Copyright
William Richards Castle William Roscoe Thayer.

The Harvard graduates' magazine online

. (page 97 of 103)
Online LibraryWilliam Richards Castle William Roscoe ThayerThe Harvard graduates' magazine → online text (page 97 of 103)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Richmond Cedar Works, the Bedford
Pulp & Paper Co., of the Wilts Veneer
Co., of Richmond, Va.; also president
of the Rosemary Mfg. Co., of Roanoke
Rapids, N.C.; also vice-president of
the Roanoke Mills Co.; director in the
Albemarle Paper Mfg. Co., of Rich-
mond, Va.; director in the West Dis-
infecting Co., of New York. — J. P.
Nields^s term as U.S. Attorney for



Delaware expired in February, 1916.
He had served since October, 1902.
U.S. District Judge Bradford sUted
oflicially in court on his retirement:
"During all the time you have held
your oflSce you have lost only one case,
and that a comparatively unimportant
one. Your success has been notable
and I may say unprecedented in this
district and probably elsewhere. You
have always had high ideals in connec-
tion with the administration of jus-
tice, and have never prostituted your
office. I have no recollection of any
case prosecuted by you in this court
in which, according to my judgment,
you were not fully persuaded of the
guilt of the defendant; and I have re-
peatedly known you to ask leave of
the court to enter a nolle prosequi
where you did not feel sure that the
Government could produce a measure
of proof which, in your judgment as
an honorable man and a good citizen,
would justify the conviction of the de-
fendant. I have always regarded you
as possessing the sense of justice to a
very marked degree; and I think that
it is owing to your love of justice, so
thoroughly imbued are you with the
principle that right should prevail,
that you have come to honor, respect,
and love your office as pertaining so
intimately to the administration of
justice. ... In closing, I wish to say
I have heard the statement made,
though I cannot vouch for its accu-
racy, that you are the only man in
the United States of America of your
political persuasion who now holds
the office of U.S. Attorney. The fact
that you remain in office is the high-
est tribute to your character and effi-
ciency." — C. H. Palmer has been
elected vice-president of the Harvard
Club of Milwaukee. — W. H. Pear
has been elected a director of the Bos-



Digitized by



Google



1916.]



Neat from the Classes.



711



ton Legal Aid Society, and a member
of the Executive Board of the Metro-
politan Chapter of the Red Cross. —
J. H. Ropes has published A CriHeal
and Exegetical Commentary on ike
EjjieiU of St James, (Scribners,
1916.) — W. H. Siebert is managing
editor of the Ohio Eietory Teachers*
Journal: also corresponding member
of the Royal Society of Canada; he
has published in the Mississippi Val-
ley Historical Review^ for March,
1916, " The Loyalists in West Flor-
ida and the Natchez District." — G.
Strong publishes in connection with
his office building in Chicago a unique
magazine entitled The Republic Item,
and has also organized a Republic
Merchants* Association to carry on
this and other activities. — R. D. C.
Ward has published "Some Aspects
of Immigration to the United States,'*
in the Eugenics Review, vol. vn, Jan.,
1916 (London); "Climatic subdivi-
sions of the United States," in BtdL
Amer. Oeog, Soe., vol. 47, Sept., 1915;
"The Weather Factor in the Great
War," in Journ. Oeogr., vol. 14, Nov.,
1915; "Meteorology and Climatol-
ogy," in American Year Book, 1915.
— C. A. Waite has been elected presi-
dent of the University Club of Deca-
tur, 111. — Randolph Cassius Sur-
bridge died at the Massachusetts
General Hospital in Boston, March 19,
1916. He was bom at Brooklyn, N.Y.,
Feb. 17, 1869, son of Samuel and An-
toinette Irene (Shedd) Surbridge, his
father being a prominent lawyer and
one time mayor of Canton, Ohio.
Surbridge was educated in the schools
of Fryeburg, Me., and Washington,
D.C. In College he was a member of
Delta Upsilon, Finance Club, South-
em Club, and prominently interested
in the Harvard Union (the then debat-
ing society.) He received the degree of



LL.B. from the Harvard Law School
in 1892 and entered the law office of
Hon. John D. Long in Boston. He be-
came active in Republican politics,
being a vigorous public speaker, serv-
ing as a member of the Cambridge
Common Council and of the Republi-
can State Committee in 1897 and
1898. In 1900, he gave a fund to be at
the disposal of the Harvard Univer-
sity Debating Club for the purchase
of gold medals, to be known as the
" John D. Long Medals," for the win-
ners of the Yale and Princeton joint
debates. In 1904, he left Massachu-
setts, and later practised law in Des
Moines, Iowa. Surbridge married at
Cambridge, Sept. 21, 1898, Miss
Lillian Wetmore Shedd, who survives
him.

