William Shakespeare.

The complete dramatic and poetical works of William Shakspeare ....: from ... online

. (page 159 of 214)
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1 L»rd. believe it, my lord, in mine own direct
knowtedfie. without any malice, but to sponk of
hmi as my kinsman, he'« a muet notable coward,
as aiaite mmI endless liar, an hourly promiiie-
Wanker, the owner of no mie good quality worthy



timd. It wwviiyun knew him: lest, nqniing



"^ . TiSni';



too fer in his virtue, which he hath not. he m cl:t,
at Noiiie great and tmsty husmess, in a maw dan-
ger, fail yuu.

Ber. 1 wouk), I knew in what partajnUr act am
to try him

2L»rd. None better than to let him fetch off hia
drum, which you bear bim so confidently malar-
lake to do.

1 Lord. I. with a troop of Florentinee, will sod-
deniy itorpriiie liim ; such 1 w.ll have, whom I nm
sure lie knuws iioi from the enamy : we will biial
ami hoiid-wink bun &<», thsil he sliall soppuae no
other but that he u carriod into the taoguerof the
adventaries, wlien we hnnic Uim to our tents : He
but your lordship preeent at liia examination : if
he do not, Aht the promise of his hfe, and in th«
hatheat OHnpolaMm of huae fear, oOer to betray you.
and deliver all the intelligeuoe in bin power mkmiii<
yoo. Mild that with the divine ferfeit of hia soul
upon oath, never trust my judxment in aiiythituc.

2 Lard O, for the love of hiwditei. I«t him fetoti
bis drum ; he vayis lie tuis a iarati«Hm Airt : wlion
your lordsliip seea the bottom of Iih suoohm ai't.
and to wliat metal this counterfeit lump of orw
will he melied. if you Kive him not John Onim's
enertainmeni, your induiiiig cannot be remuvod.
Here he ooniea.

JZa/er PeroUea.

1 Lord. 0, lor the love of kughtor. hinder not
the humour of his design : let liim Mich off his
drum in any liand.

Ber. How now. monsieorl this drum sticks
■orely in your dittpositHm.

3 Lord A pox on't, let it «e; His but a drum.
Par. But a drum I 1st hut a drum ^ A dniro

so lost I —There was an excellent oommund I to
charge in with our hone upon our own wings,
and to nnd our own sokiiem.

2 XiordL That waa not, to be hl;uned in the oom*
mand of the service; i' wmh & disaster of wart htit
Casar himself could not ha»e prevented, if he hud
been there to command.

Btr. Well, we naimot erently oomlemn our anr^
cess : some d shonour we had hi the lo«i of that
drum ; but it is utA u> be recovered.

Par. H might have been rsoovered.

Ber. It might, but it is not now.

i^BT. It n to be nowerml : but that the ment
of service ■ nehlom aunbnted to the true ainl
exact performer, 1 would have that drum or a.i-
oUier, or hiejacH, -

Btr. Why, if you have a stomach to'i, monsieur,
if you tiimk your mystery in stnaugem can bniig
tha inNtniineiit of lionour sgain luto his nutive
quarter, lie uiagnanimous iii the enisrprize. nii i so
on ; I wdl grace the attempt fern worthy eX|>lo«i :
if you speed well m it, the duke sliall b>ith spe.ik
of^k, and extend to you what lurther hecomMs his
gre ut nea i , even to the ntmuet syllable of your
worthmess

Par. By the hand of a sirfdier, 1 will umlertake iC

JBur. But you must not now sluinher iu it.

Par. I'll about it thb evemna : and I will pre-
sentJy pen down my dileaunax, enoouraxe in5ar>lf
in my certainly, ptit mywelf into ny mortal pre-
paration, und, by nddn^t, look to hear furUier
from me.

Ber. May I be bold to acquaint bis grace, yoa
are gone about it T

Par. I know not whnt the soooeas will be, my
lonl ; but the attempt 1 vow.

