William Shakespeare.

The complete dramatic and poetical works of William Shakspeare ....: from ... online

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SU. And dui/ never yet did wiuit ha meed



Servant, voa are welcome to a wortltless mistreas.
Pro 111 die on him that aays so, but yearMlf.
8iL Thai you are welcome T
Pro. No ; that you are worthless

£Mer Servant.

dr. Madam, my lord your lather would qieak
with yuu

SiL III wait upon his pleasure. {Bxit ServwL

Come, sir Thuno,

Go with me :— Once nM»re, new servant, v

ril leave you to confer of home ailHira :

When you have done, we hiok lo hear mim yoo.

Pro. We'll both attend nptiii your ladyship.

r£zetaU Silvia, lliurio. aai^ Spend,

FisJ. Now, t^l me. how do all from whence yoU
came ? [commenaed.

Pro Your friends are well, and have them raooh

VaL And how do yours T

Pro. t left them all in healtlt

VaL How does your ladyT and howthriveayoqr
lovef ,

Pro. My talea of love were wont to weaiy yo4,
1 know, you joy n«it in a love-discoune.

VaL Ay. Pruteus. but Uiat life is alter'd now :
I have done peuunce for omt4>mmng love :
Whoae higit iiiifMinous thoughts have punish'd nt
With bitter fasts, with penitential grnanN,
Wtlh nighily tears, and daily heart-Hora sighs ;
For, in revenge of my OHitempt of love.
Love hath rhus'd sleep from my entliralled tjoOt
And made them watrlion of mine own heart's sqr-
O, Mile Pioleus. love's a mighty lord ; Cro%
And hath so humbled me, as, I confesa.
There is no woe to his correction.
Nor, to his service, no such joy tai earth 1
Now, no djwounie, except it be of love ;
Now I can brt^tk my fust. dine, sup, and
Upim the very naked name of love.

Pro. Enougti ; I rend your fortune in yooroye
Was this the ulol that you worehip so f

Val. £ven she ; and is she not a heavenly saint f

Pro. No ; but <lie is an earthly paragon.

Vat CaU her divine.

Pro. I will not flatter her.

Vol. 0, flatter me ; for l«ive delights in praiaro.

Pro. When 1 was sick, you gave me bitter pilki {
And 1 most minister the like to you.
_ VaL Theuspesk the truth by bar; if notdmua.
Tat let bar ba a prindpaUiy,
loversif u to sll the creatures on the earth.



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Act II.] TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA.



07 ^^



9r»d. What ne«MlK slie. when she liath iiim1«

EMI write to Toonwlf ( Why, do yuu aut perceire
lemtr

VoL No, beliere me.

apttd. No lielivniis jrou indeed, mr : Bat did
yua perreive her eameat 7

Fn/. She cnre me none enepC an anrry word.

apeei. Wiijr, the hath Kivon jrou a letter.

Y«L That'll Uie lett«r 1 wnt to her fnend.

Sptti. And that letter hath ahe delivered, and
there an end.

VoL 1 would it were no worae.

a^ftaL 111 warrant you. *tM as well :

#br tften fOH kam writ to her; mod the, im wtodestf,
OraMfiormmtofidll»timt,amtdnolaiiamrrplt\
Or AoniM efie«om* iiw«ici«/er, Uml ought ker ouod
iutooer, llover.—

Bene^halh toi^keriaoe himoHfto write Mto her
All tha I speak in print, fur in pnnt 1 fuund it.—
Why moae you, air f 'tis dinoer-iiroe.

VaL I have dined.

aretd. Ay, but hoMrken, tir ; thyoffh the came-
leoo Lore can feed on ilie Mir, 1 am ime that am
■Moriihed by my victuiila. aud would fain have
meat :0» be not Lke your rawtrMt; be moved, be
moved. iBxamL

SCENE U.— Verona A Room m Julio's Hmm.
EiOtr Proteua onrf JnUa.

Pro. Have pattence, gentle Julia.

JoL 1 moit, where m mi remedy.

Pro. When pnaatbly I can, I will relam.

ioL If yon tarn not. you will return the aooner:
Keep this remembrauce for thy Jalia's sake.