1890.
JosBPH W. Lund, See.,

84 Stete St.. Boston.
F. P. Cabot has been appointed
Judge of the Juvenile Court in Bos-
ton. — Lowell Fletcher Huntington
died in Cincinnati on April 17, 1916.
On leaving College he was associated
with the Addyston Pipe and Foundry
Co., and later went to New York as a
representative of Proctor & Gamble.
For the last ten years he has been ac-
tively engaged in the real estate busi-
ness, as a member of the firm of
Cleanay, Nourse & Huntington, in
Cincinnati. — William Bancroft Car-
penter died at Jamaica Plain on
March 21, 1916. He was born at
Lookout Mountain, Tenn., on Feb.
10, 1869. He went for three years to
Amherst College, taking only his Sen-
ior year in Harvard. Since graduation
he has been a teacher of mathematics,
for the last sixteen years at the head of
the department in the Mechanic Arts
High School, Boston.



Digitized by



Google



712



News from the Clares.



[June,



1891.
A. J. Gabcbau, Sec^
12 Aahburton PI., BoitoD.
Howard Gardiner Cushiiif died in
New York City on April 26, 1916. He
was born in Boston Feb. 2, 1869, the
son of Robert Maynard and Olivia
Dulany Cushing. He prepared at
Groton School and entered College
with the Freshman Class. After grad-
uating he went to Paris and studied
painting for five years, returning to
America and taking up his profession
in Boston and finally in New York
City. He was universally considered
one of the six best American artists.
He left a wife, Ethel Cochrane, and
three children. His latest address was
121 E. 70th St., New York City.

1892.

Allen R. Benner, See.,
Andover.
The Class will meet as usual on Com-
mencement Day at noon in Hollis 24. —
P. L. Home, who was for ten years the
president of the Kamehameha Schools,
Honolulu, Hawaii, is now owner and
principal of the Norfolk Country Day
School, Hillside Road, Wellesley Farms.
The school has three departments: pri-
mary, intermediate, and college pre-
paratory. — It is reported that N. L.
Francis has enlisted in the 97th Over-
seas Battalion of the Canadian Ex-
peditionary Force; he is a sergeant.—
T. G. Bremer was the delegate for the
Class at the Forum of the Harvard
Alumni Association held in Cambridge
April 10.

1898.
Samttel F. Batchelder, Ste,t

721 Tremont Bldg., Boston.
Benedict continues as director of
the Nutrition Laboratory of the Car-
negie Institution, off Longwood Ave.,
Boston; residence, 195 Pilgrim Road,



Fenway. — Coeme has left the School
of Music at Madison, Wis., to occupy
the Chair of Music at the new Con-
necticut College for women at New
London, Conn. — Jaggar, who for the
past four years has been on leave of
absence from the Mass. Institute of
Technology as director of the Hawai-
ian Volcano Observatory, has been
in Washington to arrange for a per-
manent government foundation for
this work, which has proved of great
practical value. — Merrill is vice-
president of the State Normal School
at Superior, Wis., where he has been
teaching since 1900. — Nash has been
assigned as magistrate of the *' Wom-
an's Court,*' just instituted by the
N.Y. Police Department. — Stevens,
after many years with William Whit-
man & Co., of Boston, has gone to
New York. He writes: ** My brother,
C. H. Stevens, '82, and I engaged for
about six months in business in Boston
on our own account, and then merged
our infant industry in the larger
one of J. Spencer Turner & Co., of 86
Worth St.. New York City, where
we have started a cotton yarn depart-
ment; and if the future progresses
proportionately all will be well.*' Res-
idence, Tanglewylde Avenue, Law-
rence Park, Bronxville, N.Y. — Win-
ship gave an afternoon tea to the
members of the Class and their wives
at his " sanctum *' in the new Widener
Library on Sunday, Feb. 27. The oc-
casion was the first in which the ladies
of *98 were able to participate, and
brought out a large gathering. All
who wished were taken over the
building. Mrs. Winship " presided "
at the tea-table, assisted by various
other classmates-by-marriage. Much
interest and enthusiasm marked the
whole affair, which is believed to have
been unique. — For purposes of ree-



Digitized by



Google



1916.]



