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William Richards Castle William Roscoe Thayer.

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'83 men of that city intend to repeat
every five years, as long as a host and
guest can meet together. H. M.
Lloyd, R. B. Moffat, and W. H. Page
had charged themselves with all the
preliminaries and arrangements for
one of the most delightful reunions in
our Class history. Dr. Howard Lilien-
thal acted as chorister and waved
his baton over Codman, S. Coolidge,
Earle, Machado, Soren, Sullivan, and
other willing songsters. C. P. Perin



was toastmaster, and the brief talks
were listened to with serious attention,
for the Great War was in the minds of
all and many of the speakers touched
upon the prevailing theme. Horace
Binney advocated military discipline
and obedience for our American youth,
with illustrations drawn from his
observation of conscription in France.
J. D. Pennock elucidated the chemi-
cal preparedness, of which cue bellig-
erent at least has made such good
use. Dr. S. H. Knight responded for
'* Detroit Investments," and furnished
the inevitable and amusing automo-
bile anecdotes. G. D. Burrage spoke
fittingly for the Class, and W. D.
Sullivan discussed optimistically our
rowing prospects. Prof. J. R. Brack-
ett recited some felicitous verses,
with " The Eternal Feminine " as his
theme, and G. B. Morison related
with enthusiasm the stirring and up-
lifting experiences of his service at the
Plattsburg Training Camp. W. H.
Page, who has one son with the Amer-
ican Ambulance Corps in France, and
one who graduates this year from West
Point, spoke with authority on '* Pre-
paredness." When the assembly ad-
journed, it was to meet in the same
place, Feb. 12, 1921, of which (q>point-
ment all men of '83 are desired to take
note. — C. J. Hubbard is a director of
the Boston Chamber of Commerce,
and chairman of the Committee on
Transportation dealing with the reg-
ulation of southeastern railway rates,
interests of shippers and freight con-
gestion. — Joseph Lee has been ap-
pointed Instructor in Education at
Harvard. — E. W. Sawyer writes from
British Columbia: " In June, 1914,
I resigned my position as Principal of
Okanagan College, West Summerland,
B.C., owing to failing sight, but at the
request of the Board of Management,



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[Jane,



I continued to act as Held Secretary.
The war, however, cauaed auch de-
rangement of buaineaa conditiona aa to
render it impoaaible to work out our
plana, and I accordingly witlidrew
from the field early in September.
Since then I have been trying to wreat
a living from a ten-acre fruit farm that
my sister and I have an interest in.'*
In 1909 the honorary degree of D.C.L.
was granted him by Acadia Univer-
sity of Nova Scotia, where he had
taught for twenty years. In June,
1915, he was elected President of the
Baptist Convention of British Colum-
bia for 1915-16. — E. P. Warren has
been made an Honorary Fellow of
Corpus Christi CoUege at Oxford Uni-
versity. — A. G. Weeks*s son, Ken-
neth Weeks, who had enlisted in the
first regiment of the Foreign Legion,
was killed in battle at Givenchy,
France, on June 17, 1915. A young
man of rare promise, he had studied
for two years at the Mass. Institute of
Technology, had taken a special
course at Oxford, and at the time he
offered his services to France, was
working at the Beaux Arts, pursuing
both architecture and belles-lettres.
— Hon. C. S. Hamlin has been ap-
pointed claim agent for the New York,
New Haven & Hartford Railway, the
Central New England Railway, and
the New England Steamship Co. in
the State of Massachusetts, and will
have charge of investigations and ad-
justments of all claims based on per-
sonal injury or property damage. —
R. S. Codman illustrates in his own
family, as does W. H. Page, the virtues
of preparedness. His eldest son is with
the American Ambulance Corps in
France, his second son is serving in
the Machine-gun Corps of the 8th
Regiment, M.V.M., and he himself is
a member of the Business and Pro-



feasional Men's Training Battalion of
Boston. — G. W. Beats re si gned, on
April 25, his position as secretary of
the Boston Athletic Association, after
twenty-three yeara of devoted and
fruitful service. He was one of the
charter members of the Association,
and has sat on the Board of Governors
for twenty years.

