William Michael Rossetti William Shakespeare.

The complete works of Shakespeare: With a critical biography online

. (page 31 of 224)
Online LibraryWilliam Michael Rossetti William ShakespeareThe complete works of Shakespeare: With a critical biography → online text (page 31 of 224)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


measure, or a pavin, I hate a drunken rogue.

OU. Away with him: Who hath inade this
havoc with them?

Sir And. Ill help you. Sir Toby, beoause well
be dress'd toother.

Sir 7b. WiU you help an ass-head, and a cox-
comb, and a knave? a thm-fiuied knave, a gull?

OU. Get him to bed, and let his hurt be look'd to.
[Exeunt Clown, Sir Tobt, and Sir Anokbw

Enter Sebastian.
Seb, 1 am sorry, madam, I have hurt your



Bat had it been the brother of my blood,
I must have done no less, with wit and safety.
You throw a strange regard upon me, and
By that I do perceive it Imth offended you;
Pardon me, sweet one, even for the vows
We made each other but so late ago.

Duke, One Csce, one voice, one habit, and two
persons;
A natural perspective, that is, and is not.

Seb. Antonio, O my dear Antonio?
How have the hours rack'd and tortnr'd me.
Since I have lost thee.

Ant, Sebastian are you?

Seb, Fear'st thou that, Antonio?

Ant, How have you inade division of yourself f
An apple, deft in two, is not more twin
Than these two creatures. Which is Sebastian ?

OU, Most wonderful 1

Seb, Do I stand there? I never had a brother:
Nor can there be that deity in my nature.
Of here and every where. I had a sister,
Whom the blind waves and surges lia ve devour 'd : —
Of charity, what kin are you to me ?

[7b Viola.

What countryman ? what name? what parentage?

Vio. Of Messaline : Sebastian was my father;
Such a Sebastian was my brotlier too.
So went he suited to his watery tomb :
If spirits can assume both form and suit
You come to flight us.

^. A spirit I am, indeed ;
bat am in uat dimension grossly clad.
Which from the womb I md participate.
Were you a woman, as the rest goes even,
I should my tears let fidl upon your cheek,
And say,— Thrice welcome, drowned Viola t

Vio, My father had a mole upon his brow

SA. And so had mine. ^ -. t

Google



Digitized by^



THE TWELFTH NTCIHT;
Vw. And died that day when Viola from her
birth
Htd nomber'd thirteen vcaw.

Seb. O that record is lively in my soul
He finished, indeed, his mortal act,
That day that made my sister thirteen years.

Vio, If nothing lets to make us happy both,
But this my masculine usurped attire,
Do not embrnce me^ till each circumstance
Of place, time, fortune, do cohere and jump,
That I am Viola: which to confirm,
Ili brinff yon to a captain in this town.
Where lie my maiden weeds; by whose gentle

help
I was preserv*d, to serre this noble covnt :
An the oooorrence of my fortune since
Hath been between this lady, and this lord.
8eb. So eomes it, lady, you have been mis-
took: [ro Olivia.
But nature to her bias drew in that.
You woold have been contracted to a maid :
Nor are von therein, by my life deceiv'd.
Ton are betrothed both to a maid and man.

Duhe, Benotamazd; right noble is his blood.—
If this be so, as yet the glass seems true,
I skall have share in this most happy Wreck. :
Boy, thou hast said to me a thousand times,

[7b Viola.
Ihon never shonld'st love woman like to me.

Fib. And all those sayings will I over swear ;
And all those swearings keep as trae in seal,
As doth that orbed continent the fire
That severs day from night.
Dkke, Give me th^ hand ;
And let me see thee in thy woman^ weeds.

Vio, The captain that did bring me first on shore,
Hath my maia*s garments ; he, upon some action.
Is now m durance ; at Malvollo*8 suit,
A gentleroan and follower of my lady's.
OIL He shall enkffge him: — Fetch Malvolio
hither: —
And yet, alas, now I remember me,
They nj, poor gentleman, he's much distract.

B&mter Clown, with a Utter,
Amost extracting frenzy of nunc own
™m my remembrance clearly banish'd his. —
How does he, sirrah?

<^' Truly, madam, he holds Belzebub at the
jUve'i end, as well as a man in his case may do :
Je has here writ a letter to yon, I should have i
**T5 y^ >* to^y morning; but as a madman's ;
Jjpwtles are no go^« so it skills not much, when i

they are delivered.

nli n— ji - - - . i



OR, WHAT YPU WILL. 75

right, or you much shame. Think of mo as yoa
please. I leave my duty a little onthoughtof
and speak out of my injury.

