taxation, $5.50 on $1,000.
Number of polls, 1,039.
Poll tax, $2.

Total tax for State, County, and Town purposes $20,821.77

Number of dwelling-houses taxed 754

,, acres of land taxed ^i 5)833

,, horses taxed 455

„ cows taxed 421



STATISTICS OF INDUSTRY.

The statistics which follow have been taken from the reports
made by assessors to the State for the several periods named.
They may be of interest to only a few persons, but it is desirable
that they be recorded here for purposes of reference. There
are a few obvious errors in them, but the writer has no means of
rectifying them, and has copied verbatim from the State reports.
Considerable experience with such statistics destroys one's con-
fidence in their absolute accuracy. Some manufacturers, for
instance, now refuse to give the statistics of their products and
industries, being very naturally unwilling to make public the
details of their business affairs. There are at least two note-
worthy omissions in the following records. Many of the figures
also are mere guesses, made sometimes with a bias towards the
largest possible showing of results.

Statistics of Industry for the year e tiding April i, 1837.
Cotton mills, 4; cotton spindles, 1,824; cotton consumed, 77,000 pounds;
cotton goods manufactured, 180,000 yards, — value of same, $32,400 ; males
employed, 11; females employed, 45 ; capital, $31,000. Sperm oil consumed
in the manufacture of woollen goods, 1000 gallons (no other particulars stated
in regard to woollen manufacture). Common sheep, 350; average weight of
fleece, 2 pounds; value of wool, $300.



STATISTICS OF POPULATION AND INDUSTRY. 677



Hands employed in the manufacture of boots and shoes, 141 males and 40
females ; " 56,200 pairs of boots, and 26,400 pairs of shoes bottomed."

Furnace for manufacture of pig-iron, i (no particulars stated). Air and
cupola furnaces, 4; iron-castings made, 250 tons, — value of same, $20,000 ;
hands employed, 20 ; capital, $10,000. Manufactory of cutlery, i, — value of
cutlery manufactured, $5,000 ; hands employed, 8 ; capital, $1000.

Manufactories of shovels, spades, forks, and hoes, 2, — value of same,
$108,000; hands employed, 84; capital, $51,000. Straw bonnets manufac-
tured, 15,000, — value of same, $14,000. Wire manufactory, i, — value of wire,
$20,000; capital, $10,000; hands employed, 6. Manufactory of surveyors'
instruments, i, — value of instruments, $4,500; capital, $3,000; hands em-
ployed, 6. Manufactory of pegs, i, — value of pegs, $3,200; capital, $1,100 ;
hands employed, 14.^

Statistics for 1845.

Cotton mills, 5 ; spindles, 2,256 ; cotton consumed, 112,023 pounds ; print-
ing cloth manufactured, 110,000 yards, — value, $6,500 ; cotton yarn manu-
factured and not made into cloth, 45,061 pounds, — value, $10,979; cotton
thread, 19,000 pounds, — value, $11,750; cotton batting, 2,575 pounds, —
value, $154; cord, 9.000 pounds, — value, $2,520; twine and wicking, 6,525
pounds, — value, $976; capital, $24,000; males employed, 22; females em-
ployed, 37.

Furnaces for the manufacture of hollow-ware and castings other than pig-
iron, 2; hollow-ware and castings made, 350 tons, — value, $36,250; capital,
$35,000 ; employees, 35. Establishments for the manufacture of cutlery, i, —
value of cutlery manufactured, $11,000 ; capital, $5,000; employees, 20. Tack
and Brad m.anufactories, i, — value of tacks and brads manufactured, $6,000 ;
capital, $4,500; employees, 8.

Shovel, spade, fork, and hoe manufactories,!, — value of articles manufac-
tured, $136,000 ; capital, $40,500 ; employees, 72. Saddle, harness, and trunk
manufactories, r, — value of articles manufactured, $400; capital, $100;
employees, 2. Establishments for manufacture of railroad cars and other
vehicles, 3, — value of vehicles manufactured, $2,000; capital, $700 ; em-
ployees, 5.

Boots manufactured, 36,637 pairs ; shoes, 42,8 10 pairs, — value of boots and
shoes, $87,718 ; males employed, 91 ; females employed, 50. Straw bonnets
and hats manufactured, 4,611, — value, $1,150; value of straw braid manu-
factured and not made into bonnets and hats, $500; females employed, 100.