1884.

T. K. CvionNS, See,,
70 8Ut« St.. Boston.
T. R. Summer has been in Paris
since last December. He has a position
in the American Embaasy and is en-
gaged with matters immediately rdat-
ing to the European War. — L. V. Le-
Moyne sailed for Europe in March with
the intention of engagmg in rdief work in
Belgium. — P. G. Brown has presented
to the High School in Montpelier, Vt.,
a copy in miniature, by Daniel C. Frendi,
of the statue of John Harvard. — F. A.
Whitney has recently taken a position
as chemist with the New England
Mfg. Co., South Wihnington. His ad-
dress is 136 Moreland St, Roxbury. —
W. F. Booth, temporary member, has
changed his address from the New Yoik
Custom House to Appraisers Stores,
New York. — The address of Walter S.
Barnes is 8 Summit Road, Natidc

1885.
Henbt M. WiLUAiB, 8ec^
16 Stete St.. Boston.
G. D. Cushing was an unsuccess-
ful candidate in the Mass. primaries
as candidate at large pledged to
Roosevelt, for delegate to the Repub-
lican National Convention. — Dr. L.
Litchfield was on several of the com-
mittees for the meeting of the Asso-
ciated Harvard Clubs in May. — D.
Kelliher, officially represented Har-
vard at the inauguration of Pres.



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706



Suzsallo, of the University of Wash-
ington, in March. — H. M. Williams
has been elected a director of the
Veteran Association of the Boston
Cadets. •— Congressman S. E. Wins-
low is the Mass. committeeman on the
Republican Congressional Campaign
Committee for 1916. — F. Reis, Jr..
is president of the Pacific States
Savings and Land Company. — Abner
Zaza Bowen, son of Abner and Fran-
ces Ann (Cutter) Bowen, was bom at
Loami, 111., July 26, 1859. He pre-
pared himself for College. In College
he was prominent in wrestling, and
rowed on the class crew; in his Senior
year he prepared a lantern slide lec-
ture on Harvard. Later he was ad-
mitted to the bar in New York and
organized the New York Evening
Law School, now connected with New
York University. Shortly afterwards
he abandoned the law for business
and was engaged in different enter-
prises in different parts of the coun-
try. He died in San Jos6, Cal , April
19, 1916, after a rather brie! illness.
— Charies Frederic Carrier died at
Berkeley, Cal., Jan. 80, 1916, after a
lingering illness of many months. He
was the son of Rev. Augustus Hart
Carrier, a Presbyterian minister, and
Susan Ann Bandelle. He was born in
North East, Pa., Dec. 27, 1862, and
prepared for College at the Indiana-
polis Classical School. In College he
took high rank as a scholar and was a
member of Phi Beta Kappa. After
graduation he spent some time in
Leipsic and Berlin universities study-
ing law. He followed this with one year
at the Harvard Law School, and went
to Santa Barbara, Cal., in 1888. This
city became his home for the rest of
his life. In 1889 he was admitted to
the bar and entered into partnership
with Judge Garrett T. Richards, un-



der the firm name of Richards & Car-
rier. He continued to practise until
the spring of 1915, when his illness
compelled him to leave home. He
was a successful lawyer, public-spirited
citizen, and much interested in the
work of the Presbyterian Church. As
such he had held positions as school
trustee, trustee of the free public li-
brary, vice-president of Associated
Charities, president of the Municipal
League, trustee of the Presbyterian
Church, and other offices. In 1896 he
married Miss Emily H. Baker, who
survives him with one daughter.

1886.

