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td aend nn good shipping !-But who Is here ?
(T, Vlncentio ? now we are undone,
ad breast to aothing.
rim. Come hither, crack-hemp.

[Serimg Blondello.
BiM. I hope, I may chooM, sir.
rim. Come hither, yon rogue ; What, hare you



Bi^n. Forgot yon ? no. sir : I could not forget
me, ler I nerer saw you before in all my life.

riis. HTiat, you notorious villain, didu thou
never see thy roaster's father, Vlncentio ?

Bitm. What, my old. worshipful old master ? yes,
narrr. sir ; see where he looks out of the window.

Vii Is't so. indeed ? [ Brat. Blondello

Bim Help, help, help ! here's a madman will

Ptd. Help, too ! help, Ino' Baptlsu !

PH. Pr^hee, Kate, let's stand aside, and see
tiM and /thi cootTovetsy. [They rtttrt.

JU-orfer Pedant belotr : BaptisU, Tranio, aa^

ServanU.
Trm. Sir, what are you, that offer to beat my



darest.
Grt. Nay, I dare not swear It.
Tr*. Then thou wert best say, that I am not

Grt. Yes, I know thee to be signior Lueentlo.
B^ Away with the dotard; to the gaol with

rim. Thus strangers may be haled and abus'd
O aenstrous villain !

Blondello, r/A Lncentio and Bianca.

_ o, we are spoiled, and Y'onder he is ;
deny bim, forswear him, or else we are all nn-

*2i. Pardon, tweet father. [KnttUng.

,.|^ Urea my sweetest ton ?

r Blondello, Tranio, and Pedant ma /.

Hie.. Paldon, dear father. ^H-'^J'^'^i

a,^. How hatt thou offended ?

>VheTe Is Lueentlo ?

/,f. Here's Lueentlo,

Biiht son unto the right Vlncentio ;
That bare by marriage '-'
mine, . ,

While counterfeit supposes blear'd thine eyne.

/-.. Hrre-. oackinir. with a witness, to deceive



made thy daughter



Here's packing.



rin. What am I, sir ? nay. what *re yon, sir ?-
O Immortal god. ? O fine villain ! A Mlken douNe
a velvet hose! a scarlet cloak ! and a copatain hat^
_0, I am undone ! I am undone ! while I play the
good bnsbend at home, my son and my servant
tpend all at the university.

TV*. How now : what's the matter ?

Bmm. What, U the man lunatick ?

Pre Sir, yoe aeem asober ancient gentleman by
vow haMt.bM year tnrnU show you a n^'"";^
W, tir, what ceneerm It you. if 1 wear pearl and
eoM ? I thaak my feed fotb<
letait.



rin. Where is that damned villain, Tranio,
That Cac'd and brav'd me in this matter so ?
Bap. Why, tell me, U not this my Carobio ?
Bmn. Cambio Is chang'd Into LucenUo.
Lmc. Love wrought these miracle*. Bianea t
love
Made me exchange my state with Tranio,
Wliile he did bear my countenance in the town :
And happily I have arrivd at last
Unto the wished haven of my bliss :
What Tranio did, mvsclf enforc'd him to;
Then pardon him, sweet father, for my sake.

rin. I'll *lit the villain's nose, that would have
sent me to the gaol. ..... r _.: -

Bap. But do vou hear, sir? [To Lucentio.j
Have von married my daughter without aUing ray
good-will ?

rin. Fear not, Baptlsta;

But I wSl in," to be revenged for thU villainy ^^

Bap. And I, to sound the depth of thlt >^;

Luc. look not pale, Bianca ; thy fsther ill "<><

frovm. fKjmii.* Luc. and Bian.

Gr. My cake U dough : ^ut I'll in among the



I able to main



rill content you.



Out of hope 'of aUr-but my thare of the feaat



IKxii.



Aci5.



TAMING OF THE SHREW.



223



Petruchio and Katharina advance,

Kath. Husband, let's follow, to see the end of
this ado.

Pet. First kiss me, Kate, and we will.

Kath. What, in the midst of the street ?

Pet. What, art thou ashamed of me ?

Kath. No, sir ; God forbid : but ashamed to
kiss.