The madly-ns'd Malyouo."

OH Did he write this?

(Jlo, Ay, madam.

Duke, This savours not much of distraction.

OU, See him deliver 'd, Fabian; bring him

hither. [Exit Fadia5.

My lord, so please yon, these things further

thought on.
To think me as well a sister as a wife,
One day shall crown the alliance on't,so please you,
Here at mv house, and at my proper cost.

Duke, Madam, I am most apt to embrace yonr
offer. —
Tour master quits you: [7b Viola.] and, for

your service done him.
So much against the mettle of your sex,
So far beneath your soft and tender breeding.
And since you call'd me master for so long,
Here is my liand ; you shall from this time be
Your master's mistress.

OU, A sister ? you are she.

Be-enter Fabian, with Malyouo.

Duhe, Is this the madman ?

OU. Ay, mv lord, the same:
How now Malvolio?

Med, Madam, you have done me wrong.
Notorious wrong.

OU. Have 1 Malvolio? no. [letter

MdL Lady, you have. Pray you pemse that
You must not now deny it is your hand.
Write from it if you can in hand, or phrase;
Or say, tb not your seal, nor your invention :
You can say none of this : Well grant it then.
And tell me in the modesty of honour, [favour:
Why you have given me sucli clear lights of
Bade me come smiling, and cross-garter*d to yoOf
To put on yellow stockings, and to frown
Upon Sir Toby, and the lighter people :
And, acting this in an obedient hope.
Why have you suffered me to be imprisoned.
Kept in a dark house, visited by the priest.
And made the most notorious geek and gall.
That e'er invention play'd on? tell me why.

OU, Alas! Malvolio, this is not my writing,
lliongh I confess, much like the character:
But, out of Question, 'tis Maria's hand.
And now I ao bethink me, it was she [smilin|;.
First told me thou wast mad ; thou cam'st in
And in such forms which here were presuppos'd
Upon thee in the letter. Prythee, be content :



Digitized by



Google



76 THE TWELFTH NIGHT;

Oo. Why, " some are born great, some achieve
greatness, and some have greatness thrown upon
thenu" I was one, sir, in this interlude; one Sir
Tonas, sir; but that's all one:— "B7 the Lord,
fool, I am not mad ;"— But do 70U remember ?
^ Madam, why laugh you at such a barren rascal ?
an you smile not, he's gagg'd:" and thus the
whirligig of time brings in his revenge.

Mai, 111 be revenged on the whole pack of yon.

OU. He hath been most notoriously abusu.

i>iiJbe. Pursue Mm, and entreat him to a
peace: —
He hatli not told us of the captain yet ;
When that is known, and golden time convents,
A solemn combination shall be made
Of our dear souls — Mean time, sweet sister,
We will not part from hence. — Cesario, come ;
For so you shall be while yon are a man ;
Dut, when in other habits vou are seen,
Onino*8 mistress, and his fanoy*s queen.



OR, WHAT TOU WILL.
SONG.

Clo. When that I was and a little tiny boy.
With hey, ho. Ihe wmJ aud the raia,
A foolish thing was but a toy,
For the rain it raineth every day.

But when I came to man*s estate,
With hey, ho. the wind and the nUn.

*Gain4t knave aud thief men shut their c^tc
For the rain it raineth every day.

But when I came, alas I to wive.

With hey. ho, the wind and the rain.
By swaKgering could I never thrive,

For the rain it raineth every day.

But when I came nnto my bed.
With hey. ho. the wind and the rain.

With toss-pots still had drunken head.
For the rain it raineth every day.

A great while ago the world begun.

With hey, ho. the wind and the rain;
But that's all one, nur play is done,

And we'U strive to ylease you every day



[Bsdl



Digitized by



Google



DRAMATIS PERSONS.



Mr JORV FAL8TAFF. FENTOH.

SHALLOW. % eoaatryjiutle*.

SLENDER, cooBlii to SluOlow.

Ifr. FORD, a gentlem&n dwelling at Windsor.

Ur. PAGE, a eentleman dwelling at Wlndiior,

WnJJAM PAGE. % boy, ion to Mr. Pag^

Sir HUGH EVANS, a Welsh parson.

Dr. CAIUS, a Franeb phyilcUB.



HOBToftheOartarltaB. BARDOLPR, a followtr of Fyitall.

HTK, a follower of Falstaff. PISTOL, a foUowsr of Falstafl.