Thob. Tilebton Baldwin, 8ee^
77 FVanklin St.. Boston.
By apostal ballot the Class hasdected
T. T. Baldwin Class Secretaiy, and
Howard Taylor a member of the Class
Committee. Baldwin has resigned the
Chairmanship of the Class Committee
but remains a member of the committee.
The Class Committee has elected F. C.
Hood chairman. — The annual sub-
scription Class luncheon was held at the
Harvaid Chib Feb. 26. G.G.Bradford
presided. The following 35 men were
present: E. H. Babbitt, T. T. Baldwin,
G. G. Bradford, A. D. Claflin, W. R.
Dewey, F. E. Dickerman, S. H. Fessen-
den, P. R. Frothingham, A. A. Gleason,
Courtenay Guild, G. B. Harris, M. G.
Houghton, F. C. Hood, E. H. Hosmer,
P. S. Howe. G. F. Jewett, F. A. Ken-
dall, J. M. Merriam, F. J. Moors. E. H.
Nichols, W. F. Osgood, G. R. Parsons,
C. A. Pratt, M. W. Richardson, Odin
Roberts, W. H. Slocum, C. B. Stevens,
C. M. Thompson, W. B. Waterman,
G. M. Weed, F. C. Weld, R. D. Weston,
H. G. Wabur, I. L. Winter, and G. W.
Woodbury. Merriam, Nichols and others
spoke with deep appreciation of the
character and of the professional work



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[June,



of our late CUm Secretary, J. H. Hud-
dleston. Osgood spoht on present af-
fairs at Harvard. Amcmg the other
speakers were Hood and Baldwin, who
said a few words about the Thirtieth
Reunion in June, Haughton, and Weld.

— The plans for the Thirtieth Reunion
are being worked out. There is every
indication that the attendance wiU be
as large as was the attendance at our
Twenty-fifth. — Members of the CUss
who have not already filled out and
mailed to the Class Secretary the Uanka
for the Class Report are earnest^ re-
quested to do so at onoe. — J. J. Bren-
nan is a member of the Mass. State
Board of Optometry. — A. K. Day is
president of the staff of the Margaret
PiUsbury General Hospital, Concord,
N.H. — F. R. Frost is president of the
Charleston, S.C., Democratic Associa-
tion. — T. H. Gage is a member of the
Committee on Judicial Appointments of
the Mass. Bar Association. — A. P.
Gardner was an unsuccessful candidate,
favoring Theodore Roosevelt, in the
presidential primaries in Massadiusetts
for election as delegate-at-large to the
Republican National Convention. —
G. E. Howes is president of the Har-
vard Club of Berkshire County. — C. T.
Libby has started a movement to cele-
brate the 200th anniversary of the per-
manent settlement of Portland, Me., in
June, 1716, by Samuel Moodey (H.C.
1689) and a number of cashiered soldiers.

— A. H. Lloyd is Dean of the Graduate
School of the University of Michigan.

— In March the announcement was
made in the Jouma! of Medieal R^
tearch that the bacillus which is the prob-
able cause of scarlet fever had been di»-
covered by F. B. Mallory, after years
of persistent effort. The life of the bacil-
lus is from 24 to 48 hours, making the
period of contagion much shorter than
has been supposed. Mallory is patholo-



gist of the Boston City Hospital and
associate professor of Pathology in the
Harvard Medical School. — George
Santayana, who is at present living in
Oxford, Eng., has in press a volume en-
titled EgoUsm in Oerman PkOosapky. —
Odin Roberts has been elected president
of the Harvard Club of Boston. ~ A. H.
Vogel is president of the Mihraukee
Citisens* Bureau of Municipal ^Sdency,
and a director of the Federal Reserve
Bank of Chicago. — Croeby Ghuich
Whttman died Mardi 29, 1916, in Paris,
France, where he was in diarge of two
small hospitals for officers and men.
Wliitman was bom at Bemicia, Cal.,
Mardi 2S, 1868, the son of Bernard
Crosby and Mary Elisabeth Church
Whitman. In College he was president
and diorister of the Pudding, member of
the Glee Chib, the ZeU Psi, the Insti-
tute of 1770, the Art Ckh, and the St.
Pauls* Society, His dassmates remem-
ber him as a man of most lovable na-
ture. From 1886 to 1895 he studied
medicine in France and Germany, tak-
ing the degree of M.D. at the University
of Paris in 1894, and the same degree two
years later at Columbian University,
Washington, D.C., In 1895-97 he was
Dr. Osier's assistant at Johns Hopkins.
In 1901 he was appointed medical di-
rector in diarge of the Paris office of the
Equitable Life Ins. Co., and he alao en-
gaged in |»ivate practice. In 1906 he
was appointed phjrsidan to the New
American Ho^ital of Paris at Neuil]y.