Ber. I know, thou ait vaHant; and to the pne-
sibility of thy soldiership, will subscribe fer thee
FarewelL •



-vt-

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ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL. [Act III



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/toMTMk. EnOfT Ike Dake of FloreiiM. Bertnun,
Lonii, OflBotn. Soldiera, and olhen.

Dukt. The geceral of our borw ihou art; and
we.
Great in oar hope. Injr unr best lore and criidenoe
Upon Ihjr promising fortune.

At. Sir. it is

A chante too heavy Tor my strencth : but ret
Well strive U> bear it Tor your worthy sake,
To the extreme edge of hazartL

Dkke. 'Hien co thon forth ;

And fortune pUijr upon thjr prueperous helm*
As thy anspKious mistreMsl

Ber. Thn very day.

Great Mar*. I pot myself into thy file :
Make me but like my ihoufthis ; and i shall prove
A lover of thy drum, buter of love. lExamL

SCENE IV. - Roosillou. A Room in tki
Couiitiiist 8 /'atace.

Bmltr CounteMi ami Oimwrnvi.

Count Alas ! and wonhi yon lake the letter tif

ImrT
Marht you iMit kmiw. she wouki di> as site has

done.
Bf sendina me a letter f Head it again.

Slew. Imn St. Jtnflirtf ptlvnrn. thtthrrgone:

Ambihons tor* halh $o mmr fi0hnifdt
'lltnt tmrt'fooi plod I Iht mid grxnmd vfon,

Wtth tamifd note mgf nulls to have amnldfd.
Writ^, umlf, Ikol, from the blooilt mune q/* wer,

M9 denmt W¥t$ler, four dear mm wmg kw ;
Bleu km at home ht teace. wiriUi I from far^

Hi$ mrme wtlk gealnu* /rreour mtnclifn :
His Ufktn labours but him me fonin>e ;

I. hts despiteful Juno, sent him .lorth
f\mm murllif frimds, wUb rmuping foes to Iwe,

Wt^rr death imd danofr dtta the he^ts of worth :
He is too good rnnd favrfor drath ami me;
Whom I myself embrace^ to set him fire*.

Count. Ah. wliai sharp stings are in her mOdeat
wonla !— —
Riiiakln. you did never lack advioe an much.
As letting her pnas mi; had i sptike with ber,
I could have well diverted her intents,
Which thus she hath preveoted.

Slew. PardiNi me, madaon :

If I had given you this at over-night.
She Wight have been o'er-ta'eo ; and yet she

writes,
Pnninit would be but vain.

CouHt. What angel shall

IMff ihis OQWorthy lioehand T he canmit thrive,
I'lilfsa her prsyers, whom Hesven delighU to hear,
And lovcB to crant, reprieve hini fbim the wrath
Of icreiiirKt jiWica.— Wnte. write, Riiutldui
1*0 tilts unworthy hitthniid of his wife :
.L4fl every word weigh heavy of her worih,
1'liat he docs weich Un* lucbt : my greatest gitef.
1'houKh little lie do feel it. set down sharply.
DrapMicJ) the most convenient messeiigvr :—
When. Iiuply. lie sliall hear limt she is giHie,
lie will reiuni; and hope I may. that she,
lleuniuc SI* much, will speed lirr AniI again.
Led hiilier by pure love : whirli of ihem both
Is dearest to me. I have no skill lu senae
To make distinction .—Provide this messengen—
My heart ui lieavy. and mine nae is weak ;
Gnef wottkl have tean, and sorrow bids me bpeak.
iExtuni.



SCENE ▼. — WiihotU tht WaOs of noreiuv.

Atudteiofart^. Eiafer en oU Widow of Florence,
Diana, Violenta, Mariana, and other Citizens.

Wid. Nay. oome; for if they do approach Um
diy. we shall luae all the sigbi.

Dui, 1'liey say. the French count has done moaC
liomMiralile aerrioe.

Wid. It is reported that he baa taken tbair
greatest aommander; and that with his own band
lie slew the dulcet hroUter. We have loat ow
hiboor: they are gime a onnirary way: bark!
you may know by liieir trumpets.

