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William Richards Castle William Roscoe Thayer.

The Harvard graduates' magazine online

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1857..


67


36


11




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1868..


92


55


15


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1859..


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110


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1861..


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1862..


99


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1863..


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96


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1864..


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1865..


88


66


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1866..


113


95


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2


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1867..


96


71


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1868..


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1869..


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96


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87


82


14


1870..


131


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10


16


6


1871..


168


124


24






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1








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28


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1872..


114


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21


17


6


4


8


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1873..


132


114


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27


24


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1874..


165


148


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26


26


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1875..


142


121


23


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26


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9


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1876..


142


124


27



















21


10


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1877..


196


175


32









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32


29


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1878..


157


142


34













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26


26


18


4


4


1


1879..


202


190


30





















33


31


8


3


3





1880..


175


162


38








6




4


27


26


5


41


86


7









1881..


198


188


39


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15


10


8


31


24


11


63


52


10







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1882..


189


173


36








10


10


6


29


26


10


44


39


9









1883..


211


2pl


34








9


7


1


44


42


12


69


68


15









1884..


213


205


38








22


20


8


43


43


6


63


51


10









1885..


193


183


82








13


12


3


45


44


9


39


37


6







,,


1886..


236


224


34









19


17


8


35


35


7


55


54


6







,.


1887..


244


239


33









9


9


2


46


44


15


61


60


9







,,


1888..


244


232


38








18


18


7


15


14


4


66


63


17


1


1





1899..


224


217


40








14


14


10


21


21


7


46


44


6









1890..


289


280


45








12


12


7


48


47


10


66


65


18







,,


1891..


304


299


40








9


9


4


40


40


8


52


51


8


1


1


1


1892..


307


302


48








6


6


2


47


47


11


65


65


10









1893..


353


350


47








6


6


4


55


55


11


47


46


9


1


1


1


1894..


874


374


48








12


12


6


55


66


13


74


74


7









1805..


885


886


87








10


10


2


42


42


8


72


72


7







,,


1896..


411


411


39








9


9


3


62


62


7


82


82





1


1





1897..


404


404


34








3


3





46


46


12


79


79


6


1


1


1


1896..


412


412


10








7


7





54


64


3


71


71


4





,.




1899..


453


458


16








4


4


2


48


48


8


92


92


3


1


1





1900..


434


484


13

1305








7


7





60


60


1


75


75


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Total


9550


8683


*%0


we


138


238


221


94


983


865


173


1504


1461


251


106


78


88



* In the " first scholar *' column, D sigiilfles died before 1895, + mentioned in " Who *b
Who,** not mentioned in '' Who *8 Who.^



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1916.]



Note» on the Quinquennial.



599



the degree magna cum lavde^ And about
the same time the requirements for the
degree of summa cum laude were re-
lazed, 80 that it was much more fre-
quently conferred. Final honors were
first given in 1869. After 1872, when
the cum laude degree was first given,
men who took honors usually got their
degree eum laude as well. In only a few
instances after 1872 did a man take
honors without a eum laude degree.

In this inquiry, then, I have taken into
consideration the status, not only of the
first scholar in his class, but of the others
of the first ten for a period of 87 years;
the status of all those taking their de-
grees eumma eum laude, magna eum
laude, or eum laude since those degrees
were granted; and, finally, those men
who took final honors without getting
a eum laude degree.

As an estimate of a man's success in
later life I have inquired whether his
name appears in Who's Who in America,
Who'e Who is not Bradstreet, and the
man named therein may be in financial
straits and may be even reduced to
driving a street-car, like our traditional
first scholar, but mention therein im-
plies a certain measure €i prominence
in the community and a certain degree
<A success in life. Many men of distinc-
tion are not mentioned, of course, but a
man must have done something beyond
the ordinary in order to be named therein,
and it is the best available measure that
can be used in an inquiry of this kind.

