William Michael Rossetti William Shakespeare.

The complete works of Shakespeare: With a critical biography online

. (page 33 of 224)
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vou morning nor evening prayer, as any is in
Windsor, whoe'er be the other: and she Mdeme
tell your worship that her husband is seldom from
home; but she nopes there will come a time. I
never knew a woman so dote upon a man ; surely,
I think you liave charms, la; yes, in truth.

FaL Not I, I assure thee; setting the attraction
of ifiy Rood parts aside, 1 have no other charms.
Quiac Blessing on your heart fort I
FaL But, I praj^ thee, tell me this: has Ford^
wife and Page's wife acquain t ed each other how
they love me?

Quick, That were a jest indeed I— they have not
so Uttle grace, I hope: — that were a trick, indeed !
But Mistress Page would desire you to send her
your little i)age, of all loves : her husband has a
marvellous infection to the little page; and, truly.
Master Page is an honest man. Never a wife m
Windsor leads a better life than shu docs ; do what
she will, say what she will, take all, pay all, go to
bed when she list, rise when she list, all is as she
vrill : and, truly, she deserves it : forrif there be a
kind woman in Windsor, she is one. You must
send her your nage ; no remedy.
FaL Why, I will.

Quick. Nay, but do so then: and, look you, he
may come and go between you both ; und, in any
case, have a nay-word, that you may know one
another's mind, and the boy never need to under
stand anything; for tis not good that ehildren
should know any wickedness ; old folks, you know,
have discretion, as they say, and know the world.
FaL Fare thee well: commend me to them
both : there's my purse ; I am yet thy debtor.-^
Boy, go along with this woman.— This news
distracts me I [Exeunt Quickly and Bosnr.

PiaU This punk is one of Cupid's carriers :—
Clap on more sails ; pursue, up with your fights;
Give fire ; she is my piize, or ocean whelm them
all! [Exit I'JSTOU

FaL Say'st thou so old Jack? go thy ways;
1*11 make more of thy old body than I have done.
Will they yet look after thee? Wilt thou, after
the expense of so much money, be now a gainer ?
Good body, I thank thee : Let them say, tis
grossly done ; so it be fiurly done, no matter.
Eater Bjlbdolph.

Bard, Shr John, there's one Master Bcoo'k below
would fain speidL with you, and be acquainted v?ith
you; and hath sent your worship a morning's
draught of sack.

FiiL Brook is his name ?

Bard. Ay, sir.

Fal. Call him in; [Exit Bardolth,] Such
Brooks are welcome to me tliat o'erflow such
liquor. Ah I ha I Mistress Ford and Mistress
Page, have I encompassed you ? go to ; ma /

Bd-enter Bardolfh toith Ford dUguiK d ,

Ford, Bless yon, sir.

FaL And you. su: : would you iy[TeitlyJvith JdBtt
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THE MERRY

J^bra. I make Isold to press with so little prepa-
re'JoD npon Toa.

Hd, VoaTe welcoms. What's your will?
Give us leave, drawer. [Exit Bakdolpk,

Ford, Sir, I am a gentleman that have spent
much; my name is Brook.

fi'aL Good Master Brook, I desire more acqtuunt-
ance of yon.

Ford, Good Sir John, I sae for yoars : not to
charge yon; for I must let yon understand I
tliink myself in better plight for a lender than
you are: the which has somethihg emboldened
me to thit unseasoned intrusion : for they say, if
money go before all wavs do lie open.

Fat Money is a good soldier, sir, and will on.

Ford, Troth, and I have a bag of money here
troubles me : if yon will help to bear it, Idir John,
take all, or half, for easing me of the carriage.

FaL Sir, I know not how I may deserve to be
jour porter.

Ford, I will tell you, sir, if you will give me
the hearing.

FaL Speak, good Master Brook; I shall be
glad to be your servant.

Ford, Su-, I hear you are a scholar— I will be
brief with you— and you have been a man long
known to me, though I had never so good means,
as desire, to make myself acquainted with you. I
shall discover a thing to you, wherein I must very
much hiy open mine own imperfection : but, good
Sir John, as you have one eye upon my follies, as
you hear them unfolded, turn another into the
register of your own : that I may pass with a
reproof the easier, sith you yourself know how
easy it is to be suco an oniender.

fid. Very well, sir; proceed.

Ford, Theie is a gentlewoman in thif town, her
huabandlB name is Ford.

