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William Richards Castle William Roscoe Thayer.

The Harvard graduates' magazine online

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lived ever after on his large estate in
Kingston, in which he took great
pride. When he died he had been
chairman of the Parish Committee of
the Unitarian Church at Kingston
twenty-nine years, had been its lead-
ing layman, and had taken great inter-
est in the concerns of the church and
fellowship. For a long time his large
house was a center of social life for the
young people of the town, in whom he
always took great interest. He was a
good friend to many poor or struggling
people who needed a little help, and
was not careful about getting his loans
back. For the rest, he held no public
offices, and lived a retired life. For the
last fifteen years he was considerably
broken in health. He never married."

1855.
E. H. Abbot, Sec^
14 B«aoon St., Boston.
IKHUard Flagg Bliss died in a hos-
pital at Leesburg, Va., Oct. 8, 1915.
His father was Oramel Bliss and his
mother's maiden name was Flagg. He
was born in Vermont, Nov. 29, 1829.
He studied at Phillips Academy, Exe-
ter, from 1850 to 1852, and then en-
tered our class as Sophomore. After
leaving College, Bliss taught school in
Meadville, Pa., and in 1856 became an
Instructor in Washington University,
St. Louis, where he continued until
1858. He then visited Europe and
pursued classical studies at one or
more German universities, traveling
in Italy and Greece. He returned to
the United SUtes in 1859, and re-
sumed teaching in Washington Uni-
versity. He was for a short time a



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professor in the Illinois State Univer-
sity, but he resigned in 1860, married
Miss Liszie Tyler, of Vermont, and
took up farming in Dorchester, 111.,
and later in Pana, in the same State,
where he was successful and resided
for many years. After the death of his
wife, several years ago, he sold his
farm and removed to Virginia, and
thenceforth made his home with his
son at Sterling, Va., where the son also
is engaged in farming.

1857.
Db. F. H. Bbown, See^
15 SUte St., Boston.
A reception and banquet were given
to R. M. Morse at the Hotel Somerset
on the evening of Dec. 16, 1915, by
the Boston University Law School As-
sociation. Hon. John E. Hannigan
presided and introduced the speakers.
Some 500 members of the legal profes-
sion were present and joined heartily
in expressions of esteem and regard
for the "Marvel of the Profession."
Among the number were justices of the
courts and other distinguished men.
Many members of the bar were called
on and responded with testimonials
of cordial esteem for the principles
which had governed the 56 years of
his professional life, with the mainte-
nance of a high standard of propriety in
the court-room. He was pronounced
unimpeachable in every professional
and personal relation, his life consti-
tuting a record of usefulness and influ-
ence for the good which may satisfy
any ambition. In giving his thanks for
the reception of his friends Morse en-
tertained the gathering with a review
of his professional life, and of dis-
tinguished lawyers he had met and
heard. He closed with these words;
" Our profession has a great work to
do and must always be the principal



constructive and conservative force
not only in settling disputes and en-
forcing rights, but in securing to all
the people the guaranties of the con-
stitution to life, liberty and the pur-
suit of happiness, of resisting radical
changes in our system of government
on the one hand, and on the other of
promoting every rational movement
of progress.*' — John Davis Long was
bom in Buckfield, Me., Oct. 97, 1888,
and died at his home in Hin^am,
Aug. 88, 1016. As a loyal son of the
State of Maine, and of the University,
as a school-teacher, as a legislator,
lieutenant-governor and governor of
Massachusetts, as a high-toned mem-
ber of his chosen profession, as a mem-
ber of Congress, Secretary of the
Navy in the Cabinets of McKinley
and Roosevelt, as a graceful public
speaker, as a genial and lovable man
to all whom he met, as a consistent
Christian and a supporter of many
organisations in charity and in
church bodies — such was Long. In
all his relations with his Class, his
University, his political, national, pa-
triotic, benevolent, church, and social
friends, he was ever the same earnest,
sincere, consistent Christian gentle-
man. His funeral at the Hingham
church was, as he would have wished
it, most simple, and his body was
followed to the grave on foot by a
large body of sincere mourners. W.
R. Thayer contributed a memoir to
the Graduates* Magazine of December.
— Charies Victor Mapes was bom in
New York, July 4, 1836, and died at
his home in the same city Jan. ftS,
1916. He was the son of James Jay
(LL.D. of Williams) and Sophia (Fur^
man) Mapes. His grandfather on the
paternal side, Jonas Mapes, was a
major-general in command of New
York State forces in and around New



