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William Richard Cutter.

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GENEALOGICAL



AND



PERSONAL MEMOIRS

Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts.



PREPARED UNDER THE EDITORIAL SUPERVISION OK

WILLL\M RICHARD CUTTER, A.M.

Historian of the Xcw I''nglan(l Historic ( ienealoj^ical Society: Librarian of
W'obnrn Public Library: Author of "The C"ntter I-'aniily.'" "I listory of ArHngton,"
'VHi1)hogra]iln of \\i)l)urn.'" etc.. etc.



VOLUME I.



ILLUSTRATED.



.NEW YORK

LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY

.... 1908 ....



r



v,\



Copyright, 1908.
Lewis Historical Publishing Company.



S<^



w^






INTRODUCTORY.



THE present work, "Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of
Boston and Eastern Massachusetts," presents in the aggregate an amount and variety
of genealogical and personal information and ])ortraiture une(|ualled l)y any kindred
])ublication. Indeed,, no similar work concerning this region has ever before been presented.
It contains a vast amount of ancestral history never before printed. The object, clearly
defined and well digested, was threefold:

[Mrst: To present in concise form the history of estal)lished families of Boston and its
immediate vicinity, and Eastern Massachusetts.

Second: To preserve a record of their prominent present-day people.

Third: To present through personal sketches, linked with the genealogical narrative,
the relation of the prominent families of all times to the growth, singular prosperity and
\vides])read influence of the historic old City of Boston
and the region belonging to it by historical association
and ccjmmunity of interest.

There are numerous vohiminou.N narrative histories
of this section in one form or other, making it unnec-
essary in this work to even outline its armals. What
has been ])ublislied, however, princi])ally relates to the
people in tlie mass. The amplification necessary to
com]:)lete the ])icture of the region, old and nowaday, is
what is su])plied in large measure by these ( ienealogical
and PerscMial .Memoirs. In other words, whik' others
have written of "the times," the province of this work
is to be a chronicle of the people who have made lioston
and Eastern Massachusetts.

L'nic|ue in conception and treatment, this work
constitutes one of the most original and ])ermanently
valuable contributions ever made to the social history
f)f an .American communit)-. In it are arrayed in a
lucid and dignified manner all the im])ortant facts
regarding the ancestry, personal career and matrimo-
nial alliances of many of those who, in each succeeding
generation, have been accorded leading positions in the
social, professional and l)usiness life of Boston and tlu'
outlying region. Xor has it been based upon, neither
dc^es it minister to. aristocratic |)rejudices and assump-
tions. On the contrary, its fundamental ideas are
thoroughly .American and deniocratic. Ihe work every- Bunker Hiu Monnmeiu.




L?nii



INTRODUCTORY.



where conveys the lesson that distinction has been gained only by honorable pnblic service,
or by usefulness in private station, and that the development and prosperity of the section of
whiciT it treats has been dependent upon the character of its citizens, and the stimulus which
they have given to commerce, to industry, to the arts and sciences, to education and religion

to all that is comprised in the highest civilization of the present day — through a continual

progressive development.

The inspiration underlying the present work is a fervent appreciation of the truth so well
expressed by Sir Walter Scott, that "there is no heroic poem in the world but is at the
bottom the life of a man." And with this goes a kindred truth, that to know a man, and
rio^htlv measure his character, and weigh his achievements, we must know wdience he came,
from what forbears he sprang. Truly as heroic poems have been written in human lives m
the ])aths of peace as in the scarred roads of war. Such examples, in whatever line of
endeavor, are of much worth as an incentive to those who come afterward, and such were
never so needful to 1)e written of as in the present day, when pessimism, forgetful of the
s])lendid lessons of the past, withholds its eiTort in the present, and views the future only
with alarm.