[Otvtfv a ftng.

Pro. Why then we'll make exchange; here, take
youibn.

JUL And seal the banahi with a holy kiss.

Pro. Here ■ my hand for my true constancy ;
And when that hour o'er-slips me in the day.
Wherein 1 s^ not, Jalia, fur thy sake.
11m next enMui« hoar some foul mischanoe
'I onumit roe fijT my loreVi forfetfuUieMS 1
Ity father slnys my oominf ; answer not ;
Ttte tale is now : n^, not thy tale of tean;
'lliat tale wdl st^r me longer than I siioakl :

Ifixil Jalia.
JoIm. Arewell.— What ! cone without a word ?
Ay. 80 ime lore shotikl do: it cannot speak; ^W
Fur troth bath better deeda than wonls to gnoe
JEMer Panthino.

Pom, fkt Prateua, yoa are sUid for.

Pro, Go; I ooiue, I amie :—
Afatf I this parting stnkee poor luvera damh.



8C£NB UI.-7^ mum. A atrteL
Eoitr Laanoe. teading o Dog.
Loom. Nay, ^will be this hour ere I have dune
iiaepii«: all the kind of the Launces have this
ftitf foall: I have nsoeived my pr.iportiua, like
the prod«iooa son, and am going with sir Proteas
to the ImperialVi ooort. 1 Uuuk, Crab my dog be
the suorasi-nalarBd dog that lives: my mother
weeping, my father wailing, my sister ciying, our
maal howlMg, oar cat wringing her hands, and all



"^S^



m'agreot perplexUy. yet «

ensd-heaited our shed one tear; heliasUNie,a
veiy pebUe-elone, and has no mora pity in him
IhMiadM: aJewwooldhave weiittohaveseea



««r paiuog; why, my grandam having no eyes,
ka* voo, wei* henwlf blind at my parting. Nay.
ni abuw yuu the manner of tt : This shoe is my



foUier :— -no, thn left shoe u my father ;— no. no,
this left shoe is my mother :— nay, that cannot be
au neither ;— yes. it laso. it ismi ; it hath the woraer
sole : This shoe, with the hole in it. ia my inui her.
and this, my father ; A venceaiice out ! tnere 'tis ;
now, sir, Uus staff k my ssiter ; for, look ynu, she
is as white as a lily, and as small as a waiid : this
hat is Nan, our mnid ; I am the dng :— no. the dog
ia himaelf. and I am the dog,— O. the dog is roe,
and I am myself; ay, so, so. Now come I to my
fother ; Fbther, four bkuina ; now •hnald not tlie
shoe speak u word f«ir weeping; now ahould Ikiss
my toXkun ; well, he weeps on :— now come 1 to
my mother, (O, that she ooold speak now t) like a
wood woman ;— well. I kiss her ;— why. there 'tis ;
here^ ray mother^ breath up and down ; now
come I to my sister ; mark the moan she makes :
now the dog all this while sheds not a tear, nor
apeaks a word; bat see how 1 1^ the dust with



Pan. Lannoe, away, away, aboard ; thy mtisler
is shipped, and thou art to post after wtth laua.
What*8 the matter! why weep'tt thou, man I
Away, ass; yoa will lose the tide, if you tarry any
loiwer.

Latm. It ia no matter if the ty'd were lost ; tat
it is the unkindeat ty'd that ever man ty'd.

Pan. What^ the unkindeat tideT

Idnm. Why, he that's ty'd here: Crab, my dog.

i^sn. Tut, man, I mean thou'li lose the flood :
and, in loaiiig the flood, lose thy voyage \ and. in
losing thy voyaxe, loae thy master; and, m losing
thy master, lose thy service ; and, in luaing thy
semoe,— Why dost thou stop my mouth T

Lcum. Fur fear thou should *st lose thy tongue.

Pan. Where should 1 lose my tougue f

Laxm. In thy tale.

Pan In thy tail?

Jjnm. Lose the tide, and the voyan, and the
master, and the service f 'Hie tide ! Why man, if
the river were dry, I am able to fill it with my
tean: if the wind were down, 1 could drive the
boat with my sicUa.

