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William Richards Castle William Roscoe Thayer.

The Harvard graduates' magazine online

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Lake, N.Y., regaining his health. His
address there is 88 Franklin Ave. — -
M. Seasongood is vice-president of the
Harvard Club of Cincinnati, O. — R.
H. Ellis b consulting obstetrician and
gynsBCologist, Multnomah County Hos-
pital, and assistant . professor of ob-
stetrics and assistant in gynaecology in
the Medical Department of the Univer-
sity of Oregon, Portland, Oregon.—
G. C. Kimball is treasurer of the Asso-
ciated Harvard Clubs and is chairman
of the executive committee of the Har-
vard Club of Western Pennsylvania in
diarge of the meeting of the Associated
Harvard Clubs, which is to be held at
Pittsburgh on May 19 and 20. The fol-
lowing 1900 men are members of com-
mittees of the Western Pennsylvania
Club in connection with this meeting:
W. G. Mortland, Finance Committee;
J. E. MacCloskey, Jr., vice-chairman
of Hotel Committee; R. T. Watson,
vice-chairman of Saturday Conmiittee;
C. J. Wright and R. T. Watson,. Recep-
tion Committee. — Capt. G. F. Fur-
long's foreign address is 24th Battalion,
Victoria Rifles, 5th Brigade, 2d Divis-
ion Canadians, British Expeditionary
Force, Army Post Office, London, Eng.
He is at the front. He writes from
Flanders as follows: " Many times have
I thought of writing to you and have
often wondered whether my cable ever
arrived, which I sent the Class dur-
ing the time of the Quindecennial. How
did it all come off? How many turned
up ? I am sorry to have missed it, but
then here I was with my battalion learn-
ing to ' do my bit.' Have had my bap-
tism of fire and have had my experience
of being exposed to both rifle bullets and
shells and I don't think I 'd choose



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[June,



either of them as a daily ration. My
work keeps me two miles from the front
line trenches and I visit them about
every other turn in the line. My duties
are numerous and comprise those of
Assistant Adjutant Paymaster and regi-
mental or field censor, and one meets
with a great deal of humor on this latter
job. The way the British Army is 'play-
ing the game ' would recall the days of
football and other sports. The trouble
with ' the game ' is that there is no um-
pire and there *s too much dirt and off-
side play by our opponents. However,
we continue to play clean, but after the
submarine incidents and several white
flag affairs our men are not so inclined
to show mercy and no one would blame
them. My best to all members of the
Class, and I *d like to hear some news of
them. Is the Crimpoon still going
strong? " — F. F. Burr has, at Wayne,
Me., the Sunrise Farm Sununer Camp
for Boys, at which boys are taught the
various activities of fanning and gar-
dening, in addition to the usual instruc-
tion in outdoor sports and natural his-
tory. — I. S. Kahn is medical director
of Von Ormy Cottage Sanitarium, San
Antonio, Tex. — A. S. Hawks is with
Busch-Sulzer Brothers Diesel Engine
Company, St. Louis, Mo. — W. Arens-
berg has published IdoU, a volume of
poems, many of which deal with the
present war. (Houghton Mifflin Co.)
— E. W. Stix is one of the vice-presi-
dents of the Harvard Club of St. Louis,
Mo. — E. C. Carter has received the
Kaiser-i-Hind Medal of the First Class
from King George of England in recogni-
tion of special work done for the Indian
people. For some years he has been en-
gaged in organizing the Y.M.C.A. in
India. — R. Folks is Commissioner of
Public Works of the Borough of Man-
hattan, New York City. His business
address is Municipal Building, New



