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William Richards Castle William Roscoe Thayer.

The Harvard graduates' magazine online

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over already sunburnt shoulders and hie
oursdves to a great banquet hail. Here
will be hdd the Sexennial dinner with
much wit and wine and song. After the
dinner — memories of the Triennial fop-
bid even a prediction. Finally, at the
end of the evening the Class will kiss
each other " good-night " and retire to
comforting beds provided by the inn-
keeper. Next morning, remembering
that it's Class Day. we shall be left each
to himself until, at 8.S0 p.m., when we
gather for our march to the Stadium.
Clad in shining garb of blue and white,
smock-like in general cut, with a " tarn "
of even bluer blue and whiter white, we
shall, in entering the Bowl of the Sta-
dium, make all the fair ones glad they
came. On Wednesday, June 21, we shall
meet and overwhelmingly defeat the
Class of 1918 on Soldier's Field, at all
known branches of manly sport such as
baseball, track, boat-radng, and keg-
rolling. This wiU occupy the morning
and at high noon we shall repair to dther
the Weld or Newell Boathouse, where
we shall find prepared for us a magnifi-
cent cold luncheon. This we shall share
magnanimously with our victims of the
morning, the Class of 1913, and then
move back to Soldier's Field to see the
Varsity Nine give Yale its annual cause
of grievance. On Wednesday night, at
10.30, we have a Class supper at the
Harvard Club. On Thursday the Com-
mencement exercises will for the first
time be held at the Stadium and this
will afford opportunity for all interested
to attend. A Class luncheon will be held
at Holworthy Hall at noon. In the
afternoon the Alunmi Association will
hold its annual meeting. On Thursday
night we shall probably leave on a
special car for the boat-race at New
London, and on Friday bring our official



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News from the Classes.



726



celebration to a fitting doae by once more
using the " broom " to sweep the river.

1911.

J. A. SWEETBKB, SeC,t
37 Warren St., Brookline.
The Secretary wishes to remind the
Class that our Sexennial takes place a
year from this month. In order that we
may be sure of having a successful week,
plans are already under discussion, and
it is extremely important, therefore, that
correct addresses be provided. Without
them some men will not receive notices
and will be sure to regret their neglect in
keeping the Secretary informed of their
whereabouts. If you are not sure .that
your correct address is on file kindly
send it in at once. — W. C. Marshall*s
address is care of W. F. Schrafft & Sons
Corp.. Boston (Service Dept.). — W. G.
Beach's address now is 352 West 57th
St., New York City. — Franklin King
is now in the la^ office of Groodwin,
Proctor and Ballantine, 84 State St.,
Boston. — W. B. Fraser-Campbell has
sailed for England to enlbt in a Scottish
regiment after preliminary training in an
officers* school. — R. C. Foster has gone
to Europe as private secretary to War-
wick Greene, '01, who will work, prob-
ably in Poland, in the interests of the
Rockefeller foundation.

1912.

R. B. WiGGLESWOBTH, Sec.^

Adams Street, Milton.

NOTICE.

The annual Class dinner will be
held in Boston, at the Hotel Georgian,
on Monday evening, June 19. By
having the dinner in Class-Day
week, it is hoped that we may have
a big attendance. Reserve the date
now! Details will be mailed later.

G. E. Akerson is with the Minne-



i^>olis,Mum., Tribune,— V^. C. Black-
ett, formerly with the United Paper-
board Co., Lockport, N.Y., is sales
manager of E. B. Badger & Sons,
coppersmiths and chemical engineers,
75 Pitts St., Boston; home address,
28 Bromfield Road, W. Somerville. —
H. R. Bowser is in the employ of E.
M. Farnsworth & Co., bankers, 24
Milk St., Boston; home address, 26
Holyoke St., Cambridge. — T. G.
Campbell is in general charge of ath-
letics at the University of North
Carolina. — C. D. Clifton has been
elected director of the Harvard Alumni
chorus, to fill the vacancy caused by
the retirement of Warren A. Locke,
'69. — Howard Eager is a second
lieutenant in the 4th Field Artillery,
U.S.A., and is at present at the school
of fire for field artillery. Fort Sill,
Okla. — C. deL. Ensign is living at
285 Mt. Auburn St., Watertown. He
is working with the Boston branch of
the B. F. Goodrich Co., of Akron, O.

