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William Richards Castle William Roscoe Thayer.

The Harvard graduates' magazine online

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the desire to repay, in part, their obliga-
tions for the good and advantage they
derived from Harvard in their under-
graduate and professioiial school days.
To them the ''omnia signia jurseque" of
the sheepskin is inteipreted not as a per-



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288



Assodated Harvard Clubs. [September,



lonal acquisition of ngfkU and privileges
peculiar to college men, but of certain du-
ties and services they are in duty bound
to offer the University. Realising their
willingness to serve, I am constantly sur-
prised that the University makes no
effort to make use of their loyalty or to
knit the graduate body into a working
organization. Undergraduate organisa-
tions show more energy and initiative
than the University itself. Except for
the annual right to vote by postal ballot,
which is seldom used by the majority of
graduates and which is extended to only
a fraction of the men who have attendad
Harvard, the University comes into no
direct contact with her graduate body.
Graduate magaxines, class movements,
etc., are in nd way direcUy due to the
stimulating influence of the University.
They are spontaneous demonstrations of
affection which cannot be suppressed.
If there be such a thing as Harvard in-
difference, it exists in the rebitions be-
tween the University and her graduates
instead of in the graduate body itself.
The Bulletin and the Oraduaies* MagO'
title try to keep up interest in the Uni-
versity, but the graduate body is rarely
informed of University matters to a
greater extent than is the average news-
paper reader. Recently, for instance, I
obtained quite by accident more real
information about the splendid organixa-
tion of our Library from a newspaper
account than I ever acquired from all
direct sources. Why not give such valu-
able and stimulating influence to our
graduates? Why permit the few to be
and remain benefactors of the Univer-
sity through princely bequests, rather
than make the necessary appeal to
thousands of men even though the indi-
vidual subscriptions may be relatively
small?

Graduate activity is in the hands of
too small a number of men. As at pres-



ent organised nether the Harvard
Alumni Association nor the Associated
Harvard Clubs is doing the proper
amount of woric. It is true that each
year the Associated Harvard Clubs at-
tract new groups of men, but as yet the
vast number of graduates still accept
rather than give. Many of us have f oilhd
that service for the University is so stim-
ulating and satisfying that we sincerely
wish and hope that all Harvard men may
sooner or later participate; not to do so
is to be voluntarily deprived of a great
and lasting satisfaction.

So often have I seen what splendid
work an individual graduate can do for
Harvard that I cannot suppress my won-
der that the University does not avail
herself more of similar service. I cannot
help t^»"^""g of certain individuab who
have, during the past year, done really
creative work. One has built up a series
of scholarships which makes it possible
in almost every State of the Union for
some worthy boy to acquire a Harvard
education regardless of his financial con-
dition. Another has organized in the
Far West a Harvard movement which
already hat borne splendid fruit and will
be increasingly effective in future years.
A third, in a State very sparsely settled
by Harvard men, has, by means of let-
ters, telegrams, and personal visits, or-
ganized a Harvard club which to-day
applies for admission. He has raised a
scholarship which this year will send a
boy to Harvard, and best of all, he has
brought the University back into the
affections of isolated graduates who
otherwise would have drifted away.
Still, I doubt if even the name of more
than one of these men is known in
Cambridge. These examples are not
rare and can be duplicated in almost
every community.

Each year the Associated Harvard
Gubs has a Committee on Service to the



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1915.]



Associated Sarvard Clvhs.



289



University. These committees have in-
vestigated and made able reports. Most
of the recommendations could not be
carried out because there is no central
power which can direct enforcement. It
seems to me that it is time that the Uni-
versity should appoint a committee to
see how the University can assist the
Associated Harvard Clubs to assist the
University.

The second point to which I direct
your consideration is the organization,
or lack of organization, of the Associated
Harvard Qubs. Since the time of the
informal organization in 1897 until now,
the work of this Association has con-
sisted Isigely in laying sub-structures.
Our major activity has been getting or-
ganized clubs to merge into tUs Associ-
ation, to organize new clubs, and to es-
tablish nation-wide scholarships. In the
future we must do more constructive
work. We have passed what might be
called the undergraduate stage, and now
face specialized advanced work. Thb
work must be done to a large degree by
small committees and by the future offi-
cials of the organization, who must de-
pend in turn on the individual graduates
for assistance and aid. First of all, we
must make use of the endowment idea
suggested by former President Shillito.
Such a fund must be gradually accumu-
lated in order to insure financial inde-
pendence and effectiveness. I refer to
this matter of endowment, just to re-
mind you that the Association la ready
and prepared to receive funds which will
be faithfully administered for the use
and purposes of the University.