1887,

Gn>. P. FuBBEB, See^
844 South Stetion, Bortoo.
D. M. Frederiksen's address is now
618 Phoenix Bldg., Minneapolis,
Minn. — A. S. Hardy's address is 120
Broadway, Room 1626, New York
City. — Dr. J. B. Hileman*s address
is 1901 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. —



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707



Silas Arnold HovglitoQ died suddenly
from pneumonia, Feb. 6, at his home in
Brookline. Houghton was born Sept.
11, 1864, at Keeseville, N.Y., the son
of Henry Arvin and Sarah Dana (Page)
Houghton. The family later moved
to Charlestown, and Houghton pre-
pared for College at the Boston Latin
School. In College he was a member
of the Institute of 1770 and of the
Hasty Pudding; and was on the sta£F
of the Daily Crimson, Like the clean,
healthy boy he was, he enjoyed ath-
letic sports. He played a good deal of
tennis, a game for which he retained
his fondness in after life; and he was
a member of the Crimson nine which,
in 1885 and 1886, won the cups of-
fered by the H. U. B. B. A. for the
amateur championship of the College.
Houghton graduated from College
cum lands and with honorable men-
tion in natural history. After a four-
year course in the Harvard Medical
School he graduated in June, 1891,
with the «legrees of A.M. and M.D.
From July to November, 1891, he
served as House Physician at the Bos-
ton Lying-in Hospital. In February,
1892, he began his practice in Brook-
line, where he lived the rest of his life.
On June 9, 1897, he was married to
Margaret S. Beckwith of Plattsburg,
N.Y. Two children were bom, Henry
Arnold in 1899, and Margaret in 1902.
Mrs. Houghton and both children
survive him. At the time of his death
Houghton was a councilor of the' Har-
vard Medical Alumni Association and
a member of the American Medical
Association, the Massachusetts Medi-
cal Society, the Boston Obstetrical
Society, " The Doctors," — a club
composed almost entirely of '87 medi-
cal men living in and about Boston, —
and the St. Botolph, Harvard, Long-
wood Cricket, and Brookline Country



Clubs. He was also a member of the
'87 Class Committee. In a letter to
the Class Secretary Houghton not
long ago spoke of his life as " the un-
eventful life of a doctor in general
practice . . . there have been no events
worthy of recording." And so in his
gentle modesty he truly thought. He
seems to have been quite unconscious
of the constantly increasing affection
and respect with which he was re-
garded by all who came in contact with
him. But his patients will always re-
member him as a skilful physician,
quietly and lovingly giving the best
that lay within him, forgetful of self
in the cheerful response to calls that
came by day and by night — a self-
sacrifice that was undoubtedly the
cause of his death. Not only was he
a beloved physician, but a wise family
counselor whose advice was often
sought in matters quite remote from
medicine. Truly the community in
which he lived has lost one whose
place will be hard to fill. Aside from
his profession and " The Doctors,"
the medical club of which he was so
fond, his greatest interest was in his
College and his Class. Hardly any
one else in the Class was so well in-
formed as to the story of every other
member since graduation, — a knowl-
edge based on his affectionate interest
in his classmates. This interest was
so reciprocated that there was prob-
ably no one in the Class more beloved
than he. Harvard and all things relat-
ing to Harvard claimed his eager in-
terest and he followed keenly all the
developments that the years brought
the University. He was especially in-
terested in the origin and growth of
the Harvard Club of Boston, which
he hoped might be a factor of no small
importance in broadening the sym-
pathies of the alumni with the Alma