News from the Classes,



718



ord (although delayed) the Secretary
wishes to set down the '98 men who
attended the Plattsburg Training
Camps, August 10 to October 6, 1915:
F. S. Blake, G. B. Blake, Chew, Cum-
mings (corporal). Fearing (machine-
gun section). Hale, Hathaway (cor-
poral), E. Scott (corporal), Th waits.
Wilder (corporal), Winslow. Thwaits
and Wilder were chosen members of
the permanent committee of the
" First Training Regiment," com-
posed of the 1800 men who were pres-
ent at these camps. — Walter Sawyer
Adams died of consumption at Salem,
Dec. 23, 1915. He was bom at Wor-
cester, Apr. 15, 1871, the son of John
Francis and Ellen Jane (Wilson)
Adams. He fitted at Adams Academy
and was with the Class for its entire
four years, but received the A.B. in
1895, " as of 1898." He graduated
from the College of Physicians and
Surgeons at New York City in 1896,
and was successively at the Charity
Hospital, house physician of the New
York City Hospital, house gyniecolo-
gist of the Roosevelt Hospital, and
senior obstetrician of the Sloane Ma-
ternity Hospital. About 1900 he be-
came a medical examiner for the N.Y.
Life Ins. Co. at their main offices, and
retained this position, with a general
outside practice, until recently. About
a year ago his health failed so much
that he retired to his mother's home
at Salem, where the end came. Those
who were privileged to be his friends
regretted that he did not take an in-
terest in Class affairs, for to much pro-
fessional ability he united a very win-
ning personality. He was unmarried.

1894.

Prot. E. K. Rakd, See,,
107 Lake View Aye., Cambridge.
The Class will hold its Commence-



ment reunion, as usual, in Stoughton
23. There will also be a gathering of
the Class on the Monday preceding
Commencement, as announced in the
Secretary's circular. — H. C. Greene
writes: " I have been given leave of
absence by the Boston Art Commis-
sion and by the Massachusetts Com-
mission for the Blind, and sail for Eng-
land April 8, to report to the French
Wounded Emergency Fund in Lon-
don, and to go thence into their dis-
tributing service in France for six
months. That means driving a motor
hither and yon among the scattered
hospitals, delivering supplies. ** Vive la
France r* — M. LeN. King writes:
** I have been in the Canadian army
for six months, and am off today (Feb.
28) for overseas. When I found that,
if I took a commission, I should be
left, on account of age, with the
' Home Guard,' I enlisted as a private.
I have now reached the rank of ser-
geant for the squad — No. 9 Field
Ambulance. My address in England
is 52 Warley Road, North Shore,
Blackpool.*' — J. D. Logan has en-
listed as a private in the 85th Bat-
talion, Nova ' Scotia Highlanders. —
W. M. Hastings has been reelected to
the School Committee of Methuen. —
H. A. Cutler is president of the Cut-
ler-Dickie Co., 84 School St., Boston.
— F. E. Frothingham is one of the in-
corporators of Coffin & Burr, dealers
in investment bonds, 60 State St.,
Boston, and 61 Broadway, New York
City. — G. N. Henning was the
delegate of the Modem Language
Association to the Pan-American
Congress held in Washington last De-
cember and is president of the Wash-
ington Harvard Club for this year. —
E. B. Hill's symphonic poem. The
Parting of Lancelot and Guinevere,
which was performed for the first time



Digitized by



Google



714



News from tAe Clasaes.



[June,



by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra
at St. Louis on Dec. 81, 1915, was
given by the Boston Symphony Or-
chestra in Boston, March 24 and 25.
— W. S. Wadsworth has published
" The Coroner and the Physician "
in the New York Medical Journal for
Feb. 26, 1916. — J. R. Oliver is on
the staff of the new Psychiatric Qinic,
under Dr. Adolf Meyer, at the Johns
Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore.

