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Nicolls, Robert. . 100, 103, 141, 490, 502

Nicholson, Captain Francis 122

Governor 125

nine men 76, 79, 471

Noah, Mordecai 528

non-importation agreement, 1765

199,211

normal schools 499

North Hempstead 479

Northam's Civil Government, q..319
not one cent for tribute 334

O'Connor, Joseph 466

Ogdensburg 354

Ohio valley 316

Olcott, Thomas W 380

Oneida canal 373

lake 325, 369

river 369

the 353

Ouondaga country 137

salt springs 32, 163

Ontario, (Lake) 182, 265, 356, 372

Orange county , 535

(Fort) 43,46, 101, 164

William, Prince of.. .47, 109, 111

origin of the Mormons 376

Oriskany 289

battle of 265

creek 265

Osborn, Sir Danvers 158

Ossawatomie Brown 419, 508

Oswego 150, 174, 182, 185, 228, 307

canal 372

capture of 178

river.... 369

Otis, James 197

Ottawa 191

Owego creek 311

Oyster Bay 479

Paauw, Michael 52

Paine, Judge , 412

Palati nate Germans 147

Palatine 180



Index



553



PAGE

Palitine Bridge 147

Palfrey 426

Palisades 299

encroachment on 486

Palmyra 376

panic of 1837 392, 396

paper monej^ and State banks 331

pardons .469

Paris ex position 485

treaty of, 1763. 187, 351

Parker, Amasa J 418

Parkhurst, Rev. C. H 475

parochial schools.-. 475

party for action 473

names 336

of union 473

paternal legislation 534

Patriot war 397

patroon estates 52

system 50, 404

patroons grow grasping 63

peace commission 242

faction 431

of Breda 108, 109

party 473

Peck, Judge 494

people's party 381

Penn, William 116, 117*

period of riots 395

Perry, Oliver Hazard 354, 355*

personal registration law 465

Peyster, Abraham de 138

Phelps and Gorham purchase.. ..311

Oliver 312

Philipse Manor 255

Phillips, Frederick 117

Phoenix, the 347

picture of residence of Sir "Will-
iam Johnson 232

Fort Stanwix in 1777 267

Saratoga battlefield monu-
ment 278

capture of Major Andre 293

State money of New York.. .330

Continental money 332

Pierce, Franklin 417*

Pike. General Zebulon 354



PAGE

Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth..

...'. 333,334

piracy 135

Pitcher, Lieutenant-governor 386

Pitt, William, see Lord Chatham
Piatt, Thomas C......... 455, 456, 478

Plattsburg 354, 357, 359

Plymouth company 40

council of 41

Poe, Edgar Allan 527*, 528

political assesments 458

parties 336, 384, 473, 477

Polk, James K..... ....... 403*, 408, 511

Poncet, Father Joseph 162

Pontiac's rebellion, 1763 191

popular government ended 68

population of New York in 1820.377

populist party 475

Porter, David 361

James 380

Portugal claims 28

postage 336

postmaster general 456

post-roads 336

Poughkeepsie 307, 318

Pratt, of Massachusetts 194

Presbyterian church occupied.. .142

Presbyterians forbidden 144

Presentation, (Fort) 156, 171

president, power of 317

presidential electors 382, 387, 404

Presque Isle 355

Prevost, General 355, 359.360

Prideaux, General 184, 185

Prince Edwards Isle 181

prison reforms 463

ships 252, 485

prisons .in New York 37d

private schools 475

privileges.of .the people 404

problems of government 309

prohibition p.a.rty 477

prohibitory legislation

413, 414, ,448, 454, 476, 534

property qualification.. .257, 258, 382

rights of women 408

prorogue 218



654 Prentice's History of New York State



PAGE

provincial congjress 221, 473

convention 219, 238

piiblic moneys 495

school society 411

works, superintendent of 453

Puritans 47

thrift of 58

Putnam, General Israel. 236, 241*, 279

Quakers 93, 142

driven from Manhattan 77

Quebec 164, 184, 185, 229, 252, 289

Queens county 479, 536

race discrimination 258

radicals 402, 408

Raines law 476

rapid transit in New York 487

Raritan Indians ' 66

rate bill 495

Raymond, Henry J 528

re-action of 1862 430

Read, Thomas Buchanan 528

recent events 483

recuperation after the war 442

Red Jacket 312*, 357

regents of the University. . , .468, 492

Religious freedom 257

' — intolerance 77, 144, 165

tolerance.... 93, 119, 120, 131, 141

worship 105

Rensselaerwick 53, 54, 64

republic 314

republicans. 327, 329, 336, 380, 417, 477
residence qualifications of voters. 449
restrictions on commerce. 196,211, 351