BOBIN, pago to FalstailL SIMPLE, senraat to Slcador.

RUOBT, seryant to Dr. Oaloa.

Mn. FORD. Mn. PAGE.

Iffrt. ANN PAGE, daoghtar to Mn. Pa<a

Mra. QUICKLY, sarraat to Dr. Caiaa.

Senraat* to Paco,Ftad,A«.



ACT I.



BGEKB L— Windsor. Q<sr^m Front of Pages'
Houae.

Enter Justice Shallow, Slender, and Sir Hugh
Evans.

SkaL Sir Hugh, persuade me not; I will make
a Star-chamber matter of it : if he were twenty
Sir John Falstaff, he shall not abase Robert
Shallow, esciuire.

£Bm, In the county of Gloster, justice of peace,
and eorwn,

8haL Ay, oonsin Slender, and Cust-atorum.

Slen, Ay, and rotalontm too ; and a gentleman
bom, master parson ; who writes himself armigero;
in any bill, warrant, quittance, or obligation,
anttiffero,

SKcd, Ay, that I. do; and have done any time
these three hundred years.

8ltn, All his successors, gone before him, have
donet ; and all his ancestors, that come after him,
may : they may give the dozen white luces in
their coat.

&iaL It is an old coat.

Eva, The dozen white louses do b€come an old
ooat well ; it agrees well, passant : it is a familiar
beast to man, and signifies love.

. Suil The luce is the fresh fish ; the salt fish is
an old coat.

Slen, I may quarter, coz ?

ShaL, You may, by marrying.

Eta, It is marrying, indeed, if he quarter it.

8hal, Not a whit.

Eva, Yes, py'r lady ; if he has a quarter of your
coat there is but three skirts for yourself, in mj
simple conjectures; but that is all one: If Sir
John Falstaff have comrailted disparagements unto
you, I am of the church, and will be giad to do
m^ benevolence, to make atonements and compro-
mises between you.

ShaL The council shall hear it ; it is a riot.

Eta, It is not meet the council hear a riot;
there is no fear of Got in a riot : the council, look
you, shall dasire to hear the fear of Got, and not
to hear a riot ; take your vizaments in that.

Shal. Ha I o' mj life, if I were young again the
•wonl should end it.

Eva, It is potter that friends is the sword, and
3nd it; and there is also another device in my



prain, which, peradventure,pring8 goot discretions
with it : There is Anne Pa^e, which is daughter
to Master George Page, whidi is pretty virginity.

SUn, Mistress Anne Page? She has brown
hair, and speaks small like a woman.

Eva, It IS that fery person for all the 'orld, as just
as you will desire ; and seven hundred pounds of
moneys^ and gold, and silver, is her grandsire
upon his death's-bed (Got deliver to a joyful
resurrections !) give, when she is able to overtake
seventeen years old : it were a goot motion if wc
leave our pribbles and prabbles, and desire a
marriage between Master Abraham and Mistress
Anne Page.

ShaL Did her grandsire leave her seven hundred
pound?

Eva, Ay, and her father is make her a petter
penny.

ShaL I know the young gentlewoman ; she has
goodg^fts.

Eva. Seven hundred pounds, and possibilities,
is goot gifts.

Shal. Well, let us see honest Master Page : Is
Falstaff there?

Eva, Shall I tell von a lie? I do despise a liar
as I do despise one that is false ; or as I despise one
that b not true. The knight, Sir John, is there;
and I beseech you be ruled by your well-willers.
I will peat the door [hnocka] for Master Page.
What, boat Got pless your house here I

Enter Paob.

Page, Who's there?

Eva, Here is Got's plessing, and your friend,
Ju<;tice Shallow : and here young Master Slcndci :
that, peradventures, shall tell you another tale, it
matters grow to your likings.

Page. I am glad to see your worships well : t
thank you for my venison. Master Shallow.

Shal. Master Pa^e, I am glad to see you ; much

food do it your good heart I I wished your venison
etter ; it was ill killed : — How doth good M idtress
Page?— and I thank you always with my heart,
la ; with my heart.
Page, Sir, I thank you.
ShaL Sir, I thank you ; by yea and no, I do.
Page, I am glad to see you, good Master Slender.
Slen. How does your fallow greyhound, sir?



Digitized by



Google



78



THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR.



i heard say oe was oatrun at Ootaali.

Jiigc It could not be judged, sir.

SloL You'll not confess, you'll not confess.