There is, however, a serious defect in
adopting Who's Who as our measure in
such an investigation. Tlie first edition
was published in 1900. In that was
printed also a list of men who died after
the 1st of January, 1895, who would
have been included in the work, had they
lived. This list I have also considered
in my investigation. It is obvious, how-
ever, that any graduate dying before



1895 must be omitted from oonsidersr
tion. A glance at the Quinquennial will
show how many noted men in the earlier
classes were thus omitted, one of the
chief among them being the late Phillips
Brooks. Furthermore, it is fair to sup-
pose that many men who graduated in
the later years of this period will in fu-
ture attain such mention, especially as
only about 15 per cent of those included
in Who 's Who have been under 40, and
the majority have been over 50 years of
age. Occasionally, too, a Harvard man
has made his home and his reputation
in another country, and has been men-
tioned in similar works published else-
where. To obtain complete results,
therefore, amniming that Who's Who
will continue to be published, we should
have to consider the classes from 1901 to
1950 and not make the comparison until
somewhere about 2025, when they will
all have completed their work. Never-
theless, incomplete as are the data fur-
nished by the Quinquennial itself and
partial and defective as is the standard
which I have adopted as the indication
of success in later life, it is all that can
be done at present, and the results, as
I have said, seem of interest.

In estimating the success of the first
scholar, however, it becomes necessary
to fix the standard of the average gradu-
ate. The first task, therefore, was to find
out what percentage of the whole num-
ber of graduates attained that measure of
success in later life indicated by mention
in Who's Who. Of the 9550 men who
graduated in the half-oentury from 1851
to 1900, 8688 were living in 1895. Of
these 1805 have been mentioned in
Who's Who, almost exactly 15 per cent
Taking that as the average standard,
therefore, the question is whether the
first scholar, the first ten, the cum
laude men, and the honor men are above
or below that standard.



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600 Notes on the Quinquennial. [March,

Of the S7 first icholars in the period er graduates have not yet worked out

under consideration, 80 were living in their own salvation and fully deoioii-

1895; of these 22 are mentioned in fFAo*# strated thor work; or was there some

Who, — 78.3 per cent; SOS of the 870 truth in the words that some ribald mn-

first ten were living in 1 805; oi these 188 ner, oonsuU Planeo, painted in the front

are mentioned, — 41.5 per cent; 288 of University?

men have taken their degrees mmrna mv m ' • i ^

eum laude; 221 were living in 1805 and ^** Tnmwal of 1816,

04 are mentioned, — 42.5 per cent; 088 C. P. Wabb, '62.

men have taken degrees magna cum It is interesting to compare the Quin-

laude; 865 were living in 1805, 178 are quennial of 1015 with the Triennial of

mentioned, — 20 per cent; 1504 men 100 years ago. The Quinquennial is a

took their degrees eum laude; 1461 were volume of 1045 pages, including ISO

living in 1895, 251 are mentioned, — pages of index. It contains the names of

17.2 per cent. About one half the magna the alumni of some 80 departments of

eum laude and eum laude degrees have the University. The Triennial oi 1815 is

been conferred since 1890. Adding all a pamphlet of 61 pages; it has no index,

the cum laude degrees together, we find It is printed in Latin; and the names of

that 2725 have been given in the period; clergymen *' literis Italieie exarantur,"

2547 were tiving in 1805, 518 were men- while those of judges, ambassadors, etc.,

tioned, — 20.8 per cent; 106 men gradu- appear in small capitals. It is a record of

ated with final honors but without a the alumni of the College, and of the

eum laude degree; 78 of them were living holders of honorary degrees; the names

in 1895, 38 are mentioned, — 42.8 per of those who ** alibi instituti fuerunt, vel

cent. apud nos Gradu honorario donati," ap-

These figures indicate that rank in pear after the graduates of the year,

scholarship in college seems to have a ''linea inteiposita.'' Here also appear

reUtion to success in later life, the per- the names of graduates of the medical

centage of success being in direct rela- School who were not graduates of the

tion to such rank, and that the marking College; there is no separate list of the

system and the examinations really alumni of this School, — the only School

show something of the merits of the man attached to the College in 1815.

and his chances in the future, — a thing The summary on the last page of the

which we certainly doubted as under^ Triennial states:

graduates and concerning which some Alumnomm Numerufl inteaer 4,239

of us have been skeptical in later life. E vivis oeaBenint stelligeri 2,575

Nothing, however, has come to light supe„unt «ihuo Tow

about the old friend of our youth, the ^ ,. . ,

man who led his class and now drives a ^he correspondmg entry in the pies-

street-car. ^""^ Quinquennud reads:

One other thing is hinted at by my isioes

figures. Each succeeding decade of the

half-century shows a smaller percentage 23,272

of men who have attained the standard Perhaps the most interesting page of

of success which I have adopted, — the Triennial is that which contains the

mention in W?to '# Who, The explana- names of the "Officers of Government

tion of this is, of course that the youngs and Instruction" for the year 1815. The



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1916.]