on trade 211

retaliation proposed 305

revolution, cost of 472

high tide of the 276

revolutionary sentiment 194

Rhode Island 211

Richmond county 477, 535

Rigdon, Sidney 376

rights of the people 143, 404, 411

Ripley, General 357

Rising, John 81



PAGE

Rivington, James 231*

roads 324

Robertson, William H 456

Robinson, Lucius 452*, 454

Thomas 199

Rocharabeau, Comte de 296*

Rochester 307

Roebling, John A 459

Washington A 457

Roelandsen, Adam 489, 490

Rome 178, 183, 369

Roosevelt, Theodore, frontis-
piece* 479, 488, 530

Royal African company 98

Gazette, The 231

Greens 263

province 122

rule of England 221

Rulinson, Adams 56

Rutledge, Edward 242*

Rymbault, Charles 161

Ryswick, treaty of 133, 169

sabbath observance 92

Sacketts Harbor 353

attack on 355

safety fund 337

St. Johns 229

St. Lawrence river 353

St. Leger, Barry 262*, 265, 267

defeat of 26

Salt lake 369

Sanford, Nathan 381

sanitary commission 428

Saratoga 289, 359, 535

battlefield monument 278*

battles of 271-273

burning of 157

Saugerties 535

Savage. John 381

savings banks 450

Saxton ballot reform law 465

Schenectady 137, 369

assault upon 168

burned - — 127

schepen 82

Schoharie valley invaded 288



Index



555



PAGE

school commissioner 499

fund inviolate 405

of New York 494

legislation 449

supervision 495

schools 363, 531

schout 82

Schuyler family 501

Col. John 133, 501

Col. Peter

..119, 132*, 145, 149, 169, 192, 501

influence with the Iroquois. 132

Gen. Phil! p. John

...157, 182, 219, 229, 238, 342, 501

against the Johnsons. 232, 288

and the Indians 228

captured 178*

influence with Washington

323

mansion burned 274

relieves Fort Stanwix 266

superseded by Gates

263, 264*, 269

U. S. senator 321

Hon Yost 268

(Fort) 190

Schuyler's island 251

Scotch highlanders, 1798 154

Scott, John Morin 256

Winfield 354, 357*, 397

seal of New York 122

searching vessels 351

Sears, Isaac 199, 207, 220, 231

Seawan 50

secession 424

secessionists 427

second war for independence 351

self-government demanded 75

senate, membership of.. .338, 405. 469

Seneca Chief, The '371

lake 311

river. 369

Seventeenth New York regiment.425

Seward, William Henry

. .388, 398*, 402, 412, 423, 439, 453

Seymour. Horatio

. .411*, 413, 423, 431, 436, 444, 459



PAGE

Seymour and S. J. Tilden 518

death of 444

shipping 335

Shirley, Gov. William 174

Shute, John 490

silver issue 477^ 478

sinking fund 405

Six Nations 206, 228,312

slave power 399

States, additional 406

slavery, abolition of. 259, 402, 411, 416

in New York 148

Sloughter, Col. William

126, 129,131,413, 472

Smith, Gerrit 419*. 507-.509

Joseph 376

Melancthon 317

William 256

history of New York 523

Smits, Claus 66

socialist labor party 477

society for prevention of crime.. 475

Sod us bay 3n

soldier votes 431, 437

song-birds, protection of 462

sons of liberty 201, 305, 315

Sorel river 185, 3.59

South river 43

southern tier 307

Spanish, cession to the 187

claims 40, 99

explorations of 28

war 479

New York's part in 479

Sparks, Jared 426

Spaulding, Solomon 376

Spencer, John C 400

Spirit of the Times 394

Staats Zeitung, The 394

stalwarts 455

stamp act 196

congress. 1765 197

repealed 202

riot 197

Standish, Miles, 85

Stanton, Edwin M 439

Mrs. Elizabeth Cady 406



556 Prentice's History of New York State



PAGE

Stanvvix, (Fort)