Value of mathematical instruments manufactured, $4,250 ; employees, 6.
Lumber prepared, 200,000 feet, — value, $2,000; employees, 10. Firewood
prepared, 1,91 7 cords, — value, $5,751 ; employees, 6. Box factories, i ; boxes
manufactured, 3,000, —value, $875 ; capital, $200; employee, i.

Sperm-oil consumed in manufacturing, 668 gallons, — value, $668 ; whale-
oil, 32 gallons, — value, $30; anthracite coal consumed in manufacturing,
500 tons, — value, $3,350; foreign bituminous coal, 350 chaldrons, — value,
1 Industry of Massachusetts, 1837, by John P. Biglow, pp. 134, I3S-



678 HISTORY OF EASTON.

$2,925 ; value of all other articles of American production consumed in manu-
facturing, excepting cotton, wool, and iron, $16,150; value of all other arti-
cles of foreign production consumed, excepting as above, $14,000.

Sheep, 189, — value, $189; w^ool produced, 524 pounds, — value, $157.
Asses and mules, i, — value, $50; horses, 193, — value, $9,650 ; neat cattle,
734, — value, $12,000 ; swine, 234, — value, $2,500. Indian corn or maize
raised, 4.974 bushels, — value, $3,730 ; rye, 378 bushels, — value, $284 ; bar-
ley, 159 bushels, — value, $118 ; oats, 790 bushels, — value, $276 ; potatoes,
29,896 bushels, — value, $5,979 ; other esculent vegetables, 6,400 bushels, —
value, $1,600 ; hay, 1,423 tons, — value, $14,769. Fruit raised, 10,155 bushels,
— value, $2,031. Butter, 16,073 pounds, — value, $1,928; cheese, 8,307
pounds, — value, $498; honey, 100 pounds, — value, $12; beeswax, 18
pounds, — value, $4.^

Statistics for 1855.

Cotton mills, 6 ; spindles, 2,390 ; cotton consumed, 132,800 pounds ; yarn
manufactured, 82,000 pounds, — value of yarn, $16,500 ; thread manufactured,
36,700 pounds, — value of thread, $27,600; batting manufactured, 4,050
pounds, — value of batting, $524; capital, $43,500; males employed, 21;
females employed, 48. Furnaces for manufacture of hollow-ware and cast-
ings other than pig-iron, 2 ; hollow-ware and other castings manufactured,
554 tons, — value of hollow-ware and castings, $44,500; capital, $11,000;
employees, 50. Establishments for the manufacture of cotton, woollen, and
other machinery, i, — value of machinery manufactured, $2,000; capital,
$2,500 ; employees, 4.

Manufactories of shovels, spades, forks, and hoes, i, — value of shovels,
etc., $600,000 ; capital, $200,000 ; employees, 330. Daguerreotype artists, i ;
daguerreotypes taken, 500 ; capital. $600 ; employee,!. Establishments for
manufacture of railroad cars, coaches, chaises, wagons, sleighs, and other
vehicles, 4, — value of the same manufactured, $46,000 ; capital, $4,675 ;
employees, 23.

Boots of all kinds manufactured, 38,000 pairs ; shoes of all kinds manu-
factured, 87,000 pairs, — value of boots and shoes, $153,200 ; males employed,
215 ; females employed, 92. Charcoal made, 9,190 bushels, — value of same,
$1,003; employees, 15.

Lumber prepared for market, 202,500 feet, — value of lumber, $2,680 ; em-
ployees, 28. Firewood prepared for market, 2,577 cords, — value of firewood,
$9,807 ; employees, 115.

All kinds of sheep, 51, — value of all sheep, $125 ; all wool produced,
135 pounds. Horses, 230, — value of horses, $20,252 ; oxen over three years
old, 157; steers under three years old, 33, — value of oxen and steers,
$9,176 ; swine raised, 352, — value, $3,137 ; milch cows, 451 ; heifers, 59, —
value of cows and heifers, $14,965. Butter, 18,440 pounds, — value of but-
ter, $4,610; cheese, 6,980 pounds, — value of cheese, $837; honey, 160
pounds, — value of honey, $32.