FaL Well, sir.

Ford, I have long loved her. and, I protest to

Iou, bratowed much on her ; followed her with a
oting observance; engrossed opportunities to
meet Der ; fee'd every slight occasion that could
but niggardly give me sight of her; not only
bought many presents to give her, but have given
largely to oumy, to know what she would have
given ; bri^y, I have pursued her as love hath
pursued me, which hatti beei^on the wing of all
oocaaione. But whatsoever I have merited, either
in my mind, or in my means, meed, I am sore, I
have received none ; unless experience be a jewel ;
that I have purchased at an inlmite rate; and that
hath taught me to say this :

" Lore Uke a shadow flies, when mdMtanoe Ioto parsaes ;
Punuing that that flies, and flying what pttnuee."

FbL Have you received no promise of satisfac-
tion at her hands ?

Ford, Never.

FaL Have you importuned her to sudi a
purpose?

Ford, Never.

FaL Of what quality was your lore then ?

Ford, Like a fair house built on another man's
ground ; so that I have lost m^ edifice, by mis-
taking the place where I erected it.

FaL To what purpose have you nnfblded this
tomeY

Ford, When I have told you that I have told
you all. Some say, that, though she appear honest
to me, vet, in other plaoe8,she enUrgeth her mirti
ao fiff that there is shrewd construction made of
her. Now, Sir John, here is the heart of my pur-
poie : 70a are a ^^entleman of excellent breeding, '






WIVES OP WINDSOR. «5

admirable discourse, of great admittance, anthentio
in your place and person, generally allowed for
your many warlike, oourtlike, and learned prepa-
rations.

Fal, 0,sirl

Ford, Believe it, for yon know it:— there is
money ; spend it, spend it; spend more; spend all
I have; only give me so much of your time in
exchange of it, as to lay- an amiable siege to the
honesty of this Ford's wife: use your art of wooing,
wm her to consent to you ; if any man may, yon
may as soon as any.

FaL Would it apply well to the vehemem^ of
your affection, that I should wm what you would
enjoy ? Methinks, you prescribe to yourself very
preposterously.

Ford, O, understand my drift! she dwells so
securelv on the excellency of her honour, that the
folly of mv soul dares not present itself ; slie is too
bright to be looked against. Now, could I come
to her with any detection in my hsind, my desires
had instance and argument to oonunend them-
selves: I could drive her then from the ward of
her purity, her reputation, her marriage vow, and a
thousand other her defences, which now are too
too strongly embattled against me : what say you
tot, Sir John?

FaL Master Brook, I will first make bold with
your money ; next, give me your band ; and last,
as I am a gentleman, yon shall, if you will, enjoy
Ford*^ wife.

Ford, p good sir I

Fal, I'say you shall.

Ford, Want no money, Shr John, you shall want
none.

FaL Want no Mistress Ford, Master Brook,you
shall want none. I shall be with her (I may tell
y.iu), by her own appointment; even as yon came
m to me, her assistant, or go-between, parted from
me : I sa^, I shall be with her between ten and
eleven ; tor at that time the jealous rascally knave,
her husband, will be forth. Come you to me at
night ; you shall know how I speed.

Ford. I am blessed in your aoqnaintanoe. Do
you know Ford, sir ?

J'iiL Hang him, poor cnckoldlyknaviBl I know
him not:— yet I wrong him to call hhn poor; they
say the jealous wittoliy knave hath masses of
money ; for the which lus wife seems to me well*
favoured. I will use her as theke/ of theeockoldly
rogue^ coffer ; and there's my harreat-home.

Ford, I would vou knew Ford, sir; that you
might avoid him if you saw him,

Fal, Hang him, mechanical salt-butter rogue 1
I will store him out of his wita: I vrill awe nim
with my cudgel : it shall hang like a meteor o'ec
the cuckold's boms: Master Brook, thon shalt
know I will predominate over the peasant, and thon
shalt lie with his wife.— Come to me soon at night :
Ford's a knave, and I will aggravate his s^le:
thou. Master Brook, shalt know-him fbr knave and
cuckold : - come to me soon at night [FxU,

Ford, What a damned Epicurean rascal is tnis!—
My heart is ready to crack with impatience.— Who
says, this is improvident jealousy r My wife hath
sent to him, the hour is fixed, the match is made.
Would any man have thought this ?— See the hell
of having a false woman I My bed shall be abused,
my coffers ransacked, my refutation gnawn at ;
and I shall not only receive this villainous wrong,
but stand under the adoption of abominable terras,
and by him that does me this wrong. Terras 1
-Amaimon sounds well| Lucifer well*