York City. — W. L. Holt won from a
field of 80 or 40 the spelling match held
at the winter outing of the Harvard
Club of New Jersey. — H. W. Ballantine
has published ProUema in ike Law of
Contracts, (Lawyers Cooperative Pub.
Co., Rochester, 1915.) Blaekstone, Re-
vised and Abridged, vol. 15 in Modem
American Law,—' A. A. Benesch is a
member of the firm of Herrick, Hopkins,
Stockwell & Benesch, 912 Society for
Savings Bldg., Cleveland, O. — R. J.
Davis is literary editor of the Evening
Poet, New York City. — On Jan. 1,
1916, H. T. Dougherty was appointed
librarian of the Newton Free Library.
— D. Drake is Professor of Philosophy
at Vassar College. His addresses are:
business, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie,
N.Y.; home. College Ave., Poughkeepsie,
N.Y. He has a volume. Problems of iZe-
ligion, now in the press of Houghton
Mifflin Co. — G. G. Hubbard went to
Belgium in the fall of 1914 in the am-
bulance service. He is now 2d lieuten-
ant in the Royal Flying Corps of Great
Britain. He has seen hard service in
the British army, but is now on vacar
tion in England. — E. F. Loughlin is a
member of the Free Public Library Com-
mittee, Concord. — C. N. Prouty, Jr., is
treasurer of I. Prouty & Co., Inc., shoe
manufacturers, of Spencer. — M. Sea-
songood has in the Jan., 1916, Harvard
Law Review an article entitled " Drastic
Pledge Agreements." — F. H. Stedman
has resigned as rector of St. Johns
Church, Milwaukee, Wis., and is now
at St. Marks, Waterville. Me. His ad-
dress is Waterville, Me. — F. B. Talbot
is an instructor of pediatrics at the Har-
vard Medical School. He has published,
with Dr. John Lovett Morse, Diseases
of Nutrition and Infant Feeding (Car-
negie Inst., Washington, no. 201); and
Gaseous Metabolism of Infants (Carnegie
Inst., Washington, no. 283); Physiology



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of the NeuhBofn Infant, both in con-
junction with F. G. Benedict. — J. L.
Salbonstall is a member of the naval re-
serve committee of the Navy League of
the United States, which is organizing
voluntary naval reserve camps, and is at
the head of the movement in Massachu-
setts for establishing a camp for naval
training somewhere on the New England
coast this summer, similar to the P]att»-
burg camp for militaiy training. — S. B.
Southworth will again be one of the head
masters of the Marienf eld Summer Camp
for Boys during July and August at
Chesham, N.H. — P. J. Sachs is assistant
director of the Fogg Art Museum at
Cambridge. In the March number of the
Harvard Oraduates* Magazine he had an
article on the Fogg Art Museum.—
A. M. Tozzer has been appointed a mem-
ber of the faculty of the Peabody Mu-
seum, Cambridge. — H. Linenthal has
been appointed assistant in medicine at
the Harvard Medical School for one
year from Sept. 1, 1915. — H. S. Bowers
has established two prizes in the Depart-
ment of Fine Arts at Harvard, one for
the best painting and the other for the
best drawing by any undergraduate in
any fine arts course. — R. W. Kauff-
man will shortly publish a book of short
stories entitled The Silver Spoon. —
F. W. Reynolds, of the faculty of the
University of Utah, is president of the
Harvard Club of Utah. — After leaving
Harvard J. T. Williams received the
degree of A.B. from Kansas University
and M.D. from Marquette University
Medical School. He has taught science
at the Virginia Baptist Seminary, Lynch-
burg, Va., and at Atlanta Baptist Col-
lege, Atlanta, Ga. Since 1911 he has been
practising medicine, first at Sanders-
ville, Ga., and this last year at Morris-
town, N.J., where his address is 74
Water St. — - Addresses: D. Estes, (busi-
ness) 212 Summer St., Boston; B. E.



Eames, (home) Hampton Court, Brook-
line; J. C. Johnston, (business) 421 Tre-
mont Bldg., Boston; T. R. Hawley, (bus-
iness) 420 Tremont Bldg., Boston; J. H.
Hohnes, (business) 111 5th Av., N.Y.
City; F. T. Manning, (business) Box
431, Reading, Pa.; J. Wilson, (business)
45 State St., Bangor, Me.; E. J. Whit-
tier, (business) N.E. Westinghouse Co.,
Chicopee Falls; F. DeW. Wash-
bum, (business) 87-93 Haverhill St.,
Boston; N. W. Tilton, (home) 63 East
82d St., New York City; W. E. Skillings,
(home) 37 Egremont Road, Coolidge
Comer; G. S. Parker, (business) 10 East
43d St., New York City, (home) Syosset,
Long Island; A. B. Myrick, (home) 43
So. Prospect St., Burlmgton, Vt.; E. H.
MoeUer, 392 Pearl St., BuflFalo, N.Y.;
H. W. Mason, 70 Church St., No. At-
tleborough; F. H. Simonds, (home) 125
Cooper Ave., Upper Montdair, N.J.;
Max Hirsch, (business) 1105 Union
Trust Bldg., Cincinnati, O.; N. Ruland,
(home) Hotel Grafton, Washington,
D.C.; R. H. McNaught, (home) 320
Central Park West, New York City;
H. S. Bowers, (home) Greenacres Ave.,
Hartsdale, N.Y.; H. T. van Deusen,
105 Audubon Ave., New York City;
L. E. Wyman, (business) Pickering
Bldg., Manchester, N.H.; C. Hum-
phrey, (home) 21 Poplar Plains Road,
Toronto, Ont., Canada; F. Rawie, Jr.,
(home) The Coronado Apartments, 22d
& Chestnut Sts., Philadelphia; E. R.
Pope, (home) 5 Brimmer St., Boston;
C. E. Klise, (home) 320 So. 13th Ave.,
No. Yakima, Wash.; E. C. Wheeler, Jr.,
(home) 54 Chestnut St., Boston; H. W.
Sanford, (business) Sanford-Day Iron
Works, Knoxville, Tenn.; B. Chandler,
(home) 777 Prospect Ave., W^innetka,
HI.; G. W. Presby, (home) 413 Lebanon
St., Melrose; R.T. Baraefield, (business)
412 Turks Head Bldg., Providence, R.I.;
J. C. Campbell, 1649 103d St., Chicago;