Pet. Why, then, let's home again: Come, sir-
rah, let's away.

Kath. Nay, I will give thee a kiss : now pray
thee, love, stay.

Pet. Is not this well ? Come, my sweet Kate ;
Uetter once than never, for never too late.

[^Exeunt.

SCENE 11.^ Room in Lucentio's House.

A Banquet let out. Enter Baptista, Vincentio,
Gremio, the Pedant, Lucentio, Bianca, Petru-
chio, Katharina, Hortensio, and Widow. Tra-
nio, Biondello, Grumio, nrn/ others, attending,

Luc. At last, though long, our jarring notes
agree :
And time it is, when raging war is done,
To smile at 'scapes and perils overblown.
My fair Bianca, bid my father welcome.
While I with self-same kindness welcome thine :
Brother Petruchio, sister Katharina,
And thou, Hortensio, with thy loving widow,
Feast with the best, and welcome to my house;
My banquet is to close our stomachs up.
After our great good cheer : Pray you, sit down ;
For now we sit to chat, as well as eat.

[Theij sit at table.
Pet. Nothing but sit and sit, and eat and eat !
Bap, Padua affords this kindness, son Petruchio.
Pet. Padua affords nothing but what is kind.
Hor. For both our sakes 1 would that word were

true.
Pet. Now, for my life, Hortensio fears his widow.
Wid. Then never trust me if 1 be afeard.
Pet. Vou are sensible, and yet you miss my
sense ;
1 mean, Hortensio, is afeard of you.

Wid. He that is giddy, thinks the world turns

round.
Pet. Roundly replied.

Kath. Mistress, how mean yon that ?

Wid. Thus I conceive by him.
Pet. Conceives by me ! How likes Hortensio

that ?
Hor. My widow says, thus she conceives her tale.
Pet. Very well mended : liiss him for that, good

widow.
Kath. He that is giddy, thinks the world turns

round ;

I pray you, tell me what you meant by that.

Wid. Your husband, being troubled with a shrew.
Measures my husband's sorrow by his woe :
And now you know my meaning.
Kath. A very mean meaning.
Wid. Right, I mean you.

Kath. And I am mean, indeed, respecting you.
Pet. To her, Kate !
Hor. To her, widow !
Pet. A hundred marks, my Kate does put her

down.
Hor. That's my ofHce.
Pet. Spoke like an officer : Ha' to thee, lad.

[Drinlis to Hortensio.
Bap. How likes Gremio these quick-witted folks?
Gre. Believe me, sir, they butt together well.
Bian. Head, and butt ? an hasty-witted body
Would say your head and butt were head and
horn.
Fin. Ay, mistress bride, hath that awaken 'd you ?
Bian. Ay, but not frighted me ; therefore I'll

sleep again.
Pit, Nay, that you shall not; since you have
begun.



Have at you for a bitter jest or two.

Uian. Am I your bird :> 1 mean to shift my bush.

And then pursue me as you draw your bow :

Vou are welcome all.

[Exeunt Bianca, Katharina, and Widow.

Pet. She hath prevented me. Here, signior
Tranio,
This bird you aim'd at, though you hit her not ;
Therefore, a health to all that shot and miss'd.

Tra. O, sir, Lucentio slipp'd me like his grey-
hound,
Which runs himself, and catches for his master.

Pet. A good swift simile, but something currish.

Tra. 'Tis well, sir, that you hunted for yourself;
'Tis thought, your deer does hold you at a bay.

Bap. O ho, Petruchio, Tranio hits you now.

Luc. I thank thee for that gird, good Tranio.

Hur. Confess, confess, hath he not hit you here ?

Pet. 'A has a little gall'd me, I confess ;
And, as the jest did glance away from me,
'Tis ten to one it maim'd you two outright.

Bap. Now, in good sadness, son Petruchio,
I think thou hast the veriest shrew of all.

Pet. Well, I say no : and therefore, for as-
surance.
Let's each one send unto his wife ;
And he, whose wife is most obedient
To come at first when be doth send for her.
Shall win the wager which we will propose.

Hor. Content : What is the wager J

Luc. Twenty crowns.