— R. M. Ferry has received one of the
eight appointments from the gradu-
ating class of the school of medicine of
Columbia University, to medical di-
visions in the Presbyterian Hospital.

— Theodore Frothingham is living at
7 Chestnut St., Boston. — Paul Gif-
ford is assistant advertising manager '
of the Hamilton Watch Co., Lan-
caster, Pa. His home address is 832
Marietta Ave., Lancaster, Pa. — S. S.
Hanks is with the American Inter-
national Corporation, address, 27
West 99th St., New York City. — C.
H. Hoskins is on the editorial staff of
the Hanson-Bellows Co., educational
publishers, 104 S. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago. His home address remains
5705 Blackstone Ave., Chicago. —
The hockey team of the Boston Ath-
letic Association carried off the cham-
pionship of the Amateur Hockey



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726



News from the Classes.



[June,



League for the past seaaon, under the
captaincy of F. D. Huntington. — T.
R. Kendall gives his present address
as Gatun, Canal Zone. He is em-
ployed as a chemist on the water fil-
tration plant there, and his work is also
to include studies of the algte and dis-
solved gases in some of the reservoirs
and lakes of the Canal Zone. — W.
H. Mansfield is with the Cumberland
Tel. & Tel. Co., New Orleans, La. —
J. H. Perry, Jr., has been appointed
pilot engineer for the federal valua-
tion of common carriers on the Penn-
sylvania lines west of Pittsburgh, at
Louisville, Ky. His address in Louis-
ville is care of the Y.M.C.A. — N. S.
Robbins is living at 44 Simmons Ave.,
Brockton. — John Simpkins is reg-
imental sergeant-major in the field
artillery of the M.V.M. — A. E.
Strauss is an interne on the medical
staff of the Mass. General Hospital,
Boston. He gives his permanent ad-
dress on 5355 Berlin Ave., St. Louis,
Mo. — L. C. Torrey has been ap-
pointed pilot engineer for the federal
valuation of common carriers on the
Pennsylvania lines west of Pittsburgh,
with the Akron division. His present
address is 224 £. Market Street,
Akron, O. — A. D. Washburn is
' teaching at the Browning School, 29
West 85th St., New York City. —
J. G. Wiggins is planning to take a trip
to Japan during the summer months.
On his return, he is to teach at Pom-
fret School, Pomfret, Conn. — By
defeating Anderson Dana, '11, with-
out the loss of a game, in the final
round of the annual torunament, £.
S. Winston retained his title of na-
tional amateur squash champion.
The tournament was held on the
courts of the New York Harvard
Club. — Franklin Wyman, who has
been in the employ of Carter, Rice &



Co., Nashua, N.H., is now with Clin-
ton H. Scovell & Co., certified public
accountants and industrial engineers,
110 State St., Boston. His home ad-
dress is 1056 Beacon St., Brookline.

1914.

LxvxBKTT Saltonstall, See.,
99 Bay State Road. Boston.
On Feb. 12, the Boston members of
the Class met for a very successful
dinner in the Hotel Lenox. About 130
members attended. Afterwards they
watched Harvard defeat Yale 2 to
at hockey. It is hoped that this event
will continue as an annual one in Class
history. — There will be no organized
reunion this year, as all efforts are
being saved for a grand Triennial. The
Class room will be as last year, Stough-
ton 82, where refreshments of a light
order will be served on Commence-
ment. It is as yet undecided whether
there will be any Class dinner this
year. The Secretary will send notices
in regard to Commencement affairs to
each member of the Class about June 1.

— The Secretary recently presented to
the Class Baby a silver platter from
the Class with the following inscrip-
tion:

Sarah Cory Cvrtit

" Ovr Clat Baby "

from the Clan of 1014

June le, 1016

— H. E. Devereux is selling bonds for
Wm. A. Read & Co. His address is
2S4 South La Salle St.. Chicago. —
A. D. Douglas is teaching at the
Berkeley School, in Boston. Next year
he will be an instructor in English
at Harvard; address, S6 Mt. Auburn
St., Cambridge. — Warren Bulkeley
is working for the United Shoe
Machinery Co. in Rochester, N.Y.;
address, 133 Mill St., Rochester, N.Y.