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[June,



R. H. Takey, (banness) William Jewell
College, Liberty, Mo.; W. S. Davis,
(busiDess) University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis, Minn.; W. L. Holt, (busH
ness) Municipal Bldg., Maplewood,
NJ.; W. L. Beardsell, (home) Plain
Road, Wayland; £. Ingram, (home)
4 Bryant St., Cambridge; (business)
SOI Devonshire St., Boston, where
he is with the house of Morrison St
Vaughan; H. A. Freiberg, (business)
The Freiberg Lumber Co., Cincinnati,
O., (home) 927 Avondale Ave., Avon-
dale, Cincinnati, O.; C. S. Oalonan,
(business) care of Digestive Ferments
Co., KH^e Locust St., Detroit, Mich.,
(home) " The Pafans," Detroit, Mich.;
Ernest Sachs, (home) 97 Arundel Place,
St. Louis, Mo; H. T. Dougherty, (home)
S2 Maple Ave., Newton; G. G. Hub-
bard, (business) War OflBce, London,
England, (home) 585 Beaom St., Bos-
ton; H. W. Ballantine, (home) 427 N.
Butler St., Madison, Wis.; C. H. Taylor,
(business) David Whitney Bldg., De-
troit, Mich., (home) 616 Trumbull Ave.,
Detroit, Mich; F. M. Smith, (home) 120
Oak Ave., Ithaca, N.Y.; W. N. Seaver,
(home) S68 West 20th St., New York
City; R. Pulitzer, (home) 17 £. 54th
St., New York City; H. G. Robinson,
(business) care of Robinson-Bynon Shoe
Co., Auburn, N.Y.; R. J. Davis, (home)
Nepera Park, N.Y.; J. O. Wells, (home)
618 Lake Ftont Boul., St. Joseph, Mich.;
W. H. Attwill, (business) Room 817.
U.S. Patent office, Washington, D.C.,
(home) Harvard St., Washington, D.C.;
E. Cary, (business) 16 Lee St., Cam-
bridge; W. L. Beardsell, (business) 68
Devonshire St., Boston, (home) Way-
land; S. R. Boright, (business) 21 River
St., Richford, Vt.; R. D. Crane, (busi-
ness) 698 Mass. Ave., Cambridge; L. M.
Dougan, (business) The Henry Shaw
School, St. Louis, Mo.; Wm. Edmunds,
.(home) 29 Croton St., Wellesley Hills;



M. Emery, Jr., (busmess) American Tire
Fabric Co., Newburyport, (home) 800
High St., Newburyport; R. C. Hatch,
(home) 422 Lake Ave., St Louis, Mo.;
H. S. Hirahberg, (home) 841 Colling-
wood PhMX, Toledo, O.; W. lichten-
stein, (home) 781 Lincoln St., Evanston,
HI.; B. Kaufman, (business) care of
Kaufman Straus Co., Louisville, Ky.;
a F. Manahan, (business) 1112 Mills
Bldg., El Paso, Tex.; G. Manierre, 8d,
(business) Manierre Engineering k Ma-
chinery Co, Milwaukee, Wis^ (home)
176 Farwell Ave., Milwaukee. Wis.;
H. K. Mekher, (home) 502 Frendi St^
Bangor, Me.; E. Montdiyk, (business)
care of Western Electric Co., Haw^
thome Sta., Chicago, (home) Riverside,
111.; W. Morse, (home) 8 N. Lime St.,
Lancaster, Pa.; H. Parker, (home) 140
Woodland Ave., New Rocfaelle, N.Y.;
A. E. Pecker, (business) 80 State St.,
Boston; Wm. Phillips, (home) North
Beverly; H. S. Gale, (business) Geologi-
cal Survey, Washington, D.C.; E. E.
Wheeler, (business) 60 Wall St., New
York City; F. WUcodc, (home) 859 51st
St., Brooklyn, N.Y.; A. M. Toner,
(business) 7 Bryant St., Cambridge.