Another matter for consideration is
one of a radical change. Our Association
is at present loosely knit and more or less
cumbersome. Each year we have a new
President. Most fortunately in every
case, the men who have received this
high office are^men who are notably suc-



cessful and who have administered the
affairs of the organization in a brilliant
manner, as is shown by the constant and
continued growth of the organization.
But the details of administration each
year have become more complex with
the result that it usually takes several
months to learn them, and by the time
the President has become proficient, it is
almost time for him to surrender his
office to a successor. On the other hand,
there has always been more or less con-
tinuity in the treasurership and secre-
taryship. And I believe it has been a wise
action, but time and again I have been
impressed with the possibilities of real
accomplishment if we had a Secretary
who could devote all of his time and en-
ergy to the task. The benefits are so
great that I believe neither the Univer-
sity nor the graduate body has a right
further to disregard the possible benefits.
I am convinced that the time is ripe to
consider and deliberate on the question
of k paid Secretary, a man who would
be paid for his work and be expected to
give all his time and attention to the fur-
thering of the purposes of this organiza-
tion and for the ultimate benefit of the
University.' It may be urged that it
would not be proper for a graduate to
expect to be paid for his services. I be-
lieve that it would be no more undigni-
fied than it is for any officer of the Uni-
versity to be properly reimbursed, for
the paid Secretary would c^ve far more
service to the University than can be
measured by the dollars of his salary.

The Harvard Alumni Association
lacks authority over the individual Har-
vard dubs, an authority which is
broadly but vaguely delegated to the
Associated Harvard Clubs. Until a def-
initely perfected assimilation or differ-
entiation is made between the two organ-
izations, there are Sure to be certain
overlappings, wasted efforts, and conse*



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240



Varia.



[September,



quent curtaifanent of potsible activities.
It may be adviaable to amalgamate the
two secretaryships while still enjoying
individual existence, as was the case in
the consolidation of Harvard Univer-
sity with Technology, or it may be
deemed advisable to have a more in-
tensive Secretaiy who can do more ac-
tive creative work for the Assodation,
and through it for the benefit ol the Uni-
versity. C. Bard^ '01« Sec

VARU.

THE APPIAN WAY.

Bsad at the Annual Meeting qf the

Harvard Club cf New Jereey.

I
The way we have at Harvard,

Is not the Appian Way,
Where Senators roll'd homeward

Only at peep of day.



Our President and FeUows
At six first toddy brew;



Of such is Heaven's Idngdomt
A real Olympian stew.



Each Jove with proper Juno^

Our faculty ornate^
At nine retires in summer.

All other months at eij^t.

IV

Tutors at ten, and proctors,
Wild-natur'd creatures, alL

With sounds and slumber raucous^
Fill each ancestral hall.



Our goodies, gifted women.
Likewise at early hours

Adjourn their oonf ounces:
The voice renews its powers.



Hie way we have at Harvard,
We, as the fathers, keep.

With love and cheer and labor.
And plenty of good sleep.

W. Q. Peekham, W.



CORRECTION.



Vol. XXm, p. 728, col. 1. Robert lavermore Manning, of the Class of 1895, re-
ported deceased, is Eving and his address is 1090 Elm St., Manches-
ter, N.H. Robert Franklin Manning, of the Class of 1904, was the
person who died at Brooklyn, N.Y., 9 March, 1915.

Vol. XXIV, p. 22, IVofessor Barrett Wendell's dass should be ^ven as YT, instead
of '79.



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CHARLB8 B. C0TTD6, JR.
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WILMOT R. BV AH8, JR ., Lawyer
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PRAHK J. BARTLBTT, President Boston

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CUHTOH WHITB, Vice-President

Charles town P ive Cent SaTinfs Bank
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PROeRESSI¥E



COIISER¥ATI¥E



CAPITAL & SURPLUS EARNINGS
$ 3,000,000.00



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^ perhaps best known as Man-

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DECEMBER, 191 J



: HTIRVTIRD I



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PUBLlStlED-BY

THE MARVARD • Graduates*

AAGAZINC ASSOCIATION

BOSTON AASS.

Entered at the Post Office, Boston, Mass., as second-daas mail matter, October 19, 189a.
Copyright, iqis. by Thb Harvard Gwapuatbs* Magazikb AssooATiOir



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK



OF BOSTON



Daniel G. Wing, President



Clifton H. Dwinnbll, Vice-President
DowNiE D. MuiR, Vice-President
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FkANCis A. Goodhue, Vice-President



Bertram D. Blaisdell, Cashier
George W. Hyde, Assistant Cashier
Edwin R. Rooney, Assistant Cashier
Olaf Olsen, Assistant Cashier
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Stanton D. Bullock, Auditor

Capital $5,000»000

Surplus 11»000,000

Deposits 79,000,000



Charles River Trust Company



EIGHTY -TWO YEARS IN BUSINESS AT
PRESENT LOCATION, NEXT DOOR TO HAR-
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Bank of Deposit oi Radditfe 0>Uege.