Boston and Eastern Massachusetts offer a peculiarly rich and interesting field for such
research as has been here undertaken. Its sons— "native here, and to the manner born,"— have
attained distinction in every' department of human effort. An additional interest attaches to
the present undertaking in the fact that, while dealing primarily with the people of a section,
this work approaches the dignity of a national epitome of genealogy and biography. Owing
to the wide dispersion throughout the country of the
old families of this region, the authentic account here
presented of the constituent elements of her social life,
past and present, is of far more than merely local
value. In its special field it is. in an a])i)reciable degree,
a reflection of the development of the country at large,
since hence went out representatives of historic fami-
lies, in various generations, wdio in far remote places —
beyond the Mississippi and in the Far West — were with
the vanguard of civilization, building up communities,
creating new commonwealths. ])lanting, wherever the}
went, the church, the school liouse and the jn'inting
])ress, leading into channels of thrift and enterprise all
who gathered about them, and ])roving a ])ower for
ideal citizenship and good government. And further,
the custodian of records concerning the useful men of
preceding generations, of the homes and churches,
schools, and other institutions, which they founded,
and of their descendants who have lived honorable and
useful lives, who thus aids in ])lacing such knowledge
in preservable and accessible form, j^erforms a ])ublic
service in rendering honor to whom honor is due, and
in inculcating the mtjst valuable lessons of patriotism
and good citizenship.

The vast influence exerted by the ]Deople of Boston
and of the sections immediately covered by it, is
immeasurable. The story of the Plymouth and Massa- statue of captain parker, Lexington.




INTRODUCTORY



clmsetts Bay colonies lies at the foundation of the best there is in American history, and the
names of Brewster, \\'inslo\v, Bradford, Standish. Alden. Warren, Rowland (all of whom
came in the "Mayflower") and were prominent in the Old Colony, with Freeman, Corham
and Sears — all these of Plymouth ; and Winthro]). Saltonstall, Dudley. Wilson, Bradstreet,
and others of the Alassachusetts Bay Colony, have an undying fame, and these names are
prominent to-day in Eastern Massachusetts. These early settlers erected an original form
of government, pledging themselves to maintain and ])reserve all their liberties and privi-
leges, and in their vote and suffrage, as their conscience might them move, as to best conduce
and tend to the public weal of the body, without respect of persons or favor of any man.
Their heroism was exhibited in their conflicts with the savages. In statesmanship they builded
better than they knew. Their code of laws known as the 'T^ody of Liberties" has been
termed an almost declaration of independence, opening with the pronouncement that neither
life, liberty, honor nor estate were to be invaded unless under express laws enacted by the
local authorities, and when this bold declaration led to the demand of the English government
that the colonial charter should be surrendered, the colonists resisted to a successful issue.
In later days Faneuil Hall became the cradle of .American Liberty, and from its platform
were proclaimed the doctrines which bore fruit in resistance to the Stani]:) Act. in the Boston
Massacre, and the engagements at Lexington and Concord and Bunker Hill.

At a later day. when came the momentous (|uestion whether a free and lil)eral govern-
ment "of the jjcople. by the people and for the ])eo])le" was to ])erish from the earth, the
sons of their illustrious sires were not found wanting in patriotism and devotion, but freely
sacrificed comforts, property and life for sake of the ])rinci]^les inherited from the fathers.

Here. loo. were develojied in highest degree tlu' arts of ])eace. Religion, education,
science, invention, labor along all the lines of mechanical anil industrial i)rogress. here made
their beginnings, and while their ramitications extended throughout the land, the i)arent
home and the parent >tock held their ])re-eminence, as they do to the present day.

Besides the City of Boston and its immediate environs, the sco])e of the work includes
other sections of Eastern Massachusetts, whose peojjle sprang from the same or similar stock,
and whose history and traditions are akin thereto, such as Salem, the first town settled in
the bounds of the old Massachusetts Colony: Lynn, the ancient Saugus, bringing its name
from Lynn Regis ( King's Lynn) county of Xorftdk. England, in honor of Mr. Whiting,
the minister, who came from that town; Gloucester, settled in 1623. by settlers from the
citv of the same name in h'ngland ; .Marblehead. famed in histor\- and song; \ewburyi)ort
and Lawrence, and others of imj^ort-
ance both in the past and present.

The descendants of those earl\-
settlers are especiall}- ])rou(l of their
ancestry ; for. whatever the part
allotted them, even the most trivial
service rendered commands respect and
admiration, and those now residents
of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts
esteem it a precious i)rivilege to have
their names associated with such an
illustrious grouj) of families. Such an
honorable ancestry is a noble heritage,
and the storv of its achievements is

Plvnioutn Rock.




vi INTRODUCTORY.

a sacred trust committed to its descendants, upon whom has devolved the perpetuation of
the record.