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BarbMon, well ; Tet they are devils' additions, the
names of fiends! hot cuckold I wittol-cuckoldl the
devil himself hath not such a name. Page ia an
ass. a secure ass I he will trust his wife, he will not
be jealou.'^; I will rather trust a Fleming with my
butter. Parson Hugh the Welshman with my
cheese, an Irishman with my aqua-vitae bottle, or
a thief to walk my ambling geldmg, than m^ wife
with herself: then she plots, then she rmnates,
then she devises; and what they think in their
hearts they may effect they ¥rill break their hearts
but they will effect. Heaven be praised for my
{ealousy I — Eleven o'dook the hour I — I will pre-
vent tlus, detect my vrife, be revenged on Falstaff,
and laugh at Page. I will about it ; better three
hours too soon than a minute too late. Fie, fie, fie!
cuckold I cuckoldl cuckold I l£xU,

SCENE IIL— Field near W'mdMt.
EnUt GA1U9 cmd Ruobt.

CoMtf. Jack Rugby I

Bmo, Sir.

CbMW. Vat is the dock, Jack?

Ruq, T is past the hour, sir, that Sir Hugh
promised to meet

Couif. By gar, he has save his soul, dat he is no
come; he has pray his Pible veil, dat he is no
come; by gar, Jack Rugby, ho is dead already if
be be come.

Ruq, He is wise, sir; he knew your worship
would kill him if he came. _

CbNis. By ear, de herring is no dead so as I vill
kill him. Take your rapier. Jack ; I vill tell you
how I vill kill him.

Bug, Alas, sir, I cannot fence.

Caaitf. Villainy, take your rapier.

Bug, Forbear ; here's company.

Ater Host, Shallow, Slekdeh, and Paab.

Hott. 'Bless thee, bully doctor.

8kaL Save you, Master Doctor Caios.

Page, Now, good Master Doctor.

Sioi, Give you sood-morrow, sir. [for?

CoHis. Vat be all you, two, tree, four, come

Bott, To see thee fight, .to see thee foin, to see
toee trarerM, to see thee here, to see thee there;
to see thee pass thy punto, thy stock, thv reverse
^y distance, thy montint. Is he dead, my
Ethiopian ? is he dead, my Frandsoo ? ha, bully I
What says my JEscuUpius ? my Galen ? my heart
of elder ? ha 1 is he dead, bully Stale? is he dead?

Caiue. Br gar, he is de coward Jack priest of
he vorld ; he Is not show his (ace.

Hott. Thou art a Castilian, king Urinal !
Hector of Greece, my boy •

Caiue, I pray you, bear vitness that me have
stay six or seven, two, tree hours for him, and he
U DO come.

&ud. He is the wiser man, master doctor : he
Is A onrer of toolf and yon a ourar of bodies; If



THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR.



you should fight, you go against the hair of your
professions ; is it not true. Master Page?

Page, Master Shallow, you have yourself been
a great fighter, though now a man of peace.

Slud, Bodykins, Master Page, though I now oe
old, and of the peace, if I see a sword out my
finger itches to make one : though we are justices,
and doctors, and churchmen. Master Page, we
have some salt of <fjr youth in us; we are the
sons of woman, Master Page.

Page, T is true, Master Shallow.

Sud, It will be found so, Master Page. Master
Doctor Caius, I am come to fetch vou home. I am
sworn of the peace ; ^ou have showed yourself a
wise physician, and Sir Hugh hath shown himself
a wise and patient churchman : you must go with
me. Master Doctor.

Ho$t, Pardon, guest justice:— ah, Monsienr
Muck water.

CaUu, Muck-vatert vat is dat?

Host, Muck- water, in our English tongue, is
ralour, bully.

Caiue, By gar, then I have as much muck-
▼ater as de Englishman :— Scurvy jack-dog priest!
by gar, me villcut his ears.

UoeU He will dapper-ckw thee tightly, bully.

Caiua, Ckpper-deHslaw vat is dat?

Hoet, That is, he will make thee amends.

Caiue, By gar, me do look he shall dapper-de-
eUw me ; for, by gar, me vill have it. [wag.