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685



York in the War of 1812. AH his an-
cestors on this side were farmers on
Long Island back to 1040, when
Thomas Mapes came from England
and settled at Southold, N.Y. In 1850
Mapes joined with B. M. Whitlock in
the business of agricultural imple-
ments, fertilisers, etc. Since 1877 he
has been vice-president and president
of the Mapes Formula and Peruvian
Guano Company and devoted himself
to the investigation of the special re-
quirements of soils, climate, etc., as
well as to the distinctive habits of
growth of plants, rotation of crops,
and general conditions. Reports and
scientific papers have been contrib-
uted by him to the department of agri-
culture at Washington, to the Massa-
chusetts State Agricultural Board, to
the New Jersey State Board of agri-
culture, and elsewhere. Mapes mar^
ried, in 1863, Martha Halsted, the
granddaughter of Chancellor Hal-
sted, of New Jersey. He has had &yt
sons. He was a member of the New
York Harvard and other dubs and
technical societies.

1862.
Chables p. Wars, See.,

52 Allerton St., Brookline.
Arthur Reed was born in Boston
Aug. 13, 1841, and died at the Charles-
gate Hospital, Cambridge, Oct. 18,
1915. He was the Secretary of the
Class, and the fourth of its members
who has died since last Commence-
ment. " His loss to the Class can
hardly be jezaggerated, for as Secre-
tary he worked with characteristic
earnestness, devotion, and thorough-
ness; until he left home for treatment
in the hospital he was in almost daily
touch with the surviving member of
the Class Committee, and on his de-
parture for the hospital turned over to



him the matters requiring present or
future consideration. He fitted for Col-
lege at the Boston Public Latin School,
then under Head-Master Francis
Gardner; he was graduated the first
scholar in the Class of 1858, and took
the first Franklin Medal. His school-
mates there never questioned his right
to the place he held, or the honors
he received. He was a generous
and beloved school-fellow, cheerful,
helpful, oblivious of rank, and with-
out a jealousy or meanness any-
where. In College he held high place
in the respect and affection of the
Class; he was a member of the Class
Day Committee, and the Order of
Exercises for Commencement, Wed-
nesday, July 10, 1862, bears the leg-
end, — *(5) A Disquisition: Victor
Emmanud at NapUs, Arthur Reed.'
After graduation he enlisted in the
45th Mass. Regiment, of which he was
made Quartermaster Sergeant in Octo-
ber; he served with his regiment in
North Carolina, and was mustered out
in July, 1863. After some time spent
in Chicago and elsewhere, he returned
to Boston, and in 1868 went into the
insurance business, continuing in it
until the time of his death. In college,
he was greatly interested in vocal
music and was a member of the Har-
vard Glee Club; later, in 1871, he was
one of the founders of the Apollo Club
of Boston, a male vocal club of fifty
members, of which he was the first
secretary and virtually its business
manager, remaining so for twenty-five
years. He was also one of the founders
of the Cecilia Club of Boston, a mixed
vocal club of about one hundred mem-
bers, of which he was also one of the
managers for twenty years. In recall-
ing Arthur Reed in his lifetime, per-
haps the first impression that comes to
one is of his devoted faithfulness to