Pan. Come. ouoie away, man; I wassenttocall
thee.

ItOMR. Sir, call me what thoa dareat

Pan. Wilt thou co I

Laun. Well. 1 wUi gu. [iCtamI

SCENE IT.— MiUui. An Apartment in tko Doko'n

Paiact.

Boter Talenthie, salvia. 1'huno, and Speed.

aiL Servantp-

Val lltorreasT

Sbeed. Master, sir Thorio fhiwus on yoa.

VaL Ay, boy, it's f«»r love.

apeed. Not of you.

VaL Of my mmtresa then.

apnd. Twere giMid. you knocked hisL

au. Servant, yito nre satl

VaL Indeed, iiiadani, 1 seem sa

Ttm. Seem you that yuu are not f

VaL Haply 1 do

Tku. So do counlerfeita.

VaL So do you.

Tku. What seem I. that I am nott

VaL Wiae.

"nm. WhathwtaaoeortheooatfHyf

VkL Tour folly.

Thm. And how qoote yoa my folly f
' VaL lounteithiyuarjerfcBi.

Tku. My ierkhi h a duuMet.

Vol Why, then. Ill doulOe your foay.



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TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA. [A ex II



^- Your womhii). cir; or eli

VOL W0tl. jriiu'U Kt il I be too forwanl. [slow.

Aieed. And yet I was last chkklen for being too

Vol. Go to. sir ; tell me, do joa know madam

Bpeed. She that rour worahtp love* T rSilria T

Vol Why, how know jrou that 1 am in lore ?

Spffd. Marrjr. hy these special marks: First,

you have leametl, like air Pntteos. to wreath your

amis like a male-«ontenl ; to relish a lore-suug,

like a Robin-red-hreast ; to walk alone. Uke one

tliat had the pestiieitce ; to sigh, like a achool-huy

that liad lost his A. B. C; tu weep, like a young

wench that had buried her grandam: to ftst. hke

onp that takeM diet ; Ui watch, hke one that fears

lobbing; to speak puling, like a bqqpir at HfU-

Iiiwnias. You were wont, when you laughed^ lo

crow like a cock ; when you walked, lo walk like

one of the liuns; when yon fasted, it was pre-

situily after dinner; when you looked sndiy.it was

lor want of money : and now yuu are meianior-

rlio(>ed wiih a mixtrHS, that, when I look on you.
(■an hardly Uiink you my master.

VaL Are all these things perceived in me T

£prfd '1 hey are all iieroeived wiihoul you.

Vol. Without me T iney cannot

JtoMf. Without you f nuy. lliat^ certain, for,
wit boat you were so simple, none else would : but
you are so without these fonies,that these follies
are wiiliiu you, and hhine llirongh you like the
water in an urinul ; thai not an eye that sees you,
but is a iibysidnn U) comnteni on jttur maladv.

VaL But tell me. dust thou know my lady Silvia?

SpeetL She, Uiat you guze on so, as she sits at
supper f

Yal Haat thoa observed t hat T even she I mean.

Sj/etit. Why, sir, I know her noL

VaL Dust iliou know her tiy my gazing on her.
aial yet knowest her not ?

Sfetd Is she not hard-favoured, sir t

Val. Not so fnir, boy, as well-favoured.

.'Mraf. Sir, 1 know that well enough.

V(al. Wtiat dost thou know I

SiMmi. lliat she is not so fiur, as (of you) well-
favoured.

VaL I mean that her beauty is exquisite, but
ber Civour inflniie.

^4Brf. Thai's beoaone the one is painted, and
tlie otliar out of all count

VaL How pain'ed ? and bow out of count T

l^ieed. Marry, sir, so painted to n. Jie her Our.
that no man counts of her beauty. [Iieauiy.

VaL How esteemest thou me? 1 account of tier

SpmL You never saw ber sinoe she was de-
formed.

VaL How ioof bath she been deformed 7

^eoL Ever since you loved her.

VaL I have knred her ever nnoe I saw her ; and
sidl 1 see her beautiful.