Boat. And I will provoke hun to % or let him

Caiue, Me tank you for dat

Hoet, And, moreover, bullv, — ^but first master
g:uest, and Master Page, and eke cavalero Slender,
go you through the town to Frogmore.

[Aeideioihem,

Page, Sur Hugh is there, is he?

Host. He is there : see what humour he is in ;
and I will bring the doctor about by the fields:
willitdoweU?

Shal. We will do it

Page^ 8haL^ and Slen, Adieu, good CMster
doctor. [Exeunt Paob, Shal., and Slbh.

Caiue. B^ gar, me vill kill de priest; for he
speak for a jack-an-ape to Anne Page.

Hoet, Let him die: sheathe thy impatience;
throw cold water on thy choler : go aoout Uie
fields with me through Frogmore; I will bring
thee where Mistress Anne Page is, at a farm-
house, a feasting : and thou shalt woo her : Cried
I gaine? saidi wdl?

Caiue. By gar, me tank yon vor dat : by gar,. I
love you ; and I shall procure-a you de good guest,
de Earl, de Knight, de Lords, de Gentlemen, my
patients.

Hoet. For the which I will be thy adversary
tOMrard Anne Page; said I wdl?

Caiue, By gar, *t b good ; vdl said.

Hoet, Let us ¥rag then.

(kdue. Gome at my heels, Jack Rugby.

[BxeMit




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THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR.



87



ACT IIL



SCENE h—A FSdd near Frogmore.
JSiUer Sir Hugh Eyans and Sdcflb.

3mu I pray yon now, ^ood Master Slender's
•enring-inan, and (Kend Him pie by jour name,
whidb war have joa looked for Master Cains,
that calls himself doctor of pbjsio?

Sun. Many, sir, the pittie-ward, the park-ward,
tmrj way ; old Windsor way, and every way bat
the town way.

Em, 1 most fehemently desire yon, you will
also look that way.

iSlMi. I will, sir.

Em. Pless my soul! how full of cholers I am,
and tremplinff of mind I — I shall be glad if he
have deceived me: how melancholies I am! I
will knoff his urinals about his knave's costard,
when I bare good opportunities for the 'ork —
pless my soul I [JSmffs.

To shallow riTen, to whose falls
lUlodkras birds sing madrigato ;
There will we voMke our peds of roeea»
And a thousand f rsgzant posies.
To shallow—

Herey on me 1 1 have a great dispositions to cry.

Molodkias birds sing madrigals :
When as I sat in Pabylon,—
And a thousMMl Tsgram poslea
To shallow—

Sbn. Yonder he is coming, this way. Sir Hu^

Em, He's welcome:

"To shallow itvera, to whose fslbb— *
Ilearen orosper the rip^ht !— What wei^ns is he ?

Sim, No weapons, sir : There comes my master,
Haeter Shallow, and another gentleman from Frog-
more, over the stile, this way.

Eva, Pray you, give me my gown ; or else keep
H in your arms.

Enter Paob, Shallow, and Slkhdib.

&iaL How now, Blaster Parson? Good morrow,
good Sir Hugh. Keep a gamester from the dice,
and a good student from his book, and it is
wondennL

SUn. Ah, sweet Anne Page I

Ihffe, Save you, good Sir Hugh!

Em. Pless you from his mercy sake, all of you I

ShaL What! the sword and the word; do you
•tndy them both Master Parson ?

/^^ And youthful still, in your doublet and
boee, this raw rheumatic day ?

Eixi, There is reasons and causes for it.

Page, We are come to you to do a good ofBot,
master parson.

Em. Fery well: What is it?

Bape, Yonder Im a most reverend gentleman,
who belike, having received wrong by some per-
son, is at most <Mds with his own gravity and
patience, that ever yon saw.

ShaL I have lived four score years and upward ;
I never heard a man of his pUce, gravity, and
learning, so wide of his own respect.

Em, What is he?

Avs. I think you know him : Master Doctor
Cains, the renowned French physician.

Em. Got*s will, and his nassion of my heart I
I had as lief you would tell me of a mess of

Itage. Whj?



Eva. He has no more knowled^ in Hibocrates
and Galen,— and he is a knave besides ; a cowardly
knave, as you wou^ desires to be acquamted
withal.

Page, I warrant you, he*s the man should fight
withnim.

Slen, 0, sweet Anne Page !

