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University of California Berkeley



A Gift of the Hearst Corporation




PAUL REVERE



Of this book there have been printed one

hundred and thirty-five copies on Van

Gelder paper and thirty-jive copies

on extra quality Imperial "Japan

paper made by the Imperial

Government Mill

The right is reserved to print a few extra
copies of the illustrations in this
) none of which, how-
ever, will be offered
for sale



cTlir Bami0crtpt of tins Book toa0
complete!) in August, nineteen
tjunUrea and one,
printing toad fi'msljeD



teen IjunoreD
ano one,



PAUL REVERE AND HIS
ENGRAVING




The BLOODY MASSACRE ptn.eunt*in ^^f;^ 8 ,^"

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N' fee thy Sow deplore,

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Orif a-wtepingWarii can ouglit appcafc



Thr Patriots cqpicnts'ieRrs for eadiai'e filed.
ABlonotulHbuwwhichemlailmjthfDcttd.



ShodJ-youlC 1 die JcmUl of thfland



CceuErecratjousoti this Plate mtnb'd ,
Shall reub JuDOE nbo nerer






PAUL REVERE



WILLIAM CORING ANDREWS




PAUL REVERE



UY

WILLIAM CORING ANDREWS

... .^M



NEW YORK

CHARLES SCRIBXER'S soxs




COPYRIGHT, 1901
BY WILLIAM LORING ANDREWS





tltir BB.LL W CANNON Fo0HDr,<rt tit
North Part o/ BOSTON,



PREFACE

O winnow the wheat from the
chaff and establish the absolute
truth, in all its details, of any
historical statement is well nigh an im-
possible task. It is hardly too much to
say that no event in history has ever been
reported quite correctly, even at the time
of its occurrence, and as years and cen-
turies pass by, errors accumulate around
and cling to the story as do barnacles to
the bottom of a ship.

No sooner had I yielded upon what I
considered good authority to the belief
that the State Treasurer's note herein re-



PAUL REVERE

produced was engraved by Revere, than I
was confronted with one almost exactly
the same in appearance signed by jf.
M. Furnass, who is said to have been a
nephew of Nathaniel Hurd. The only
variation in it from the one not signed, and
ascribed to Revere, is a slight difference in
the ornamental work in the left-hand
border. I am now, however, in possession
of other of these notes, in which, while the
printed matter remains the same, the en-
graved borders and head-lines differ wide-
ly; furthermore, I have been shown an
impression of the unsigned note in which
the engraving was almost entirely worn
away. I have consequently come to the
conclusion that the borders and head-band
of the plate were necessarily re-engraved
a number of times, as the copper would
show signs of wear more quickly than
the type metal. If Furnass engraved the
unsigned and presumably the original
plate, why should he not have signed it as
he did the others ? Therefore, albeit posi-



AND HIS ENGRAVING

tive proof is lacking that Revere engraved
the unsigned note, the circumstantial evi-
dence in the case is in his favor, and I
am disposed to accord him the benefit of
the doubt.

By one of those freaks of fortune of
which the collector is occasionally the
sport, the following amusing letter, relat-
ive to the subject of which these pages
treat, fluttered into my hands immediate-
ly after the book had gone to press, as did
also the copy of the Columbian Centmel
containing PAUL REVERE & SON'S Bell
and Cannon Foundry advertisement, with
a reduced reproduction of which this
preface concludes. w. L. A.