Mar. Come, let's return again, and suffice oar-
selves with ilie report of lU Well, Dniiia, take
h'^ed of this French earl : the liommr of a maal
is her name : and no legai^ ia so rich ss lame^ty.

WUL I have tiild my neighbour, how you have
been solicited by a geiiileman his compwiiion

Afer. I know that knave; liaiuc him-! one Pa-
rolles: a (illliy officer be is in thtsie snrgestitHis
for the vooiur eari— Ueware of them. Diana ; their
pronitties. enticements. oaths, tokens, and all these
emrmes of lust, are not the thinas they go nnder,.
many a maal halh been seduced by them; and the
misery is. example that so terrible sliows in the
wreck of maidenhood, cannot for alt that dnauade
soocesRMNi. iHit that they are limed with the twigs
that threaten them. I hope I need not to advisa

I oil further; but, I hope, your own gra<« will
eep yoH wliere you are. though there were no
furtlier danger kiMiwn, but the SMideaty wbioh m
sol<«t.
Dw. Yon shall- not need to ibar me.

Enter Helena, m the dress of a pUgnm.

Wid. 1 hope so I.ook. here comes a pifacrim :

I know she will lie at my house: thither they

send one another ; I'll question her.—

GimI save you. pdsnm ! Whitlier are you bound t

HtL To Sjaini Jaques le grand.
Wliere do ilie palmeis lodge. I do beseech jroo T

Wui At tli«<Samt Francis here, besale the port.

HeU Is this the way ?

Wid. Ay, marry, is it.— Hark you !

iA marth mfor vg.
They come this way :— If you will tarry, holy |iil-
But till the iHMips oimie by, Uniu,

I mil ciMMluct yon where yon shall be Imlr'd ;
The rather. I«»r I think, I know your btatess
As ample as myselC

HeL Is it youreelf T

Wid. If yon shall please so. pilgrim.

HA. I thank you. and will stay uimhi your leanirs.

Wid. You came, I think, from France I

HH. IdKlan

Wid. Here you shnll see n ronntryman of youn.
That lias done worthy service.

Hel. I lis name, I prey yon.

Dm TheConni Kouaillou; Kiiowyousiirhaouel

Hd. But liy the ear, that hears must mibly of hini :
His face 1 know not.

Lio. Whatsoe'er he is.

He's bravely taken here. He atole fhim Preia«,
As tis reported, for ihe king had married liini
Against his hking : Thmk you it is so I

HtL Ay.sorely.mere the truth; IkiHiwInslady.

Din, I'liere is a gentleman, that aervea I be count.
Reports iHit coarsely of her.

HtL Whatli his name '

Dui. Monsieur Parolles.

HeL I believe with him.

In nrsnment of praise, or to the worth
Of the great a>uiit himself, site is loo mean



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AotIU.J ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL.



do. ^J^rtnith, I takt nqr ftnva^ loid to be a

CtmU Bf what o l mn ftto e, I wmy yooT

do. Wb7. IM wUl look upon ha boot, ami mag:

mond tbo rolT, and ling; auk qoartioaa, and aing:

piekMitoaUuaad nnir: Iknoiranian that hiid

thm tnok of melaocbaly, ■old a goud^ manor fur



Onml. Let ma MO what he writae. and when
hemaaaatoooaie. tOpniiv a ktttr.

a*. I have no mind to IM, item 1 waa at
euaiC; o«r oM hng and oar labels othe ooantnr
an «oChinf JIke vour okl liwr and wior Isbeto
o'Uie oourt ; the online of my Cupid's knnnfced
o«t: and I begm to love, aa an old man loves ui>-
■er. with DO sinmaoh.

OomU. What have we here?

00. Ete that yoa have there. iBxU.

Count [Jterff] / Aeoc jmt foa a dbaip*(er-m>
Imp : fhe katk r ta w ered tht kimg, ml wtflome me, I
kan wedded ker^moi bedded kar; and mB9rn to make
Ike not etermoL Ton ekait hear, I am run awajf:
kmmU^befon the mmrt come. If tken be breadtk
emmi^imllit world, iwOl hold a but dutamoe. Mf
dmt^lotmL

Yeear wnfitrttmate mm.