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any duty; bis high ideal of service; his
generous giving of himself to things
that were worth while, and that were
the essentials of living and character;
his perfect simplicity; his modesty;
his reasonableness. No one who ever
knew him but learned from daily con-
tact with him to respect and honor
what he stood for more and more. He
had an orderly mind and this showed it-
self in many ways. He was too natural
to seem anything that he was not, and
his genial presence and cheerful friend-
ship are lasting memories to those
who knew him during his entire life."
H. H.B. — Chazies Edward Grinnell
died in Boston on Feb. 1, 1916. He
was bom in Baltimore, May 7, 1841,
the son of Charles Andrews and Anna
Almy (Cobb) Grinnell. In College he
was Class Orator. After graduation he
studied theology in Yale and took his
degree from the Harvard Divinity
School. He was successively pastor of
the First Unitarian Church in Lowell
and of the Harvard Church in Charles-
town. In 1874 he retired from the
ministry and entered the Harvard
Law School, taking the LL.B. degree
in 1876. He opened an office in Bos-
ton, where he has practised law ever
since. He was the author of several
legal books, and was at one time editor
of the Ameriecait Law Review, He was
Class Secretary from 1887 to 1914. In
1865 Grinnell married Elisabeth
Tucker Washburn, who died on Jan.
26, 1909. Four sons survive him.

1863.
C. H. Denny, See,,
23 Central St., Boston.

Edward Storgis Grew, son of Henry
and Elizabeth P. (Sturgis)' Grew, was
born in Boston, Mardi 10, 1842. He



died at West Manchester, Jan. 20,
1916. He prepared for College at
Epes L. DixweU's school. After grad-
uation he began his career in the
dry-goods commission business with
Frothingham & Co., Boston. On July
15, 1867, he became agent in Boston
for A. T. Stewart & Co., of New York
City. Jan. 1, 1872, he began business
for himself as a member of the dry-
goods commission house of Gowing &
Grew, Boston and New York; and
Jan. 1, 1884, became a partner in the
firm of Lawrence & Co., of which
Amos A. Lawrence was the senior
member. Jan. 1, 1887, he retired from
this firm, after 28 years of active busi-
ness life. He had been a director in
the Mass. Nat. Bank of Boston, treas-
urer for many years of the Benevo-
lent Fraternity of Churches, and had
served the Boston Dispensary as a
member of the board of managers and
as secretary. He was married, at St.
FauFs Church, Dedham, on Nov.
26, 1867, to Annie Crawford Clark,
daughter of Joseph W. Clark, of Ded-
ham. After living in Longwood for
two years, they made their home in
Boston, and spent their summers at
West Manchester. His wife, three
sons, and a daughter survive him. — r
Henderson Josiah Edwards, son of
Albert and Susan Hill (Dunnell) Ed-
wards, was born in Industry, Me.,
April IS, 1840. He died in Boston,
Jan. 20, 1916. He fitted for College at
the Boston Public Latin School. He
joined the 5th Maine Volunteer Regi-
ment, as acting adjutant, the regiment
being then under the command of his
uncle, M. H. Dunnell, in June, 1861,
and served with them for three months,
going through the first battle of Bull
Run. He wrote an interesting account
of his experiences in this battle which



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587



appeared in the Bartard Magazine in
April and May, 1862. He took his
deirree with his Class in 1863, and soon
after received an appointment as sec-
ond lieutenant in the 75th U.S.C.T.,
joining his regiment at Port Hudson,
La. He was promoted to first lieuten-
ant Dec. 20, 1863; and to captain
April 16, 1864, commanding the color
company. He was in Gen. Banks's Red
River campaign, and on his return to
New Orleans, was taken with fever,
induced by exposure, and after seven
weeks of hospital life, received an hon-
orable discharge on the surgeon's cer-
tificate. May 26, 1864, and returned
North. From September following,
till January, 1865, he had charge of
the High School at Yarmouth Port,
reading law in his leisure moments.
He then entered the law office of
Henry W. Paine, of Boston, as a stu-
dent; and in the following March that
of Joseph Nickerson. On Jan. 1, 1866,
he was admitted to the bar. He was
trial justice for Middlesex County for
several years, at that time residing in
Watertown. He was elected to the
School Board of Watertown and after-
wards was secretary and chairman of
the same. He represented his district
(Watertown and Belmont) in the leg-
islature of 1873. He was the author of
several pamphlets and reports on
Common School Education, and also on
Drawing and Music in the Public
Schoole of Maeeaehueetts. In 1876 he
left Watertown, and lived in Brookline
for a while, and afterwards in Boston,
practising law, and active until the
end. In fact he was taken ill on the
way to his office, and, being removed
to his home, 19 Allston St., Boston,
died almost immediately after reach-
ing there. He was married, Nov. 29,
1866, to Elizabeth Eaton Henley,
daughter of Francis O. Henley, of