CAPITAL and SURPLUS $400,000.00
DEPOSITS. ..... 1,000,000.00

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS



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NATIONAL SHAWMUT BANK FIRST NATIONAL BANK



JAMES F. PENNELL, Prarident
GEORGE H. HOLMES, Treasurer E. H. NORRIS, Assistant Treasurer



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OFFICERS

OF THE

HARVARD GRADUATES' MAGAZINE ASSOCIATION.



HENRY WINCHESTER CUNNINGHAM, '82, of Boston, Mass,

FRANCIS JOSEPH SWAYZE, '79. OF Newark, N.J.
GEORGE DICKSON MARKHAM, '81, of St. Louis, Mo.
JAMES JACKSON STORROW, '85, of Boston, Mass.
THOMAS WILLIAMS SLOCUM, '90, of New York, N,Y.

JAMES ATKINS NOYES, '83, of Cambridge, Mass.

WINTHROP HOWLAND WADE. '81, OF Dedham. Mass.

CoitiuiL

For the term ending in igi6.
WILLIAM COWPER BOYDEN, '86, of Chicago, III.
ROGER ERNST, '03, of Boston, Mass.
RALPH LOWELL, '12, of Boston, Mass.

Far the term ending in igty.
OWEN WISTER, '82, of Philadelphia, Pa.
JAMES DUNCAN PHILLIPS, '79, of Topsfield, Mass.
ARTHUR ADAMS, '99, of Quincy, Mass.

Far the term ending in igi8.
VALENTINE HORTON MAY, '95. of Seattle, Wash.
HENRY SMITH THOMPSON, '99, of Concord, Mass.
BENJAMIN LORING YOUNG, '07, of Weston, Mass.



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William Richards Castle, Jr., 'cx5, Editor.
William Bennett Munro, g '99, University Editor.
DwiGHT Harold Ingram, '16, Student Editor,

Winthrop Rowland Wade, '81.



The Harvard Graduates* Magazine is published
quarterly, on September i, December i, March i, and June
I. The annual subscription is three dollars; single copies,
eighty-five cents each.

Communications for the Editor should be addressed to
Mr. W. R. Castle, Jr., No. 3 Grays Hall, Cambridge,
Mass.

All business communications and subscriptions should be
sent to Mr. W. H. Wade, at the office of the Magazine, 99
State St., Boston, Mass.



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Copyright, 1915,
By Thb Harvard Graduates' Maoazxnx Association.



The Riverside Press, Cam.
bridge, Mass., U. S. A.
Electrotyped and Printed
by H. O. Houghton A Co.



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T H M

HARVARD GRADUATES' MAGAZINE.

Vol. XZir. — DBCBMBEB, 1915. — No. XCIV.



MILrrARY INSTRUCTION CAMPS.
PLATTSBDRQ, 1915.

MAJ.-QEN. LE»NARD WOOD, M.O. '84, L.L.D., '99.

In 1913, stadents' military iDstniction oamps for yonng men
jErom 18 to 30 years of age, educational qualifications last year of
high school or better, were established at Gettysburg, Pa., and at
the Presidio of Monterey, Cal. This experiment was so successful
and created such widespread interest that the following year oamps
were established at Asheyille, S.G., the Presidio of Monterey, Csd.,
at Ludington, Mich., and at Burlington, Vt. The attendance at
these camps was more than double that of the first camps. This year
camps were established at the Presidio of San Francisco, Cal., at
liudington, Mich., and at Plattsburg, N.Y. The attendance again
was nearly double that of the preceding year. The work was ex-
tremely well done and a most valuable jper^onneZ developed.

The military instruction camps this year at Plattsburg, which
followed the student camps, were for older men with the same gen-
eral qualifications as those for the students' military instruction
camps. These camps for older men resulted from a rapidly growing
appreciation on the part of our people of the fact that we are
practically without men properly trained to act as junior oflBcers
of volunteers in case of war. The cost of tmpreparedness in the
way of trained officers in the great European war has served to
bring home to us very forcibly the necessity of departing from our
time-honored custom of doing little or nothing in the line of pre-
paration and organization of our resources in men and material
until the emergency is upon us, and then doing it in haste and



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242 Military Instruction Camps. [December,

under conditions and in a manner which has always resulted in
great and unnecessary loss of life and treasure.

This is a purely patriotic movement by a portion of the most
intelligent of our people and is expressive of their appreciation
of the fact that an enterprising, energetic, highly developed, and
warlike though non-military people, without training and well-
thought-out organization, cannot, with any hope of success, meet
in war an equally energetic, enterprising, and highly developed
military nation, which has thoroughly organized its resources in
men, money, and material so that they may be at once available in
case of necessity. They have seen, what has always been apparent
to every educated soldier, that good men, untrained and unorgan-
ized, without necessary equipment and arms, cannot, with any
hope of success, meet equally good men trained, organized, and
equipped.