157, 183, 190, 266*, 285, 312

si«ge of 265

treaty of 206

Gen. John 185

Stark, John 182

State and municipal elections

separated 468

banks 387, 392

■ bounty debt 453

> capitjpl 454

' constitutions 255, 256,

257, 338, 378, 404, 443, 453, 468

flower, the rose 465

money of New York 330*

prisons, superintendent of.. 453

• superintendent of schools...

411, 499

office re-established 411

appeal to 496

Staten island 45, 53, 66, 240

steamboats, first 345

Stedman, Edmund Clarence, 527*, 528

Stephens, John Cox 345, 347

Steuben, IJaron 506*

Stewart, Charles 360*

Stillwater 324

■ battle of 273

Stirl ing. Lord 235*

Stoddard, Richard Henry... 527*, .528

Stony Point ( Fort) 246

captured 284

reservation 485

Stowe, Harriet Beecher 412*

Stuart, John 198*

Stuy vesant, Peter

73, 74*, 141, 164, 471, 489

intolerant 76

suckenhock 50

Suffolk county 536

Sullivan, General John 242, 286*

Sullivan's campaign 286

Sumter, (Fort) 220

supply bill 205

Swansdale 54, 69, 70

Swedes on the Delaware 62, 75

Swift, General Joseph 361



PAGE

Sylvester, Peter 321

Syracuse 19, 32, 285, 307, 369

Talcott, Samuel L 380, 381

Tallmadge,Lieutenaut-Goveruor.371

Tammany society 349, 377

Taney, Roger B 392

Tawasentha, treaty of 39, 46

tax on tea 209, 21 1

taxation 95, 1 19, 120, 483

by the people 79, 140

without consent 195

taxes of New Netherlaud 95

regulated by the people 79

Taylor, Bayard 527*, 528

Zachary 410*, 514

tea shipped to America 212

temperance law 476

movements 413

Texas, admission of 406

Thayendanegea 175*

Throop, Enos Thompson 388*

Ticonderoga (Fort).. 181, 184, 185,

..,226, 246, 251, 262, 263, 264, 289

captured 263

Tilden, Samuel J

409, 445, 449*, 476, 518-520

trust 476

Tilden-Hayes electoral count 452

Times, The New York 445, 519

Tioga county 311

Tippecanoe, hero of 400

to the victors belong the spoils.. 339

Tompkins, Daniel D 338,

..347*, 363, 365, 366, 377, 378, 492

death of 385

Toombs, Robert 422

tories 201,288, 305, 389

town commissioners 496

inspectors , 499

superintendent 499

Townsend, Samuel 256

Thomas S., q 426, 440

Tracy, Lieutenant-Governor 404

Marquis de 165

training classes 499

treason ! .260



Index



557



PAGE

treaty of Hartford 80, 86

Ghent 362

Utrecht 149

Trenton 250

battle of 250

trespass bill 306

trial by jury 105

Tribune, The New York

447,513,515,517

Trinity (Fort) 81

school 491

triple alliance, 1666 108

Troy 307

trustees, school 499

Tryou county, 211

county militia 265

Governor 210, 227, 279, 299

Tweed, William Marcy..444, 445, 447

ruv^ 444, 447, 519

twelve men , 66, 470

Tyler, John 400*

Ulster county 285, 535

Uncle Tom's Cabin 412

underground railroad 413

Underbill, Captain 71

under the constitution 314

Union forever 426

League Club 436

square meeting, 1861 428

United States bank 392, 396

deposit fund 393, 494

flagon all school buildings. 476

University of the State of New

York 469, 492

Utica 369

Utrecht, treaty of 149

Valcour Island 250

Valley Forge 277

Van Buren, :Martin..377,380,387*,

390, 396, 401, 409, 509, 510, 512, 518

Van Cortland family 238

— Jacob, 147

Perie 260. 328

Philip 125

Stephen 117, 125



PAGE

Van Curler, Arendt 116, 162, 167

Van Dam, Rip 147, 151

Van der Donck 522

Van Kruckebeeck, Daniel 46

Van Rensselaer, family

238,307,402,502,503

Colonel 147, 353

Jeremiah 321, 502*

Killian 52, 441

Mrs. Anna, q 56

General Robert 288

Stephen 352, 370,371, 503*

Van Twiller, Governor Wouter..