Portland, Me. His wife died July 2,
1902. They had no children.

1865.
Gbobob a. Goddabd, Sec.,
10 Tramont St., Boeton.
Frank Merrick HoUister di^d sud-
denly at his home in Bu£Falo, N.Y., on
Jan. 22, 1916. He was born in Buffalo,
Nov. 28, 1843. His school training
was in the public schools of Buffalo
and at the Sanborn School at Concord.
After graduating from College he re-
mained for a few years in Boston, and
then returned to Buff ala where he ob-
tained a position on the Exj)ress, In
1877 he joined the staff of the Com^-
mercud and remained an associate
editor of that paper until his retire-
ment a few years ago. He was a direc-
tor of the Buffalo Historical Society,
secretary of the University Club, a
curator of the Buffalo Library, a trus-
tee of the First Unitarian Church, and
a member of the Saturn and Thursday
Clubs. In 1872 he married Mary J.
Evans, who, with a son and a daugh-
ter, survives him. The Harvard Club
of Buffalo, at its meeting on Feb. 5,
adopted the following minute: " In
the death of Mr. Frank M. Hollister
of the Class of 1865 — and our former
President — this Club has lost its best
loved and its oldest living member.
His strength of character, uprightness,
equanimity and unfailing courtesy
made him always conspicuous as the
finest type of Harvard man. In his
cultivation, in his attitude of mind,
and in his conduct, he exemplified
always the ideals of Harvard. The
Secretary is directed to enter upon the
records of the Club this minute, in
recognition of our gratitude, both for
the privilege of his friendship while
living and of our great regret at his
death."



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1866.

C. E. Stratton, Sec.,

70 State St., Booton.

John Leonard Norton wu born in
RusseUville, Ky., Nov. %%, 1844, the
son of John Leonard and Lucinda
(Brown) Norton. Soon after gradu-
ation he went to Memphis, Tenn., and
entered, as partner, the firm of Briggs
& Norton, wholesale grocers and gen-
eral commission agents. He lived in
Memphis the rest of his life, continu-
ing actively in business, as railroad
treasurer, cotton-buyer, manufacturer
of cotton batting, inventor and paten-
tee of a machine for manufacturing
the same, dealer in stocks and bonds,
commercial paper, and real estate. He
was also at one time an alderman of
Memphis and county trustee of his
county. He married at Memphis,
Dec. 4, 1872, Miss Lizzie N. Elder,
who died March 26, 1906. He died
suddenly July 17, 1915, at his sum-
mer cottage at St. Joseph, Mich. One
daughter, three sons, and several
grandchildren survive him.

