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; ;^:silEa?

' BU^^HK



SHAKESPEARE'S * *
MEN AND WOMEN



AN

EVERY
DAY
BOOK



CHOSEN
AND

ARRANGED

BY

R05E PORTER




E. R. HERRICK & COMPANY
70 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK



Copyright, 1897
BY

E. R. HERRICK & Co.

.



/Pnworth, Munn & Barber,
Pinters and Binders,
" Brooklyn, N. Y.



Other books by ROSE PORTER arc :
THE CHARM OF BIRDS.

lamo, cloth, gilt; $1.25
DAILY SOUVENIRS ; an olio of Treasure
Thoughts.

ismo, cloth, gilt ; dec. cover ; $i.s

E. R. HERRICK & Co.,
70 Fifth Avenue, New York



439375



Contents



January.

Selections from

Gbe tempest*
XTwo Gentlemen of \Derona.
of Brrors.



Jfebruan?.

Selections from



ttbe dfcerrs TOves of Wnfcsor.
Measure for /flbeasure.

r Dream.



flDarcfo.

Selections from

Aucb Bt>o Bbout fiotbina*



Xabour



BprtL

Selections from

Bs ffiou Xike ft,
^Tbe jflbercbant of IDenice*
s B^TOinter's ZTale.

6



Selections from



Naming of 3be Sbrew*
airs Well Sbat nt>0 TOeiL
Ring



3unc.

Selection* from



"Kfcbarfc Ebe Second*
Icing fbentB trbe ffourtbpatt f *
IbenrB ^be JFourtb part If ,



Selections from



iDenrsttbeffiftb*
i 1>enrB be Siitb part f .
Ring Denrs Gbc Siitb part f f .



Hugust.

Selections from



Ring f>enr^ TTbe Sixtbpart f f f .
Ring IRicbarD ITbe bir&.
Ring Denr^ Ube Bigbtb*
7



September.

Selections from

Julius Caesar.
^- BntonB anD Cleopatra*
Groilus anD CressiDa*

October*

Selections from

tbello, ttbe Aoor of TDenice*

Coriolanus*

Cimon ot Btbens*

movember.

Selections from

Damlct, prince of 5>enmarft*
f Borneo anD Juliet*
Pericles, prince

December.

Selections from

fting Xear*



Bnfcromcus.
etb*
poems anD Sonnets*

8



January.



Gempeet,
<Two Gentlemen of IPerona,
of Errors.



! won&cr!

Mow man^ gooM^ creatures are tbere beret
Slow beauteous manfetnb is I , brave new worlb,
Ubat bas sucb people in't!

The Tempest, Act V, Sc. i.



January 1*

Wisely, good sir, weigh
Our sorrow with our comfort.

Act II, Sc. i.

3-anuatE 2*

Look! he's winding up the watch of his
wit; by and by it will strike. . . . Fie, what a

spendthrift is he of his tongue.

Act 77, Sc. i.

January 3

The truth you speak doth lack some gentle-
ness,

And time to speak it in: you rub the sore,
When you should bring the plaster.

Act 77, Sc. /.
January 4*
Full many a lady
I have eyed with best regard; and many a

time
The harmony of their tongues hath into

bondage

Brought my too diligent ear; for several vir-
tues

Have I liked several women : never any
With so full soul, but some defect in her
Did quarrel with the noblest grace she owed,
And put it to the foil : but you, O you,
10



Gbe tempest.

So perfect, and so peerless, are created

Of every creature's best.

Act III, Sc. i.

January 5*

It is foul weather in us all,
When you are cloudy.

Act //, Sc. i.



MEN.

While you here do snoring lie,
Open-eyed conspiracy

His time doth take:
If of life you keep a care,
Shake off slumber, and^beware:
Awake ! Awake !

Act //, Sc. a.

WOMEN.
Consider, . . .

The beauty of his daughter ; he himself
Calls her a nonpareil.