It was the consensus of opinion of gentlemen well informed and loyal to the memories
of the past and the needs of the present and future, that the editorial supervision of
William Richard Cutter, A. M., would ensure the best results attainable in the preparation
of material for the proposed work. For more than a generation past he has given his
leisure to historical and genealogical research and authorship. He was the author, with his
father, of "History of the Cutter Family of New England." 1871-1875; and "History of
Arlington, Massachusetts," 1880; and edited Lieutenant Samuel Thompson's "Diary While
Serving in the French and Indian War, 1758," 1896. He also prepared a monograph entitled
"Journal of a Forton Prisoner, England," sketches of Arlington and Woburn, Massachu-
setts, and many articles on subjects connected with local historical and genealogical matters
for periodical literature. He prepared a "Biography of Woburn," and he has been editor
of various historical works outside of his own city. His narrative on "Early Families,"
which introduces Volume I. of this work is of peculiar value for information and reference.

Others to whom the publishers desire to make grateful acknowledgment for services
rendered in various ways — as writers, or in an advisory way, in pointing to channels of valuable
information, are : Edward Henry Clement, long editor of the Boston Transcript : Arthur G.
Loring, an author and investigator of peculiar industry; Nathan M. Hawkes, who has made
valuable contributions to the literature of his region ; John Howard Brown, late editor of
"Lamb's Biographical Dictionary of the United States ;" Thomas Franklin Waters, author
of various works and monographs on New England antiquities and genealogy; and Frank
Smith, widely known as a writer and lecturer on historical subjects.

This work comi)rises a carefully prepared genealogical history of several hundred repre-
sentative families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts. Tlie editor and publishers desire
to state that they have adopted a dififerent method for collecting and compiling data than has
heretofore been pursued in this country. Time and expense have not been spared in making
the publication a valuable work for reference. The value of family history and genealogy
depends ujion accuracy, and the thoroughness of research in public and private records ;
also, upon the use of old and un]niblished manuscri])ts, supplemented by a careful gleaning
and comj^iling of information to be found in the various printed works in ])ublic and ]irivate
libraries. It has been the aim of editor and publishers to utilize all such material, connecting
the same with the first ])rogenitor, where possible, and present in a narrative form the family
line down to and including the present generation, weaving in the military and civic services
of the subject treated. In order to insure greatest possible accuracy, all matter for this work
was submitted in typewritten manuscript to the persons most interested for correction.

If, in any case, a sketch is incomplete or faulty, the shortcoming is save in exceptional
cases, ascribable to the paucity of data obtainable, many families being without exact records
in their family line ; while, in some cases, representatives of a given family are at disagree-
ment as to names of some of their forbears, important dates, etc.

It is believed that the present work, in spite of the occasional fault which attaches to
such undertakings, will prove a real addition to the mass of annals concerning the historic
families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts, and that, without it, much valuable informa-
tion would be inaccessible to the general reader, or irretrievably lost, owing to the passing
away of custodians of family records, and the consetiuent disappearance of material in their
Dossession. THE PUBLISHERS.



EARLY FAMILIES.



SUFFOLK COUNTY.

The late William H. Whitmore, city regis-
trar of Boston, has treated the history of the
]jrominent families of Boston in the seven-
teenth and eighteenth centuries in a cursory
manner in two chapters at the end of the first
and second volumes of Winsor's "Memorial
History of Boston." There has never been,
according to his statement, any general or
complete attempt to write their genealogy, as
a whole, and probably never will be, owing to
the want of proper material, and the magni-
tude of the undertaking. The greater part of
the early settlers came from the middle class
of England. Their ideas of society were the
same as the English, and they were devoid of
the element of the very poor, as well as of the
higher class of the nobility. Until the Revo-
lution of 1775 they were in effect and in prac-
tice a British province.

yir. Whitmore gives a list of forty promi-
nent families of the seventeenth century in
which he names the following:



I.


W inthroj).


21.


( ierrish.


2.


Ik'llingham.


22.


1 'ayne.


3-


hjidicott.


23 •


Middlecott.


4-


Leverett.


24.


Lusher.


5-


Ijradstreet.


25-


Jeffries.


6.


Hough.


2(^.


Lidgett.


7-


Hibbens.


27-


Saffin.


8.


Gibbons.


28.


Ruck.


9-


Davie.


2i).


\\'hittinghain,


10.


Richards.


30.


Shrimpton.


1 1.


Savage.


3'-


Stoddard.


12.


Cooke.


3^-


Sergeant.


13-


Hutchinson.


?^?^-


Sheaffe.


14.


Oliver.


34-


Gibbs.


u>


Hull.


35-


Lvnde.


16.


Brattle.


3^^-


Lyde.