This ii not wett. rash and anbridled bojr,
To fljr the Ihvoors of so goud a king:
To piuck his indignation on thy hmd,
By the misprisinf of a maU too virtooos
For iha onitempt of empire.

Re-enter Clown.

Cto. madam, yonder is heavy news within,
between two sohuera ami my young lady.

OemU. What is the matter f

Cto. Nay, there is aome oomfbrt in the news,
aoofe oontort; yoor son will net be killed eo soun
Bs I thooght he tmald.

OmotI. Wby ehouM he be kill'd ?

Cto. So eay I, madam, if he ran away, as 1 bear
be doee : the daager is m standing tot ; thst's lUe,
k«a of men, thoi^i it be the getting of chiUren.
Here they ouose, will tell yoo more : for my part,
1 only bear,yoar eon was mn away.

iBtUCIawn.

&Uer Helena mtd two Gentlemen.



1 Om. Save yoo, good i
HeL lladaim, my lord is gone, for ever gone.

3 6m. Do not sny so. [men.—

Goaa/. Think npon patieooe —'Pray you. aeotle-

I have felt so many quirks of joy. ami i^ie^

That flM iint fnoa of neither, on the sUrt,

Can womnu me 0010*1 :— Where is my son. I pray

ycntf (Florence:

2 Gem. Madam, he^ gone to serve the duke of
We met him thitherwanl ; tram them^e we came.
And, after some despaloh in hand at court,
lliither we bend again. [paMport.

Bd. liook 00 ha letter, iMdam; here's my

a^^wkkkmeoertkaUemmoKmidekmmeockUd
%!iottemqnk$bodg,lkatJomMerto.lkmc9Ume.
' il ta ^Mdk a then i urils « never.



This is a drsadfbl sentence.

ObmrI. Brought you this letter, gentlemen!

I Gem. Ay. mads .

And. for the pontents' sake, are sorry ibrfior paiiis.

CbMNf f pfYthee, lady, have a better clieer;
ir thoa eoffroasisir all the griefs are thine,
TlwtfnbAtmaflramniety: Hewasmyson;



But I do wash his Bams out of my blood.

And thou art all my child.— Towanls Plursnoe b
Z-Oem. Ay, m4j!*nf>. [beif*

OfmL And to be a soldier r

3 Gea. Sodi ia his noble porpoee : and, belieip*:,

The duke will biy apon htm all the honour '

That gtiod convenience olaima. .

Ooaal. Retnrnvon thither T

1 Gem. Ay. madam, with the swiftest wiug of

BtL CbSSl] Tai1mmmwifi,Jhmemothhv




Du that there?

Ay.mi

of n» hand. -haply.
[>t coneeuting to. fwhicb

s in France, until he have no wife '
nere. that is tun good fiir him.
nd she deserves a lord. ' '

;h rude buys mucht tend npou.
riy, mistress. Who was with him I



int only, and a gentleman
W «ne time known.

c;m0K. Parollee, wast nm T

1 Gem. Ay. my good lady. he.

CotmL A very Uinted follow, and ftill of wick-
My eon oormpts a well-ilerivad nature tedueai.
With his iuduoeoMnt.

1 Gem. Indeed, good lady.
The fellow has a deal of that, too nuoh.
Which holds liim mucb to have.

CrwNl. Too are welcome, gentlemen,
I will entreat you. when you see my son.
To tell him that his sword can never win
The honour tlial he loses : more Til entreat you
WriUeu to bear along. « ;

2 Gem. We serve you, madam.
In that and all your worthiest afiairs. \

Coumt. NutBo.butaswechaiigeoaronurtesiee.

Will yuu draw near T \

lExewU Counteas amd Gentlemen.