1901.

H. B. Clark. Sm.,
14 Wall St., New York, N.Y.
W. E. Hocking is Professor of Phil-
osophy at Harvard. — R. L. Frost,
the poet, author oi- North of Boston, A
Boy's Will, etc., is now living in Fran-
Gonia, N.H. Until three or four years
ago he spent his time farming and
teaching. He also spent two or three
years in England in study, writing and
knocking about. He came back to
America to find himself noted. — C.
A. Moore, after leaving Dobbs Ferry,
was abroad on the Rogers Fellowahip
(1912-18). He took his Ph.D. at Har-
vard in 1918 and is now a member of



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the English Department at Trinity
College, N.C. — Dr. Waiter B. Swift
has recently published the following
articles: ** The Hygiene of the Voice
before Debates," Qtiarterly of Pub.
Sp,, July, 1915; " The Form of the Re-
flexes in Chorea," Albany Med, An-
nals, Sept., 1915; "Studies in Neu-
rological Technique No. 4," "The
Form of the Reflexes in Chorea-
Technique of Elidtation," Albany
Med, AnnaU, Oct., 1915; " The Voice
Sign in Tabes-Technique of Elicita-
tion," " Studies in Neurological Tech-
nique No. 5," Review N. and P.,
Oct., 1915; " The Mentally Construc-
tive Nurse," The Trained Nurse and
Hosp, Review, Oct., 1915; " Can the
Speech Present a Sign of Congenital
Syphilis? " B, M, and S, J„ Oct. 21,
1915. — Warwick Greene is with the
Rockefeller Foundation, 61 Broad-
way, New York City. — Changes cf
address: J. H. A. Symonds, Suite No.
1824-26, 288 Broadway, New York
City; G. G. Brockway, 220 Broadway,
New York City; M. I. Goldman, U.S.
Geological Survey, Washington, D.C.;
T. F. Barrett, 78 Madison Ave.,
Memphis, Tenn.; R. M. Brown, 18
Church St., Saranac Lake, N.Y.; G.
R. Ford, 247 Beach St., Wollaston. —
Peter Harden Eley, son of Edwin Eley
and Annie Holt Harden, was bom
Sept. 25, 1875, at Windsor, Vt. He
prepared for college at Williston
(Tenn.) Academy, after which he en-
tered the University of North Caro-
lina. During the latter part of his
junior year at this university he had
an attack of typhoid fever and twice
after that he had to give up his col-
lege work because of poor health.
But through perseverance finally he
won his A.B. magna cum laude and
later his A.B. from Harvard. — The
Boston Quindecennial Conunittee is
made up as follows : J, W. Hallo-



well, Chairman, Matthew Bartlett, B.
S. Blake, Dr. Gerald Blake, G. W.
Canterbury, R. W. Dibble, Dr. T. J.
Eastman, R. E. Goodwin, H. F. Hurl-
burt, Jr., H. W. Keene, James Law-
rence, John S. Lawrence, Harris Liver-
more, E. P. Morse, H. W. Palmer, J.
O. Ptoctcr, Jr., W. T. Reid, Jr., C. M.
Rotch, J. E. Somes, H. L. Shattuck,
H. C. Shaw, C. J. Swan, R. D. Swaim,
and L. J. Watson, 2nd.

1902.