1895.
Frederick H. Nash, SO SUte St.,
Boston, has been elected Secretary of
the Class, a position which has been
vacant for more than a year.

1896.

J. J. Hatbb, 8ee^

30 State St., Boston.
An informal dinner of the Class for
men in New York City and vicinity was
held on Feb. 25 at the Biding Club, at
7.80 P.M. There were 62 men present
and the occasion was a great success.
Plans for our Twentieth Reunion have
matured and the circular describing them
in detail should be in the hands of the
Class before the publication of this maga-
zine. The Reunion paper The Ninety-
Sixer has appeared in two numbers and
the third and final one will be issued on
or before June 1st. From the numerous
changes in address as shown on the
Class Reports it would seem that our
various members have not notified the
Secretary when these changes were
made.

1897.

W. L. Garbibon, Jr., 8ee^

60 State St., Boetoa.

R. B. Dixon has been appointed

Professor of Anthropology, and H. V.

Hubbard, Assistant Professor of

Landscape Architecture, at Harvard.



- H. J. WUder is in the Office of Ex-
tension Work North and West, States
Relation Service, U.S. Dep*t of Agri-
culture, Washington, D.C. — £. E.
Southard, director of the Boston Psy-
chopathic Hospital, was a speaker at
the Convention of Louisiana State
Societies for Mental Hygiene, at New
Orleans, April 8. — P. MacKaye is
the author of the Shakespearean
Masque for the Centenary Celebration
in New York City. —J. M. Little,
associated for nine years with Dr.
Grenfell in his medical mission, is now
surgeon of St. Anthony's Hospital in
Labrador. — W. W. Kennard and C.
P. Drury are among the active leaders
in the legislative work of the present
session of the Massachusetts Legisla-
ture. — C. H. Turner, Jr., is vice-
president of the Harvard Club of St.
Louis. — E. Stevens is the sole repre-
sentative of the Class in the Harvard
Club of Porto Rico. — F. V. Edgell,
associated with the firm of Hill, Ha-
ven & Wm. W. Crosby, is now located
at 40 Central St., Boston. — H. D.
Buell announces the opening of his
law office at 15 William St., New York
City. — H. von Briesen is a partner
in the new law firm of Briesen &
Schrenk, 25 Broadway, New York
City. — W. L. Garrison, Jr., is one of
the incorporators of Coffin & Burr,
Inc., investment bankers, 60 State St.,
Boston. — R. Upton b one of the
committee appointed by the Navy
Dept. to organize the so-called Cruise
for Civilians in the First Naval Dis-
trict. This undertaking has been de-
scribed as " The Floating Plattsburg."
— In the lists published by the BulU"
tin of Harvard men in the Great War
the following names appear: D. Chee-
ver, chief surgeon. Second Harvard
Medical Unit; W. B. Johnston, in
charge of small hospital in France;



Digitized by



Google



1916.]



News from the Claaaea.



716



R. Whoriskey, assistant, American
Consulate, Hanover, Germany; C. S.
Wilson, First Secretary, American
Embassy, Petrograd, fitted up the em-
bassy, at his own expense, as a hos-
pital for wounded Russian soldiers.
The Bulletin also adverts to the loss
of Elbert Hubbard on the Lusitania.
— Chester Chapin Ritmrill, son of
James Augustus and Anna Cabot
(Chapin) Rumrill, succumbed to an
attack of meningitis in his apartments
in the Hotel Kimball, Springfield, on
March 7, 1916. He prepared for Col-
lege at a private school in Springfield,
spent four years with the Class, re-
ceiving his A.B. degree in '97. After
graduation Rumrill traveled in Eu-
rope, returning in January, 1898, to
take a position in the freight depart-
ment of the Boston & Albany R.R.
Co. In November, 1901, he entered •
the office of Lee, Higgineipn & Co.,
Boston, leaving there in 1907 to take
charge of his father's affairs. Since
his father's decease in 1909 his busi-
ness interests were identified prima-
rily with Springfield, and at the time
of his death he was acting president of
the Chapin National Bank. His mo-
ther and two sisters, Rebecca, wife of
Prof. Lewis H. Dow, of Dartmouth Col-
lege, and Anna, wife of Edward C.
Hammond, of New London, Conn., sur-
vive him.