Note* on the Quinquennial.



601



liBt contaiiis 28 names: 7 members of
the Corporation, \6 profeaaors,>4 tutors,
1 instructor, and the librarian. The list
for the present year fiUs more than 40
pages in the Annual Catalogue, and con-
tains over 900 names.

''Harvard Mumni."
Albert Matthxws^ 'SS.

May I be allowed to repeat here the
substance of a plea made in the Harvard
Alumni BtdUtin of January 14, 1914, for
the publication of a volume to which
the above tentative title may be given?
This should include not merdy every
graduate, but every person who was ever
a student at Harvard. All living gradu-
ates know that in their time there were
many men who, because of death or for
some other reason, did not graduate, and
this has been the case since the earliest
days. A list of about four hundred such
students, previous to 1801, was printed
in the Magaxine for December, 1914.

As early as 1646 it was enacted that
"Every Scholar shall bee called by his
Simame onely till hee bee invested with
his first degree; except hee bee a Knights
Eldest Sonne or of superiour Nobility."
Knights' eldest sons and those "of su-
periour Nobility" were conspicuous by
their absence, and this law was perhaps
the only College Uw never or very rarely
violated. If there was in College at a
given time only one student of a particu-
lar surname, and that student gradu-
ated, the Quinquennial Catalogue will
show to what class he belonged. If he
did not graduate, the task of identifica-
tion before 1725 (when the Faculty Rec-
ords begin) is almost impossible. But
frequently there were in College at once,
and sometimes in the same dass, two or
three or even four students of the same
surname. The contemplated volume, if
in existence, would immediately identify
such students; but in the lack of such a



volimie, identification is extraordinarily
difficult, and it is necessary to examine
genealogies, town histories, and news-
papers, to write to town derks, and even
to correspond with descendants of for-
mer students.

Harvard has been lamentably remiss
in respect to this matter. A "Harvard
Alumni" was first publicly suggested, so
far as the writer is aware, two years ago;
yet other colleges long ago published
similar volumes. Among these are Ox-
ford University (induding temporary
students) and Wadham College (Oxford)
in England; and in this country Amherst
(including temporary students), Bow-
doin. Brown (induding temporary stu-
dents), Colby, Columbia, Dartmouth,
DePauw, Illinois, Michigan (induding
temporary students). New York, North-
western, Pennsylvania (induding tem-
porary students), and Washington and
Jefferson (induding temporary stu-
dents) . If one wishes information about
certain Harvard men, it is rather hu-
miliating to be obHged to seek it in the
catalogues of other colleges from which
those men merely received honorary



This is not the place to discuss in de-
tail exactly what information should be
induded in the proposed volume, but
some suggestions may be thrown out.
Clearly parentage, exact dates and
places of birth and death, degrees, and
positions held are essential. Some of the
catalogues referred to above give dates
of birth, marriage, and death; names of
mothers, wives, and diildren; relation-
ships to fathers or brothers, if graduates
or students; present addresses, if living;
titles of books published; and references
to authorities for the statements made.
All this may well be left to the dedsion
of those to whom is entrusted the prepa-
ration of the suggested volume (or vol-
umes), for that will be a work of great



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602



War Notes.



[March,



labor and of oonaiderable expense. "Oie
purpose of this oommunication is merdy
to point out the absolute necessity for
the publication outlined* in the hope
that it will lead to the immediate start-
ing of the project

WAR NOTES

Harvard Men and Belgian Rdief,
Edward Etre Hunt, '10.

" For a sheltered i>eopIe'B xmrth
In jestinc ffuiae.
But ye are wiae.
And ye know what the jest ia w<»th."