Pet. Twenty crowns !
I'll venture so much on my hawk, or hound.
But twenty times so much upon my wife.

Luc. A hundred then.

Hor. Content.

Pet. A match ; 'tis done.

Hor. Who shall begin ?

Luc. That will I. Go,
Biondello, bid your mistress come to me.

Bion. I go. {Exit.

Bap. Son, I will be your half, Bianca comes.

Luc. I'll have no halves ; I'll bear it all myself.

Re-enter Biondello.
How now ! what news ?

Bion. Sir, my mistress sends you word

That she is busy, and she cannot come.

Pet. How ! she is busy, and she cannot come !
Is that an answer .>

Gre. Ay, and a kind one too :

Pray God, sir, your wife send you not a worse.

Pet. I hope, better.

Hor. Sirrah, Biondello, go, and entreat my wife
To come to me forthwith. [Exit Biondello.

Pet. O, ho 1 entreat her 1

Nay, then she must needs come.

Hor. I am afraid, sir.

Do what you can, yours will not be entreated.



Re-enter Biondello.

Now Where's my wife ?

Bion. She says, you have some goodly jest in
hand ;
She will not come ; she bids you come to her.

Pet. ^Vorse and worse ; she will not come ! ()
vile.
Intolerable, not to be endur'd !

irrah, Gruraio, go to your mistress ;
Say I command her come to me. [Exit Grumio.

Hor. I know her answer.

Pet. What /

Ur, She will not come.

Pet. The fouler fortune mine, and there an end.

Enter Katharina.

Bap. Now, by my holidame, here comes Ka-
tharina !
Kath. What is your will sir, that you send for

me ?



thMa hlthar traiffat.

{Ejtil tiMhrmm.

Mur. Aa4 to tt U; I mmJm what it bodM.
PH. Mmrrj, fmem It boda*. aiMi 1, asd qait



Aa4.ib*ihOTt,lM

Bm. Now takr k^kl IhM. (ood PMrvebi*!
Tk waftr tkM kMt WM : M 1 wiU add

t tiMMaad CTOWM t



rr**ia

rat.



la dMMM. M dM kad Mvar kM
Nay. 1 wiU via wmf wagOT katMt :

i4ai VMM aad akadtaMS.



iNTwItlitkat

t



bMMa. Itoaw It mdar feat.
mmimas'jr^r tmf, Md Am

M aavar kava a caM ta ilgl
ta Mck a iiUy paai I

yeallMMtkli
MlbolUklaa:



Tka wUdai ar ar dat, <Ur BUaca.
Hatk ct n* aa koMira* aravw (taea



mmm. TkaiOTfctly.rl^hifaaydi
A. Katkariaa. I c kafga Ikat. tab tkSM ki

rkt diSr^Jwy d?a!w tkair laida ad k i k
Wtd. Camm, eomm. yvmf aaeckiag ; a will



Put. CaMaa. I ny; and nt bcia witk kar.
iru. SkatkallMC

A<. I tay, fka thall ;_bim1 flnt bcyin with her.
iTaO. Fj, ly* ! anknit that thraat'ning BoUnd

Amd dan not iromful glance* from thoic cjta,
Ta waiid th; lord, th; king, thj gortmot :
It Mat* thy bcauiT, a* frotU bite the md ;

thj tune, a* whirlwiads ihakc fidr



Aad tai acBa U maet or ainUble.

A womaa mor'd, U Uke a fountain troubled.



Muddy, iU-i
And, whUa It I



224 TAMING OF THE SHREW

PH. WkanlayOTriatar,Md Hirtiailii'i wite?
CaM. "nay alt eaalktrlac hj iha aariowr fir*.
Ad. O*. &tck ttaaa hitkar ; If^ay daqr to
omm,
Swla> aaa ikaaa a a d ly fbttk uto their haa-

haad*:
Away, I (ay, and bri^



j4d5.