1868.
A. D. Chandlbh, See.,

70 SUte St., Boston.
Frederic Guion Ireland, bom in
New York City Sept. 7, 1846, died in
that city from pneumonia, Dec. 88,
1915. His ancestry, from the North of
England, settled at Hempstead, Long
Island, in the 17th century. The lin-
eage in America is Joseph, John,
George, and George Ireland, father of
Frederic Guion. He was educated at
the Ward Schools of New York City,
at private schools, and at Exeter Acad-
emy. At Harvard he was a member
of the Institute of 1770; the Hasty
Pudding Club, and iU Poet; the ZeU
Psi Society, and editor of the Advocate
and Secretary of the Board. He wrote



the Class Song of 1868. He received
the degree of LL.B., at the Columbia
Law School in 1871. He practised law
in New York until 1874, when he en-
gaged in teaching until 1896, then be-
coming chief examiner of the Munici-
pal Civil Service Commission of the
city of New York, which position he
held for twenty years, until his death.
He was a contributor to the AUatUie
Monihly and to other periodicals. He
was president of the Schoolmaster's
Association of New York in 1891-92;
a member of the University Club; the
Harvard Club; the Reform Club; the
Century Association; and was presi-
dent of the Phillips Exeter Academy
Alumni, of New York, for 1897-98.
He married, Sept. 1, 1880, in Wren-
tham, Alice M., daughter of Linus E.
and Lucy Carpenter, of Fozboro.
His wife survives him. His sterling
character, broad culture, constancy,
and vigilance enabled him to exert a
commanding influence in progressive
work for New York's Civil Service
Commission. His abhorrence of f avor^
itism, his gentleness but fearlessness,
and his honesty and fidelity helped
give to New York an assurance of high
standards of public office said to have
been almost unique. He was recog-
nized in New York as the *' Pretorian
Guard " of its municipal civil service.
His integrity was a veritable munici-
pal asset; and he was one of the ablest
civil service administrators in this
country.

1869.
T. P. Bbal, 5ec.,
2d Nat. Bank, Boston.
Archibald Munay Howe died sud-
denly in Cambridge on Jan. 6, 1916.
He had been for some time suffer-
ing from serious nervous depression.
Howe was born in Northampton, May



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689



dO, 1848» the son of James M. and
Harriet B. (Clarke) Howe. From 1878
to 1875 he acted as secretary to Hon.
Henry L. Pierce, in Washington; in
1876 he served a term as Common
Councilman in Cambridge; and was a
Representative in the General Court
in 1891. He lived during all his life in
Cambridge, where he was much inter-
ested in local affairs. He practised his
profession of law in Boston. On June
4, 1881,. he married Arria Sargent.
Howe's summary of himself in the last
Report gives a good picture of the
man: " I am engaged in the practice of
the law, and always somewhat di-
verted from it by charities and public
questions. ... I cannot characterise
my religious views; they are hopeful
and based upon a very happy experi-
ence with men and women in many
places in thought and life. I believe
democracy of a true type is the largest
basis for increasing our intelligence. I
am not much of a follower of institu-
tional tenets." Howe's funeral was in
the Mt. Auburn Chapel and was con-
ducted by Rev. S. M. Crothers, as-
sisted by Rev. F. G. Peabody, '69.
W. A. Locke, '69, was at the organ.

1871.
A. M. Babneb, 8ee,t
1290 MMMohuaetts Ave., Gunbridse.
The Class will celebrate its 45th
anniversary with a dinner at the Uni-
versity Club, Boston, on Wednesday,
June 21, the night before Commence-
ment, and the Secretary will gladly
procure tickets for any classmates who
wish to attend the Harvard- Yale base*
ball game in the afternoon of that day.
— Treby JohiiBOii died Nov. 14, 1915,
at his home in Augusta, Me., from a
stroke of apoplexy following ptomaine
poisoning. He was bom in Augusta,
Jan. 18» 1850, and was fitted for Col-