In one of Frederick Palmer's war sto-
ries, describing what he saw of the mar-
velous work of the Commission for Relief
in Belgium, mention is made more than
once of the Conmiission's courier. Pal-
mer caUs him "Harvard 1914." That
sphinx-like youth, in a mud-covered
raincoat and a typical Harvard hat, rac-
ing in a high-power automobile from
Bergen op Zoom, Holland, to Brussels,
Belgium, twice, thrice, or even four
times a week; halted at least twenty-
two times each trip to show his celluloid
covered passport to inquisitive German
sentries; seeing much; saying little, —
"Harvard 1914" is the oldest in service
and youngest in years of the Harvard
contingent in the Commission service.
In private life he is Edward D. Curtis, of
Boston.

Curtis is almost a legend in Belgium.
He thrives on silence and he enjoys ar-
rest. The beginning of the war found
him studying at Cambridge, England.
He went immediately to London and
helped the volunteer American com-
mittee there to send home his stranded
and panicky fellow-citizens; then, when
Herbert C. Hoover, who was head of the
London committee to help Americans,
started the International Commission
for Relief to help Belgians, Curtis volun-



teered again, and opened up automobile
communication between the Rotterdam
shipping office of the CommissioD and
the Bnuseb headquarters. Arrest and
search have become almost by-wofds
with Curtis. I think he knows the inside
of all the Kommandaniurs on the Pntte-
Antwerp-Bnisseb line; but while he was
courier he kept the line dear. For six
months, rain or shine, — and it usually
rains in Belgium, — he was our faithful
Rubber-tired Mocury. After that he
was promoted to the station at St. Quen-
tin, in the North oi France, where he
managed the distribution of relief to the
Frendi. Later he acted as Secretary in
the Brussek Office. More recently he
has been transferred to the London Of-
fice. He is still in the service.

George S. Jackson, '06, is next in point
of service. He was sent in November,
1914, to the border Province of Li^
where he served until October, 1915.
The Li^ situation was peculiarly diffi-
cult. For months Jaduon hardly left his
office. His bedroom and office adjoined,
and he slaved morning, noon, and ni^t
Thanks to him, the traffic facilities of his
IVovince were especially well kmked
after, and shipmente of food from Rot-
terdam to li^ were apportioned with
marked rapidity. Li^ stands at the
side-door to Belgium, on the Meuse
River, and the safety and dispatdi of
cargoes to Namur, Dinant, Charieville,
and two Departments of Northern
France largely depended on Jaduon's
efforts. In May, 1915, George S. Jadc-
son's brother, Robert A. (Harvard. '99)
joined the Li^ staff. Although older in
years, we dubbed him, by reason of the
youthfulness of his service, "Jackson
fils," and the youngw brother was al-
ways called "Jaduon pdre."

I volunteered in November, 1914, af-
ter seeing the siege and fall of Antwerp
and was made ddqjate of the Conmus-



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1916.]



War Notes.



608



sion for Relief in charge of the Fortress
and Province of Antwerp, plus part of
the Province of East Flanders. It was a
territory larger than the State of Rhode
Island and with a population of 1,100,-
000. The staff was never less than three
and sometimes as large as six Americans.
Among the excellent workers on my
staff have been Richard Harvey Simp-
son, M.A. '12, and John B. Van Schaidc,
/ 1888-80 (Cambridge, '88). E. Copp^
Thurston has joined the Antwerp staff
since I left Belgium in mid-October,
1915.

Simpson is a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford
from the State of Indiana. He came into
Belgium in December, 1914, and served
in the Province of Limbourg, then at
Antwerp, and at CharleviUe, France.
He is now stationed at Hasselt, in the
Province of Limbourg. Simpson's keen,
quiet sense of humor and good judgment
have helped him to carry off many trying
situations. Just after the sinking of the
Luniania, while Simpson was serving at
the headquarters of the Grerman General
Staff at Charleville, the position of the
American delegates became very un-
comfortable. It was no extraordinary
thing for officers to twit the Americans
with the prospect of spending their time
for the rest of the war in a concentration
camp in Germany. But Simpson came
back into Belgium with a dozen affec-
tionately inscribed photographs of these
same officers, and an additional trophy
in the form of a German nickname. . . .
Greater honor hath no man than this!
The Iron Cross is nothing to it.