ing, thick, beren of beauty :
o, Bone M) dry or thirfy
dain to aiy, or touch onr drop of it.
Thy kwibaad b tky lord, thy lift-, thy keeper,
Thy head, tky aavwalgn ; otie that cam for thee.
And for thy aaaiateMaaoa : coouniu hit body
To painful labour, both by aaa and land ;
To watch the Bight la atanna, the day in cold.
^Vhilc thou licit warm at home, iccurc and ufe :
And crarc* bo other tribute at thy handa.
But lore, fiOr looks, aad traa obcdicace :
Too Uttle payaaaat fcr to great a debt.
Sach dutr aa tha nkjact owoa the priace,
Bea aaek,* waaua awatk to ker kuabaad :
Aad wkaa dM^ ftwwaid, paaeiih, culica, aoar,
Aad aot obadlaat to ki* koaaat will.
What is ika, bat a foal oaateading rebel,
Aad grain law traitor to ker loTing lord ?
I aa aakaaa'd, tkat woaaaa art lo aimple
To oAr war, wkara tkey ikonld kneel for peace ;
Or aeok fta tale, aapicaBacy, and tway.
When they are boaiid to ier*e, lore, and obey.
Why ara oar bodlaa soft, and weak, and unooth,
Uaapt tototl, aad troaUe in the world ;
Bat tkat oar aoft coaditlona, and our hearts,
with our exiei nal paru ?



m, oaaM. yoa fhoward and unable wonaa
My Mlad kath baea as big as one of yours.
My koait as great ; my reason, haply, more.
To kaady word lar ward, and frown for frown ;
Bat aow, I aaa ear laaccs are but straws ;
Oar atnagtk m waak. our weakness past com-

TkaK aaeaaiiv to ha most, which we leau are.
Than Tail yoar rtooMchs, for it is no boot ;
Aad placa /oar hand* below your huiband't foot :
la tahea at which duty, if he please.
My kaad is raady, may it do him ease.
Ptl. Wky, there's a wench ! Come oo, and

klmme, Kate.
Lmt. WeU, go thy ways, old lad : for thou shalt

hat.
rim. TU a good keariag. when childrea are

toward.
Lme. Bat a harsh hearing, when woaica axe fro-
ward.

I>a. Coroe, Kate, we'll to bed :

We three are married, but you two are sped.
'Twas 1 won the wager, though you hit the whlM :
[To I.ucentio.
And. being a winacr, God give you good night !

[jrvaf Petmchio ami Kath.
Br. Now go thy ways, thou hast lam'd a curst



Lme. 'TIS a wonder,



by yoar leave, she will be
L Bxtnnl.



WINTER'S TALE.



Leontes, Kin^ o/Sicilia.

Mamillius, his son.

Camillo, ^

Antigonus, ( giciUan lords.

Cleomenes, I

Dion, J

Another Sicilian lord.

Rogero, a Sicilian g nthman.

An Attendant on the young Prince Mamillius.

Officers of a Court of Jaduature.

Polixenes, King of Bolicmid.

Florizel, hit son.

Archidamus, a Bohemian lord.

A Mariner.

Gaoler.

An old Shepherd, reputed father o/Perdita.

SCENE, sirmeiimes



REPRESENTED.
Clown, his son.
Servant to the old shepherd.
Autolycus, a rogue.
Time, as Chorus.

Hermione, Queen to Leontes.

Perdita, daughter to Leontes and Hermione.

Paulina, wife to Antigonus.

f"''^'''lL " '!"'P \ attending the Queen.
Two other ladies, J o



Do7crs',]"-i"-'^"-



Lords, Ladies, and Attendants ; Satyrs for a Dunce
Shepherds, Shepherdesses, Guards, ifc.



Sicilia, sometimes in Bohemia.



ACT 1.

SCENE I. Sicilia. An Antechamber in Leontes'
Palace.

Enter Camillo and Archidamus.

Arch. If you shall chance, Camillo, to visit Bo-
hemia, on the like occasion whereon my services are
now on foot, you shall see, as I have said, great dif-
ference betwixt our Bohemia, and your Sicilia.

Cam. I think, this cominij summer, the king of
Sicilia means to pay Bohemia the visitation which
he justly owes him.

Arch. Wherein our entertainment shall shame us,
we will be justified in our loves : for, indeed,

Cam. 'Beseech you,

Arch. Verily, I speak it in the freedom of my
knowledge : we cannot with such magnificence

in so rare I know not what to say Vi'e will

give you sleepy drinks ; that your senses, unintelli-
gent of our insufficience, may, though they cannot
praise us, as little accuse us.