Speed. If you love her, yoa cannot see her.

J^TwhyT

Speed. Because love is Mind. O, that yoa had
aiiue eyes; or your own eyes had the lights they
tRere wont to have, when you chid at sir Proteus
for going ungartered! *

VaL Wliiit vhould I see then f

Speed. Your own present folly, and her .
deformity : for he, being in htve, could nut see to
garter Ins hose ; aiui you, beiAff'm tdve.6uinot lie
III put on voiir lutte.

VaL Belike, boy. then yoo are in love ; for
Bionungjrou ooukl nor see lo wipe my shoes.

.S^peetC^rme, shr; 1 was in love with my bed : 1
thank yoo, you swinged me for my love, which
makes me the bolder to chide you for yonra.

Vai. lu ouodusion. 1 st^ual alfoeted to her.



Speed, I wonld you were set; so^ your aflbcUuo
would cease.

VaL Last night she eiUoiaed me to write soom
lines to one she loves.

Speed. And have youT

VaL I have.



Speed. Are Ihey not lamely writ T
VaL fie - - -



^.. No, boy, but as well as I can do them ;—
Peace, here siie comes.

BiUer SOnu.

Speed. O excellent motion I O exceeding p*i|»-
pet ! now will he interpret to her.

VaL Madam and mistreas, a tboosand good-
morrows.

Speed O. 'give yoo good even I here's a miUino
of iimnnera. iAmde.

SU. Sir Valentine and servant, to yoo two thou-
sand.

Speed. He should give her interest, and site gives
it him.

VtiL As yoo enjoin'd me, I have writ yoor letter.
Unto the secret nameless friend of yours;
Whwh 1 was much onwilling to proceed in.
But for my dnty to your ladyship. [done.

SU. 1 thank yoii,gentleservant: 'tis very clerkly

VaL Now trust me. madam, it come hardly off;
For. being ignomnt to whom it goes.
I writ ut random, very doubtfully. [peina 1

SiL Perchance you think too much of so mndi

Vat No. madam ; su it stead vou, I will write.
Please you coiumand.alhousaiid times as much :
And wt.—

SU. A pretty period I Well, I gueaR the sequel ;
And yet I will not name it:— undyel I care not;—
And yet lake thiM again ;— and yet I thank you '
Meaning hendeiorth to trouble you no more.

Speed, And jet you will ; and yet another yet.



leryet.
lAsidi



VaL What means your ladyship T do yoo noi
like it?

SU. Yes. yes: the lines are very 4naint^ writ :
But since unwillingly take tliem again;
Nay. take them.

VaL Madam, they are for yoo.

SiL Av. ay. you writ them, sir, at my request ;
But I will none of them ; they are for yoo :
1 wonld have had them writ more movimdy.

Vai. Please you I'll write your ladyship another,

StL And when it's wi%, fur my sake read it over.
And If it please you. so : if not, why. so.

Vol. If It pleasis me. madam ! what then T

SU. Why. if it please you, lake it for yoor labour.
And so good morrow, servant. [£nf Silvia.

AQpred O je^t unseen.- inscmtable, invisible.
As a nose on a fhan^ f^, or a weathercock on a

steeple!
My master sues to her; and she hath taught her

suitor. ,
He befaig her pupil, to become her tutor.
excellent device ! was there ever heard a bettei I
'lliat my mtuiter, heiiic acnbe, to hiniNeli UumLl
write the letter t

VaL How now. sir? what are you reasomng
with yourself!

l^ieed. Nay. I was rliyming ; 'tis yoo that have
the reason.

VaL To do what?

Ateed. To \m a spokesman from madam Silvia.

VaL To whom !

Speed. To yourself: why she woos yoa bf n
flgnre.

Via. What figure T

ape^. By a letter, I shoold say.

VaL Why,-'-'



) haih not wril to i



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TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA.