— S. D. Weissbuch is manager of the
Placement Clearing House, New



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727



York City; address, 366 2d Ave., New
York City. — A. J. deGozzaldi is
working for the Union Mills, Inc., at
CatskiU, N.Y.; address, CaUkUl, N.Y.
— A. N. Herman is in the second year
of the Yale Law School. He is also
working for an M.A. in history; ad-
dress, P. O. 1186, Yale Station, New
Haven, Conn. — A. S. Hatch is work-
ing in Detroit for the Packard Motor
Car Co.; address, 79 Benton Rd.,
Somerville. — E. C. Grover is prin-
cipal of the high school in Essex; ad-
dress, Essex High School. — H. deV.
Pratt is working as a draftsman. He
intends- to go to the Architectural
School in Cambridge in the fall; ad-
dress, 83 Brattle St., Cambridge. —
W. L. McLean is an assistant teacher
in the Dorchester High School; ad-
dress, 59 Dracut St., Dorchester. —

B. Jenney*s address is 132 Carlton St.,
Brookline. — P. A. Kober is em-
ployed as a chemist by the Corn Pro-
ducts Refining Co. at Edgewater,
N.J. His permanent address is Cliff-
side, N.J., care of G. W. Laird. —
Sidney Ripley is working for the firm
of Cocks & Willets, 49 Wall St., New
York City; address, Union Club, 5th
Ave. and 51st St., New York City. —
G. E. Plaisted, Jr., is in Rome as a
Parker Fellow of the Graduate School
at the American Academy; address,
Accademia Americana, Porta San Pan-
crazio, Rome, Italy. — W. P. Tyler is
in office work at Portland, Or.; ad-
dress, 507 S. Hayes St., Portland. —

C. H. Smith is in the employ of Fred-
erick Smith, who deals in general
merchandise. His address is 33-37
Main St., Allegheny, N.Y. — Stetson
Avery is in Europe in the interests of
the U.S. Fastener Co. of Boston. His
present address is Villa Belledonne,
Grenoble, France. — E. R. Hastings
is with the S. D. Warren & Co., paper



mfrs., 120 Franklin St., Boston. —
J. C. Devereux is in the cotton brok-
erage business. His firm is Brennan
& Devereux, he having recently be-
come a partner. His address is 413
Genesee St., Utica, N.Y. — J. Coles
is a travelling salesman for Sulzberger
& Sons Co., of Chicago; address, Hull
House, 800 So. Halsted St., Chicago,
111. — Donald White is an assistant
in the Poultry Dept. of the Mass.
Experiment Station and is studying
for an M.S. in the Mass. Agric. Col-
lege. His address is 12 Chestnut St.,
Amherst. —I. Levin is in his third
year at the Law School and lives at
501 Craigie Hall, Cambridge. — W. H.
Gilday is with the Fred F. Field Shoe
Co. of Brockton. He is also a teacher
in the night school there. His address
is care of Fred F. Field Shoe Co.,
Brockton. — H. H. Powel is contem-
plating going to France shortly. His
address is 22 Kay St., Newport, R.I.
— E. B. Dustan is working for Bond
& Goodwin, bankers, 30 State St.,
Boston. — Howard Wilbur is prin-
cipal of the Geo. A. Plimpton Gram-
mar School, Walpole. His address is
11 Charles St., Walpole. — Thorn-
dike Saville is a candidate for Doctor
of Sanitary Engineering at M.I.T.
He is also assistant in geology at Har-
vard. His address is 5 Sumner Road,
Cambridge. — F. S. Clark, Jr., is
with the National Machine & Tool
Co., 253 A St., So. Boston. — R. M.
Coryell is working for the Rhead Pot-
tery Co., Santa Barbara, Cal. — W. E.
Shea is on a waterworks construction
job in Cuba for the J. G. White Engi-
neering Co., of New York. His ad-
dress is Apartodo 74, Remedios, Sta.
Clara, Cuba. — W. H. Chatfield has
been moved from the Cincinnati of-
fice of the Chatfield & Woods Co. to
the Pittsburgh office; address, Chat-



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New$fron% the Clcuses.