Cam. You pay a great deal too dear, for what's
given freely.

Arch. Believe me, I speak as my understanding
instructs me, and as mine honesty puts it to utter-
ance.

Cam. Sicilia cannot show himself over-kind to
Bohemia. They were trained together in their child-
hoods ; and there rooted betwixt them then such an
affection, which cannot choose but branch now.
Since their more mature dignities, and royal neces-
sities, made separation of their society, their en-
counters, though not personal, have been royally
attornied, with interchange of gifts, letters, loving
embassies ; that they have seemed to be together,
though absent ; shook hands, as over a vast ; and
embraced, as it were, from the ends of opposed
winds. The heavens continue their loves !

Arch. I think, thtre is not in the world either
malice, or matter, to alter it. You have an un-
speakable comfort of your young prince Mamillius ;
it is a gentleman of the greatest promise, that ever
came into my note.

Cam. I very well agree with you in the hopes of
him : It is a gallant child ; one that, indeed, phy-
sicks the subject, makes old hearts fresh ; they,
that went on crutches ere he was born, desire yet
their life, to see him a man.

Arch. Would they else be content to die ?

Cum. Yes ; if there were no other excuse why
they should desire to live.

Arch. Ifthe king had no son, thoy would desire
to live on crutches till he had one. [Exeunt.



Enter Leontes, Polixenes, Hermione, Mamillius,
Camillo, and Attendants.

Pol. Nine changes of the wat'ry star have been
The shepherd's note, since we have left our throne
Without a burden : time as long again
Would be fill'd up, my brother, with our thanks ;
And yet we should, for perpetuity,
(Jo hence in debt : And therefore, like a cipher.
Yet standing in rich place, I multiply.
With one we-thank-you, many thousands more
That go before it.

Leon. Stay your thanks awhile ;

And pay them when you part.

Pol. Sir, that's to-morrow.

I am question'd by my fears, of what may chance.
Or breed upon our absence : That may blow
No sneaping winds at home, to make us say,
This is put forth too truly ! Besides, I have stay'd
To tire your royalty.

Leon. We are tougher, brother.

Than you can put \xs to't.

Pol. No longer stay .

Leon. One seven-night longer.

Pol. Very sooth, to-morrow.

Leon. We'll part the time between's then : and
I'll no gain-saying. [in that

Pol. Press me not, 'beseech you, so ;

There is no tongue that moves, none, none i' the

world.
So soon as yours, could win me : so it should now,
A\'ere there necessity in your request, although
'Twere needful I denied it. My affairs
Do even drag me homeward : which to hinder.
Were, in your love, a whip to me ; my stay.
To you a charge, and trouble : to save both.
Farewell, our brother.

Leon. Tongue-tied, our queen ? speak you.

// r. I had thought, sir, to have held my peace,
until [sir.

You had drawn oaths from him, not to stsy. You,
Charge him too coldly : Tell him, you are sure.
All in Bohemia's well : this satisfaction
The by-gone day proclaimed ; say this to him.
He's beat from his best ward.

l,eon. Well said, Hermione.

Her. To tell, he longs to see his son, were strong
But let him say so then, and let him go ;
But let him swear so, and he shall not stay,
A\'e'll thwack him hence with distaffs
Yet of your royal presence [to Polixenes. 1 I'll
adventure

Q



WINTER'S TALE.



Act I



Ttm htnam aim wtk. Wban at BobetnU i

Ym Ukm wo lord. 111 gi* Ma* mj commmioa.
T* M kl tiMn OMQlh. ImMmI tb* RMt
Pnfa^ fcr bk pwtiBd : 74. good dood. Uwitn,
1 ! thM M jw o* itao clock bthted
WhMt lady ibo bar lord.-Yooll tu; >

ft<. No, mad^in.

Hr. Ny. bat joo will ?

IVI. I mav not, varil;. |

mr. Vorily!
Vo pt aaoflTwitb Unbar Ta: Bat I,
Tho|b ;o wald Mok to wupbara tha tun with
MmwM yat m;, &I-. tm-g. Vtrily, [oath*.