H^L TiU Ihaoe mo wife, I haoe motlumg iu Finmc^
Nothing in Fronce, until ha has no wife I '

Thou shall have iMaie, Rousilloa, none m Fimnoe,
Tlien h«k fhou alt aaain. Poor lonl ! ist I '
That chase thee from thy country, and expoee .
Thoee tender limhs of thine to the event
Of the noo-eparinr war? and is it I
Thatdrive thee from the sportive oourt,wherB thoU
Wast shot at with fair eyes, to belhemark
Of smoky muskets T O vou leaden massengen, ,
That ride u|k« the violent speed of grs,
Fly with febMi aim ; move the stiU>pierdng air, ■
That sinipi with piercing, do n^ touch my lonl I ,
Whoever shoots at h}m, 1 set him there ;
Whoever chanes 011 his forward breast,
1 am the Ciiitiff. that do hold him to it ;
And. though I kill him not, I am tlie cause
His death was so effiBCted : better twere,
I met tlie ravin lion when he rnar'd
With shnrp constraint of hunger : better twero
That all the maenes, whwii nature owes.
Ware mine at once : No, coma thou home. Koo-

sillon,
Mnieooe honour but of danger wha a sear,
Aa oft it Inees all : I will be gnoe :
My being here it n. that holds thee hence :
Shall 1 stay here to di»t T no. no. aUhf>ogh
'llie air of paradise did fen the houee.
And angels offin'd all : 1 will be gnoe ;
That pitiful rumour may report my flight, ^

To ooneolate Uiine ear. Come niant ; end. day I .
For, with the dark, poor thief; I'U steal away.



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Tin. S^



:^



Ber. And bf other wamoted tmtinoay.

Otf. Thnn my dial goc* uut true ; i took thil
lark Tor a boulinf .

Brr. I do uwure yoa. my lord, he is very great
hi IdiowledKe, and aoronliugly viihant.

MT I have then sinned agninat hw ezperieooe,
and iranai^rened amunst his valour; and my state
Uiai way n d^nperuus. tiuoe 1 cannot vet nnd in
uiv heart to repent. Here he conies : I pray you,
Biake as frieuus, I wiU pursue the amity.

loiter PHrollea.

J*ar. Theae things shall he dune, sir.

[7b Bertrain.

lAf. Pray yoa, sir, whols his tailor I

J^ir. Sir?

Jm/. O. I know him well : Ay, sir; he, sir, b a
go(4l workman, a very food tailor.

Ber. Is she gone to the king T

[Aside to Puo\U».

Pm-. She is.

Ber. WiU she away to-night f

Par. As you'll have her. [sare,

Ber. 1 have writ my letters, easketed my trea-
Given order for our horns ; and to-night.
When 1 should take possession of the bnde,—
And, ere 1 do begin,

Lkf- A good traveller is something st the latter
end of aduiner: but one that Ues three- thinls, and
aaes a known truUi to pass a thooaand ntiibings
with, shoukl lie once heard, and Uirice beateu —
God save you, captain.

Ber. Is there any unkindne« between my lord
and you, monsieur T

Par. I know not how I have deoerved to ran into
nay lord's displeasure.

Lff. You have tuede shift to ran intot, boots
and spurs and all, like liim that leaped uitu the
custard ; and out of it you'll nin again, rather
than suOer question for your rendenoe.

Ber It may be you have mistaken hini, my lord.

Lgf. And shall do so ever, though I took him at
his prayers. Fare you well, my lord ; and believe
this of me, there can be no kernel in this light
nut ; the soal of this man is his clothes : trust him
not in matter of heavy cousequettce ; I have kept
of them tame, and know their natures.— Farewell,
monstear : I have spoken better of you. than yoa
have or will deserve at my hand ; but we must do
food against enL [Exit.

Par. An idle Uiid, I swear.

Ber. 1 think so.

Par. Why, do you not know him T [speech

Ber. Yes, I do know lum well; and common
Gives him a worthy pais. Here comes my clog.

Enter Helena.

Hd. I have, sir, as I was commanded from you.
Spoke with the king, and liuve pmcurwi hn leave
Fur preseui parting; only, he desires
Some private speech with you

Brr. 1 shall obey his will.