1 Industry of Massachusetts, 1845, ^y John G. Palfrey, pp. 272, 273.



STATISTICS OF POPULATION AND INDUSTRY. 679



Indian corn, 252 acres ; Indian corn per acre, 26 bushels, —value, $6,552.
Wheat, li acres ; wheat per acre, 10 bushels, —value, $30. Rye, 44 acres ;
rye per acre, 9 bushels, — value, $590. Barley, 22^^ acres ; barley per acre, 12
bushels, — value, $270. Oats, 29 acres ; oats per acre, i6i bushels, —value,
I310. Potatoes, 187^ acres ; potatoes per acre, 84 bushels, — value, $11,780.
Onions, i acre ; onions per acre, 560 bushels, — value, $336. Turnips culti-
vated as a field crop, 5 acres ; turnips per acre, 350 bushels, —value, $440.
Carrots, ^ acre ; carrots per acre, 200 bushels,— value, $12. Beets and other
esculent vegetables, i acre, — value, $100; all other grain or root crops, i
acre, — value, $120. Millet, 3 acres, — value, $40. English mowing, 1,581
acres ; English hay, 1,144 tons, —value, $22,880. Wet meadow or swale hay,
639 tons, — value, $6,390.

Apple-trees cultivated for their fruit, 1 1,044, — value, $3,488. Pear-trees
cultivated for their fruit, 619, — value, $85. Fruit of various kinds raised dur-
ing the year, 1,750 bushels. Cranberries, 78 acres, — value, $[,109. Bees-
wax, 17 pounds, — value, $6.

Gross value of all other articles manufactured in the town during the year,
$24,152; capital, $9,600; employees, 51. Said articles are reported to be
" wooden hoops, philosophical instruments, mathematical instruments, shoe-
makers' awls, cord, twine, and wicking, castors, piano-forte tools, spools, deck
scrapers and washers." '

Statistics for 1865.

Cotton mills, 3; spindles, 2,270 ; cotton consumed, 39,240 pounds, — gross
value of stock used, $32,800. Thread manufactured, 32,200 pounds, — value,
$55,400; capital, $15,000; males employed, 9 ; females employed, 22. Es-
tablishments for the manufacture of shoddy, i, — value of stock used, $200 ;
shoddy manufactured, 1,800 pounds, — value, $594; capital, $2,000 ; employee*
I. Furnaces for the manufacture of hollow-ware and castings other than
pig-iron, 3, — value of stock used, $35,956 ; hollow-ware and other castings
manufactured, 279 tons, — value of same, $58,426 ; capital, $6,000 ; employees,
38. Establishments for the manufacture of butts or hinges, i, — value of stock,
$40,000 ; butts or hinges manufactured, 30,000 dozen, — value, $60,000 ; capi-
ta , $20,000 ; employees, 35.

Establishments for the manufacture of shovels, spades, forks, and hoes, i,
— value of stock used, $575,000 ; shovels, spades, forks, and hoes manufac-
tured, 65,500 dozen, — value, $982,500 ; capital, $280,000; employees, 250.
Establishments for the manufacture of detached parts of piano-fortes, i, —
value of instruments manufactured, $3,000; value of stock used, $1,200;
capital, $5,000; employees, 5. Daguerrian and photographic establishments,
I, — value of stock used, $80; daguerreotypes and photographs taken, 1,000,

value, $166 ; capital, $200 ; male employed, i.

Railroad cars, coaches, chaises, wagons, sleighs, and other vehicles, i ;
wagons manufactured, 10, —value, $600 ; value of stock used, $200 ; capital,

1 Industry of Massachusetts, 1855, pp. 75- 7^, 77-



68o HISTORY OF EASTON.

$400 ; employee, i. Blacksmith shops, 3, — value of stock used, $300; value
of work done, $1,220 ; capital, $700 ; employees, 3. Flouring mills, 4 ; corn
ground, 6,400 bushels, — value, $8,000; capital, $3,000 ; employees, 2.

Boots of all kinds manufactured, 19,332 pairs ; shoes of all kinds manufac-
tured, 44,500 pairs, — gross value of stock used in the manufacture of boots
and shoes, $95,000, — value of boots and shoes manufactured, $146,000 ; capi-
tal, $23,900; males employed, 65 ; females employed, 7. Straw-braid manu-
factured and not made into bonnets or hats, — value, $4,000.

