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The Harvard graduates' magazine online

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him.

1885.
H. M. WiLUAMB, See.,
16 State St., Boston.
J. J. Storrow was elected a member
of the Boston City Council at the
December election. — S. £. Winalow
has been elected first vice-president of
the Harvard Club of Washington. —
H. K. Swinscoe has terminated his
connection with the Morgan Spring
Co. of Worcester. — W. F. Bacon has
moved his law office to 68 Devonshire
St., Boston. - Willitm StanislAiss
Murphy, the first of that name to
graduate from Harvard College, died
a bachelor at his home in Boston Jan.
7, 1916, leaving a will which will doubt-
less result in a long succession of Har-
vard Murphys. This wiU, giving all of
his property, estimated at $40,000, to
Harvard, provides for *' the establish-
ment of one or more scholarships for
the collegiate education of any young
man or men named ' Murphy ' who in
the judgment of the faculty should
prove deserving of this land of encour-
agement.'* Murphy was born at the
West End in Boston Oct. 6, 1860, the .
son of Patrick J. and Julia (Gallagher)
Murphy. He prepared at the Boston
Latin School, entered Harvard with
the Class of 1885, and took his degree
in due course. After a year of teaching
school, he began his long service of
thirty years for the U.S. Government,
in the Surveyor's office of the Boston
Custom House. His nearest relatives
were cousins living in Worcester. His
simple life, made happy by the enrich-
ment of a college education, enabled
him to fulfil a long-settled purpose to
provide the opportunity of similar
happiness for others.



1886.
The Thirtieth Anniversary Reunion
of the Class will take place in June.
The celebration will oover four days,
from Tuesday, June 20, Class Day, to
Friday, June 28, the day of the Yale
race, inclusive. The outline of the
plan is as follows: Tuud^^, a clam-
bake for the men of the Class and
their wives, somewhere at the sea-
shore^ making the trip by automo-
bile, and returning in time to attend
Class Day exercises in the evening.
Wednesday, golf and other sports for
the men in the morning, followed
by luncheon. Reception and lunch-
eon for the wives of members. In the
afternoon the men and their wives
attend the Yale baseball game. Eve-
ning, Class Dinner. Thursday, Com-
mencement, Class Spread. Com-
mencement exercises in the afternoon.
Friday, the Yale race at New London.
The details of the above plans are
being worked out. A preliminary
notice was sent out to the Class on
Feb. 1. Detailed notices will be sent
later. — It is planned to issue in June
a Class Report covering the past five
years. — The Nobel chemistry prixe
has been awarded to T. W. Richards.
— In November a loan exhibition of
early Italian engravings was held in
the Fogg Art Museum in memory of
Francis Bullard. It was the most im-
portant showing of 15th and early
16th century Italian prints ever seen
in this country. — At the request of
the Worcester Bar Association Gage
has delivered before it an address,
since printed, on the history of
the Worcester County Bar. — John
Henry Huddleston, Class Secretary
since graduation, died in New York,
Oct. 80, 1915, from double pneumonia.
He was born in Boston, July 11, 1864,
the son of Charles Henry and Susan



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Elizabeth (Matthewpon) Huddleston.
He graduated, with high rank, from
the Boston Latin School, in 1882, and
entered Harvard* in the fall of that
year. He received a <)etur in his
Freshman year, and graduated third
in the Class, with honors in physics
and with honorable mention in history,
natural history, physics, and English
composition. He was vice-president
of the Class in Sophomore, Junior, and
Senior years, and was elected Class
Secretary in the fall of 1885. He was
recording secretary of Phi Beta Kappa,
secretary of the Hbtorical Society and
of the Signet, vice-president of the
Everett Athenteum, director of the
Harvard Dining Association, member
of the O.K. and of the Harvard Union,
and an honorary member of the Hasty
Pudding. He graduated from the
Harvard Medical School in 1891 with
the degrees M.D. and A.M. After
service as house officer in the McLean
Asylum, the Boston Children's Hos-
pital, and the Boston City Hospital,
he began the practice of medicine in
New York in March, 1892. At one
time or another since then he was
secretary of the New York Academy
of Medicine; member of the Harvard
Medical Society, County and State
Medical Societies, New York Patho-
logical Society, Society of Internal
Medicine, Hospital Graduates' Club,
National Association for the Preven-
tion of Tuberculosis, American Asso-
ciation of Military Surgeons, and
American Public Health Association;
secretary of the American Delegation
of the Fourteenth International Medi-
cal Congress; chief-of-clinic in the
University and Bellevue Medical
Schools; visiting physician at the
Workhouse and Almshouse Hospital,
Gouveneur Hospital, Willard Parker
Hospital, and Riverside Sanitarium;