Act III, Sc. 2.

January 7,

MEN.

Wisely, good sir, weigh
Our sorrow with our comfort.

Act III, Sc. 9.

ii



gentlemen of HJerona.
WOMEN.

Admired Miranda!
Indeed the top of admiration ; worth
What's dearest to the world! Full many a

lady
1 have eyed with best regard; and many a

time

The harmony of their tongues hath into bond-
age

Brought my too diligent ear ; for several virtues
Have I liked several women; never any
With so full soul, but some defect in her
Did quarrel with the noblest grace she owed,
And put it to the foil: but you, O you,
So perfect, and so peerless, are created
Of every creature's best.

Actlll, Sc.i.

ttwo Gentlemen of Verona.

3anuat 8.

MEN.

He cannot be a perfect man,
Not being tried, and tutor'd in the world ;
Experience is by industry achieved,
And perfected by the swift course of time.

Act I, Sc.j.

12



Uwo Gentlemen of Derona.
WOMEN.

Maids, in modesty, say no to that
Which they would have the profferer construe

ay.

Fie, fie! how wayward is this foolish love,
That, like a testy babe, will scratch the

nurse,

And presently, all humbled, kiss the rod!

Act /, Sc. 2.

January 0*
MEN.

Hearken, sir; though the cameleon Love can
feed on the air, I am one that am nourished
by my victuals, and would fain have meat.

Act II, Sc. i.

WOMEN.

' Is she not a heavenly saint? 1
' No; but she is an earthly paragon.'

Act //, Sc. 4.

January 10.
MEN.

Hope is a lover's staff; walk hence with that,
And manage it against despairing thoughts.

Act III, Sc. i.

13



Gentlemen of tflerona*

WOMEN.

She is mine own ;

And I as rich in having such a jewel
As twenty seas, if all their sand were pearl,
The water nectar, and the rocks pure gold.

Act //, Sc. 4.

SanuatB u.

MEN.

His words are bonds, his oaths are oracles ;
His love sincere, his thoughts immaculate;
His tears, pure messengers sent from his

heart ;
His heart as far from fraud as heaven from

earth.

Act //, Sc. ?.

WOMEN.

Win her with gifts, if she respect not words ;
Dumb jewels often, in their silent kind,
More than quick words, do move a woman's

mind.

Act III, Sc. i.



12*

MEN.

You have an exchequer of words, and, I
think, no other treasure to give your follow-

14



Gentlemen ot Derona.

ers ; for it appears by their bare liveries, that

they live by your bare words.

Act //, Sc. 4.

WOMEN.

Of many good I think him best. ... I have
no other but a woman's reason ; I think him
so, because I think him so.

Act /, Sc. 2.

January 13,

MEN.

I know the gentleman
To be of worth, and worthy estimation,
And not without T desert so well reputed.

Act //, Sc. 4.

WOMEN.

He after honor hunts, I after love :
He leaves his friends to dignify them more:
I leave myself, my friends, and all for love.

Act /, Sc. i.

January 14.

MEN.

His years but young, but his experience old ;
His head unmellow'd, but his judgment ripe;
And in a word ....



<5entlemen of tDerona.

He is complete in feature and in mind,
With all good grace to grace a gentleman.

Act II, Sc. 4.
WOMEN.

What is she,
That all our swains commend her?

Holy, fair, and wise is she,
The heaven such grace did lend her,
That she might admired be.

Act IV, Sc. a.

Sanuarg 15.

MEN.

Cease to lament for that thou canst not help,
And study help for that which thou lament'st.
Time is the nurse and breeder of all good.

Act III, Sc. /.
WOMEN.

A virtuous gentlewoman, mild and beautiful.

Act IV, Sc. 4.
Sanuarg 16.

MEN.

O, heaven ! were man

But constant, he were perfect ; that one error
Fills him with faults ; makes him run through

all the sins,

Act V, Sc. 4.