Establishments for the manufacture of philosophical, nautical, astronomi-
cal, and mathematical instruments, 2 ; instruments manufactured : 3 theodo"
lites, 6 engineers' transits, 15 surveyors' compasses, 12 portable compasses,
12 gas protracters, 30 engineers' levelling rods, 6 ektroponuters, 100 land
chains, 125 levels, 9 pendulum gun-sights, 15 gun calipers, 100 chain-
pins, 9,000 thermometers, — value, $5,500; value of stock used, $1,300;
employees, 7.

Establishments for the manufacture of boxes, i, — value of stock used,
$300 ; value of wooden boxes manufactured, $500 ; capital, $700 ; males
employed, 2. Establishments for the preservation of ice for market, i ; ice
preserved, 600 tons, — value, $250 ; capital, $1,000; employee, i. Saw-mills,
2; lumber prepared for market, 33,000 feet, — value, $480; capital, Sr,ooo;
employees, 2. Firewood and bark prepared for market, 1,216 cords, — value,
$3,650; capital, $1,520; employees, 2 (?). Charcoal manufactured, 3,000
bushels, — value, $405 ; capital, $300; employee, i.

Farms, 91 ; acres, 4,108, — value, including buildings, $194,508 ; land im-
proved, 3,893 acres ; employees, 91. Unimproved land, 1,484 acres. Unim-
provable land, 106 acres. Woodland, 6,113 acres, — value, $121,379.

Indian corn, 190 acres; Indian corn, 4,842 bushels, — value $7,463.
Wheat, 2i acres ; wheat, 22 bushels, — value, $44. Rye, 28 acres ; rye, 286
bushels, — value, $429. Barley, 25 acres ; barley, 10 bushels, — value, $400.
Buckwheat, J acre ; buckwheat, 10 bushels, — value, $10. Oats, 24 acres ;
oats, 315 bushels, — value, $250. Potatoes, 161 acres; 12,986 bushels, —
value, $9,090. Turnips cultivated as a field-crop, 7 acres ; 1,615 bushels, —
value, $505. Onions, ^ acre; 75 bushels, — value, $75. Carrots, ^ acre;
104 bushels, — value, $25. Cabbages, 2 acres, — value, $720. Beets, and
other esculent vegetables, i acre; 500 bushels, — value, $250. Hops, |
acre; 1,350 pounds, — value, $550. Tobacco, | acre ; 800 pounds, — value,
$200. Cranberries, ^ acre ; 10 bushels, — value, $20.

English mowing, 1,436 acres; English hay, 958 tons, — value, $19,160.
Wet-meadow or swale hay, 1,436 acres ; wet-meadow hay, 423 tons, — value,

$3,807-

Apple-trees cultivated for their fruit, 8,300, — approximate value, $2,866.
Pear-trees cultivated for their fruit, 910, — value, $131. All other trees culti-
vated for their fruit, 96, — value, $45. Value of nuts and berries cultivated
for market, $50.

Merino sheep of different grades, 2; all other grades, 22, — gross value of
all sheep, $176; merino wool, 6 pounds, — value, $6 ; all other wool, 6;^



STATISTICS OF POPULATION AND INDUSTRY. 68 1



pounds, — value, $57. Horses, 225, — value, $15,985. Oxen over four years
old, 84; steers under four years, 20, — value of oxen and steers, $7,550.
Milch cows, 381 ; heifers, 108, — value of cows and heifers, $19,490; value of
neat stock not embraced above (10 goats and 9 bulls), $400, Milk sold,
13,498 gallons, — value, $2,700. Butter sold, 4,500 pounds, —value, $1,800.
Cheese sold, 220 pounds, — value, $44.

Beef dressed, 76,104 pounds, — value, $14,088. Pork dressed, 83,650, —
value, $8,365. Mutton dressed, 600 pounds, — value, $90. Veal dressed,
10,500 pounds, — value, $1,050. Swine, 207, — value, $3,100. Value of
poultry sold, $1,693 ; value of eggs sold, $850. Honey, 75 pounds, — value,
$20. Value of unenumerated articles of farm produce, $325.^

The following estimates have been condensed from the Massa-
chusetts Census Report of 1875, made under the charge of Col.
Carroll D. Wright. One looks in vain among them for any ac-
count of two very important Easton products ; namely, hinges
and cotton thread. Such noticeable omissions vitiate the value
of such reports. The writer has for the sake of saving space



Online LibraryWilliam L. (William Ladd) ChaffinHistory of the town of Easton, Massachusetts (Volume 3) → online text (page 62 of 78)