Cambridge 2jd July 1832.
Dear Sir:

I write this to enquire whether you, or Mr. * * *
or both, have put upon paper the particulars as far
as you know, or can know of Paul Revere ; and if so, to
send them to me by way of foundation stones, joice, boards,
shingles and paint for the snug structure contemplated.
I wish to have distinctly written the original name of P.
R. as his father wrote it ; for many of the old Hugonots,



PAUL REVERE

or their silly descendants, varied the spelling so as in some
cases to render it doubtful whether they were of the same
stock ; in Newport, Bodoine was altered to Bow down,
and Ami'e to Almy as Jack Anvil, a journeyman black-
smith, when he became rich, was John Anville, Esq\
So Snelling may have been originally Smelling. / wish
to have particulars of P. Revere as an ingenious and la-
borious mechanic or artizan. I know all that is needful
to be known of him as an active partizan in " the good
old cause" I want facts of his industry ingenuity. Was
he, or was he not a Masonic officer of rank ?as Grand
master? But this is of less importance than his experi-
ments and labors in cannon founding and above all in
Bell founding. Have you any treatises on either of these
arts ? I want these things sent to me, or rather brought
to me by one or both of you. In a word bring your
straw, and you shall have brick, and don't put it off be-
yond Thursday.

Yours with impatience,




Paul Revere & Sort,

/f lt> tlLf. W CrfAWOAT Fowt.r. Ik
MM f. H .1 BOSTON.

f~> ASt $LLS. ol all fixes i eery kind

V" of Brif. (JRDJMNCP, and t?*rj kiodol
C.erf I?.,!./* JHIP5, &c.< ihftaif -<* i
M4i.uf.-aur. COPPER into S.t.Tl. tAttt.



**p, by the**, ewry HW'of

ibct of Church '*<] Ship Bcllv.of dif-

iS?K*

En' K l.fii



V ;, .
- Ik




LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PACE

i The BOSTON MASSACRE, per-
petrated on March the 5th,

1 770 Facing title

Printed in colors.

Photogravure, after the original engraving
by Paul Revere. Size of the original en-
graving, including the inscription, 9|x8|
inches.

ii TITLE-PAGE

Designed and engraved on copper by E.
Davis French in the style classed by book-
plate collectors as JACOBEAN.

in Portrait of PAUL REVERE
After the painting by Gilbert
Stuart

Copied by permission, after the copper-
plate by S. A. Schoff, published in the
Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic As-
sociation Proceedings of 1854.

ix



vn



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE

iv Silver Teapot, manufactured by

Revere 1 1

One half the size of the original.

v BURIED WITH HIM BY BAP-
TISM 15

Engraved by Revere.
Size of the original 6x4 T 3 inches, in-
cluding title.

vi Massachusetts State Treasurer's

Note 18

Border and headline said to have been

engraved by Revere.

Size of the original 10^x4^ inches.

vii Continental Paper Money . .21

Printed by Hall and Sellers.
Same size as the original.

viii The Able Doctor; or, America

Swallowing the Bitter Draught 3 3

Engraved by Revere for the Royal Amer-
ican Magazine.
Size of the original 5^x4 inches.

ix A VIEW OF THE TOWN OF BOS-
TON WITH SEVERAL SHIPS OF

WAR IN THE HARBOUR . . 43

Engraved by Revere for the Royal Amer-
ican Magazine, 1774.
Size of the original io|x6| inches.



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PACE

x Title-Page to " The New Eng-
land Psalm Singer or Ameri-
can Chorister" . . . .61

Engraved by Revere.

Size of the original 6^x5 1 inches.

xi "The Mitred Minuet . . . . 72

Engraved for the Royal American Maga-
zine by Revere.
Size of the original 6|\3-| inches.

xii A Conference held between some
Indian Chiefs and Colonel
Bouquet, in the Year 1764. . 75

Engraved by Revere for the Royal Amer-
ican Magazine.
Slightly reduced from the original.

xiii Book-Plate of DAVID GREENE 79

Engraved by Revere.
Same size as the original.

XIV (^ ^iew of Q)a6tle 'William by

aoo6ton in < TOew Snglanct . 93
From an old copper-plate engraving.
Size of the original I2.lxi2 inches.

xv Copy of the Pen and Ink Plan,
Made by Paul Revere, of the
Scene of the Massacre of
March 5th, 1770 .... 99

Engraved on copper by Sidney L. Smith.
Size of the original 12^x8 inches.