16



(Bentlemen of Derona.
WOMEN.

O, 'tis the curse in love, and still approved,
When women cannot love where they're be-
loved.

Act F, Sc. 4.

January 17.

MEN.

Unheedful vows may heedf ully be broken ;
And he wants wit that wants resolved will
To learn his wit to exchange the bad for
better.

Act. 77, Sc. 6.

WOMEN.

She excels each mortal thing,

Upon the dull earth dwelling ;
To her let us garlands bring.

Act IV, Sc. *.



MEN.

Slander. . . .

'Tis an ill office for a gentleman ;
Especially, against his very friend.

Act III, Sc. 2.
17



Gentlemen of Werona.

WOMEN.

Is she kind as she is fair ?
For beauty lives with kindness.

Act IV, Sc. 2.

3-anuatE 19,
MEN.

I reckon this always that a man is never
undone till he be hanged ; nor never welcome
to a place till some certain shot be paid, and

the hostess say, Welcome.

Act II, Sc. j.

WOMEN.

" Say . . . wouldst thou counsel me to fall

in love ? '
" Ay, madam ; so you stumble not unheed-

fully."

Act 7, Sc. 2.



20*

MEN.

The man that hath a tongue, I say, is no man,
If with his tongue he cannot win a woman.

Act ///, Sc. i.
18



Gentlemen of Derona*

WOMEN.

A woman sometimes scorns what best contents

her:

.... Scorn at first makes after-love the more.
If she do frown, 'tis not in hate of you ;
If she do chide, 'tis not to have you gone ;
For get you gone, she doth not mean away !
Flatter, and praise, commend, extol their

graces :
Though ne'er so black, say they have angels'

faces.

Act III, Sc.i.

January 21.

MEN.

Truth hath better deeds than words to grace it.

Act II, Sc. 2.

WOMEN.

To be slow in words is a woman's. . . . virtue.

Act HI, Sc. i.



22,

MEN.

" How know you that I am in love ? '

" Marry, by these special marks : first, you



Gentlemen of Derona*

have learned to relish a love-song like a robin-
redbreast ; to walk alone like one that has the
pestilence ; to sigh like a school-boy that has
lost his A B C ; to fast, like one that takes
diet ; to watch like one that fears robbing.
You were wont, when you laughed, to crow
like a cock ; when you walked, to walk like
one of the lions ; when you fasted, it was pres-
ently after dinner ; when you looked sadly, it
was for want of money ; and now you are met-
amorphosed with a mistress."

Act II, Sc. i.

WOMEN.

Her beauty is exquisite, but her favor infinite.

Act 77, Sc. i.

January 23.

MEN.

We cite our faults,

That they may hold excused our lawless lives.

Act IV, Sc. i.

WOMEN.

O, know'st thou not his looks are my souFs

food?

Pity the dearth that I have pined in,
20



of ;6rror0.

By longing for that food so long a time.
Didst thou but know the inly touch of love,
Thou wouldst as soon go kindle fire with

snow,

As seek to quench the fire of love with words.

Act II, Sc. 7.

SanuatB 24*

MEN.

Fire that's closest kept burns most of all. . . .
O, they love least that let men know their

love.

Act /, Sc. 2.

WOMEN.

She hath taught her suitor,
He being her pupil, to become her tutor,

Act //, Sc. i.

Comcfty of rroc0.

January 25.

MEN.

Learn, sir, to jest in good time.
There's a time for all things.

Act II t Sc. 2.

21



ot Errors.

WOMEN.

The time was once, when thou unurged wouldst

vow

That never words were music to thine ear,
That never object pleasing in thine eye,
That never touch well-welcome to thy hand,
That never meat sweet-savor'd in thy taste,
Unless I spake, or look'd, or touch'd, or carved

to thee.
How comes it now, my husband, oh how comes

it,
That thou art thus estranged ?

Act II, Sc. 2.

January 26.
MEN.