1 lu must not marveU Helen, at my course,
y\ hich htA»lM not colour with the time, nor does
'1 lie niiiiuaratHm and required office
Ou my particulnr : preptir'd 1 wus not
For Micli a iifHiiiean : therefore niii 1 fimnd
8«» much unsettled : 1'lii» dnvos me to entreat yoa,
1 hat prvsenily you take yuur way for home ;
And rather muse, tliaii ask, why I entreat you :
tur my respects are belter than Uiey seem ;
And my appdutnientii have in them a need.
G muter than sliows itself, at the first view,
lo you iliM kuuw them not. litis to my mother:
[Givutu a Utter.



Twill be two days ere I shsU see yoa ; so
1 leave you toyoor wisdom.

Hei. Sir. I can nothing sar*

Bi«t tliat I am your most obedient servant.

Ber. Come, conie, no more of that.

HeL And ever ihaB

W ith trne oheervanoe seek to eke out that.
Wherein toward me my homely stars have feii'd
To equal my great fortune.

Ber. Let that go :

My haste is very freat: Farewell ; hie home.

HeL Fray, air, yinir pnrdon.

Ber. Well, what would yoQ s^ t

HeL t am not worthy ot the wealth I owe ;
Nor dare I say, tis mine : and yet it is ;
But, Uke a timtanous thief, must fain would steal
What law does vouch mine own.

Ber. What would yoa hairs f

HeL Something ; and scarce so much :— nothing,
indeed.— [yee:-~

1 woald not tell yon what I would : my lord— 'faith.
Strangers, and foes, do sunder, and not kiss.

Ber. 1 pray you. stay not, but in haste to hoiw.

HeL 1 shall not break your balding, good my lonL

Ber. Where are n^ other men, nHmsieur T —

Farewell. r£xU Helena.

Go thou toward hoaie ; where I will never come,

Whih* 1 can shake my swunl, or hear the drum :~

Away, and lor our flight.

Par. Bravely, coragio I



ACT III.



I much, our oouiii



SCENE L— Florence. A Room m tte Dokati
Palace.

Fkneritk, Eater the Duke of Florence, atteadei;
two French Lords, and Miters.
IMte. So tliat, from point to point, now have yoa
The (tandameutal reasons of this war ; [heard
Whose great decision hath much bkaNl let Ibrth,
And more thirsts after.

1 Lord. Holy aeems the qoaml
Upon your grace's part ; bhick and fearful

On the oppueer.
Duke, llierefore we manrel i
France

Would, in so just a business, shut his bosom
Agaiiiet our borrowing prayers.

2 Lord. Good my lonl.
The reasons of our state I cannot yield,

But bke a common and an outward man.
That the great figure of a council frames
By self-unable roiAion : there&ire dare not
Soy what 1 think of it; since I have fiauMl
Myself in my uncertam grotinds to (sil
As often as 1 gueas'd.

Duke, fie it his pleasure.

2Lord.'Bnl I am sure, the younger of our natora.
That surfeit on their ease, wUl, day by day.
Come here fur physMS.

Daks. Welcome shsU they be ;

And all the honours, that can fly from us.
Shall un them setile. You know your places well ;
When better fall, for your avails they fell :
To-morrow to the field. [Ftoarisk. ExemU.

SCENE n. — RoosiUon. A Room m <*s Coub-
tess's PoiooB.

Eater Countess and Clown.
OoMNf. It hath happened all as I woiiki have had
it, save, that he cuhmmi uut aiuug wti't har.



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KTMoe off roe: aconry. old. fiUlijr. ■carvy lord !—
Well, 1 romt m piaieiit ; there m iio feitering of
auUmnty. 1*11 lieal him, liy niy life, if 1 nun meet
him with auy csonrenieiice. an he were douhle
and dtrable a lord. 1*11 have no more pity of his
a^. Uian 1 would have of— 111 beat hmi, au if I
GuiiJfd but meet liim acaiu.