56,530

and Kieft 61

Jacob 58

Vanderbilt, William H 457

Vaughn, General 275, 280

Vermont, New York's claim to.. 309

relinquished '. .. .310

Verazzano 9.. 30*

Vestius, William 489

Vicksburg, battle of 432

Virginia, colonization 172, 174

Von der Donck, Adrian 77

voting machines 468

Vriesdale 70

Wadsworth, James S 430

Waldenses 94

Wall street built , 71

Wallabout 43, 252

Walloo.is 42, 46, 93

Walters, Robert 138

Walworth, Reuben Hyde 521*

Avam pum 50, 79

war of 1812 3.51

cost of 363

results 362

King George's 156

King William's 168

Queen Anne's 144

of the Austrian succession.. 1.56

of the Spanish succession... 144

Washington, burning of 361

(Fort) 246

captured 249



558 Prentice's History of New York State



Washington, George

253,317,322*, 342 506

a general 239

camp of ..234

commander-in-chief 227

death of 334

defeat of 241

disappointment of 296

farewell address of 302

in New York 276, 299

inauguration of 323, 464

reprimands Arnold 290

statue of 459

Watson, Elkanah 324

Waverly 282

Wayne, Anthony 284*

Webb, General 179

James Watson 389,394,528

Webster, Daniel 452, 514*

Noah 336

Weed; Thurlow 384*, 388, 512, 513

weeklj^ payments to employees. ,465

Wellington, Duke of 356

Westchester county 535

West India company

41, 43, 50, 51,57,74, 82,

98, 101, 103, 106, 110, 139, 140, 164

compl.'iints against 63, 78, 87

West Point 246, 252, 279

military academj*. 345

western lands, title to 316

Wheeler, William A 443

Whig party 389, 402, 406

White Plains 249. 275

Whitman, Walt 526*

Whittier, John G 426

Wiley, William 199

Willett, Colonel Marinus

227, 265, 267, 268*, 349

Thomas 85, 104

William III. ...109, 123*, 131, 135, 139



William and Mary 123*, 472

(Fort) 157

Henry (Fort).... Ill, 131, 179,246

Williams, Colonel 175

Willis, Nathaniel Parker. . .527*, 528

Windmill Point 250

Winney, Cornelias 307

Winsor, Justin, q 316

Winthrop, Governor 101, 110

Wirt, William 389

Wisner Henry 256

Witchcraft 106

Wolfe, General 184, 185, 186*, 229

death of 186

woman suffrage 408

woman's rights movement 406

women of Dutch New York 91

Women's Central Relief associa-
tion 428

Wood creek 369

Fernando 415, 427

Woolsey, Lieutenant 353

workingmen's party 388

Wright, Silas

..380. 388, 390, 403*, 405, 510-512

and DeWitt Clinton 511

and S. J. Tilden 518

Wyoming massacre 282

Yankee 480

Yates, Abraham, jr 256, 257»

.Joseph C 381*

J. Van Ness 381

Robert 256, 317

year of blood, 1643 69

Yeo, Sir James 356

Young, John 406*

Men's Christian association. 463

York, Duke of 471

Zenger, John Peter 1.52,'522



ACKNOWLEDOKMENTS

For the picture on page 266 we are indel)ted to the painter of the origi-
nal picture of which this is a photo-engraving — P. F. Hugunine, of Rome,
who gives special permission for its use in this work.

The map on page 358 is from an old number of Harper's Magazint*.

The maps of New York printed in two colors are all from the 171st
edition of Northam's Civil Government.



■TTJE SCnOOL BULLETIN' PUBLICATIONS.



Books for New York Schools.