Vo kball aot >o : a todi't varil; U
A potant M a lofd't. iV'ill }o go jet >
Paica mo to kaev ;oa a< a priioncr



Nat Uka a ga : m> joa thall pa; yomt feet.
Whoa yoa dayaw, aad aava jaor thuikk Hoi




Tobayt

Wbtcb la Ibc aa kaa aM} to coimait.

Thaa T0 to MaUb.

m*r. .Vat ymm foalar mi

Bm jam ktad tiaalaw Cma. HI onartlai
Of My le*d^ Mcka, aad jtmn, vbeo ;a




U'a vara, (air ^ao.



tfrr. Waa not my lord tba vartar wait o' tha two ?

fW. Wa war* m tvbmM Umb*. that did fiUk i*
tbatM.
Aad blaat tba om at tha otbtr : ^lut vc chanc'd
W la wo c a a ca Ibr Innocaaca : r kn not
Tba danrlaa af m-dolng . no. aor draara'd
That aaj dM: Had waii a a d that Ma.
And oar vaak qriiiis aa>cr baaa btgbat laar'd
With iiniigac Mood, a aboald bara amvcr'd



Itaiy oar.

JV*r. By tht wa gatbar,

Yoa bava iripp*d iac.

Ptl. O my mart Mcrcd Udy,

l>tmptatioas hava tincv than bcm bom to ns : for
la tboaa Bflodg'd day* was my wifc a airl ;
Yoar prarioas *alf had then not rroM'd tha ay
Of m; yoaag pUy-fellow.

JVrr. Grace to boot !

Of this make no coadiuiaa ; Ictt yam uj,
Vaar aaa a n and I are deril* : Vet, go an ;
7*ba oSknccs we hare made yoa do, we'll answer ;
If yea 6rst tlnn'd with as, and that with as
Yoa did coBtinoe faalt, and that yoa tlipp'd not
With aay bat with as.

Lum. Is he won yet ?

tttr. HaV May, my lord.

Limt. At my rcqoeat, be woald not.

H matu aa. aay daarcat, thoa nerer spok'u
To batter parpota.

Her. Na^er ?

linm. Nerer, hat once.

Bit. What* hare I twice said well ? when
wart bafora?

Crun OS with praise, f.d

: One good deed, drlng



A* &t aa



SUa^tars a thoatand, waiting npon that.
Oar pralae* re oar wages : You may ride us.
With one soft ki, a IhouMnd furlongs, ere
With spar we heat an acre. Bat lo the goal ;
My last good wai, to entreat his suy :
What WM my first ' it wa* an elder tiiter.
Or I mistake you : O, would her name were Grace !
Bat ooca before I spoke to the porpoM: : When ?
Nay, let me baTt ; I long.



Ltom. Why, that was when

Three crabbed months had sour'd tbemselret to

death,
Ere I could make thee open thy white hand.
And clap thyself my loe ; then didt thou utter,
t mm ytmrt for ntr.

Btr. It it Grace, indeed

Why, lo yoa now, I have spoke to the parpoaa

twice;
The one for rer earn'd a royal hosband ;
The other, for tome while a friend.

[GiitNir htr hmmi to PoJisenet.
i*. I oo hot. too hot : [Atidt.

To mingle Ariaadsblp f tr Moods.

I have (mnor (vrrfu on i; ilancet:

Batnotforioy.-oo(j< nment

May a <ra hoe pat on

From heartineta. tmm I >M>m,

And well become the ac .;rant

Bot lo be paddling pain _ finKcn.

As now thry are ; and iii. <.. , i u tis <1 \miles.
At in a looking glass ; and ilicn to 'iiih, as twere
The mott o' the deer; O, that i rntrrtainment
My botom Ukta not, nor my brows .Mamilliat.
Art thoo my hoy 7

Mmm. Ay, my good loid.

i>". Ifeckt >

Why, that't my bawcock. What, hast (mntch'd

thy note >
They say, 1ft a copy out of mine. Come, captain,
We miut be neat ; not neat, but cleanly, captain >
And yet the steer, the heifer, and the calf.
Are all call'd ncat.-Still virainaUing

[ Okttrt imc rolixanet oW Henniooc.
Upon his palm > How now, you wanton calf?
Aft thoa my calf ?
Mam. Yes, if yoa will, my lord.