Time is a very bankrupt, and owes more than

he's worth to reason.
Nay, he's a thief too ; have you not heard

men say,
That Time comes stealing on by night and

day ? . . . .
There's no Time for a man to recover his hair,

that grows old by nature.

Act II, Sc. 2.

22



of Errors.

WOMEN.

Of excellent discourse :
Pretty and witty : wild, and yet too, gentle.

Act III, Sc. i.

27.



MEN.

A mere anatomy ....

A needy, hollow-eyed, sharp-looking wretch,

A living dead man.

Act V, Sc. i.

WOMEN.

The venom clamors of a jealous woman
Poison more deadly than a mad dog's tooth.

Act V t Sc. i.

January 28.

MEN.

One whose hard heart is button'd up with

steel :

A wolf, nay, worse, a fellow all in buff ; . . .
A back-friend, a shoulder-clapper.

Act IV, Sc. 2.
23



ot

WOMEN.

Alas, poor women ! make us but believe,
Being compact of credit, that you love us ;
Though others have the arm, show us the

sleeve ;
We in your motion turn, and you may move

us.

Act III \ Sc. 2.

January 20*
MEN.

Slander lives upon succession ;
For ever housed where it gets possession.

Act III, Sc. i.

WOMEN.

Sweet mistress, (what your name is else, I

know not)
Less, in your knowledge and your grace, you

show not,
Thou our earth's wonder; more than earth

divine,
Teach me, dear creature, how to think and

speak.

Act III t Sc. 2.



ot ;6rror0.

January 30.

MEN.

V

A man is master of his liberty ;

Time is their master ; and, when they see time,

They'll go, or come.

Act //, Sc. i.

WOMEN.

Her fair sister,

Possessed with such a gentle sovereign grace,
Of such enchanting presence and discourse,
Hath almost made me traitor to myself.

Act III, Sc. 2.

January 31.

MEN.

There's nothing situate under heaven's eye
But hath his bound, in earth, in sea, in sky :
The beasts, the fishes, and the winged fowls,
Are their males' subjects, and at their con-
trols :

Men, more divine, the masters of all these,
Lords of the wide world, and wild watery seas,
Of more pre-eminence than fish and fowls,
Are masters to their females, and their lords.

Act H t Sc. jr.



ot 3Srror0.

WOMEN.

Thou art an elm, my husband, I, a vine ;
Whose weakness, married to thy stronger

state,

Makes me with thy strength to communicate ;
If aught possess thee from me, it is dross ;
Usurping ivy, brier, or idle moss.

Act If, Sc. 2.



Gbe flfcertsTIGlfvcs ot TDdtn&sor.
for /flbeasure.



Uberc is a fttnfc of character In tb^ We
Ubat, to tbe observer, fcotb tl)^ bfstor^
jfullc unfold.

Measure for Measure. A ct I, Sc. i.



<Ibe flfcern? Wives of TOnfcsor*
jFebruarg 1*
MEN.

They say, if money go before, all ways do lie
open.

Act //, Sc. 2.

WOMEN.

I know the young gentlewoman : she has
good gifts .... Seven hundred pounds and

possibilities.

Act 7, Sc. i.



2*

MEN.

An honest, willing, kind fellow .... no
tell-tale, nor no breed-bate : his worst fault
is .... he is something peevish ; but no-

body but has his fault.

Act /, Sc. 4.

WOMEN.

She is pretty, and honest, and gentle j and
one that is your friend.

Actl t Sc. 4.
28



dfcetts TOves of TOnfcsot.



MEN.

He hath but a little wee face, with a little
yellow beard ; a Cain-colored beard.

/, Sc. 4.



WOMEN.

The warrant of womanhood, and the witness
of a good conscience.

Act IV, Sc. 2.



MEN.

Wit may be made a Jack-a-lent, when 'tis
upon ill employment.

Act F, Sc. 5.

WOMEN.