[Jone,



field & Woods Co., Third Aye., Pitts-
burgh, Pa. — Clay Judson is study-
ing law at the University of Chicago;
address, 601 Bush St., Chicago. —
M. E. VanBuren is working in the
decorating dep't of the Carson, Pine
& Scott Co., Chicago; address,
Y.M.C.A., 8«10 Withington St.,
Chicago. — Emmet Russell is in his
first year at the Harvard Law School;
address, 47 Wendell St., Cambridge.

— J. P. Harrington's address is
1 Dana Terrace, Watertown. — C. L.
Churchill is with Bellows and Aldrich,
architects, Boston; address, Gleason-
dale. — J. H. McLeod is assistant
superintendent of a department store
in Cleveland, O.; address, 1853 East
73d St., Cleveland. — F. H. Black-
man is working for the D. F. Munroe
Co., paper bag and twine merchants,
Boston. His address is 27 Agassis
St., Cambridge. — M. Friedburg is
in educational work in a department
store in Baltimore. His address is
2220 Madison Ave., Baltimore, Md.

— Barton Harvey is working for the
Harvey Machine Co. in Catonsville,
Md. — T. O. Freeman is in the em-
ploy of J. H. Rorabuck, promoter of
hydro-electric power plants. His ad-
dress is P. O. Box 97, Canaan, Conn.

— J. M. Kuder is in his second year
at the Harvard Medical School; ad-
dress, 19 Fairfax Hall, Cambridge. —
H. H. Ripley, Jr., is with the SUte
Street Trust Co., Boston. — Putnam
Eaton is at the London branch of the
Swift Beef Co., 58 W. Smithfield,
London, Eng. — Jean Abreu is in
his last year of the Law School at the
University of Paris. He intends to be
in this country this summer. His adr
dress is 5 Rue Nouvelle Stanislas,
Paris, France. — A. C. Hawkes is with
the Remington Arms Co., Bridgeport,
Conn. He intends to go into the



Bridgeport Hydraulic Co. in the
early spring. His address is 678 War-
ren St., Bridgeport, Conn. — J. R. O.
Perkins is with the American Ambu-
lance Service on the western front in
the European War. — M. H. Hecht
is sales manager of the N.E. Enamel-
ing Co., mfrs. of kitchen utensils.
His address is Larchmont, N.Y. —
J. H. Henderson, of the H. K. McCann
Co., has been transferred from the
N.Y. office to Cleveland, O. — G. P.
Grainger is in business at 7 Fosket
St., West Somerville. — W. J. Brackett
is working for the Angus Jute Co.,
Ltd., Calcutta, India. His address is
Box 428, Calcutta, India. — F. C.
Bryant is studying for the degree of
C.E. at the M.I.T.; present address,
78 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge. —
F. P. Culbert graduated from the
U.S. Naval Academy, June, 1915. At
present he is on the U.S.S. New
Jersey. — P. J. Waldstein is with
Devoe k Reynolds Co., paint mfrs.,
1305 So. Central Pk. Ave., Chicago. —
S. F. Withe, formerly on the adver-
tising division of the E. L duPont
de Nemours Co., has been elected
national sec.-treas. of the American
Amateur Trapshooters' Ass'n, 200
Maryland Trust Bldg., Baltimore,
Md. His home address is 1028 Ca-
thedral St., Baltimore, Md. — J. D.
Ryan is teaching at the Boston Latin
School. His address is 27 Coolidge
Road, Allston. — D. W. Lewis is a
salesman for the Ford Motor Co. at
their Brooklyn Branch. His per-
manent address is 163 So. Oxford St.,
Brooklyn, N.Y. — Randolph Boyle
has passed his Kentucky bar exami-
nation and is practising law in Louis-
ville, Ky., where he is now living. —
Innis Young is studying in the Har-
vard Graduate School. — Graham
Winslow has been moved by Stone