And ihiu I warch it wiUi « snvera^n kiss.
Bat twice, or thrioe, was Proteas written dowa :
be calm, good wind, blow u<it a woni away.
Till r hsve fuand eaeh letter in the letter,
Exrept mine own name ; that some whirlwind
Unto a nigiced, fearfu^ han^ne mck. [hear

And throw it thence into tiie HMrinc sea !
Ln. here in one line is his UHnie twine writ-
Poor .^rfom Prolaa, passkmale Protetu,
Tb the tweet Jutia ; that 111 tear nway ;
Antl fst I will mit, sith so prettily
He oitaples it tu his OHuplaininx names ;
Thaa will 1 fold them one upon another:
Now kiss, embrace, contend, do what yoa wiU.

Rt-enUr (.ncettm.

Lmc. Madam, dinner's ready, and your fltther

JU. Well, let ns ro. Istays.

Luc What, shall these papers lie like tell-tales
here'

JuL If you respect them, best to take them up.

Lw. Nay. 1 was taken up for lajrinrthem down :
7et here they shall not lie, ftir CHtcfiinff cold.

JhL 1 see you hare n month's mind to them.

Jmc Ay. madam, you may sny what sicUts yon
aee;
I aee thincs ton, altbomrh yon judfce I wink.

ML Come. come, wilt please yiiofoT [Examt.

SCENE ni. — The Snme. A Roam m Antonio's
Uatm.

Enter Antonio tmd Panthino. •
Ani. Tell me, Panthino, what sad talk was that.
Wherewith my brother lield yon in the cloister f
Ptm. TwBS of his nephew Proteus, your soo.
Ant. Why, what of him T
Pan _ He wonder*d, that your lonlship



Would snfBv him to spend his youth at home ;

J, of deiMler remjratiun.

Put forth their sons to seek preferment out



While other men, o



Some, to the wars, to trr their fortune there ;

Some, to discover (elands for away ;

8o»is, to the studiiios universities.

Kur any. or for all these exercises.

He said, that Prnteos, your son, wns meet :

And did request me, to importune you.



T*> let him spend his time no more at home.
" I would be I

iwrincki
_ AmU Nor needte thou much importune me to



WhbJit
Inlu



J great impeachment to his afra,

known no travel in his youth. (that



Whereoa this mouth I have been hammeriii(.

1 have cunsider*d well his loss of time;

And how he cannot be a perfect man.

Nut bduf try*d. and totor'd in the world :

Rxpenence » by industry arhiev'd.

Ami perfected by the swift course uf time :

l*heu, tell me, Whither were I Ijest to send him f

Pm I think, your tordsliip is not ignorant,
Hi'W his oompenioa. youthful Vnientina,
Attends the emperor m his rural court.

AmL IknowTtwell. [him thither:

Ps*. Twere good, I think, your lordship sent
There shall be pnctisr tilts ami Uiomanients,
Hear aweet disoourae, omverse with noblemea ;
Aad be in eye uf every exercise.
Worthy his youth and iiobloneas of birth.

Ant. I Uke thy counsel ; well hast thou advVd :
A mi, that thou mayte perceive how well 1 lik« it.
The tixscQtiou of it shall make known ;
b'vgB With the ipeediesf execuikw
i will deepatoh him to the emperor^ cm. .

Msd. TuHBorrow, may it please yoo, Ooo Al-
WKk other fsntlemea of cuod



. i will deepatoh

V Msd. TUHBOI

^ ^ WKk Other fsn



Are Journeying to salute tlie empemr.

And to commend their service to his wjlt. [ffe .

Ant. Good ooiiipnuy ; with tliem shall Pmuios

And, in good time.— now will we break with hipi

Enter Proteus.
Pro. Sweet love! sweet lines I sweet life I
Here is her hand, the event of lier heart ;
Here is her oath fur luve. her honour** pawn :
O. that our fsthers would applaud our loves.
To seal our happiness with their consenu !

heavenly Ju lia 1 [there ?
Ant. How nowT what letter are yoa reading
Pro. Ma]r*t please yuor lonlship. 'tis a wonI or

Oroomraendation sent from Valentine, [two
Deliver*d by a friend that came fh>m him.

Ant. Leud me the letter ; let me see what news.