17-


Tyng.


37-


Clarke.


18.


Alford.


38.


Cotton.


19-


Scarlett.


39-


Allen.


20.


Joyliffe.


40.


Mather.



Of the above, Winthrop, Endicott, Leverett,
Bradstreet, Savage, Hutchinson, Oliver, Brat-
tle, Tyng, Usher, Jeffries, Shrimpton, Stod-
dard, Lynde, Clarke, Cotton and Mather, are



about all the names that are familiar to the
present generation. Taken up seriatim :

1. The ancestor of the Winthrop family left
two sons who left male descendants in New
London, Connecticut, and Cambridge, Massa-
chusetts. One son, whose only son died with-
out issue, is represented at present by descend-
ants in the female line in Chelsea and Win-
throp, Massachusetts.

2. Bellingham : Name extinct in the second
generation.

3. Endicott : Descendants in Essex county,
through one son. The other son died without
issue.

4. Leverett: Ancestor an alderman in Old
Boston before removal here ; one son and sev-
eral married daughters in the second genera-
tion.

5. Bradstreet : Numerous descendants.

6. Hough : Alderman of Old Boston before
coming here ; one son in the second generation,
one son in the third ; two sons in the fourth
generation died before middle age.

7. Hibbens : No issue after first generation.

8. Gibbons : Extinct soon.

9. Davy : Ancestor was son of a baronet ;
one son returned to England and inherited
estate and title of his grandfather; two sons
by a second wife.

10. Richards: No children in one case;
another Richards had an only son and also
daughters ; a third of the name died without
issue.

11. Savage: By two wives, six children and
eleven children. "The family has maintained
its position in Boston till the present genera-
tion."

12. Cooke: One son of the second gener-
ation. This son had an only daughter whose
descendants of another name still represent
the family in Boston.

13. Hutchinson: The later generation be-
longs to the record of the eighteenth century.

14. Oliver: Appear to have well sustained
their number and influence.

15. Hull: In the second generation, an only
child, a daughter, whose descendants were
numerous.

16. Brattle: Male line extinct in the third
generation.



(I)



BOSTON AND EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS.



17. Tyng: Male members, descendants of
two brothers, not numerous ; line continued in
female branches.

18. Alford:, Does not appear after the
third generation.

19. Scarlett: No male descendants.

20. Joyliffe : In the second generation, an
only child, a daughter, died unmarried.

21. Gerrish (later Essex county) ; a grand-
son returned to Boston and left descendants.

22. Payne: One child (a son). "The fam-
ily became extinct here in 1834."

23. IMiddlecott : Four children, three daugh-
ters and one son ; the son settled in England.

24. Usher: Two sons and two daughters of
the second generation ; one son married and
had no children ; one son married and had one
daughter, and by a second marriage had other
issue "still represented in Rhode Island."

25. Jeffries : Two sons of the second gener-
ation. "The family is still represented in
Boston, being one of the few which have con-
tinued through all the changes of two centu-
ries."

26. Lidgett : Represented by a son of the
second generation, wdio died at London in
1698.

27. Saffin : No issue of the first generation.

28. Ruck, or Rock : One son of second gen-
eration, beyond whom the line is not traced.

29. Whittingham : Left issue after first
generation here.

30. Shrimpton : Left issue of a later dis-
tinguished generation.

31. Stoddard: "The family still flourishes,
though not in Boston."

32. Sergeant: One generation, without issue.

33. Sheaffe : Two daughters of the second
generation, one of whom married a relative of
the same name. The name appears to have
ended in Boston in 1724.

34. Gibbs : "The name continued till re-
cently in Middlesex county."

35. Lynde : One son (second generation)
settled in Salem.

36. Lyde: One child, a son. no further men-
tion.

37. Clarke : One son, for one family ; other
families of this name were more numerously
represented.

38. Cotton : Two sons of the second genera-
tion and two daughters. "The family, how-
ever, soon passed from Boston."

39. Allen : One son, who was treasurer of
the province.

40. ]\Iather : The members of this family
appear to be numerous, especially in the female



branches. "The name, however, was soon lost
to Boston, though descendants in Connecticut
still bear it."

Mr. Whitmore, for the eighteenth century,
continues his list of the most prominent fami-
lies of Boston (or Suffolk county) until he
has included one hundred numbers for the two
centuries which his list was designed to cover ;
more especially for the eighteenth century, the
provincial period from 1692 to 1775. He also
observes that with few exceptions the names
of the colonial (or first period) disappear early
in the eighteenth century. In his list for the
eighteenth century he includes such names as
follows :



41.