Go you, and where you find a maid,
That, ere she sleep, has thrice her prayers

said,

Raise up the organs of her fantasy,
Sleep she as sound as careless infancy ;
But those that sleep, and think not on their sins,
Pinch them, arms, legs, backs, shoulders, sides,

and shins.

Act V t Sc. j.
29



of Wtnteor.
JebruatE 5*

MEN.

No man means evil but the devil, and we
shall know him by his horns.

Act V, Sc. 2.

WOMEN.

Better a little chiding than a great deal of
heart-break.

Act V t Sc. 3.



6*

MEN.

You are a gentleman of excellent breeding,
admirable discourse, of great admittance,
authentic in your place and person, generally
allowed for your many warlike, courtlike, and

learned preparations.

Act n, Sc. 2.

WOMEN.

Wooing thee, I found thee of more value
Than stamps in gold, or sums in sealed bags ;
And 'tis the very riches of thyself.

That now I aim at.

Act III, Sc. 4.

3



flfceasure for

ff ebtuatB 7.

MEN.

A man may be too confident.

Act 77, S<r. /.

WOMEN.

A kind heart he hath : a woman would run
through fire and water for such a kind heart.

Act HI, Sc. 4.

Measure fox Measure.

ffebruatB 8*
MEN.

Thyself and thy belongings
Are not thine own so proper, as to waste
Thyself upon thy virtues, they on thee.
Heaven doth with us as we with torches do ;
Not light them for themselves: for if our

virtues

Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike
As if we had them not. Spirits are not finely

touch'd
But to fine issues.

Act I, Sc.i.



/fceasure for Measure.

WOMEN.

In her youth
There is a prone and speechless dialect,

Such as moves men.

Act I, Sc. 2.

jfebtuars 9,
MEN.

Good counsellors lack no clients : though
you change your place, you need not change

your trade.

Act 7, Sc. 2.

WOMEN.

She hath prosperous art
When she will play with reason and discourse,

And well she can persuade.

Act I. Sc.2.

Jfebruarg 10.

MEN.

How would you be,

If He, which is the top of judgment, should
But judge you as you are ? O, think on that ;
And mercy then will breathe within your lips,

Like man new made.

Act II, Sc. 2.

3*



/T&eagute for tf&easure*

WOMEN.

When maidens sue,
Men give like gods ; but when they weep and

kneel,

All their petitions are as freely theirs
As they themselves would owe them.

Act 7, Sc. j.

ffebruarE ti.

MEN.

O, it is excellent
To have a giant's strength ; but it is tyrannous

To use it like a giant.

Act II, Sc. 2.

WOMEN.

The hand that hath made you fair hath
made you good ; the goodness that is cheap in
beauty, makes beauty brief in goodness ; but
grace being the soul of your complexion, should

keep the body of it ever fair.

ActllL. Sc.i.

ffebruatE 12*

MEN.

Our doubts are traitors,
And make us lose the good we oft might win,

By fearing to attempt.

Act 7, Sc. j.

3 33



Measure for /Hbeasuve,

WOMEN.

It oft falls out,
To have what we would have, we speak not

what we mean :

I sometimes do excuse the thing I hate,
For his advantage that I dearly love.

Act 77, Sc. 4.



13.

MEN.

Could great men thunder
As Jove himself does, Jove would ne'er be

quiet,

For every pelting, petty officer
Would use his heaven for thunder: nothing
but thunder.

Act II, Sc. 2.

WOMEN.

True prayers,

That shall be up at heaven, and enter there,
Ere sunrise; prayers from preserved souls,
From fasting maids, whose minds are dedicate
to nothing temporal.

Act 77, Sc. 2.
34



Measure for Measure.

jfebmarg 14.

MEN.

I love the people,

But do not like to stage me to their eyes :
Though it do well, I do not relish well
Their loud applause, and aves vehement ;
Nor do I think the man of safe discretion

That does affect it.

Act /, Sc. i.