Babbitt Wendell, Jb., Sec,,
44 State St.. Boston.
R. C. Barnard has moved to Pueblo,
Col., where he is in the railroad busi-
ness. — J. C. Cobb, Jr., is now in busi-
ness under the firm name of Cobb &
Co., 60 State St., Boston. — Oscar
Cooper is now engaged in cattle rais-
ing. — J. C. Grew is Secretary, Ameri-
can Embassy at Berlin, where he has
been since the outbreak of the war. —
R. K. Hale is one of the majors of the
new regiment of artillery recently
formed in Massachusetts. — C. W.
Hobbs, Jr., is a member of the Mass.
State Senate. - F. W. Hunnewell,
2d, is secretary to the Corporation of
Harvard College. — Dr. R. I. Lee has
charge of Hygiene in the College. He
is now engaged making a great many
interesting experiments in connection
with the general health of the student
body. — ^ Halstead Lindsley is at pres-
ent on a trip to South America to in-
spect and report on a mine. — R. T.
Lyman is still engaged in the business
of cotton manufacture, being treasurer
of various mills. — R. W. Morris is a
teacher at Amherst College. — R. B.
Ogilby is still headmaster at Bagui
School, at Bagui, P.I. — Charles
Piatt, 3d, is still engaged in the insur-
ance business with offices at 400 Walr
nut St., Philadelphia. — Philip Wads-
worth is a partner in the firm of



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[June,



Bigelow k Wadsworth, architects, with
o£Sce8 at 8 Hamilton Place, Boston. —
S. P. Ware is a partner in the firm of
Bond & Goodwin, note-brokers, 31
SUte St., Boston. — H. P. Williams
is an insurance broker in Boston. —
Alfred Winsor, Jr., is a commission
merchant at 156 State St., Boston. As
is his custom, Windsor has just com-
pleted another successful season coach-
ing the Harvard hockey team.

1905.

S. N. HiNCKIXT, iS«0.»
25 Broftd St., New York, N.T.
R. A. Derby, who owns a plantar
tion near Pinehurst, N.C., has been
accomplishing great results in im«
proving conditions among his neigh-
bors. His latest work has been in
forming the Derby Memorial School,
on the Drowning Creek Plantation.
This has resulted in most important
changes in the local educational sys-
tem. In connection with this under-
taking I quote from the Pinehurti
Outlook: "There were four district
schools in the surrounding country
when the plantation was started.
They were schools only by grace of the
dictionary. Four cabins, a tired and
underpaid female, a few urchins, a
spelling book. There you are. Derby
went to the commissioners of two
counties and had these all consoli-
dated into one. He went to some peo-
ple with both money and intelli-
gence, and obtained a small school
fund. He employed a capable and
distinguished architect, Lawrence
Butler, of New York, and he built a
school. A real school, to hold three
times the available scholars apparent,
with beautiful lines, and three modern
class rooms, which could be thrown
into one big lecture hall for neighbor-
hood occasions. It has a library and



a music room, and is properly heated.
It is quite as good as any school build-
ing need be." — H. C. J. Roelvink
has written a new play, Mr9. 0., which
has been having a most successful
run at the Hague, Holland, since
March 4. The Royal Theatre and
other companies have given revivals
of two other plays. He writes the
Secretary that the people of Holland
are mostly pro-Ally. From April 1 he
will make his residence at Laren, near
the Zuyder Zee. -^ R. H. Oveson has
just won his first case before the Su-
preme Court of the United States.
He acted as attorney of record for
defendant in error in the case of
John £. Eaton vt. Boston Safe Deposit
Co. and Fannie Leighton Luke. —*
Clarence Dillon, on April 1, was made
a member of the firm of Wm A. Read
k Co., bankers, of New York City. —
Henry Stephens, when last heard from,
was living in Rosario de Santa F^,
Argentina. — F. W. Wead has opened
an office for the practice of architec-
ture at 1146 Tremont Bldg., Boston.

— R. P. Dietzman has been elected
vice-president of the Kentucky Bee-
Keepers Association for the coming
year. He has drafted the law which
the Association has presented to the
Legislature to govern and control the
treatment of bee diseases in the com-
monwealth. His address is Louisville
Trust Bldg., Louisville, Ky.

1907.
John Rktnolds, See^
2 WaU St., New Yoik City.
C. C. Stetson is in London acting aa
one of the representatives of the Na-
tional City Bank of New York City.

— D. G. Tucker is business manager
of the Washington Square Players at
the Band Box Theatre, New York
City, and also appears in minor parts



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in some of their productions. — W. 6.
Oakman, who is a lieutenant in the
2d Battalion of the Coldstream
Guards, has been seriously wounded.
— R. B. Gregg is a member of the firm
of Valentine, Tead & Gregg, industrial
counselors, of 75 State St., Boston. ~«
W. F. Eastman's address is the Wool-
worth Building, New York City. He
is publisher of the Electrical Age. —
W. M. Canaday is advertising man-
ager of the Willys-Overland Company
of Toledo, O. — M. C. Leckner is in
the Chicago office of the LadUe* Home
Journal. — S. H. Newhall is professor
of Greek at Baker University, Bald-
win City, Kan. — H. C. Dale is assis-
tant professor of history at the Uni-
versity of Wyoming, Laramie, Wy.