I'hips.


71-


Tavlor.


42.


Tailer.


72.


Eliot.


43-


Dummer.


73-


Belcher.


-I4-


Shirley.


74-


W^illiams.


45-


Hutchinson.


75-


W'inslow.


46.


Oliver.


7'>-


W'illard.


47-


H.jbb)-.


77-


W'alley.


48.


Temple.


78.


Ballentine.


49-


Nelson.


79-


A'alentine.


50.


Sewall.


80.


Gushing.


51.


Addington.


81.


Bowdoin.


52-


Davenport.


82.


Faneuil.


53-


Savage.


83-


Johonnot.


54-


PhilhVs.


84.


Olivier.


55-


Wendell.


85-


Sigourney.


5^>-


Lloyd.


86.


Brimmer.


57-


liorland.


87.


]\Iascarene.


58.


\'assall.


88.


Bethune.


59-


Lindall.


89.


Cunningham,


60.


Brinley.


90.


Boylston.


61.


Pitts.


91.


Trail.


62.


Apthorp.


92.


Alountfort.


f'>3-


Salisbury.


93-


Greenwood.


64.


Marion.


94.


Charnock.


65-


Bridge.


95-


jNIartyn.


66.


Quincy.


96.


Cooper.


67.


Fitch.'


97.


Lynde.


6S.


Clark.


98.


Gardiner.


69.


Bromfield.


99.


Amory.


70.


Pavne.


100.


Waldo.



The Eighteenth Century, taken up seriatim :

41. Phips: No children of the first ancestor,
but a wife's nephew became his heir and
adopted the name ; this nephew had an only
surviving son, whose family consisted of three
sons and three daughters.

42. Tailer : The founder married twice : no
issue reported after first generation.

43. Dummer: Three sons of this name, of
which one died unmarried, another married



BOSTON AND EASTERN MASSACHL'SETTS.



left an only daughter, and the third left no
children. "The family has been continued in
Boston, though not in the name."

44. Shirley (family of the English Gover-
nor) : Four sons and five daughters. "Only
one son survived him, whose only son died
without issue in 1815."

45. Hutchinson (also of the seventeenth
century) : Family consisting of two sons, both
married, whose descendants were most notable ;
the first had Thomas (the famous lieutenant-
governor of the province) and Foster Hutch-
inson ; the second left a son Edward and two
daughters. Foster had a son and daughter,
and Governor Thomas had three children. As
the members became refugees, they are not
found here after the Revolution.

46. Oliver: In the second generation was
one son, whose son was the father of a branch
of the family which remained here. liy a
second marriage the first ancestor had a family
of fourteen children. Another branch of the
early Oliver family had two sons who were
married. Another branch of the second gen-
eration was a member who had four sons, the
descendants of whom have been numerous.
There was still another branch of these Boston
Olivers, one of whose members had two wives,
and by them many children, most of whom
died young. A son of this last group was a
graduate of Harvard College in 1719. one of
whose daughters married Benjamin Prescott,
and was "the ancestress of famous men."

47. Hobby : The particular member was
knighted^ — "one of our few titled natives;" he
left a widow, but no children.

48. Temple: One son of this family had
three daughters, and sons, whose descendants
are numerous. One of the sons of the emi-
grant inherited the baronetcy belonging to this
family.

49. Nelson : Two sons represented this
family in the second generation ; also daugh-
ters. '

50. Sewall : One son of the second genera-
tion was married, but "the line soon ceased in
the name ;" one son of the same generation was
married and had a family. "Descendants of
the name still reside in Boston and the vicin-
ity."

51. Addington : The family ended in the
second generation with the death of a daughter
who died young.

52. Davenport : Third generation was repre-
sented by two sons and two married daughters
in Boston.

53. Savage : This family was numerously



represented in the eighteenth century in the
male line.

54. Phillips : Well represented in the male
line in Boston to a late generation.

55. Wendell: \\'ell represented in the male
line.

56. Lloyd: Numerously represented in the
male line to about 1850.

^^j. Borland: An only son of the second
generation here had two sons and a daughter.
One of the two sons had twelve children.



Online LibraryWilliam Richard CutterGenealogical and personal memoirs relating to the families of Boston and eastern Massachusetts (Volume v.1) → online text (page 1 of 114)