Sfud. That he will not:— tis your fault:— tis
your fiiult :— Tis a good dog.

J\Mffe. A cur, sir.

SmL Sir, he^ a good dog, and a fiiir dog; Can
there be more said r he is good, and fiur. Is Sir
John Fabtaff here?

Flage, Sir, he is within ; and I would I could do
a good office between you.

Mvcu It is spoke as a christians ought to speak.

SkaL He hath wronged me, Master Pa^e.

Bage, Sir, he doth in some sort confess it

ShaL If it be confessed it is not redressed ; is
not that so. Master Page ? He hath wronged me ;
indeed, he hath ;— at a word he hath ;— believe me ;
Robert Shallow, esquire, saith he is wronged.

iV^e. Here comes Sir Jolm.

Enter Sir John Faubtapp, Babdolph, Ntm, and
Pistol.

ItiL Now, Master Shallow | youll complain of
me to the king?

JSfuxL Knight, tob hare beaten my men, killed
my deer, and broke open my lodge.

FaL But not kissed ^our keeper's daughter.

ShaL Tut, a pin I this shall be answered.

FaL I will answer it straight;— I have done all
this ; — Tliat is now answered.

ShaL The council shall know this.

FaL Twere better for yon if it were known
in counsel ; youll be lauded at

Iam. Pauca verha^ Sir John, goot worts.

FaL Goot worts I good cabbage.— Slender, I
broke your head ; what matter have you against
ne?

SUn, Marry, sir, I have matter in my head
against you; and against your conev-catching
rascals, Bardolph, Nym, and Pbtol. T Tiiey car-
ried me to the tavern and made me ornnk, and
afterwards picked my pocket]

Bard. You Banbury cheese!

Sloi, Ay, it is no matter.

Piit, How now, Mephostophilus?

Sim. Ay, it is no matter.

Nym. Slice, I say! pauca^ pauca; slieel that's
my humour.

Sien. Where^ Simple, my man ?— can you tell,
oousin?

Jiva. Peace: I pray you I Now let us under-
stand : there is three umpires in this matter, as I
understand: that is— Master P&^e^JtdeUcet, Master
Page; and there is myselt^ fiddicet^ mpelf; and
the tliree party is, lastly and finally, mme host of
Uie Garter.

Page. We three, to hear it and end it between
Uienu

Eva. Fery goot : I will make a prief of it in
ni/ note-book ; and we will afterwards 'ork upon
die cause, with as great discreetly as we can.

FaL Pistol—

Pitt, He hears with ears.

Eva. The tevil and his tami what phrai^e bthis,
•• He hears with ear "? Why, it is affectations.

Fal. Pistol, did you pick Master Slender 's purse ?

Slen, Ay, by these gloves, did he (or would I
miglit never cjme in mine own great chamber
again else), of seven groats in mill-sixpences, and
two Edward shovel-boards, that cost me two
shilling and twopence a-piece of Yead Miller, by
tJiestt gloves.

Fal. Is this true, Pistol 7



Efta. No ; it is fiUse, if it is a piek-pursc.

PiaL Ha, thou mountain-foreigner! — Hir Johv
and master mine,
I combat challenge of this latten bilbo:
Word of denial in thy labras here :
Word of denial : froth and scum, thou liest 1

SUn. By these gloves, then 'twas he.

Kym. Be advised, sir, and pass good humtiirs ;
I will say, " marry trap," with you, if you run the
nuthook^ humour on me : that is the very note ot
it

&€tL "By this hat, then, he in the red face had
it: for though I cannot remember what I did
when you made me drunk, yet I am not altogether
an ass.

FaL What eaj you, Scarlet and John ?

Bard. Why, sir, for my part, I say, the gentle-
man had drunk himself out of his five sentences.

Eva, It is his five senses: fie, what the ignoranoe
isl

Bard, And being fiip, mr, was, as they say,
cashiered ; and so oondusions passed the careers.

Slen. Ay, you spake in Latin then too ; but *di
no matter : I'll ne'er be drunk whilst I live again,
but in honest, civil, godly company, for tlib trick:
if I be drunk. 111 be drunk with those that have
the fear of God, and not with drunken knaves.

Eva. So Got Hidge me, that is a yirtuous mind.

FaL You hear all these matters denied, gentle-
men ; you hear it

Enter Mistress Akkb Page, with tome; Mistress
Ford and Mistress Paqe^ foUawing,

Page. Nay, daughter, carry the wine in ; well
drink within. [Exit Anne Pa or.