WOMEN.

I hold you as a thing enskied, and sainted : .
And to be talk'd with in sincerity,
As with a saint.

Act 7, Sc. 4.



15.

MEN.

'Tis one thing to be tempted, . . .
Another thing to fall.

Act II, Sc.i.

WOMEN.

Be that you are,

That is, a woman ; if you be more, you're
none;

35



Measure for /Ifceasute*

If you be one, (as you are well expressed
By all external warrants,) show it now.

Act //, 6V. 4.

ffebruarg 16*

MEN.

Man, proud man !
Dress'd in a little brief authority ;
Most ignorant of what he's most assured,
His glassy essence, like an angry ape,
Plays such fantastic tricks before high Heaven,
As make the angels weep.

Act //, Sc. *.

WOMEN.

She speaks, and 'tis
Such sense, that my sense breeds with it.

Act //, Sc. 2.



17.

MEN.

Happy thou art not ;
For what thou hast not, still thou striv'st to

get;
And what thou hast, forget 'st.

Act III. Sc. /.
36



Measure for Measure.

WOMEN.

Woman ! Help Heaven ! Men their creation

mar
In profiting by them. Nay, call us ten times

frail ;

For we are soft as our complexions are,
And credulous to false prints.

Act 77, Sc, 4.



18*

MEN.

Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful :

Act III, Sc. i.

WOMEN.

She, having the truth of honor in her, hath
made him that gracious denial which he is

most glad to receive.

Act III, Sc. i.



MEN.

O, what may man within him hide,
Though angel on the outward side !

Act III, Sc. a.
37



for /l&easure,

WOMEN.
I have heard of this lady, and good words

went with her name.

Act III, Sc. i.



20,

MEN.

He who the sword of heaven will bear
Should be as holy as severe ;
Pattern in himself, to know,
Grace to stand, and virtue go ;
More nor less to others paying.
Than by self-offences weighing.
Shame to him, whose cruel striking
Kills for faults of his own liking !

Act III, Sc. 2.

WOMEN.
This virtuous maid

Subdues me quite.

Act h, Sc. 2.

jfe&ruarg 21*

MEN.

Sirrah, thou art said to have a stubborn soul,
That apprehends no further than this world,

And squar'st thy life according.

Act V, Sc. i.

3*



B jflMfcsummet Iftiabt's Dream*

WOMEN.
Show your wisdom, daughter, in your close

patience.

Act IV, Sc. HI.

B /flibsummct "ttujbt's Bream*

22*



MEN.

To say the truth, reason and love keep little

company together now-a-days.

Act III, Sc. /.

WOMEN.

O happy fair !
Your eyes are lode-stars ; and your tongue's

sweet air

More tunable than lark to shepherd's ear,
When wheat is green, when hawthorn buds

appear.

Act I, Sc. i.

Je&tuatB 23*

MEN.

Awake the pert and nimble spirit of mirth :

Turn melancholy forth to funerals ;

The pale companion is not for our pomp.

Act 7, Sc. /.
39



a dfclfcsummer Bigbt's Bream*

WOMEN.

In the modesty of fearful duty
I read as much as from the rattling tongue
Of saucy and audacious eloquence.
Love, therefore, and tongue-tied simplicity.
In least speak most, to my capacity.

Act F, Sc. i.



24*

MEN.

His speech was like a tangled chain ; noth-
ing impaired, but all disordered.

Act V t Sc. /.

WOMEN.

Be advised, fair maid :
To you your father should be as a god.

Act 7, Sc. /.

jfebruatB 25*

MEN.

A good moral ... it is not enough to
speak, but to speak true.

Act y t Sc. /.
40



U /Sfctosummcr HfQbt's Dream*
WOMEN.

We cannot fight for love, as man may do :
W r e should be woo'd, and were not made to woo.

Act 77, Sc. i.

JFebruarg 26.

MEN.

This fellow doth not stand upon points.