1. A Manual of School Law. By C. W. Bardeen. Cloth, 16mo, pp.
300. Manilla, 50 cts. ; cloth, $1.00.

This book has been for twenty years the only recognized text-book oa
the subject. The present edition was wholly re-written in 1896, and brings
the subject up to date. It includes the author's "Handbook for School
Trustees ", and adds all the questions in school law given at uniform exam-
inations from the first to March, 1896, with full answers as imhlished by the
State Dejmrtment corrected to date according to changes in the law. As
school law is hereafter to be required in all teachers' examinations, 2d and
3d grades, as well as 1st, this book is absolutely indispensable to every
teacher, and hence has been put in the Standard Teachers' Library.

2. Laws of New York relating to Common Schools, with Comments and
Instructions, and a digest of Decisions. Leather, 8vo, pp. 807. $2.50.

This is what is known as " The Code of 1888 ", and is the final authority
upon all disputed questions,

5. A Descrijitive Geography of the Empire State. By C. W. Bardebn.
Cloth, 8vo, pp. 126, with 25 outline maps on uniform scale, 5 relief maps, and
125 illustrations. 75 cts.

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themselves at sight. No New York school can afford to be without it.

4. A Brief History of the Empire State, for Schools and Families. By
Welland Hendrick, A.M. Cloth, small 4to, pp. 201. 75 cts.

This book has proved one of our great successes, more than three hun-
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part of the Regents' course of study, with special questions in the examina-
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examinations for State certificates. Whether used as a history, or as a sup-
plementary reading-book, it has given universal satisfaction.

5. Civil Government for Common Schools, prepared as a manual for
public instruction in the State of New York. To which are appended the
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etc., etc. By Henry C. Northam. Cloth, 16mo, pp. 220. 75 cts.

This book no longer needs description, as its use is almost universal.
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6. A Chart of Civil Government. By Charles T. Pooler. Sheets 12 x
18. 5 cts. The siime folded for the pocket, in cloth covers, 25 cts.

7. History of Educational Journalism in New York. By C. W. Kar-
DEEN. Paper, 8vo, pp. 45. 50 cts.

C. W. BAKDEEN, Publisher, Syracuse, N. T



THE SCHOOL BULLETIN PTIBLIUATIONS

HenWs Brief History of tlie Empire State.

The success of this work may be judged from the fact that the last Re-
gents' report giving the text-books used shows that the number of schools
in which Hendrick's History is used has increased from 98 in 1891-2, when
first published, to 162 the next year, 189 the next, 231 the next, and 268 in
1895-6, the last reported, while two others are used altogether, and these only
in 2 schools. Since the Regents give two counts to New York history, and
the Department of Public Instruction gives nearly half the questions in
American history to New York history, principals are not slow to see that the
trend in history as in geography is toward beginning at home, and making
first well-known that which is nearest. Here are some testimonials:

Entered 50 in New York history; passed 42, 0^92$? of class. Think the
book first-class for the purpose.— Principal J. A. Bassett, Richfield Springs.

We use your History, 40 in the class. It is the best supplementary
Header I ever sau\ — F. L. Gammage, Headmaster St. Paul's School.

Hendrick's book was used as a supplementary book in one of our gram-
mar classes with very great acceptance. The teachers report great interest
on the part of the pupils, and express the opinion that the book is admir-
ably adapted to the purpose for which it was designed. It ivas by all odds
the most popular reading book placed in the hands of the c^«s5.— Principal
E. N. Jones, Plattsburgh Normal, while superintendent at Saratoga Springs.

Two things especially impress me in perusing this work, viz.: the im-
portance of this knowledge to the school children of New York State, and
the means of acquiring the same, made attractive by the clear and concise
Style of the author.— Commissioner Oscar Granger, Tioga county, N. Y.

What a fine work the " History of the Empire State "is! I hope to see
it in every school, for it is exactly such knowledge that will prove most in-
structive to the children of our State.— A H. Wilson, School Commissioner,
Fayetteville, N. Y.