J^en, O heaven I this is Mistress Anne Page.

Piaae. How now. Mistress Ford?

FaL Mbtress Ford, by my troth, you are yery
well met : by your leave, good mistress.

[Kistmg her.

Page. Wife, bid these gentlemen welcome:
come, we haye a hot venison pasty to dinner:
come, gentlemen, I hope we shall dnnk down all
unkindness.

[Exeunt aU hui Shau, Slen., and EyANS.

SUn. I had rather than forty shDlings, I had
my book of Songs and Sonnets here:—

Enter Simple.

How now. Simple! Where have you been? I
must wait on myself, must I? You have not tlie
" Book of Riddles" about you, have you?

Sim. "Book of Riddles"? why aid you not
lend it to Alice Shortcake upon Allliallon'mas
last, a fortnight afore Michaelmas ?

Skal. Come, coz; come, coz; we stay for you.
A word with you, coz : marry this coz : there is,
as 'twere, a tender, a kind of tender, made afar off
by Sir Hugh here:— Do vou undei-stand me?

Slen. Ay, sir, you sluill find me reasonable; if
it be so, I shall do that that is reason.

ShaL Nay, but understand me.

Slen. So I do, sir.

Eva. Give ear to his motions. Master Slender:
I will description the matter to you, if you bo
capacity of it

Skn. Nay, I will do as my cousin Shallow says:
I pray you, pardon me; he's a justice of peaoa in
hb countr}', simple though I stand here.

Kva. But tiiat is not the question; the que»tiaD
is concerning your marria^^e.

ShaL Ay, thereVi the point, sir. ^

Digitized by VjOOQ IC



THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR.



79



Eva, MaiTf, is it ; the very point of it ; to
]Ji5tre88 Anne Pag^

8Un. Why, if it be so, I will marry her, upon
uaj reasonable demancLi.

Eva, But can you affection the *oman? Let us
command to know tliat of your month or of your
lips; for divers phillosophers hold tliat the lips is
parcel of the month: — Therefore, precisely, can
jou carry your good will to the maid ?

3kaL Cousin Abraham Slender, can you love
her?

Skn, 1 hope, sir,—! will do as it shall become
one that would do reason.

JEAm. Nay, Got's lords and his ladies, yon must
speak possitably, if you can carry her your desires
towaroti he .

ShaL That you must: Wfll you, upon good
dowry, marry ber?

Slen. 1 will do a greater thing than that, upon
jour request, cousin, in any reason.

ShaL Nay, conceive me, conceive me, sweet
eoe; what lao is to pleasure you, cox: can you
love the maid?

Slen. I will marry her, sir, at your request;
kot if there be no great love hi the beginning, yet
Heaven may decrease it upon better acquaintance,
when we are married and have more occaMion to
kaow one another: I hope, upon funiliarity will
grow more contempt ; but if you say, " marry
her,** I will marry her, that I am freely dissolved,
and dissolutely.

J£va, it IS a feiy discretion answer; save, the
fiul' is in the *ort dissolutely : the 'ort is, according
to our meaning, resolutely ; — his meaning is gooo.

ShaL Ay, I think my cousin meant well.

SUn, Ay, or else I would I might be hanged, la.

Reenter Ahkb Paqb.

Shei, Here comes £ur Mistress Anne :— Would
I were young, for your sake, mistress Anne I

Anne, The dinner is on the table; my father
desires yoxa worship's company.

ShaL I will wait on him fair Mistress Anne.

Bfta. Od*s plessed will I 1 will not be absence at
the grace. [Exeunt Sual. a»id Sir li. Evans.

Anne. Will't piease your worship to come in, sir ?

Skn, No, I thank you, forsooth, heartily ; I am
▼eiywill.

Annt, The dinner attends you, sir.

SUn. I am not a-hungry, I thank you, forsooth.
Go, sirrah, for all you are my man, go wait upon
my cousin Shallow : \Eait Simple.] A justice of
peace somethne may be beliolden to his friend for
a man :— I keen but three men and a boy yet, till
my mother be dead : but what though? yet I live
like a poor gentleman bom.

Anne I may not go in without your worship:
tiiey will not sit till you come.

8U$i, r faith, 111 eat nothing; I thank yon as
much as though I did.

Anne. I pray you, sir, walk in.

Slen. I had rather walk here, I thank you ; I
bruised my shin the other day with playing at
•word and da^trer with a master of fence, three
veneys for a di^^h of stewed prunes ; and, bjr my
troth, 1 cannot abide the smeU of hot meat since.
Why do your dogs bark so ? be there bears i' the
town.