J. B. Van Schaick was formerly a
broker in New York City and a member
of the New York Stock Exchange. Last
spring he served with Richard Norton's
American ambulance corps in France,
and from there he came to Antwerp.
Having dealt with grain on 'change he
WES peculiarly well fitted to help in the



handling, milling, transshipment, and
distribution of Commission supplies to
the Belgians. We caUed him "General,"
because of his fine military appearance.
Van Schaick, whose ancestors were
Dutch or Flemings, has been chiefly
occupied in inspecting communal dis-
tributions of food. The Commission for
Relief in Belgium has a fixed ration for
every Belgian over two years old. The
man who can pay, the man who must
depend on charity — each receives the
same daily allowance of flour or bread,
bacon, etc., and Americans must certify
that he gets it.

E. Copp^e Thurston is another of the
very valuable men in the Commission
service. In January, 1915, he took hold
of the management of the Brussels
docks, where grain and all sorts of sup-
plies for the City of Brussels and the
Province of Brabant are received and
warehoused. Later he was transferred
to Ghent as delegate in charge of the
Province of East Flanders. He was
obliged, for family reasons, to give up
the work for a time, but in November,
1915, he returned to Belgium, and he
now has charge of the important dock
work at Antwerp. Commission barges
of food clear from Antwerp for Brussels,
Louvain, Malines, Mons, and Northern
France. Nine big steam-roller mills work
for the Commission in Antwerp alone.
Four large warehouses in the dty and
innumerable smaller ones in the province
must be supplied through Antwerp.
The inspection and control of all this is
in Thurston's hands.

T. Harwood Stacy, / 1911-14 (Texas,
'11), came in December, 1914, and
served until October, 1915. He was
assbtant delegate in the City of Brus-
sels; next he was at Valenciennes in the
North of France, and after that delegate
in the Province of Luxembourg. Stacey
has the distinction of having served alone



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604



Varia.



[March,



in charge of a provinoe for two montlis.
He has done fine work, and he is now in
the United States BBBiiiting in the appeal
which is being made to America to help
clothe three million destitute people in
Belgium and France.

J. Robinson Smith, Gr. '00 (Yale, '08),
known as a translator of Cervantes,
came in December, 1914, and was sent
to the City of Mons, where he was dele-
gate in charge of the Province of Hain-
aut, the most populous province in Bel-
gium. He did admirable work organising
the province and remained in charge of
it until July, 1915. At a time when
Hainaut was almost the only channel for
assisting the isolated Departments in
Northern France, Smith was ind^atig-
able. He lived for weeks in his automo-
bile, flying from Lille and Valenciennes
to Mons and Charleroi, and from there
to Brussels, arranging shipments of food,
overseeing milling, apportioning supplies
on hand, and persuading local Belgian
and French committees to adopt a sys-
tem of distribution of which he was the
proud father. In July he was transferred
to the Brussels Office in charge of an
important department.

The Reverend Charles N. Lathrop,
'96, succeeded George S. Jackson as dele-
gate in charge of Li^ in September,
1915, and on Feb. 1, 1916, returned to
America to become Dean of All Saints'
Episcopal Cathedral, Milwaukee. Few
people in Belgium knew that Lathrop is
a *'sky pilot." When he sailed for Bel-
gium last August he laid aside his clerical
dress for the first time since he was or-
dained. From that time on he was sim-
ply "dSUgui anUriiDain pour la province
de LUge" applying Christianity through
the secular ritual of bread cards and
soup tickets, instead of through the
rites' of the Church.

Robert A. Jackson, '99, was at Li^ge
until June, 1915. He then served for a



time in the Brusseb General Office; later
at Longwy (yclept "ennui" by the
Faithful, because of the deadly dreari-
ness of life just bdiind the German lines)
and he is now at Namur.

Paul Dana, '74, was also stationed at
Namur in April, 1915, but for personal
reasons he had to leave after only a
month's service.

Francis C. Wickes, LL.B. '15 (Wil-
liams, '12) came in August, 1915, and
served first at Mons in the Province of
Hainaut. He is now at Namur with
Robert A. Jackson.

VARIA.

ALMA MATER.

Chables Alexander Neubon, '60.

(Tune: ^cto»y — Patutrina)

Alma Mater! Alma Mater! Alma Mater!
O Mother, 't is a chorions thing
Thy loyal sons to thee can bring
Each year their filial offering.
Alma Mater.

Offering of Faith, ever thy due;



Online LibraryWilliam Richards Castle William Roscoe ThayerThe Harvard graduates' magazine → online text (page 82 of 103)