Fro. There is no news, my lord ; but that he
How happily be lives, how welUbelov'd, [writes
And daily graced by the emperor;
Wishing me with him. partner of his fortune.

Ant. And how stand you aflbcted to his wish T

Pro. As one relying on your lordship's will.
And not depending on his friendly wish.

Ant. My will is something sorted with his wirii :
Muse not that I thus suddenly proceed ;
For what I will, I will, and there an end.

1 am resolv'd, that thou shalt spend some time
With Valentinus in tlie emperor's court ;
What maiulebance he fVom his fViends receives.
Like exhibition shalt thou receive from me.
To-morrow lie m readiness to go :

Excuse it not, for I am peremptory.

Tro. My lord, I cannot be ao soon provided :
Please you, deliberate a day or twa [Nfler thee:

AnL Look, what thou want'st, shall be sent
No more of stay ; to-momiw tlioa must go.—
Come on, Panthino ; you shall be empkiy'd
To hasten on his e^wditiim.

[Exemt Ant and Pan.

Pro. Thus have I shunn'd the fire for fear of
burning;
And dreuch'd itie in the sea. where I am diown'd :
I fear'd to show my fiitlier Julia's letter.
Lest he should take exoeptioos to my love ;
And with the vniitage of mine own excuse
Hath he excepted most against my love.
O, how this sphug of love resemUeth

The unoerti^u gUinr uf an April day;
Which now shows all the beauty of the sun.

And by and by a cloud takes all away T

Re-tiOer Panthina
Pom. Sir Proteus, your father calls for yoa;

He is in haste, tlierefure, I pray you, go.
Pre. Why. this it is ! my lieart aooords thereto;

And yet a thousand times It answers, no. [JTmnif,



ACT II.

8CENI I.— Mian. An apartment in tht Oakeli



H



Ent& Valentuie and Speed.



luves ars o«. [bat caa.
iiuiy be yours, for this it
ay, give It me, it's b
icks a tiling divine I

MadamS'lviil *
it

lin hearing, ilr.
ale you call her F



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y tellinc



TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA.



tellinc her mini] Give her no token but ■tooee ;
lor »lie^ as hun) m steeL
^. What. KMJd slie nothing T
S^ttd. Nn, tun M nioch vm — takt tkit for tkf
vaau. To iestif3r your bounty, i thenk jun. you
havetefitem'd me : in requiial whereof, beucefiinh
carry your lettem yuameir: and ao, air, I'll com-
mend yon to my master. [wrrck ;
Pro. Oo, go. he ciNie. to Mve your aliip Drum
Which canmit perteli. havimr thee nhuanl.
Beimt destined to a uner death uu shore :—
I most go send some better nie»«iiffer ;
1 lear, my Julia wiHikl not deign my linet,
BeceiTing them from such a wuniilee» post

iExnmt.
SCENE II — TVmbm. Garden ^ Jabals ikmae.
Enter Julia ami l^uortta.
Jut But say. Lucettn. now we are alone.
Would'M thou then counsel roe lo fall in lofe T
Luc Ay, madiuii ; so yuu atunible nut uuheed-
A/. Of all the dir murt of crmlemen. [fully.
That erery day with ptirle eiic<Hiiit«r uih.
In thy (MMuiou, which is wurtlncKt tur« f
Lmc. Please you, rspeol their iwuies, HI sIkiw
my mind
Anoordiug to my shallow simple skill. rn»<*ur f
JuL What Uiink'st thou n[ ihr fair Sir E^la-
Xmc As of a knight weilHtpokeii. ii«at nod fine;
0ut, were 1 you, he never sliould lie «iinie.
Jul What thmklst thou of the ndi MercatioT
Lac Well, of his wealth ; but of liiiiiaHlf. so, so.
JuL What think^t thou of the ffiitle Hroiens f
Lae. Lord, kml I to see what fbllv reigns m m !
JaL How now ! what means this' passion at his

name!
lAtc Pardon, dear mndam;tis a passing sluune,
Tuat I, unworthy iMidy as I am.
Should censure tlius im lovely genllemen.
JaL Why not on PruteiM. as of all the rsetf
Lac Then thus,— —of touny gtntd I tliink him
JhL Year reasiNi T [best.