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE

xvi Title-Page of Dr. Benjamin
Church's Oration on the
BOSTON MASSACRE . . .105

Boston, 1773.

xvii The BOSTON MASSACRE . .109

Frontispiece to the Boston Edition (1770)
of the " Short Narrative"
Size of the original 5^ x^ inches, exclus-
ive of the lettering.

xviii An Indian Gazette . . . .144

From the illustration in the Royal Amer-
ican Magazine.
Size of the original 7^x6|. inches.

THE HEAD-BANDS, TAIL-PIECES
AND INITIAL LETTERS

The head-bands and tail-pieces were
designed by Sidney L. Smith and engraved
by him on copper. The initial letters to
the chapters in what is known as Old
Colonial engrossing hand were also drawn
by Mr. Smith.

i LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS : Head-
band ix

Seal of the Massachusetts Charitable
Mechanic Association, of which Re-
vere was one of the founders and first
President.



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE

ii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS: Tail-
piece xiv

Boston Tea Party, in which Revere is
said to have taken part.

in CHAPTER i : Head-band. . 5

Paul Revere's Coat-of-arms.

iv CHAPTER i : Tail-piece. . 29

The Midnight Ride.

v CHAPTER n : Head-band. . 30
The Silversmith.

vi CHAPTER n : Tail-piece. . 51
The part of Revere's Harvard Col-
lege plate that now exists.

vii CHAPTER in : Head-band. . 52

The Engraver.

vin CHAPTER in : Tail-piece. . 66

Revere's house at North End, Boston,
as it now appears.

ix CHAPTER iv : Head-band. . 67

The Public Spirit.

x CHAPTER iv : Tail-piece. . 90

The Liberty Tree.

xi CHAPTER v: Head-band. . 91

War.

xii CHAPTER v: Tail-piece. .102
The Mulatto Crispus Attucks.

xiii



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

xiii CHAPTER vi : Head-band.
The Man of Affairs.

xiv CHAPTER vi : Tail-piece.
Finis.

xv APPENDIX : Ornamental.



PAGE
103

I2 4



" With the exception of the head-band to Chapter I,
which is a free copy of Revere's work on book-plates,
an attempt has been made in the head- and tail-pieces
to recall the side of contemporary French work that
Revere took as a model for his ornamental engrav-
ing, either direct or through English imitations."

Sidney L. Smith.




PAUL REVERE AND HIS
ENGRAVING




PAUL REVERE




CHAPTER I

VERYONE familiar with the
Annals of our Revolutionary War
will concede that one of the most
interesting and romantic characters of
those dark days in our history that " tried
men's souls" is that of the patriot, soldier,
silversmith, copper-plate engraver, mer-
chant, brass founder* and sheet-copper-
roller, dentist, picture frame designer and
manufacturer, die sinker, Grand Master
Mason and confidential agent of the State

* After the peace Revere erected an air furnace in which he
cast cannon and church bells, and a number of the latter are
still pealing forth their melodious notes upon the New England

5



PAUL REVERE

of Massachusetts Bay, the "Mercury of the
Revolution" Colonel Paul Revere. He
was decidedly a man of action, who in
his time played many parts and in all his
manifold undertakings achieved success.
In the words of one of his biographers,
" He prospered, accumulated by a long life
of industry and economy a competency
in the way of property, and educated a
large family of children who venerated
the memory of such a father."

The following fac-simile of an advertise-
ment in the Boston AMERICAN HERALD
of Monday, February 6, 1786, shows the
diversified character of the mercantile busi-



Sabbath air. The business card of PAUL REVERE & SONS as
casters of bells and brass cannon will be found reproduced in E.
H. Goss's "Life of Revere," Vol. II, page 557.