. . . He knows not the stop.

Act F, Sc. i.

WOMEN.

The imperial votaress passed on,
In maiden meditation, fancy-free.
Yet mark'd I where the bolt of Cupid fell :
It fell upon a little western flower,
Before milk-white, now purple with love's

wound,
And maidens call it love-in-idleness.

Act 77, Sc. /.



27.

MEN.

The country proverb known,
That every man should take his own.

Act III, Sc. 2.
4*



B dRtosummer ibiQbVB 2) team*

WOMEN.

O, when she's angry, she is keen and shrewd !

. . . And, though she be but little, she is fierce.

Act III, Sc. 2.



28*

MEN.

The will of man is by his reason sway'd.

Act //, Sc. 2.

WOMEN.

She hath blessed and attractive eyes.

How came her eyes so bright ?

Act II, Sc. 2.



fl&arcfx



/ftucb Bfco Bbout Hotbfng,
fcwelftb TOgbt.
fcove'0 Habour'



ot> 10 to be worsbippe& ; all men are not alike-

^fwM /J </<? -4 ^<w/ Nothing?. A ct III, Sc. 3.



43



/fcucb BDo Hbout flotbing.
flfcarcb I*

MEN.

He hath borne himself beyond the promise
of his age ; doing, in the figure of a lamb, the
feats of a lion ; he hath, indeed, better bet-
tered expectation.

Act 7, Sc. /.

WOMEN.

She cannot love,
Nor take no shape nor project of affection,

She is so self-endeared.

Act III, Sc. i.



2,

MEN.

Silence is the perfectest herald of joy : I were
but little happy if I could say how much.
Lady, as you are mine, I am yours : I give
away myself for you and dote upon the ex-
change.

Act II t Sc. T.

WOMEN.

By this day ! she's a fair lady :

I do spy some marks of love in her.

Act 77, Sc. j.

44



flfcucb 2l&o Bfcout IRotbing.
flfcarcb 3*
MEN.

God hath blessed you with a good name ;
to be a well-favored man is the gift of fortune.

Act III, St. j.

WOMEN.

The idea of her life shall sweetly creep

Into his study of imagination ;

And every lovely organ of her life

Shall come apparell'd in more precious habit,

More moving-delicate and full of life,

Into the eye and prospect of his soul.

Act IV, Sc. i.

d&arcb 4.

MEN.

Manhood is melted into courtesies, valor
into compliments, and men are only turned
into tongue, and trim ones too.

Act IV, Sc. i.

WOMEN.

I cannot be a man with wishing, therefore 1
will die a woman with grieving.

Act IV, Sc. i.
45



/iftucb Bdo about

jflBarcb 5.
MEN.

Friendship is constant in all other things,
Save in the office and affairs of love,
Therefore, all hearts in love use their own

tongues ;

Let every eye negotiate for itself,
And trust no agent ; for beauty is a witch
Against whose charms faith melteth ....
This is an accident of hourly proof.

Act 77, Sc. /.

WOMEN.

Can virtue hide itself ? . . . graces will ap-
pear, and there's an end.

Act 77, Sc. i.

Jfcarcb 6*

MEN.

A man to a man : stuffed with all honorable
virtues. . . It is so, indeed ; he is no less than
a stuffed man : but for the stuffing, well, we
are mortal.

Act 7, Sc. i.
46



fl&ucb B&o Bbout l&otbing.
WOMEN.

A kind overflow of kindness : there are no
faces truer than those that are so washed.
How much better is it to weep at joy than to

joy at weeping !

Act I, Sc. /.

fl&arcb 7.

MEN.

Who is his companion now ? He hath every
month a new sworn brother. ... He wears
his faith but as the fashion of his hat ; it ever

changes with the next block.

Act I, Sc. i.

WOMEN.

What, my dear Lady Disdain ! are you yet

living ?

Act /, Sc. i.

fl&arcb 8.


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