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729



& Webster to one f
Crown and Bridge Work, and Kurt H.
Thoma, '11, a valuable work on Oral
Anasthesia. — Research. Great oppoj-
tunity for research work is offered by
the Harriet N. Lowell Society, which
was formed in 1911 by the faculty and
students of the Harvard Dental School.
It was made possible by a bequest of
Miss Harriet N. Lowell who, in 1907,
left to the school a sum of money, the
interest of which was to be used each
year for dental research. The Research
Society is made up of graduates and
undergraduates of the Harvard Dental
School. At the annual meetings, certifi-
cates of fellowship are awarded to such
Senior and graduate members as have
submitted acceptable original laboratory
or literary work. During the past year,
the following graduates have been carry-
ing on research work: Dr. Lawrence W.
Baker is making a further study of "The
Influence of the Forces of Occlusion on
the Development of the Bones of the
Skull,*' the preliminary report of which
was published in Items of Interest, vol.
XXXIII. no. 2, Feb., 1911. Dr. Kurt H.
Thoma, '11, has done histo-pathologi-



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Literary Notes.



[Jane,



cal work in preparation for his paper,
"Oral Abscesses/* which he read before
the American Academy of Dental Sci-
ence, and which was published in the
March (1916) number of the Journal of
ike Allied Dental Societies. Dr.Thomab
now continuing his work on the "Histo-
logio-pathology of other Tissues of the
Mouth." Mr. H. C. Smith, of the Chem-
istry Department, is studying the " Phys-
iological Effects of the Mineral Constit-
uents of Food." Dr. Fred R. Blumen-
thal has submitted a paper, *'The Evo-
lution of Mammalian Dentition with
Special Reference to the Primates and
Man." Dr. George H. Wright b working
on three problems: first, *' A Study of an
Etiological Factor in Trigeminal Neu-
ralgia"; second, "A CUssification of (he
Normal Barriers against Disease as
found in Human Teeth"; and third, "A
Further Study of the Variations in Form
of the MazUlary Antra." Dean E. H.
Smith addressed the society at the first
meeting. Prof. William H. Potter ad-
dressed the society on his experiences in
Europe during the war. A paper was
read by E. L. Drowne, M.D., of the
"Relation of Intestinal Stasb to Oral
Conditions." E. H. Horton, from the
Peabody Museum, addressed the so-
ciety March 9. His subject was "The
Evolution of Human Dentition and its
Relation to the Head Form." — Pereon-
als. Dean Eugene H. Smith and Prof.
William P. Cooke attended the meeting
of the American Institute of Teachers
held in Minneapolis, Minn., Jan. 26-^,
from whence they proceeded to Chicago
and attended the meeting of the Dental
Faculty Associates of American Univer-
sities. The four years* course for dental
students and problems of higher stan-
dards of dental education were the im-
portant subjects discussed. They also
visited the College of Dentistry of the
University of Minnesota and the North-



western Univenity Dental School io
Chicago. In April there was a special
meeting of the deans of the Dental Fac-
ulties of the Association of American
Universities in Albany, N.Y., which
Dean Smith attended. An important
educational question was discussed with
the New York Regents about the law of
the State of New York which restricts the
granting of dental licenses to students
who have spent three years of study in a
dental school, regardless of their other
education. Graduates who have taken
the first year medical course and then
passed into the dental school for two
more years would not be allowed to prac-
tise in New York according to this law.
Dean Smith made efforts to change this
law which would exclude many good
men.

LITERARY NOTES.

*«* To avoid mimmdentanding, tlie Editor
beRB to sUte that copies of books by or about
Hanrard men should be sent to the J/offuiiM
if a review is desired. In no other way can a
complete register of Harvard publications be
kept. Writers of articles in prominent periodi-
cals are also requested to send to the Editor
copies, or at least the titles of their contribu-
tions. £Izoept in rare oases, space will not
permit mention of contributions to the daily



Volume VI of The Writings of John
QuiMp Adams, H.C. 1787. covers the
years 1816-10 and contains unusually
interesting material, public and personal.
When it begins, Adams was Minuter in
London; when it ends, he was Secretary
of State under President Monroe. Polit-
ical readjustments, following on the res-
toration of peace and the downfall of Na-
poleon, occupy much attention; but
Adams was a person of such varied
tastes that he records many misceUane-
ous facts, besides opinions on books,
writers, hbtorical events, and the bases
of life. When this edition is completed
and indexed* it will prove a quarry for



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1916.]