Mr. Welland Hendrick, a teacher of history, finding the need of a brief
history of New York State, set about to supply the deficiency. The result
of his labors in compilation, arrangement, and condensation is a very satis-
factory text-book. In a compact manual of eighteen chapters he outlines
the story of the Empire State. The descriptive matter is well furnished
with wood-cuts, portraits and maps. In an appendix a number of well
framed questions are given for each chapter, making the work doubly use-
ful for the scholar and teacher. There is also an index. * * * It is really
quite refreshing to find the maker of a text-book of the history of New
York going at it properly, instead of hieing at once, as is usual with the
compiler, to Washington Irving, and taking him seriously. Mr. Hendrick
shows the sturdy qualities of the first settlers of New York, pays high trib-
ute to the merits of the Hollanders, does justice to Leisler, emphasizes the
story of liberty, gives due proportion of space to the events leading to the
Revolutionary and later wars, and to the triumph of peace. The last chap-
ter treats of the era of centennial celebrations. — The Critic.

C. W. BARDEEN, Publisher, Syracvise, N. Y.



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Martin's Stories of New York

The recent marked tendency to make local history prominent in sup-
plementary reading is in every way to be commended. Children like tales
of adventure and daring, they like such tales the more if they know they
are true, and still more if they are associated with places near by or well-
known.

New York is as remarkable in its history as in its geography. Here were
the headquarters of the Indians; here were some of most romantic of ex-
plorations; here were the most important battles of the revolution and of
the war of 1812; here the Erie canal was built; here the first steamboat ran;
here the development of commerce and of manufactures has been the
greatest. To ride from Albany to New York or to Buffalo is to pass through
a region full of historical associations.

This history is the rightful heritage of the children of the State. They
have the right to expect of their education that it shall enable them to
recognize its landmarks and recall their associations.' When they see from
the windows of the train the Oriskany monument, it should call up the
picture of what was perhaps the pivotal battle of the revolution, Avith General
Herkimer wounded at the foot of the tree but still directing his men.
When they pass the ruins of Ticonderoga, their minds should recall Ethan
Allen's rough demand for its surrender. Crown Point, Plattsburg, Oswego,
Niagara, Stony Point— what memories of valiant deeds should cluster about
these names.

This volume is a contribution to this end. The stories deal with the
Indians, the explorers, the patroons; they tell of Champlain and Stu^'vesant
and Leisler; of the settlement of New York, the burning of Schenectady,
the capture of Ticonderoga and Stony Point, the surrender of Burgoyne,
the treason of Arnold. Most of the stories are told as by contemporaries —
the narrative of the wounded soldier to his grandchild, the letter of the
husband to the wife, of the son to his absent mother. They have all been
used in the schoolroom and have all been found to be interesting to the
children. Profitable they cannot fail to be.

For supplementary reading the advantage of stories which have a con-
nection is well known to observing teachers. The volume is in large and
open type, in familiar conversational style, and handsomely illustrated, so
that as a reader for children of the fourth to seventh grades it deserves a
place in every school. It will prove among the most pleasing to the chil-
dren, and certainly among the most useful in every way. Our children
should know what a grand old State they live in, and they cannot learn his-
tory moi'e certainly and pleasantly than by using this volume as a reader.

The expressed purpose of the regents of the university and of the de-
partment of public instruction to give more and more prominence in the
regents and in the uniform examinations in history and geography to the
history and geography of New York, makes it especially desirable as an
early preparation for these examinations.
Cloth, 16ino, pp. 119, 41 portraits and other illustrations, 50 cts.



THE SCHOOL BTTLLETIK PUBLICATIONS.

Books for Teaching" Geography.

1. A Brief Geography of the Empire State. With 25 outline maps on
uniform scale, 5 relief maps, and 125 illustrations. By C. W. Bardeeit.
Cloth, 8vo, pp. 120. 75 cts. Outline maps of New York for pupils' use to
accompany It, 15 cts. per pad of 50.

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features. The series of outline maps is designed to make prominent one
thing at a time. * * * There are also the unusual maps of Mineral Springs,
Indian Reservations, and of Charitable and Correctional Institutions. The
book is intended for the use of pupils as young as fifth grade. * * * The
illustrations embrace the unequalled natural attractions of a State famous for
its beauty of waterfall, mountain, and landscape. These illustrations are of
excellent quality and tastefully arranged, and will be enjoyed by everybody



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