Luc I have no other but n woman's reason ;
I think him so, because i think liini so. [him f
JaL And would^ t hou have me ciitit my love on
Lac A V, if you thought your love not cast away.
Jilt Why, he of all the rest hath ne*er moved
me. [ye.

Lac Yet he of all the rest. I think, beat loves
.M. His little speaking shows his love but small.
Luc Fire, that McliNMst kept. bu..ji most of all.
JaL 1 bey do not love, that do not show their-
love. [love.

Lac O. tliev love least, that let. man know tlieir
JaL I would, I knew his miml.
Lac Peruse this paper, madam.

JuL To Jahar-Suy. from wliom ?
Lac 1'liat the omtents will show.

JuL Sny, «iy : who itav** it thee T
Luc Sir Valentine's page; ukl sent. I think,
from Pnileus : [way.

He wouki liave given ii you, Imt 1. being in the
Did in yoor name receive it; pardon the fault, I
pray.
JUL Now, by my modesty, a goodly broker!
Itere vou presume to Iwrbuur wantiHi lines T
To whisper and conspire against my youth ?
Now. trust me. tis an office of great worth.
And you an officer fit for the iihKse.
There, take the paper, see it be retomVI ;
Or ebn return no more iuto my sight. [bate.

Lac To plead for love deserves more foe than



[Aci I. X

id her. ^



K



Jul Wm you begone?

Lue. That you may ,

Jul Aodyet.Iwoold.lhado'Miook'dtheliMter.



rmmtnate. fExU.



It were a shame to call her back sgain.
And pray li«r to a foult for which! chid her.
What fiMil is she, tiiut knows I am a mak).
And would not force the letter to my view T
Since nuuds. in modesty, sav No, »o that
Which tliey would have tJlie proflferer oonvnM.
Fie. fie ! bow wayward is this fiMifish love, [jg.
That, Idee a testy babe, will scratch tlie nuise.
And preseully, all humbled, kns the rod 1
How diurlisfily 1 chul Lncetta hehce.
When willingly 1 would hnve had her here I
How angrily I taudit my brow u* frown.
When iuwurd Joy enforu'd my lieart to smile I
My penance is. to en II Luceita beck,
A nd usk remission for my folly past :—
What ho! Uoetul

Ac-en/er Lnoetta.

Lac Wha: woukl yoor ladyship I

JuL Is it near dinner-tmie T

Luc 1 would it were ;

Tliat you might kill your stomach on your meat.
And nut upon your maid.

Jul What U*fyua took op

Shi gingerly T

Luc Nothing.

JaL Why dklst thou stoop then I

Lac To take a paper up th«t I h>t falL

JuL And is that paper nothing ?

Imc NtHhiu:; concerning me.

Jul. Then let It lie for thtiee that it ouuoenis.

Luc Madam, it will not lie where it ooucems.
Unless it have a fiilse hiterpreter. [rliynie.

JuL Some love of yours hath writ to you m

Lac That I might siiig it. madam, to a tnne^
Give roe a note : your ladyship can set.

JuL As little by such uWn as msy be possible :
Best siiur it to the tune of Light o' lave.

Luc It is too heavy for so Ught a tune.

JuL Heavy, belike T it hath some burden then.

Luc Ay; and melodMius were it, wookl yon

JuL And why not you T [sing it

Imc I cannot reach so high.

JuL Let^ atfi your song ;— How pow, minion t

Lac Keep tune tliere s* ill. s<»you will singit oat :

ndyet,methinks,l '

Jilt Tou do not T

Luc No, madam ; it is ttm sharp.

JuL You, minion, are too saucy.

Lac Nay, now you are Um flat.
And mar the oonooid with too harsh a descant :
There wanteth but a mean to fill your song.

Jilt The mean is drown'd with your unruly baae.

Lac Indeed, I bkl the bane for Pfoteus. ime.

Jilt ThM bubble shall not henceforth trouble
Here is a coil with proi eeution i— [ Tcffrs <As ^ittr



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