Literary Notes.



735



all sorts of readers. Adams's letter to his
father on the death of Mrs. John Adams
may stand as a specimen of what the se-
vere New Engiander permitted himself
to express in the acutest bereavement.
Of special Harvard interest is his advice
to N. W. Boylston, who had just estah-
Ibhed the Boylston Prizes, and liis refer-
ence to McKean, who followed Adams
as Boylston Professor of Bhetoric. Mr.
W. C. Ford, h '07, had performed his
editorial duties with his customary rare
skill. (Macmillan. Cloth, 8vo, $3.50
per vol.)

The anonymous author of Rdigio
Docioris presents a series of ethical and
philosophical essays, directed primarily
to the everyday man, unacquainted
with the history of thought and with
any but the most popular ethical the-
ories. In the simple and untechnical
language of the four essays, he discusses
the more fundamental problems related
to thoughtful living, from a viewpoint
always fresh and stimulating and often
original. The first essay deals with the
relation of philosophy and daily life,
and proposes the basic theory that the
ethical ideal is the essential foundation
for rational and moral existence. The
remaining chapters consider, in turn, the
nature of explanation, the problem of
evil, and the relation of happiness and
morality. It b unfortunate that the
rather forbidding title of the book b
likely to prove a barrier to many of the
readers for whom it b especially intend-
ed. It b dedicated to President Eliot.
(Religio Dodoris, MediiatioM upon Life
and Thought, by a retired college presi-
dent. Richard S. Badger, Boston.)

Two rather long articles have left
space in the volume of Harvard Studies
thb year only for some "Notes on the
Fourth and Fifth Centuries" by George
W. Robinson and "Summaries of Dis-
sertations for Degree of Ph.D. for 101^



15." The first of the two articles en-
titled Quo Modo Arittophanes Rem Tent"
poralem in Fabulis Suis Tractaverit b an
interesting study, in readable Latin, of
the comic poets' treatment of the unity
of time. The dear arrangement and
careful sunmiary by the writer of each
point before he leaves it make a review
of thb article unnecessary. Equally self-
explanatory b The Roman Magistri in
the Ciffil and Military Service of the Em-
pire, Because of their interest and
treatment the reader will not regret the
amount of space in the volume occupied
by these long articles. (Harvard Studies
in Claeeical Philology: vol. xxvr. 1915.)
In the issue of March 22, of the Fath-
erland, was publbhed an article of which
the editor says, "the Oreai Conspiracy
Exposed b the most important article
that it has been my privilege to pub-
Ibh." The essay "proves" that the rea-
son for anti-German sentiment in Amer-
ica b an active conspiracy to reunite the
United States with England. One of the
arch conspirators b Sinclair Kennedy,
'97, whose book. The Pan-Angles, is
largely quoted and misquoted. Mr.
Kennedy has answered, in an open letter
to the editor which b notable for its
calm statement and conclusive disproof
of "the most important article." He
points out, for example, that Mr.
Rhodes's will, in establbhing the Ox-
ford scholarships, states as part of their
purpose "to encourage in the students
from the United States ... an attach-
ment for the country from which they
have sprung, etc." (quoted in the Fa-
therland); and that a spirit of fairness
and love of truth might have suggested
to the writer to finbh the quotation,
"but without, I hope, withdrawing
them or their sympathies from the land
of their adoption or birth," instead of
saying merely "etc." He also points out
that the author omits any mention of



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[Joiiey



the fifteen German scholan, to be ap-
pointed by the Emperor, in the hope of
creating good feeling; "a good under-
standing between England, Germany,
and the United SUtes will," says Mr.



Online LibraryWilliam Richards Castle William Roscoe ThayerThe Harvard graduates' magazine → online text (page 99 of 103)