lege in the Augusta public schools. He
was at the Harvard Law School in
1878 and 1874 and was admitted to
the bar in Augusta in 1875. He served
as official stenographer to the Secre-
tary of SUte in Washington. D.C.,
from August, 1876, to May, 1879,
when he was elected cashier of the
Cobbossee Nat. Bank at Gardiner,
Me. He resigned this position in Octo-
ber, 1881, to become cashier of the
Granite Nat. Bank in Augusta, and
was elected president in March, 1907;
he held this o£Bce until his death. He
was a member of the Augusta City
Council for six years, a Representative
in the legislature for two years, and
Mayor of Augusta in 1909. He was
married July 29, 1880, to Annie L.
Barbour, of Lewiston, Me., who, with
seven children, survives him. — Fran-
ds Ogden Lyman died suddenly from
pneumonia on Dec. 16, 1915, at
Micco, Fla., where he had gone for a
few weeks' rest. He was bom at Hilo,
Hawaii, Aug. 6, 1846, and was fitted
for College at Exeter, N.H. He was
graduated from the Harvard Law
School in 1874 and has since followed
the practice of law in Chicago. While
in College he was stroke oar in his Class
crew, Freshman year, of the Varsity
crew the next two years, and was a
member of the four-oared crew that
rowed at Oxford, Eng., in 1869. He
was married Dec. 27, 1876, to Ruth
Charlotte, daughter of Richard H.
Dana, and she died in 1903, leaving
two children, Charlotte Dana Lyman
and Richard Dana Lyman, '09.

1874.

C. S. Penballow, 8tc^

808 Sean BMc., Boston.

Finuik Bldfidge Randall was born

June 22, 1851, in the town of DeRuy-

ter, Madison Co., N.Y., the son of



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Paul King and Harriet Louise (Eld-
ridge) Randall. In 18^6 his family
moved to Boston, where for many
years his father represented the Mich-
igan Southern Railroad, as freight
agent. Randall entered the Latin
School in 1804» where he prepared for
College under the famous Dr. Gardi-
ner: and graduated with a medal. In
1870, he entered the Freshman class
of Harvard College, and in this year
won a Lee prise for reading. He took
an active interest in football and was
a member of the Everett Atheneum,
Christian Brethren, and Pi Eta Soci-
ety, and one of the organisers and the
secretary of the College Telegraph
Society, which established a circuit of
the College Yard. At this time a Bos-
ton physician, who made a specialty of
collecting vital statistics, pronounced
him an almost perfectly proportioned
specimen of physical manhood. After
graduation he taught history in the
Latin School in Boston for three
years, and then attended the Colum-
bia Law School, taking his degree
of LL.B. in May, 1870. He was
admitted to the New York Bar, May
29, 1879, and began the practice
of the law in that city with offices at
45 Wall St. While practising law he
was connected with several business
enterprises. He organised and became
the president of the Empire Coal and
Coke Co.; in 1898 he became the sec-
retary and treasurer of the Western
Gas and Fuel Co.; later he became
interested in a construction company
organized to build the Washington
County Railroad in the eastern part of
Maine, and on the completion of that
road in January, 1899, he became the
vice-president and treasurer. He was
also an officer and director in several
other corporations, one of the trustees
of the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville,



Conn., and a member of the Univer-
sity Club of New York. He lived for
many years at Lakeville, Conn., and
here, on Apr. 29, 1891, he was married
to Gertrude Meredith (HoUey) Oim-
stead. Their only child, a son, Paul
K. Randall, '14, was bom on April 12,
1892. The family moved from Lake-
ville to New York City, where they
lived for a while on Park Avenue: and
later settled at Irvington-on-the-Hud-
son. About six years ago his health
began to fail and he died at his home
in Irvington on Sept. 15, 1915.—
Vred«rick Swift was bom in New Bed-
ford, Dec. 12, 1852, the son of William
Cole Nye and Elisa Nye (Perry) Swift.
After graduation he was connected for
fifteen years with the whaling business
in New Bedford, and then, as weO as
later, in the electric lighting business
in that city. For two years he lived in
New York, interested in electric rail-
way constraction and in mining, and
for several years in Chicago with the
Illinois Car and Equipment Co., and
as head of the firm of Frederick Swift
& Co., dealers in railroad supplies.



Online LibraryWilliam Richards Castle William Roscoe ThayerThe Harvard graduates' magazine → online text (page 73 of 103)