bacteriologist at St. Vincent's Hospi-
tal; vice-president of the Association
of Tuberculosis Clinics, New York;
trustee of the New York State Hos-
pital for Incipient Tuberculosis; and
director of the Metropolitan Life
Insurance Company, in which position
he gave especial attention to welfare
work. He joined the Seventh Regi-
ment, N.G.S.N.Y., in 1894; the next
year was appointed assistant surgeon,
with the rank of captain^ and resigned
in 1907. He was a member of the Cen-
tury Association, and of the Harvard
and Barnard Clubs, of New York. He
published various medical papers and
articles. Huddleston established him-
self as a general practitioner, and was
remarkably successful in practice. It
has been said of him that " he was the
type of the perfect family physician."
For the last ten years his private work
fell increasingly into the more re-
stricted channels of diseases of the
chest and abdomen. It was largely
through his initiative that the first
sanitarium for consumptive employ-
ees in this country was established —
that of the Metropolitan Life Insur-
ance Company at Mount MacGregor,
of which institution he became the
medical counselor and consultant.
Recently he had been made president
of the Willard Parker Hospital and
invited to become a member of the
advisory board of the New York City
Health Department. He married,
Sept. 18, 1894, at Raymond. N.H.,
Mabel Parker Clark, who, with three
children — Margaret Susan, Carrol
Hyde, and Jean Fuller — survives
him. John Huddleston was a man of
high ideals; scholarly, an indefatig-
able worker, quiet, kindly. His strong
character and his delightful personal-
ity won and retained the respect and
love of his classmates. As one of them



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[Maicbf



wrote since Huddleston's death, " No
one can take his place in the hearts of
the Class." — Fnmds Stanley Parker
died in Boston, Jan. 88, 1916, from
pneumonia. He was bom in Hon^
kong, China, Sept. 1, 1863, the son of
Ebeneser Francis and Elisabeth Clapp-
(Stone) Parker. He entered Harvard
with the Class of 1886, leaving before
the end of the Junior year. At the
Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Class
in 1911 he was given the degree of
A.B. " as of 1886." His interest in the
Class was keen. In College he was a
member of the Institute of 1770, the
Dickey, the Hasty Pudding, and the
Porcellian, and at the time of his
death was a member of the Somerset,
Harvard, and Exchange Clubs, of Bos-
ton, and of the Nahant Club. On
leaving College he entered the office of
Gay and Parker (afterwards Gay and
Parker Company), wholesale coal
merchants, Boston. From 1889 to
1898 he was president of Gay and
Parker Company, and since 1898
president of Hanson and Parker, Lim-
ited. On July 2, 1898, he was mu»-
tered in as second lieutenant of the
Fifth Massachusetts Infantry Volun-
teers, serving at Jacksonville, Florida,
on the staff of Brigadier-General Wil-
liam A. Bancroft. He was mustered
out Aug. 20, 1898. Since about 1908
he had been in ill health which com-
pelled him to retire from active busi-
ness. Severe rheumatism, which he en-
dured uncomplainingly, finally affected
his heart. Much of his life was spent on
his farm in Bedford, where he gave at-
tention to the raising and training of
standard-bred trotting horses. On
Dec. 87, 1888, at Boston, he married
Harriet Amory Anderson, who, with
two sons, — John Stanley, Harvard,
1913, and William Amory, — survives
him.