1898.

Babtlbtt H. Hates, 8ee„
Andover.
Herbert I. Foster, a partner in the
firm of Paine Webber & Co., bankers
and brokers, has opened a New York
City office for his firm at 25 Broad St.
— J. Freeman Marston has been elected
assistant treasurer of the Common-
wealth Trust Co., Boston. — James
L. Knox is N.E. manager of the Dic-



tograph Interconversing System, Gen-
eral Acoustic Co., with offices at 59
Temple Place, Boston. — Dr. H. O.
Feiss has been assistant to Dr. Bou-
chet, head of the American Ambu-
lance Hospital at Neuilly-sur-Seine,
Paris, since the outbreak of the war.
Prior to that time he had been engaged
in medical research work for three
years at Edinburgh University and
one year at the Pasteur Institute,
Paris. — L. P. Marvin is chairman and
Milton S. Jarger, S. L. Fuller, J. W.
Prentiss, and William H. Wheelock
are members of the Harvard Club of
New York Committee on Appoint-
ments. — Philip S. Dalton is one of the
incorporators of Coffin & Burr, Inc.,
dealers in investment bonds, 60 State
St., Boston. — G. F. Hurt is treasurer
and in the New York City office of the
Pratt Engineering & Machine Co.,
Room 1204, 60 Wall St., New York
City. — Fraizier Curtis has returned
to this country from France and has
been made flight commander of the
Harvard Flying Corps. — W. E.
Doman has been made clerk of the
Mass. Senate Committee on Rules. —
R. W. P. Brown has agreed to act as
an advisory football coach for another
year. — B. H. Hayes is a member of
the governing committee of the Bos-
ton Stock Exchange. — Jordan Du-
maresq, son of Herbert and Julia
M. (Jordan) Dumaresq, was born in
Boston Nov. 15, 1876, and died at
Territet, Switzerland, Dec. 11, 1915.
Dumaresq prepared for Harvard at
St. Mark's School, Southboro, and
entered College with the Class in the
fall of 1894. After leaving College
he entered the employ of E. Rollins
Morse & Co., bankers, in Boston, in
the fall of 1898, and remained there for
about a year. He then traveled abroad
for about a year and in July, 1901,



Digitized by



Google



716



News from the Classes.



[June,



married Amy Gunther Sweet. He re-
mained in this country for about a
year, but from 1902 up to the time of
his death he has lived abroad, for the
most part at Dinard, France. On
March 4, 1911, he married Olive Fits-
Gibbon. About three years ago his
right leg became infected and he had
to undergo an amputation and, as a
result of this, his health steadily de-
clined. Soon after the outbreak of the
war he turned his villa at Dinard into
a hospital and went to Switzerland in
the hopes of regaining his health, but
there he passed away.

1899.

Abthitb Adams, See,,^
7 Water St.. Room 912. Boston.
Rev. MaxweU Savage is minister of
the Unitarian Churdi in I^mn, having
left Louisville, Ky.» where he has been
over 6 years. — Benjamin T. Creden^ the
only remaining " lost ** degree h<^der ol
the Class has been located. On Jan. 80;
1915, he enlisted at Gait, Ontario^ and is
a lance corporal in the 1st Overseas Bat-
talion, Canadian E^qieditioiiaiy Force.
He was officially reported as admitted
to No. 1 Canadian General Hospital*
Etaples, on Feb. 12, 1916^ suffering from
a gun-shot wound in the shoulder and
was transferred to Na 6 Convalescent
Depot, EUples, on Feb. 24. —Edward
H. Virgin is connected with the Mon-
tague Press at Montague, whidi is his
present address. — Addison G. Fay has
left Chicago and removed East. His
permanent address will be Orford, Graf-
ton County, N.H. He has had a 57-loot
ketch built at Geo. Lawley & Son's
yard, Neponset, and will spend most
of his summer on her. — William G.
Morse's home address is now 408 More-
land Ave., Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia.
— ^Pliny Jewell is one of the incorporaton
of Coffin & Burr, Inc, dealers in invest-