ShaL It appears so by his weapons:— Keep
them asunder ;— here comes Doctor Cains.

Enter Host, Caius, and Ruqbt.

Page. Nay, good Master Parson, keep in you
weapon.

Slud, So do you, good Master Doctor.

Ho8t, Disarm them, and let them Question ; let
them keep their limbs whole, ana had( oux
English.

C/onia. I pray you letnt me speak a word vii
your ear :Verefore vill you not meet-a me?

Eva. Fray you nse your patience: in good
time.

Canu. By gar, you are do eoward, de Jack dog,
John ape.

Eva. Pray you, let us not be lau^hin^-stogs to
other men's humours ; I desire vou m friendship,
and I will one way or other make you amends : -
I will knog your urinal about your knave^ cogs-
comb for missing your meetmgs and appoint-
ments.

Caiue. JXabltl—JMt^ Bugb^r, — mine hoii de
Jarterre^ have I not stay for hijn, to kill him?
have I not, at de place I did appoint?

Eva. As I am a christians soul, now, look you,
this is the pUce appointed ; 111 be judgment by
mine host or the Garter.

Host, Peace, I say, Guallia and Gaul ; Frenoh
and Welch ; soul-curer and bodv-ourer.

Ccdus. Ay, dat b very good f excellent 1

HoaL Peace, I say; hear mine host of the
Garter. Am I politic?— am I subtle?— am I a
Machiavel? Shall I lose my doctor? no; he
gives me the potions and the motions. Shall I
lose my parson ? my priest? my Sir Hugh? no;
he gives me the proverbs and the noverbs.— Give
me thy hand, terrestrial ; so: — Give me thy hand,

celestial: so. Boys of art, I have deceived you

both ; I nave directed you to wrong places ; your
hearts are mightjr, your skins are whole, and let
burnt sack be the issue. — Come, lay their swords
to pawn:— Follow me, ]ad of peace; follow,
follow, follow.

Shai. Trust me, a mad host: — ^Follow, gentle-
men, follow.
Sien, O, sweet Anne Page I

[Exeunt Shal., Slen., Paob, and Host

Oaiua. Ha I do I perceive dat ?— have yon make-
a de sot of us?— ha, ha.

Em. This is well ; he has made us his vlouting-
Stog. — I desire you that we may be friends ; and
let us knog our prains together^ to be revenged on
this same scall, scurvy, cogging companion, the
host of the Garter.

Caiui. By gar, vit all my heiut ; he promise to
bring me vere is Anne Page; by gar, he deceive
me too.

Eva. Well, I will smite his noddles :— Pray
you, follow.

[ExewU.



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88



THE MERRY WIVES OP WINDSOR.



SCENE XL— rAe Street m Windsor.
Enter Mistress Paob cmd Robin.



Mr$, Page, Naj, keep vour way, little gallant;
you were wont to be a follower, but now you are
a leader: whether had you rather lead mine eyes,
or eye your master's heels?

Hob, I had ratlier, forsooth, go before yoa like
a mnn, than follow him like a dwarf.

Mrs, Page. O you are a flattering boy; now, I
see youll be a courtier.

Enter Ford.

EortL Well met, Mistress Page: whither go
yoo?

Mrs, Ptige, Truly, sir, to see your wife ; is she
at home?

FcnL At; and as idle as she may hang together,
for want of company. I think if your husbands
were dead, you two would marry.

Jtfrt. Page. Be sure of that, — two other hus-
bands.

Ecmd, Where had you this pretty weathercock ?

Jir$, Page. I cannot tell what the dickens his
nante is my husband had him of: what do you;
call your knight's name, sirrah ?

Jtob, Sir John Falstaff.

Ford, Sir John Falstaff I

Jir9, Rage, He, he ; I can never hit on*s name.
— There ia such a league between my good man
and he I— 'Is your wife at home, indeecl ?

Ford Indeed, she is.

Mrs. Page, By your leaye, ur: — ^I am sick, till
I see her. [Exeunt Mrs, Paob and Robin.