1887.
Gao. P. FirspBa, See^
844 South SUtion. Boftoa.
The members of the Class in the
vicinity of Boston, have adopted a
plan of dining at the Harvard Club of
Boston on the first Monday of each
month. The dinners are entirely in-
formal and any member of the Class
who can attend, will be gladly wel-
comed. At the Jan. meeting 19 were
present. — Edgar J. Rich has resigned
as general solicitor of the Boston &
Maine R.R., and has resumed the gen-
eral practice of law, giving special
attention to the law relating to rail-
roads and to practice before the Fed-
eral Trade Commission and Interstate
Commerce Commission, with an office
at 6 Beacon St., Boston. — H. W.
Brainard's address is 150 Warrenton
Ave., Hartford, Conn.

1888.
G. L. PuLaiFBB, See^
412 Banister's HaJQL Bortoo.
The permanent address of Albert G.
Brodhead is University Club, Denver,
Col. — Rev. P. J. O'Callaghan has
been appointed, by the Superior Gen-
eral of the Paulist Fathers, Director
of the Apostolic Mission House in
Brookland. He has resigned as rector
of St. Mary*s Church, Chicago. — F.

B. Williams has been, appointed non-
resident lecturer in city planning law in
the University of Michigan. In March
he will deliver a series of four lectures
on the subject.

1889.
Hon. Cbabubb Wabben, 5«..,
D^t. of Justioe, WMhinctoB. D.C.
W. Atkinson is now treasurer of the
Vacuum Fumigating Co. at 801 Dev-
onshire St., Boston, a corporation
formed to fumigate foreign cotton. —

C. C. Batchelder is delegate to the



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651



Secretary of Interior of the Philippine
Islands in charge of the wild tribes. — -
G. L. Hunter is giving a course of
tweWe lectures at the Metropolitan
Museum in New York on the " History
of Civilisation aa Manifested in Art '*;
also courses of lecture-promenades at
the Museum on tapestries, furniture,
and rugs. — The Class of 1889 is not
behind in *' Preparedness." It was
represented at Plattsburg last summer
by three members. Burr, Nields, and
Proctor. Burr, Bunker, and Holli-
day are enrolled in the 1st Corps of
Cadets, School for Business and Pro-
fessional Men. — Dunham, HoUiday,
and Hull have aons in the Freshman
Class, Dunham receiving a Harvard
Club of Boston scholarship. — A Joint
luncheon of the Classes of 1889 of Har-
vard and Yale was held at Fraunces'
Tavern, New York, Jan. 29. This was
the first occasion of the kind. It was
the joint idea of the respective Class
Secretaries, Charles Warren and
Charles H. Sherrill, both of whom
acted as toastmasters; 86 Yale men
were present, and the following :I8
Harvard men: Alexander, Bush, Ca-
bot, Caner, Clark, Copeland, Coulaon,
Davenport, Dunlap, Gerstle, Greene,
Griffing, Gunther, Hunter, King,
Knapp, Lydig, Marsh, Meeker, Mor-
gan, Naumbnrg, Parker, Prescott,
Reynolds, Ropes, Ruland, G.R. Salis-
bury, R. Salisbury, Saltonstall, Scott,
Sears, Stead, Swain, Townsend, Traf-
ford, Warren, Wilder, Whitridge. —
In the evening there was an informal
*89 dinner at the Harvard Club of
New York, the following 20 being
present: Parker, Sears, Meeker, Caner,
Ropes, Whitridge, Lydig, Tlrafford,
Townsend, Greene, Copeland, King,
Prescott, Marsh, Davenport, Gun-
ther, Stead, Griffing, Knapp, Hun-
ter, Dunlap, Coulson, Clark, Bush,