One of Revere' s church bells was recently offered for sale by
the First Methodist Episcopal Church in Boston and quickly
found a purchaser. It had, so the advertisement states, a his-
tory, for it used to summon the people of the Old North End
to worship when it was the "court part " of the town. It was
in the tower of the old First Church and bears this inscription :
" The First Church, Cast in Boston in I?g2 by Paul Revere."
The price asked was #500.



AND HIS ENGRAVING

ness which Revere conducted, after the
War of Independence, which had enlisted
his energies and occupied his time for seven

PAUL REVERE,

WOULD refpeflfully inform his Cufto-
mers and the Publick,

that be has REMOVED

from the South Part of the Town, oppofne
Liberty-Pole, to Dock -Square, in the Store
adjoining Mr. JOSEPH BUSH, near the
Market.

Where lye has for Sale>

A general Aflbrtment of
Hard-Ware GOODS

Confiding of

Pewter* Brafs, Copper,

Ironmongery, Plated, Jappaned, and Cutlery
WAKES ;. Files, Tools, &c. for Gold fmkhs,
Jewellers, Clock and Watch -Makers, Chapes
andTongnes, blue Melting- P6ta from No. i
to ao, Crucibles, very neat Scale Beams 3*
Inches long with hox Ends; Willard's Patent
Jacks, LookmK-Ct(aflca &c. &c.

t& The GOLDSMITH'S BUSINESS, fo

there, carried on in all its Branches ] all Kinds
of Plate made in the neweft Tafte, and finiih-
ed in the neateft Manjrer.

Conftant Attendance given, and the fmaileft
Favours gracefully acknowledged.

long weary years, was over, and peace had
settled once more upon the land he served
with such ability, remarkable versatility,
and unselfish devotion.



PAUL REVERE

In the BOSTON INDEPENDENT CHRON-
ICLE and UNIVERSAL ADVERTISER * of
Thursday, January i, 1784, we find two
more of Paul Revere's business advertise-
ments. In one he announces that he has
imported in the ROSAMOND, Captain Love,
and HOPE, Captain Peirfon [in addition to
his former stock] "A very elegant aflbrt-
ment of PLATED WARE," consisting of
"Tea-Pots, plain and chafed" and sundry
other articles of domestic use. The list
closes with a " Tea-Caddy with Lacks [?]
and Candlefticks, Also an Aflbrtment of
London Pewter."

In his second card Revere offers for sale
at a very low advance over the cost of im-
portation, a great variety of such goods as
usually form the stock in trade of a general



* The rough cut which adorns the top of this four-page 12x18-
inch newspaper is thought to have been engraved by Revere. It
represents a soldier with a drawn sword held upright in his dex-
ter hand. In the left a scroll inscribed with the word Indepen-
dence. Above the figure on a ribbon is the motto, "Appeal to
Heaven," all within an ornamental border.



AND HIS ENGRAVING

store in a country town, and this advertise-
ment likewise concludes with a notice
that " ne Gold- and Silver- Smith's Bufinefs
is carried on in all its Branches." Revere
evidently believed in the efficacy of a free
and full advertisement of his wares and
various occupations.

It will be observed that Revere here
announces an importation of plated ware.
If, as has been suggested, he was also an
importer of silverware, a notice to that
effect should also appear. Some other
newspaper of the day which I have not
had the good fortune to see, may however,
contain such notification, so that its ab-
sence from the journals I have quoted, can-
not be taken as conclusive evidence upon
this point. At all events, we may rest as-
sured that such imported silverware, if
such there were, never received the silver-
smith's stamp of Paul Revere.

We learn from Allen's American Bio-



PAUL REVERE AND HIS ENGRAVING

graphical Dictionary that Revere or Ri-
voire as the name was written by his an-
cestors in France, and also for some time
after they had emigrated to this country,
was of Huguenot descent, and was born
in Boston, where he died in May, 1 8 1 8,
at the age of 83. He was his father's
eldest son and was brought up to the
paternal trade of gold- and silver-smith.
It is said that he engraved not only the
graceful designs we find upon the silver
plate which bears the coveted mark of
P. REVERE or simply REVERE as it oc-
casionally appears but also the wreaths,
garlands and medallions which ornament
many of the cups, spoons, tankards, sal-
vers, tureens, teapots and porringers manu-
factured by other Boston silversmiths of
the period. Thus, by a natural process of
evolution, he acquired, as many a self-taught
engraver before and since his time has done,
a knowledge rudimentary, it is true of
the art of chalcography.