FML Has Page any brains? hath he any ejeA ?
hath he any thinking? Sure, they sleep; he
hath no use of them. Why, this boy will carry a
letter twenty miles, as easy as a cannon will shoot
point-blank twelve, score. He pieces out his
wife's inclination ; he gives her folly motion and
advantage : and now she^s going to my wife, and
Falstaffs boy with her. A man may hear this
shower sing In tlie wind I — and Falstaffls boy with
her! — Qood plots I — they are laid; and our
revolted wives share damnation together. Well ;
I will take him, then torture my wife, pluck the
borrowed veil of modesty from the so seeming
Mistress Page, divulge Page himself for a secure
and wilful Actaeon ; and to these violent proceed-
ings all my neighbours shall cry aim. [Clock
temses.] The clock gives me my cue, and my
assurance bids me search ; there 1 shall find Fal-
stafT: I shall be rather praised for tliis than
mocked ; for it as positive as the earth is firm that
Fahtaff is there : I will go.

Enter Paob, Shallow, Slbnder, Host, Sir
Huou Evans, Caius, and Ruoby.

SheL Page, &c Well met, Master Ford.

Ford, Trust me, a good knot: I have good
oheer at home; and, I pray you all go with me.

ShaL I must excuse myself, Master Ford.

SUn^ And ^ must I, sir ; we have appointed to
dint with Mistress Anne, and I would not break
with her for more money than 1 11 speak of.

BhaL We have lingered about a match between
Anne Page and my cousin Slender, and this day
we shall have our answer.

8Un, I hope I have your good will, £Uher Page.

Page, You have. Master Slender ; I stand
wholly for you :— bat my wife. Master Doctor, is
for you mlt<H;ether.



Caiut. Ay. by gar; and de maid is love-a me.
my nursh-a Quickly tell me so mush.

Boat, What say you to young Master Fenton ?
he capers, he dances, he has eyes of youth, he
writes verses, he speaks holiday, he smells April
and May : he will carry *t, he will carry 't ; t is
in his buttons ; he will carry t

Page, Not by my consent, I promise you. The
gentleman is of no liaving; he kept company
with the wild prince and Poins; he is of too high
a region, he knows t>o much. No, he shall not
knit a knot in his fortunes with the finger of my
substance : if he take her, let him take her simply;
the wealth I have waits on my consept, and my
coasent goes not that way.

Ford, I beseech you, heartily, some of yon go
home with me to dinner : besides your cliefr, yoo
shall have sport; I will show you amonstpr, —
Master Doctor, you shall eo;— so shall you.
Master Pa^ ;— and you, Sir Hugh.

Stud. W ell, fare you well : we shall havB the
frver wooing at Master Page's.

[Exeunt Shal. and Slbn.

Caiai, Gk> home, John Kugby ; I come anon.
[Eadt KuoBT.

Host, Farewell, my hearts: I will to my honest
knight Falstaff, and drink canary with him.

[Exit Host.

Ford [Aeide,"] I think I shall drink in pipe-wine
first with him; 111 make him dance. Will you
go, gentles ?

AIL Have with you, to see this monster.

[Exewil,

SCENE III.— il Room m Ford^ House,
Enter Mrs. Ford and Mrs. Page.
Mrs, Ford, What, John I What, Robert 1
Mrs. Page, Quickly, quickly: Is ^e buck
basket?
Mrs, Ford, I warrant: What, Robin, I sayl

Enter Servants, wih a basket,

Mrs, Page, Come, come, come.

Mrs. Ford, Here, set it down.

Mrs. Page, Give your men the charge; we
must be brief.

Mrs^ Ford, Marry, as I told you before, John
and Hubert, be rMuy here hard by in the In^w-
house; and when I suddenly call you, come forth,
and (without any pauFe or staggering) uke tliis
basket on your shoulders : that done, trudge with
it in all haste, and carry it among the whitsters in
Datchet meaa, and there empty it in the muddy
ditch, close by the Thames side.

Mrs, Page, You will do it?

Mrs. Ford, I have told them over and over ;
they lack no direction : Be gone, and come when
you are called. [Exeunt Servants.

ifrt. Page. Here comes little Robin.

Mter RoBDr.

Mrs. Ford. How now, my eyas-musket? what
news with you ?

Ech. My master, Sir John, h come in at your
back-door, Mistress Ford; and requests your
company.

Mrs. Page, You little Jaok-a-lent, have you
been true to us?

Hob. Ay, 111 be sworn : My master knows noi
of your being here ; and hath threatened to put
me into everUsting liberty if I tell yon o^ it ; roc,
he iwean, hell turn me away.



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Online LibraryWilliam Michael Rossetti William ShakespeareThe complete works of Shakespeare: With a critical biography → online text (page 33 of 224)