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[June,



Maier. (F. S. M.) — Fhmcis Cleave-
Uttd Hiintiiigtoii, the only son of the
Rev. Dr. Wm. R. and Theresa Rey-
nolds Huntington, was born at Wor-
cester, April S, 1865, where his father
was rector of All Saints' Church. He
therefore, at the time of his unexpect-
ed and widely lamented death in New
York City, on March 15 last, had not
quite completed his 51st year. Prepar-
ing for College at the Worcester High
School, Huntington entered Harvard
with the Class of 1887, took his degree,
magna eum laude, with that Class, and
entering the Law School, graduated
with an A.M. in *91, having spent one
year as lecturer on political economy
in the College. At about the time
Huntington went to Cambridge, his
father was called to Grace Church,
New York City, so that the whole of
the son's active life, with all its varied
usefulness, was spent in that city. In
October, 1801, he entered the office of
Parsons, Shepard & Ogden, a most
happy start in his profession, and one
whose influences and personal rela-
tions remained with him through life.
Admitted to the bar in 1892, he
formed in the following year a partner-
ship with T. N. Rhinelander, '87. In
1005, Origen Seymour joined the
firm, which, under the name of Hunt-
ington, Rhinelander & Seymour, con-
tinued to the present time. It may
truly be said that during those 28
years of active professional life, Hunt-
ington filled a constantly larger place
in the great field which the New York
Bar affords, and has left a gap in the
many-sided activities of that profes-
sion which his friends reflect upon
with both sorrow and deep satisfac-
tion. There has seldom been a man
who took a keener and more practical
interest in a great variety of things, or
who has had a wider usefulness out-



side his chosen profession. As a young
man he devoted much time to military
matters, and was one of the earlier
members of Troop A of the New York
National Guard. As corporal in that
troop he served through the Spanish
War, saw active service in Porto Rico,
and later on was finally mustered out
as lieutenant. In all movements for
better government or any form of
civic improvement he took an ardent
part. For many years a member of
the executive committee of the Citi-
zens' Union, he was in the 1011 Cam-
paign Chairman of the Citisens' Com-
mittee of 100. As vice-president of the
New York State Commission of Pri»-
ons — a post which he held nearly
up to the time of his death — he per-
formed noteworthy service. He was
also trustee of the New York Trade
School and one of the Board of Man-
agers of the State Charities Aid Asso-
ciation. To church affairs he was de-
voted heart and soul. On his father's
death, in 1000, he became a vestryman
of Grace Church, and four years later
its treasurer. He was also treasurer of
the Christian Unity Foundation, and
was one of those most active and in-
fluential in the institution of the
Church Pension Fund, which, under
the leadership of Bishop Lawrence, has
reached the sum of $2,500,000. He mar-
ried, on June 15, 1004, Susan Louisa
Butler, who, with three young sons,
survives him. His life, though it was
not to extend past middle age, was
many-sided, well rounded, and com-
plete. To do his whole duty in every
direction or relation was with him so
unvarying a rule that it long ago be-
came second nature — or rather, per-
haps, it was the basis of his nature.
No man ever more truly " wore the
white flower of a blameless life," or
left a more fragrant memory. (R. R*)



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709



1888.

G. L. PULBIFEB, SeCt
412 Barrister's Hall, Boston.
F. B. Williams, a member of the
Advisory Committee on City Plan-
ning, New York City, has delivered a
series of lectures at the University of
Michigan on City Planning Law, and
is to deliver a similar series in Cam-
bridge under the Architectural Depart-
ment. — C. S. Hervey has been ap-
pointed by Gov. Whitman a member
of the Public Service Commission of
New York State. — On Feb. «6, 1916,
the New York members of the Class
gave a dinner at the Harvard Club,
New York City, to the other mem-
bers of the Class. Seventy-one men
were present. Rand presided and
called upon Miles to ask grace and
upon Adams, Pulsifer, Wardner,
Piatt, Swarts, and Barnes to speak
briefly. Most of them followed in-
structions. As a guest on this occa-
sion the Secretary can express the
thanks of his fellow guests for the ef-
forts of the New York men, which pro-
duced most excellent results. Perhaps
the highest praise is the statement that
this dinner was as good as the two
which had preceded it in New York.
For those who were so unfortunate as
to be absent it may be worth while to
state that the average attendance for
the three dinners at New York has
been seventy-four, a much larger aver-
age than any other class has attained
during the last nine years for dinners
at the same place.— W. B. deBillier's
address is Tejon Ranchos, Bakers-
field, CaL — William Ropes's address
is 106 Greenwood Ave., East Orange,
N.J. — H. M. Plummer*s address is
South Dartmouth. — Nathan Op-
penheim died on April 5, 1916, in New
York, at the Hotel Belmont. Oppen-
heim studied medicine at Columbia,