PAUL REVERE AND HIS ENGRAVING

One of Revere's first engravings is re-
puted to have been a portrait of his friend
and spiritual guide, ^ke d&ev'd Jonathan
Sffiaykew, 3). > gattot of the ^eAt
@kutck in S&oAton. This portrait, it is as-
serted, was prefixed to one of the doctor's
numerous printed sermons ; but I have
been unable to verify this statement by
ocular proof. The New York Historical
Society possesses a number of Dr. May-
hew's sermons in the original editions,
but none of them contains this alleged
portrait, and Mr. Sidney L. Smith of Bos-
ton, one of the last and best of our steel- and
copper-plate engravers, whom I regard as
an authority upon Paul Revere and his en-
graving, writes me that he can discover
no trace of its whereabouts : so that I have
grown sceptical in regard to its existence
and a little weary in the chase for this elu-
sive will-o'-the-wisp of an effigy of the
eminent New England divine.

It is in the year 1765 that, aside from



PAUL REVERE AND HIS ENGRAVING

this portrait of Dr. Mayhew, we first hear
of Revere as an engraver. In this year
he engraved the music score in a " Collec-
tion of Psalm Tunes" published by him
and Josiah Flagg in Fish Street, at the
North End of Boston. Then followed a
succession of engravings which embraced
a wide variety of subjects "Harmonies
for Singing Schools" embellished with
quaint frontispieces, Caricatures, Allegori-
cal pieces,* Masonic, and other Certifi-
cates, Bill-heads, Seals, Book and Maga-
zine illustrations, and Continental paper
money. "When, in the struggle for in-
dependence, the province of Massachu-
setts resorted to a paper currency and ac-
cepted bankruptcy as a part of the price
to be paid for civil liberty," j- Revere not



* " Buried with Him by Baptism." The copy of this rare
allegorical engraving which is here reproduced, was sold in Dr.
Charles E. Clark's sale, Boston, January, 1901, for $31.00,
and is now in the possession of Mr. Edwin B. Holden, of New
York.

j- Bryant's Popular History of the United States.
14




BURIED WITH HIM BYBAPTISM



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PAUL REVERE AND HIS ENGRAVING

only engraved the plates, but made the
press and printed the promissory notes of
the State of Massachusetts Bay, as well as
some of the earliest of the Bills of Credit
authorized by the Continental Congress,
and they are far more creditable examples
of the arts of engraving and typography
than are the 3^ x 2^ inch Continental
notes "it was death to counterfeit" which
David Hall (Dr. Franklin's old business
associate) and William Sellers, his partner,
supplied to the Assembly of Pennsylvania
as well as Revere's native State at a later
period. By the year 1780 Hall and Sellers
appear to have become the Congressional
printers, and were manufacturing a large
proportion of the paper money of the sev-
eral United Colonies. The border and
headline of the Massachusetts State Treas-
urer s Note, here reproduced, is, however,
said to have been engraved by Revere. It
is made payable to, and endorsed on the
back by him. The body of the note is evi-

19



PAUL REVERE AND HIS ENGRAVING



dently in letter-press. It is 10% x
inches in size, and is printed on fairly
well-made paper. For the sake of com-
parison we have also reproduced both the
face and the reverse side of one of the
Continental notes turned out by the cele-
brated Philadelphia typographers.