JSf-eater LaferL

l/tf. Sirmlu your lord and master^ married,
thure's news itir you : yoo have a new niutrMa '

Pmr. I roust uofeignediy l>eiieech your lordnhtp
lo make aome resKfvation of your wrongs : He la
my eimmI liHfd : whom 1 serve above, is iiiy master.

lAf. Who? OodT

Por. Ay,kir.

lAf. I'ne devil it is, that's thy master. Why
d'Wt thou garter up thy arms rf this fashion T di«t
make hu«e of thy sleeves T do other sei vants so T
Tttou wert best set thy lower pan where thy i^joe



By mine honour, if 1 were hut two iiohrs
younger. IVl beat tht« : roethinks, thou art a ge-
neral oflriice. and every man should beat ihee.
I «hmk, thou wast created Ua men to breaihe
themselves upon thee

Hot. 'litis is hard and undeserved measure, my
h*d.

laf. Go to, sir; yon were beaten in Italy for
picking a kernel out of a pomeerunate ; you are a
vaicubond. and no true traveller: you are more
. mucy with lufdi>,Mnd honourable persouuKes, than
the benikiry of yunr birth and virtue gives you
oonunissioii. You are not worth another word,
ebe I'd call you knave. 1 leave you. [£cil.

JEaler Bertram.

Pur. Good, very good; it is so then.— Good,
very cood ; let it lie OHicealed awhile.

Act. Uialoue, and forfeited to cants for ever I

Par. Wliat u the inattcir, sweet heart T

Ber. Although before the solemn prawl I have
1 will not bed her. iswom.

Par. What? what, sweet heart T

Btr. O my ParoUes, they have married me :—
ni to the Tuscan wars, and never l«d her

Par. Fninoe is a dog-hole, and it no more me-
fila the tread of a man^s fool : U> the wai s !

Ber. I'herv's letters from my mother: what the
I know not yet. [iinpori is

Pw. Ay, that would be known : To the wars,
my buy. to the wan!
He wean h« honour in a box unaeen.
That hogs his kicksy-wick*ty here at home;
8pendin|r his manly roarrow in her arms.
Which sboukl sustain the bouial niid hiidi curvet
Of Mar's rteiy steed : To oUier reghtuii !
France is a stable ; we. that dwuil in't, jades ;
llterefbre, to the war !

Jkr. It shall be so ; 111 send her to my house,
Acnuaint my mother with my hate to her.
And wherefore 1 am AhI ; write to the king
l*hat which I durst mrt speak : His present gift
Shall Aimish me to those Italhiii fleldii.
Where noble fellows strike : War is no strife
To the dark boose, and the detested wife.

Par. Will tliia oaprlck> hohl in thee, art sore ?

Btr. Go with me to my chamber and advise roe.
ru send ber straight away : To-morrow
111 to the wars, she to her single sorrow.

Par. Why, these balls bound; there% noise in
it. 1-ishatd:
A young man, married. Is a man that's roarr'd :
I'herefure away, and leave her bravely ; go :
The king has dune you wrong : but hush! tis ao.
iExeunl.



V The kug li



SCENE IV.. 7^ J



AMolhtr Room m ikt



K

Km '



Enter Helena and Clown.

ka. My mother greets me kindly : Is she well T

CLa. She is iiU well ; but yet she lias her healtli:
She's very merry : but yet she ia not well : But
thaiuks he giveiL she's very well. auJ wants iio-
tliing i'lhe world : but yet she is not well.

HeL If she be very well, what does site ail, that
she's not very well i

Cio. IVuly, she's very weU, indeed, but fw two



HeL What two tlun^ T

Cto. Due, that alie's nut in Heaven, whither Ofd
•end her quickly! the other, that she's m earth,
(rom whence God send her quickly I

£n<er ParoUes.

Piir. Bless you. my fortunate lady I

HeL 1 hope, sir, 1 have your good-will to have
mine own good fortunes.

Par. You had my prayen to lead them on : and
to keep theiu on. have them still.— O, my knave I
How does my old ludy I

Cio. So thiit you hud her wrinkles, and I ber
money, 1 would she diil as you say.

Par. Why. 1 say nothing.

Cio. Marry, you are the wiser man : for many
a man's tomcue shakes out his master's uiahiiiig :



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