graduating from there in 1891. He
served in some of the hospitals in New
York and then went into private
practice in that city. He was attend-
ing physician of the Children's De-
partment of the New York Red Cross
Hospital and the New York City Chil-
dren's Hospital. He had made a
specialty of the diseases of children
and had published several medical
books, including Children in Health
and Mental Growth and Control. He
spent the summers at his farm at Fer-
risburg, Vt., in which he was intensely
interested. Mrs. Oppenheim survives
him.

1889.

Hon. Chablbs Wabren. Sac.,
Dept. of Justice. Washington, D.G.
New addresses: (home) D. H.
Clark, 4955 Beriin Ave., St. Louis,
Mo.; A. C. Garrett, Logan, Phila.,
Pa.; A. Goadby, Huntington, N.Y.;
C. F. M. Guild, Boston Tavern, Bos-
ton; P. M. Lydig, 14 Washington
Square, N., New York City; G. E.
Wright, 1227 88th Ave., N., Seattle,
Wash.; (business) S. R. Dunham, 488
Beacon St., Boston; £. S. Griffing, 141
Broadway, New York City; F. E. Litch-
field, 954 Old South Building, Boston.
— * A. G. Barrett was elected last Oc-
tober a member of the Board of Edu-
cation of Louisville, to fill a vacancy
expiring January, 1917. He deliv-
ered last July before the Kentucky
State Bar Ass*n, an address on the
Federal Trade Commission, published
in Central Law Journal^ vol. 81. —
A. Burr is one of the incorporators
of Coffin & Burr, Inc., dealers in in-
vestment bonds, in Boston; he is one
of the New England Finance Com-
mittee, to raise money for the Military
Training Camp Ass*n. — R. C. Cabot
is a member or the Committee of the



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[June,



Citizens' League for America and the
Allies. — C. B. Davenport has been
elected a member of the National
Committee for Neutral Hygiene and
of the Board of Managers. — G. L.
Deblois has been elected a trustee of
the Provident Institution for Savings,
in Boston. — F. W. Faxon has pub-
lished the 7th annual volume of his
Dramatic Index, originated by him
in 1909. — V. Harding is president
of the Western Association of the
Alumni of Phillips Exeter Academy.

— J. R. Hayes is about to have pub-
lished his Collected Poems. — M. D.
Hull has been elected president of the
Harvard Club of Chicago; he is a mem-
ber of the Illinois State Senate, and
has been elected a delegate to the Re-
publican National Convention; his
son, Denison B., is in Harvard, *19. —
J. G. King and P. D. Trafford have
been taken into the law firm of Miller,
King, Lane & Trafford, Nathan A.
Smyth and William G. Parr. — G. W.
Lee is interested in one form of pre-
paredness, viz: ''Sponsors for Know(-
ledge," whereby a registration of spe-
cialists in all topics is under way at
the headquarters of the American
Library Ass*n, in Chicago. — F. E.
Litchfield has resumed the practice
of the law, with ofiices at 954 Old
South Building, in Boston. — P. Mar-
quand is a structural engineer with the
Edgemoor Iron Co., Edgemoor, Del.

— C. Millhiser is president of the



Online LibraryWilliam Richards Castle William Roscoe ThayerThe Harvard graduates' magazine → online text (page 96 of 103)