Reynolds, Warren. — George Hodges
Shftttnck died at Salem, May 11, 1915.
He was bom at Winchester, June 2,
1868, son of Edward and Sarah Jo-
sephine (Crosby) Shattuck. He pre-
pmd for College at G. W. C. Noble's
Private School in Boston. In College
he waa a member of the Cricket Club,
the Institute, D.K.E., and Hasty
Pudding. After graduation, until
1906, he was in the freight and traffic
department of the Boston & Albany
R.R. at Boston. After 1906 he retired
from active business, residing at
Salem, and, having a farm at Top»-
field, devoted his time to farming
and charitable interests. At various
times he was a member of the Salem
Board of Overseers of the Poor, a mem-
ber and treasurer of the Trust Funds
Commission of Salem, a trustee of
Salem Hospital, president of the Ber-
tram Home for Aged Men. He waa
also member of the Board of Govern-
ment of the Essex Institute. In busi-
ness lines, he Vras a director in the
Salem Electric Lighting Co., Colbert
Brothers, Inc., Pratt, Read & Co.,
Piano and Organ Supply Co. of Chi-
cago, and a director of the Merchants'
National Bank of Salem. He was a
member of the Union Club of Boston
and of the Salem Country Club.
Shattuck married at Salem, June 15,
1897, Anne Bertram Emmerton, who
survives him, with three children,
Jane Bertram, born May 18, 1898;
George Hodges, Jr., bom Sept. 14,
1899; Otis Emmerton, born May 25,
1903. Shattuck was of a quiet, retiring
nature, which* under a shy exterior,
concealed firm views and high integ-
rity of character. Just, discreet, clean,
and straight, of few words, but of real
sympathies, few men in the Class had
warmer friends. A devoted attendant
at Class reunions — always at hand in



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News from the Classes.



[March,



the window seat of Hollis 2 on Com-
mencement, he will be sorely missed.
— Benjamin Weaver died at New-
port, R.I., Nov. 9, 1915. He was born
at Newport, R.I., May 3, 1866, son of
John Goddard and Wealthy Moore
(Townsend) Weaver. In College he
was a member of the Institute,
D.K.E., Hasty Pudding, ZeU Psi,
and Art Club; he also played on the
Freshman ball team. His star parts
in the Hasty Pudding Theatricals
will long be remembered, and the
songs sung therein by him have be-
come College classics. After gradu-
ation he was associated with his fa-
ther in the hotel business in Newport
and New York. Upon his father's
death in 1894, he sold his interest in
New York and in 1906 his hotel prop-
erty in Newport. He then engaged in
farming until 1902. After traveling to
some extent, he became treasurer of
the George A. Weaver Co., in 1907,
and until 191S engaged in the agricul-
tural hardware business at Newport,
R.I. After April, 1913, he was in the
real estate and insurance business as a
member of the firm of Andrews &
Weaver. Weaver married at Newport,
R.I.. Nov. SO, 1892, Miss Eleanor
Whipple, who survives him, with one
child, Eleanor Swan, born Oct. 23,
1897. " Benny " Weaver was one of
the best-known men in the Class, and
at all Class reunions could Hb de-
pended on for a humorous song or
story. Genial and witty, at the same
time quiet and retiring, a vein of deep
seriousness lay frequently beneath his
jester's air. No one can fill exactly his
place at our reunions.

1890.
Joseph W. Lund. 5ae.,
84 State St., Boston.
J. B. Scott was among the speakers



at the Peace Conference of the South-
ern Commercial Congress at Charles-
ton, S.C, on Dec. 14. — Robert Her-
rick has recently published a book
about the Great War, entitled The
World Decision, — At the twelfth
annual meeting of the Carnegie Hero
Fund Commission a bronxe medal
was awarded to Arthur H. Pingree,
deceased, for his attempt to save two
girls from drowning at Annisquam,
July 19, 1915. This was one of seven-
teen acts recognised by the Commi»-
sion at this time. — Francis Gardner
Curtis died in Boston on Nov. 29,
1915. He was born in Boston March
9, 1868, the son of James Freeman and
Helen Read (Gardner) Curtis. He
prepared for College at Hopkinson's
School. Curtis had long been associ-
ated with the Museum of Fine Arts in
Boston as assistant curator of the de-
partment of Chinese and Japanese
Art. In Japanese painting and sculp-
ture he was regarded as an expert. He
had taken lessons in the Japanese
style of painting and two of his pic-
tures had been bought by the Japa-
nese Government. He contributed
several articles on his subject to the
Bulletin of the Museum. Curtis was a
member of the Somerset and Tavern
Clubs of Boston. He married, on
April 3, 1913, Mary Winchester Ber-
nard, who survives him.