Lm. Thoa want'tt a roagh path, and the thooC*

that I have,
To he fVill like me : yet, they tay we are
Almott as tike as etcg< ; women tay to.
That will tay any thing : I nt were they false
.K% o'er died blck. as wind, as waters ; falae
.At dice are to be wikh'd, by one that fixes
No boam "iwiit hit and mine ; yet were it true
To tay this boy were like me Come, tlr page,
l.ook on me with yoar welkin eye : Sweet villain '
.Mott dear'tt ! my collop '.- -Can thy dam Pmay't

be ?
.4ff^tion ! thy intention stabs the centre:
i h.xi ii...t niAe potvible, things not to held,

with dieamt ; (How can this

rral thoa eoactive art,
"thing: Then, 'tis very credent.
Thou uid>'st co-join with something; and thou

dott ;
(And that beyond commlstion ; and I find it,)
.\nd that to the infection of my braint.
And hartlening of my brows.

Pol, What means Sicilia ^

Her. He something seems antettled.

PpI. How, my lord ?

^"hat cheer ? how Ut with yoa, best brother ?

Hrr. Yoa look.

At if yoa held a brow of much distraction :
-Vre you mov'd, my lord ?

Lton. No, in good earnest,

How sometime* nature will betray Its folly.
Its tendemet, ard m \r il-elf a pastime
To harder ho<ni i the- lines

Of my hoy's tm : did recoil

T wenty -three ^ ' nyseif nnbreech'd.

In my green \< ji:> r n-.uzzled,

I.et it should ' lore,

.As ornament*
How like, mrt * kernel.

Th; ijua-^h. tl :.^:iest frirnd.

Will xou t^kc .

V.m. So, n

Leov. You . , . man ha hit doU

My bti,u.^i.



Mt



^/d I.



VVIN'rER'S TALE.



227



Are you so fond of your young prince, as we
Do seem to be of ours ?

Pol. If at home, sir.

He's all my exercise, my mirth, my matter:
Now my sworn friend, and then mine enemy ;
My parasite, my soldier, statesman, all :
He makes a July's day short as December ;
And, with his varying childness, cures in me
Thoughts that would thick my blood.

Leon. So stands this squire

OfRc'd with me : We two will walk, my lord.
And leave you to your graver steps. Hermione,
How thou lov'st us, show in our brother's wel-

Let what is dear in Sicily, be cheap :
Next to thyself, and my young rover, he's
Apparent to my heart.

Her. If you would seek us,

We are your's i'the garden : Shall's attend you
there ?

,eofj. 'i'o your own bents dispose you : you'll be
found.
Be you beneath the sky ; I am angling now.
Though jou perceive me not how 1 give line.
Go to, go to !

[AaUle. Ohservinp Polixenes atid Hermione.
How she holds up the neb, the bill to him !
And arms her with the boldness of a wife
To her allowing husband ! Gone already ;
Inch-thick, knee-deep, o'er head and ears a fork'd
one. i^JExeunt Polixenes, Hermione,

and Attendants.
Go, play, boy, play ; thy mother plays, and I
Play too ; but so disgrac'd a part, whose issue
Will hiss me to my grave ; contempt and clamour
Will be my knell. Go, play, boy, play; There

have been,
Or I am much deceiv'd, cuckolds ere now ;
And many a man there is, even at this present.
Now, while I speak this, holds his wife by the arm,
That little thinks she has been sluic'd in his ab-
sence.
And his pond fi?h'd by his next neighbour, by
Sir Smile, his neighbour : nay, there's comfort in't,
Whiles other men have gates ; and those gates

open'd,
-Vs mine, against their will : Should all despair,
That have revolted wives, the tenth of mankind
Would hang themselves. I'hysick for't theie is

none ;
It is a bawdy planet, that will strike
Where 'tis predominant; and 'tis powerful, think it.



Online LibraryWilliam ShakespeareThe plays of William Shakespeare → online text (page 49 of 190)