Anne. I thmk there are, sir: I heard them
talked ot

Slen. I love the sport well ; but I i»liall as soon
quarrel at it, as any man in England :— You are
afraid if you see the bear lootie are you not?



Aime. Ay,^ indeed, sir.

Slen, Thai's meat and drink to me now: I have
seen Sackcrson loose twenty times; and have
taken him by the chain : but, I warrant you, the
women have so cried and shrieked at it, tbnt it
passed: — but women, indeed, cannot abide 'em;
they are very ill-favoured rough things.

Bcrenter Page.

Pom, Come, gentle Master Slender, come ; we
stay for you.

Slen, 1*11 eat nothing, I thank you, sir

Page. By cock and pye, you shall not choose,
sir : come, come.

Slen. Nay, pray jrou, lead the way.

Page. Come on. sir.

SUn. Mistress Anne, yourself shall go first.

Anne. Not I, sir ; pray you, keep on.

Slen. Truly, I will not go first; truly, la: I
will not do you that wrong.

Anne. I pray you, sir.

« Ilf r ' •



rather be unmannerly than trouble-
some; you do yourself wrong, indeed, la.

[Exewii.

SCENE IL^The $ame.

Enter Sir Hugh Evahs and Siuplb.

Eva. Go jour ways, and ask of Doctor Caius*
house,— which \b the wajri and there dwells one
Mistress Quickly, which is in the manner of his
nurse, or his dry nurse, or his cook, or his laun-
dry, his washer, and his wringer.

Sim. Well, sir.

Eva. Nay, it is petter yet;— give her this letter;
for it is a 'oman that altogether s acquaintance
with Mistress Anne Page: and the letter is to
desire and require her to solicit your master's
desires to Bllstress Anne Page: I pray you,
begone ; I will make an end of my dinner ; tliere's
pippins and cheese to come. [Exaud.

SCENE IIL— ^ Room m the Garter Inn.

Enter Falbtatf, Host, Bardolph, Ntm, Pistol,

and Robin.

FaL Mine host of the Garter,—

Ho8t. What says my bully-rook? Speak
scholarly and wbely.

FaV. Truly, mine host, I must turn away some
of my followers.

Host. Discard, bully Hercules; cashier; let
them wag; trot, trot.

FaL I sit at ten pounds a week.

Host. ThouVt an emperor, Ciesar, Keiser, and
Pheezar. I will entertain Bardolph; he shall
draw, he shall tap: said I well, bully Hector?

FaL Do so, good mine host

HoaL I have spoke : let him follow : let me see
thee froth, and live : I am at a word ; follow.

[Exit Host.

FaL Bardolph, follow him ; a tapster is a good
trade : an old cloak makes a new jerkin ; a withered
servingman a fresh tapster: Go; adieu.

Bant. It b a life that I have desired; I will
thriye.

[Exit Babd.

Pist. O base Hungarian wight! wilt thou the
spigot wield ?

Nym. He was gotten in drink; \i not the
humour conceited ? [lli^ mind u not heroic. And
thereV the huiiiuur oriLl^



Digitized by



Google



80



^ Fed, I am glad I am so acquit of this tindp.r-box ;
his thefts were too open ; his filching vras like an
unskilful singer, — ho kept not time.

Nym, The good humour is to steal at a minufc s
rest.

Pist, Convey, tho wise it call: steal! foh; a
fico for the phrase.

Fal, Well, sirs, I am almost out at heels.

PUL Why, then let kibes ensue.

FaL There is no remedy ; I must ooney-catoh ;
I must shifL

put. Young ravens must have food.

Fal, Which of you know Ford of this town?

PiaL I ken the wight ; he is of substance good.

FdL 'iiy honest laBs, I will tell you what I am
about.

Pist, Two ;^ds, and more.

FaL No quips now, Pistol : Indeed I am in the
waist two yards about ; but I am now about no
waste ; I am about thrift. Briefly, I do mean to
make love to Ford's wife; I spy entertainment in
her ; she discourses, she carves, she gives the leer
of invitation : I can construe the action of her
familiar style; and the hardest voice of her
behaviour, to be Englished rightly, is, I am Sir
Tohn Falstaff's.

Pist. He hath studied her will, and translated
her will, out of honesty into English.



Online LibraryWilliam Michael Rossetti William ShakespeareThe complete works of Shakespeare: With a critical biography → online text (page 31 of 224)