1891.
A. J. Gabceau, See.,
12 Aflhburton PI., Borton.
£. A. Codman has been appointed
a member of the Committee on the
Entertainment of Wives and Children
at the 25th Anniversary Celebration.
— The following is a tentative pro-
gram for the 25th Anniversary Cele-
bration: StiTufay, June 18. A.1C. Regis-
tration at the Copley Plasa Hotel;



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lunch at the Copley Plaza Hotel, p.m.
Services at Appleton Chapel; recep-
tion by President and Mrs. Lowell.
Monday, June 19. Field Day at Na-
hant Club; reception and luncheon to
the ladies by Mrs. T. N. Perkins at
the Dedham Country and Polo Club.
Tuesday, June 20. a.m. Lunch in
Cambridge; p.m. Class Day Stadium
Exercises; supper in Cambridge. Wedr
needay, June 21. A.M. Baseball game
between '91 and '96; boat race be-
tween '91 and '90; luncheon in Cam-
bridge. P.M. Harvard- Yale baseball
game; Class Dinner at Harvard Club.
Thursday, June 22. a.m. and p.m.
Commencement. Ladies are invited
to Commencement Exercises. Friday,
June 28. a.m. and p.m. Boat races at
New London.

1892.
Allen R. Bennkb, See.,

Andover.
Joseph Shattuck has resigned from
the presidency of the 3d Nat. Bank of
Springfield, and has become a part-
ner in the firm of Aldred & Co.,
24 Exchange PL, New York. — A. M.
White has retired from partnership in
the firm of White, Weld & Co., and
has joined the firm of W. A. & A. M.
White, 14 WaU St., New York. — The
annual meeting of the Boston Associa-
tion of Harvard, '92, was held at the
Wardroom Club, Nov. 19, 1915. Dr.
Greenough and Dr. Mosher spoke of
their recent service in France; Jere-
miah Smith told of his mission to Con-
stantinople; and T. C. Tebbetts spoke
of '92 at Plattsburg. — The Edge, by
John Corbin, has recently been pub-
lished by Duflield & Co. — R. Ross
Perry, Jr., announces the removal of
his law offices to Rooms 801 to 805
Union Trust Bldg., Washington. D.C.
— The following '92 men attended the



Plattsburg Camp from Sept. 6 to Oct.
6: E. B. Adams and C. Walcott. The
names of '92 men who attended the
August camp were published in the
previous number of the Magazine,

1893.
S. F. Batcheldeb, Sec.,
721 Tremont Bldg., Boeton.
About forty members of the New
England Association of the Class
dined at the Harvard Club, Boston, on
Thursday, Jan. 17. Frothingham pre-
sided, Sibley manipulated the piano,
and White gave a long and intensely
interesting account of his experiences
and observations in England and
France as manager of the Harvard
Medical Units. He kindly continued
answering questions and amplifying
his statements till the gathering broke
up at a late hour. — Connolly has
been appointed assistant clerk of the
Somerville police €Ourt. His home ad-
dress is 17 Cutter St., Somerville. —
Flint reports himself as permanently
settled in landscape architectural
work at Cleveland, O. Address, care
of A. D. Taylor, 1900 Euclid Ave. —
Friedman is a member of the execu-
tive committee of the Republican
Club of Massachusetts. — Hiler has
been elected president of the Choral
Music Society of Boston. — W. C.
Moore has been elected superinten-
dent of schools at Newburyport, with
offices at City Hall. — Robey has
received, after due examination, a
commission as first lieutenant in the
Medical Reserve Corps of the army.
— Sheldon, upon the expiration of his
term as Governor of Nebraska in
1909, removed to Wayside, Miss.,
where he is conducting a general plan-
tation of 4000 acres. — F. U. Stearns,
of Adams, is a vice-president of the
Republican Club of Massachusetts,



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[March,



reprefleating the First District. —
White has been business manager
of the two " Harvard Units " sent to
France for work in the hospitals. He
accompanied the second ** onit "
himself.