ment bonds, 00 State St, Boston. —
P. D. Haughton is vice-president of
William Read & Sons, Inc., a well-known
sporting goods store. He will also have
diarge of the University Football Team
next fall, in addition to his duties with
the Boston National Baseball Club. —
Joseph Lovejoy is a partner in F. H.
Coleman & Co., members of Boston
Stock Exchange; address, 50 Congress
St., Boston. — Paul Burrage has moved
his office to 20 Central St., Boston. —
John H. Sherburne has been elected
colonel of the 1st Regiment, Field Artil-
lery, M.V.M. He also represents Brook-
line in the State House of Representa-
tives. — D. Howard Fletdier is a teacher
at Loomis Institute, Windsor, Conn. —
£. V. Gage's address is 230 Keikgg Ave
Palo Alto, Cal. — Lee Ullmann is vice-
president, secretary and treasurer of the
UUmann Thist Ca, Springfieki, Mo. —
E. B. Barstow is a member of the firm
of Warren & Barstow, proprietois of a
cigar stand in the Ames BuiUing, Bos-
ton. — The names of the following '99
men i^>pear in the list of Harvard men
who have been or are connected with the
European War, as compiled by the
Hanard Bulletin: Dr. Roades Fayer-
weather. Dr. James C. Fyt^, Dr. John
C. Phillips, Robert A. Jadcson, Heniy
James, Jr., J. Tucker Murray, Arthur
Ruhl. In addition there is Ciedenabom
referred to.

1900.
Abthub Dbinkwateb, Sm^

Berkeley St., Boston.
The annual New York dinner of the
Class was held at the Harvard Club on
Feb. 25. Some 85 men were there. W. P.
Eaton presided and among the men who
had something to say were T. H. Whit-
ney, William Morrow, R. C. Boiling,
Ralph Pulitzer, R. W. Kauffman, Arthur
Drinkwater, and Walter Hampden.



Digitized by



Google



1916.]



News from the Classes.



Ill



R. S. Foss, '03, entertained the gather-
ing by clever imitations of lectures by
Prof. Wendell and Prof. A. C. Coolidge.
Toward the end of the evening A. F.
Gottbold acted as interpreter of a mov-
ing-picture sketch, showing the experi-
ences of the toastmaster in traveling to
New York and spending $1.S6, the pro-
ceeds of the sale of pigs raised by him at
his country estate. The speeches were
so well worth listening to that hardly a
man left the dinner before it broke up,
a few minutes before 12 o'clock. The
standard of the talking was of a very
high order, for Pulitzer told us about his
experiences on a voyage in an aeroplane
over the front line trenches in France
(see his book. Over the Front in an AerO"
'plane) and Boiling informed us of the
doings of the New York National Guard
aeroplane corps, which he commands.
— F. H. Danker, rector of St. Luke's
Episcopal Church, Worcester, has writ-
ten a number of articles and delivered
numerous addresses on the need of na-
tional preparedness. He is a member of
the Worcester Military Training School
for Officers. — W. L. Holt has been re-
appointed health officer of South Orange
Township, N.J. His address is 12 Girard
Place. Maplcwood. N.J. — R. H. John-
son is a member of the University Coun-
cil of the University of Pittsburgh. He
has in the press of John Wiley's Sons,
N.Y., Princi'plea of Oil and Gat Pro-
duction, by Johnson and Huntley.—
H. L. Leiter is urologist to the Hospital
of the Good Shepherd, Syracuse, N.Y.,
and genito-urinary surgeon to the Syrar
cuse Dispensary. His business address is
Physicians' Building. — R. A. Sanborn
has published Horizons, a volume of
verse. (Four Seas Company, Boston.)
His business address is 265 Henry St.,
New York City. — N. R. Willard's
business address is 129 Front St., New
York City. At present he is in Cuba. —



H. A. Guiler is AssisUnt U.S. Attor-
ney, New York City. His home address
there is Hotel Belleclaire, Broadway and
77th St. — F. R. Greene is at Saranac



Online LibraryWilliam Richards Castle William Roscoe ThayerThe Harvard graduates' magazine → online text (page 97 of 103)