1908.

Gut Euebson, Sec,,
85 East 56th St.. New York City.
A remarkable Class dinner was held
in New York on April 28. It is prob-
ably one of the few times in the his-
tory of any Class when all the Class
officers and Class Committee have
gathered together at one time. The
three marshals, Ball, Richardson, and
Glass, Brigham and Emerson, the
Treasurer and Secretary, and Amberg
and Newhall, the Class Committee,
were all present. Bacon accompanied
Richardson and Brigham from Bos-
ton, and Grant, Manning, and Wood-
man came on with Newhall from
Philadelphia. Altrocchi came from
Chicago to read a poem specially pre-
pared for the occasion. The principal
speech of the evening was made by
Stranahan, who gave some details of
his remarkable business in Toledo.
He is engaged in the manufacture of
spark plugs, his plant being the larg-
est in the world, and supplying all the
Ford cars, and in fact more than 80



per cent of all the cars manufactured
in the United States. Altogether, ap-
proximately 60 men were present.
Among the speakers of the evening
was Amberg, who is now chief ex-
aminer to Vice-Chairman Hurley, of
the Federal Trade Commission, in
Washington, and Desmond, who has
a prominent position in connection
with the construction of the new sub-
ways in New York City. Gilder told
of Starr, who is in the British army,
and of Fraser-Campbell, who is now
captain in the 2d Argyll and Highland
Regiment. They have both made re-
markable records. Several men in the
Class sang, and the music was fur-
nished by a Hawaiian orchestra of five
pieces. This dinner is mentioned par-
ticularly because many men felt that
it marked a new era in Class reunions.
Many men felt that the Class was now
old enough to treat itself rather more
seriously than it had in the past, and
that there were enough men who were
really doing things, and could tell
about them in an interesting way, to
justify our making these occasions
really memorable and valuable. It is
planned to get from 75 to 100 men at
the New York dinner next year. —
The attention of the Class is invited
to the fact that the decennial reunion
in Cambridge will take place two years
from June.

1909.

F. A. Harding, Sec.,
52 Fulton St., Boston.
The second informal dinner of the
Class of 1009 for the 1915-16 season
was held at the Harvard Club of Bos-
ton on Wednesday, March 22. About
55 men were present. After dinner,
J. B. Hebberd, '09, Deputy Prison
Commissioner and Member of the
Mass. Board of Parole and Pardons,



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[June,



gave an interesting lecture, illustrated
with lantern slides, on the " Prison
System in Massachusetts." — A. G.
Brodeur, whose name was omitted in
error from the Sexennial Report, is at
present doing graduate work at Cam-
bridge in the English Department.
He has been appointed Instructor in
English Philology in the University of
California and will begin his duties at
the beginning of the college year in
August. — W. T. Pickering has re-
cently been appointed Advertising
Manager of the Raymond & Whit-
comb Company, with headquarters in
Boston. — Although an off year for
'09, tentative plans are already being
made for as large a class reunion as
possible on Monday, June 19. It will
probably be held at one of the country
dubs near Boston and definite ar-
rangements will be announced later.
— The new Class Directory is about
to go to press and a copy will be
mailed to every member of the Class
as soon as possible.

1910.

C. C. LiTTLB, See.,
Goddard Ave.. Brookline.
The Class has been holding informal
luncheons at the Harvard Club of Bos-
ton every Thursday since the middle of
March. The attendance has been small,
but it is hoped that vrith the approach
of June the numbers will increase. —
Arrangements are now completed for
the Sexennial in June. On Monday,
June 19, the Ckss will take a special
train to Gloucester. Here we shall have
the opportunity to disport ourselves
the 11 velong'day and to feel our approach-
ing age while we play baseball, golf, or
tennis. Then, urging the tired muscles
to the edge of the Atlantic, we, discreetly
dad in near-bathing suits of raucous
coloring, shall float upon the waves (and



bamades). Hiis done» with renewed
hopes we shall don our cttisens* dotbing



Online LibraryWilliam Richards Castle William Roscoe ThayerThe Harvard graduates' magazine → online text (page 98 of 103)