1894.
PboF. E. K. Raitd, to.»
107 Lake View Ave., Csmbridfe.
J. A. Widtaoe, president of the Agri-
cultural College of Utah, has been
nominated to succeed Dr. J. T. Kings-
bury as president of the University of
Utah. — F. L. Olmsted, who resigned
the Charles Eliot Professorship of
Landscape Architecture at Harvard,
has been appointed Lecturer on land-
scape Architecture. — Dr. J. R. Oliver
returned from Austria to this country
last autumn and is now in Washing-
ton, 17«7 Q St. — G. A. Walker is
practising law in San Francisco, 1112
Merchants' Nat. Bldg. — C. DeW.
Jackson is a member of the Railroad
Commission of the State of Wisconsin;
his address is Madison. — DuBois
Tooker is teaching Classics at the
Tome School, Port Deposit, Md. —
Capt. A. L. Conger, U.S.A., is to edit,
with Prof. R. M. Johnson, a new
quarterly called The Military Hi*-
tartan and EeonomiH ; it will be pub-
lished by the University Press. — A.
French has published (Hd Concord
(Little, Brown & Co.), an account of
the historic and literary associations of
Concord. — Dr. J. D. Logan has been
in Toronto, Can., since 1905, where he
has been engaged in lecturing and
writing. With the president of Acadia
University, Wolfville, N.S., he inaug-
urated the first series of lectures on the
literary history of Canada to be given
in any Canadian university. The lec-
tures will be published soon and will
be followed by a fuller history of Cana-



dian literature. He has presented to
Acadia his collection of rare Canadi-
ana, chiefly poetry, dating from 1759;
this will form, with a larger collection
of general works< a library of great
importance for the study of Canadian
history and literature. Logan has pub-
lished numerous essays and poems.
— C. Stetson, from whom the Secre-
tary has not heard for years, writes as
follows: "After I left College, my
health for several years was uncertain,
necessitating frequent changes of oc-
cupation. I spent eight years in Wall
Street, a couple of years in newspaper
work, and two more at the profession
pf landscape architecture, until, in
1912, 1 went to Newport, R.I., to settle
down as a writer of fiction. In this I
had a moderate success, until, at the
instance of Rear-Admiral Luce, I be-
came associate editor of the B/ue-
Jaekety an enlisted man's magazine.
In January, 191S, I sailed on the bat-
tleship Georgia for the southern cruise.
We went to Guacanabo Bay for
torpedo practice, sailed thence to
Colon, where we were taken through
the then empty Canal, and returned
to Guantanamo. Shortly after, we
were ordered, at half an hour's notice,
to Vera Crux. I stayed with the ship
as long as she remained at Vera Cms,
returning early in May. The following
March I returned to Vera Crus, this
time on the North Dakota, and partic-
ipated in the landing of the American
blue-jackets and marines and the seis-
ure of the custom house. After ^ve
months I returned, being much de-
pressed with what seemed to me the
utter demoralisation of the naval serv-
ice. After vainly trying to interest
various editors in bringing our naval
ineflBciency to the attention of the
public, I at last, through the inter-
mediation of R. Phillips, '93, pub-



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565



lished in the New York Tribune a
series of articles on the navy. These
artides, coming coincidentally with
the resolution of Congressman A. P.
Gardner for an investigation of onr
military defenses, helped to accelerate
the movement for preparedness. I
then cooperated for a while with the
National Security League. Last July,
in the company of two other men, I
founded the American Defense Soci-
ety. We have a huge work before us,
of which our present inadequate army
and navy are merely incidental. We
are urging military education in pub-
lic schools and colleges, a mercantile
marine, and generally, every step,
civil and other, which would make us
an efficient and aggressive nation." —
W. S. Wadsworth has published Po9tr
Mortem Examinati<m$ (W. B. Saun-
ders Co., Philadelphia).

1895.
CiASB ComoTmB,
00 8tot« St., Room 60, Boston.



Online LibraryWilliam Richards Castle William Roscoe ThayerThe Harvard graduates' magazine → online text (page 75 of 103)