Revere's military experience began when
"the continent was still young in the
study and practice of arms," in the war
of 1756, between England and France,
during which he held a lieutenantcy in
a Company of Artillery, in the expedition
against Crown Point, and was stationed
through the summer of that year at Fort
William Henry, on Lake George. He
returned to Boston, and was married in
1757,* and no other of war's alarms ap-
pears to have disturbed the even tenor of his
life until the conflict between Great Britain



* His first wife, Sarah Orne, died May 3, 1773, and in
October of the same year he married a Miss Rachel Walker,
of Boston. E. H. Goss's " Life of Revere," Vol. I, pages
109 to in.



Bute of Mafacfyfetts-Bay.



No. . r/FEA^T DOLLARS^

npH E Poffcflbr o] ;# xjfc * /* j*<ffl

TWENTY SpanHhVv* DOLLARS Jy theg
Thirty-firft Day of Dtnmktr t One Thoufand SeverfHua-^



dred ad ligkty-fix, witk Intereft in like MoneyAjt thej
Rate offiviftr Ctntumftr Ax***t t by the State qffiafa-
cJmfitH'M^f t according to an Act of the LegiHaturej^if the
faid State, f tko Fiik Day of May, 1780.





PAUL REVERE AND HIS ENGRAVING

and her North American colonies fore-
shadowed its approach. He was one of
the party which planned the destruction
of the tea in Boston Harbor, and a mem-
ber of the band disguised as " Mohawks"
whose praises have been sounded loud and
long in song and story, which, at sunset,
on the 29th of November, 1773, boarded
the three East India Company's tea ships
in the harbor, and in less than three hours
on that memorable night, broke open three
hundred and forty-two chests of the " best
Bobea" and emptied their contents into
the waters of the Bay.

cargo came ! ana toljo coula blame
ei?eu tlje tea,

, riirst bv clirst, let Uoum tin* same
1 mo tlir laughing sra ?
/-or UJliat auail tlir plough or sail
<&r lanu or life, if freeoom fail? "

After the British evacuation, Revere
became a lieutenant-colonel in a regiment
of artillery raised for the defence of his

*3



PAUL REVERE

native State, and he was one of the "up-
wards of thirty North-End citizens, chiefly
mechanics," who, in the winter of 1775,
formed themselves into a committee and
patrolled the streets of the " distressed town
of Boston" to watch the movements of the
Tories and the British forces. This little
band of patriots held their secret meetings
at the GREEN DRAGON TAVERN, in Union
Street, a famous hostelry in Revolutionary
times, much frequented by those whose
sympathies were on the side of the Col-
onies.

The story of the midnight ride of Paul
Revere from Charlestown to the "rude
bridge that arched the flood" at Concord
town where

" - once tlje embattled farmers



ftreo ttye sfyot IjearD round tjie toorU),"
has become, through Longfellow's lines*
as familiar to his countrymen as a house-
hold word. It had been arranged that
if the British troops sallied forth at



AND HIS ENGRAVING

night by water, to seize and destroy the
guns, munitions and stores at Concord,
two lanterns would be shown as a signal
in the North Church * steeple. If they
went out by land, only one lantern was to
be displayed.

On Tuesday evening, April 18, 1775,
Dr. Joseph Warren, the ardent patriot,
who was destined within two short
months j- to lay down his life for his coun-
try on the brow of Bunker Hill, " the
first great martyr to the national cause,"
discovered, in Boston, that the troops
were to be moved at once, and marched
to Lexington and Concord. He sent
in great haste for Revere, and besought
him to set off immediately for Lexington,



* The spire upon which the lanthorns were hung is, accord-
ing to Justin Winsor, a matter of dispute, " Revere' s North
Church being considered by some to have been the Church in
North Square, Boston, pulled down by the British during the
siege, and by others the present Christ Church, and it is upon
the latter that the tourist to-day is shown an inscription identi-
fying that building with the event."

j- Battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775.



PAUL REVERE

where were "King" Hancock and Samuel


1 3 4 5 6

Online LibraryWilliam Loring AndrewsPaul Revere and his engraving → online text (page 1 of 6)