A considerable number of the men who have come to this camp
are beyond the military age. I think this in a way has added to the
value of their presence in camp because of the force of the ex-
ample given to younger men.

The primary purpose of the military instruction camps is to train
an educated class of men to discharge with reasonable efficiency
the duty of officers of volunteers, especially in the company grades.
It is appreciated that the time given for the training was brief,
but it should be remembered that in actual hours of work it was
equivalent to a long period of instruction given through short drillff
scattered over several years, and that this year's training was only
a portion of the course to be given, which should cover three peri-
ods of one month each, except in the case of those who have had
previous military experience. The instruction was given under the
most favorable conditions. The men were highly intelligent and
quick to learn. Regular organizations were used as models and
the work conducted under carefully selected officers of the regular
army, which made it possible to accomplish a great deal in a com-
paratively short time.

Another valuable result of the training was found in the dis-
cipline, habits of regularity, and thoroughness which characterized
the conduct of men in camp. Especially was this valuable to the
younger men, who have the greater portion of life's work ahead of
them. They learned to do things when told and as told, and to do



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1915.] Military Instruction Camps. 243

them thoroughly. They also received instruction in camp and per*
sonal sanitation, in the care of men in the field, the routine of camp
life, and in the use of terrain for the purposes of offense and de-
fense. They were given training in map-making and map-reading,
and gathered much information of a practical character in many
different fields. In a word, these camps provide to a limited ex-
tent the opportunity referred to in the President's message. '* It
will be right enough, right American policy, based upon our ac-
customed principles and practices, to provide a system by which
every citizen who will volunteer for the training may be made
famUiar with the use of modern arms, the rudiments of drill and
manoeuver, and the maintenance and sanitation of camps. We
should encourage such training and make it a means of discipline
which our young men will learn to value. It is right that we
should provide it not only, but that we should make it as attrac-
tive as possible, and so induce our young men to undergo it at such
times as they can command a little freedom and can seek the physi-
cal development they need, for mere health's sake, if for nothing
more."

The attendance at the camp, while of the same general type as
that of the students' camps, represented many different classes of
our population, prominent lawyers, a former colonial governor, an
ambassador and secretary of state, a former solicitor-general of the
United States, heads of great banks, men at the head of great busi-
ness concerns, selected oflBcers of the New York police force, liter-
ary men, young men who were assisted to come, — in a word, real
men of all classes, the only requisites being certain educational at-
tainments and a sound and vigorous physique.

Generally speaking, the men reported in very good condition.
Some were not, and it was most interesting to note the improve-
ment in the physical condition of these men. Loose, flabby figures
were straightened up, straight fronts took the place of protruding
abdomens, and fat necks and double chins were replaced by nor-
mal tjrpes of development. Physically the work has been of great
benefit to practically all the men concerned.

The men have learned enough to make them of real value as
junior officers of volunteers. I do not mean to say that they are
thoroughly proficient, but they have accomplished as much as they
could have accomplished in four or five months in the hurry and



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244 Military Instruction Camps. [December,

oonf nsion which mnst always aeoompany preparations for war in a
oonntry which does little nntil war is actually at hand. They have
acquired the basic principles of training and could take and instract
a company up to a point of considerable proficiency. In place of
having perhaps one regular officer as an instructor, they had over
twenty. In place of waiting for equipment and receiving it at odd
intervals, they came to a completely equipped camp. No time was
lost in commencing the practical work of instruction. I hope that
these camps are only the beginning of a movement which will be*
come nation-wide and that, pending the adoption of some definite
military policy, all physically fit men of the class who attended
these camps will hear the call and respond to it through attendance
not for one season's camp, but for at least two of these camps for
intensive training, and will continue the instruction until they are
listed as qualified to serve efficiently as officers of volunteers.

There was an air of extreme seriousness and earnestness on the
part of the men who were serving in camp. The regular offi-
cers realized that they had under instruction a group of men who
were keenly desirous of improving every moment in getting the
utmost out of the period of training. Indeed, one never sees in any
line of work a collection of men more thoroughly interested in what
they were doing or more determined to do it thoroughly. Men who
are in charge of important public affairs and at the heads of great
offices were really more disturbed over an error in drill or some
mistake in leading a squad than they would have been over errors
of judgment in the conduct of their regular business. It is a splen-
did spirit and it gives promise of great results in the way of
national preparedness and consequently of national peace.

It is proposed to make the instruction at the camps progressive



Online LibraryWilliam Richards Castle William Roscoe ThayerThe Harvard graduates' magazine → online text (page 34 of 103)