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1903


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SfR WALTER SCOTT.



Zbc Berber leMtion



WAVERLEY NOVELS

EDITED WITH

INTRODUCTORY ESSAYS AND NOTES



ANDREW LANG

Supplementing those of the Author.

JVi'/k Two Hundred and Fifty New and Original Illustrations by Eminent Artists.

BY the kind permission of the Hon. Mrs. Maxwell-Scott, of Abbotsford, the
great granddaughter of Sir Walter, the MSS. and other material at Abbotsford
were examined by Mr. Andrew Lang during the preparation of his Introductory Essays
and Notes to the Series, so that the Border Edition may be said to contain all the
results of the latest researches as to the composition of the Waverley Novels.

Complete i?t Twenty-four Volumes. Crow?i Svo, tastefully bound in greeti cloth, gilt. Price

3^-. dd. each.

hi special cloth bi?iding, flat backs, gilt tops. Supplied in Sets o?ily of 24 volumes.

Price ^4 4J-.

Also an edition with all the 250 original etchings. I?i 24 volumes. Crown Svo, gilt tops,

6s. each.

SOME ARTISTS AND ETCHERS

Contributing to the " Border Editiofi "



Sir J. E. MiLLAis, Bart., P.R.A.

Sir James D. Linton, P.R.I.

John Pettje, R.A.

LocKHART Bogle.

Gordon Browne.

D. Y. Cameron.

Prank Dadd, R.T.

R. be Los Rigs.

Herbert Dicksee.

M. L Gow, R.I.

W. B. Hole, R.S.A.

Ad. Lalauze.



Sir Henry Raeburn, R.A., P. R.S.A.

W. Q. Orchardson, R.A.

R. W. Macbeth, A.R.A.

J. Macwhirter, A.R.A., R.S.A.

Julien le Blant.

W. E. LOCKHART, R.S.A.

H. Macbeth-Raeburn.

James Orrock, R.I.

Walter Paget.

Sir George Reid, P. R.S.A.

Frank Short.

W. Strang.



Sir Walter Scott's Poetical Works. Globe Edition. Edited by F. T. Palgrave.

Cr. 8vo. y. 6d. xA.lso in Special Binding for Prizes, ^s. 6d.
Lockhart's Life of Scott. In five vols. 8vo. 3^. 6d. net each. (Library of

English Classics.)
Sir Walter Scott. By Richard H. Hutton. Cr. 8vo. Library Edition. 2s. net.
Popular PMition. is. 6d. Sewed is. (English Men of Letters Series.)



MACMILLAN & CO., LTD.. LONDON,



"The Bookman" Biographies.



A Serh's of Popular Illustrated Monographs on Great Writers.

With a Special Half-Tone Photogravure Frontispiece, and a wealth of excellent illustrations.

Price Is. net each volume (postage 2d.).



2.



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By G. K. CHESTERTON,
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Sir Walter Scott.



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By W. S. CROCKETT,
JAMES L. CAW,
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By G. K. CHESTERTON,

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EXTRACTS FROM PRESS NOTICES.

" Providing as they do brief, vivid and instructive impressions of men in whom everybody is interested,
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' ' The Bookman Biographies should be a great success. The books are very fully illustrated with excellent
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" Messrs. Hodder and Stoughton have had the happy idea of re-issuing some ot the literary biographies
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— Daily Mail.

"Comprises a vast amount of biography, criticism and pictorial illustration in a remarkable small compass."
— St. James' Gazette. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

London: HODDER & STOUGHTON, 27, Paternoster Row, E.G.




SIR WALTER SCOTT



rROM A PAINTING BY
JOHN GRAHAM GILBKRT.



Sir Walter Scott



BY

W. S. CROCKETT

AND

JAMES L. CAW



WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS



LONDON
HODDER AND STOUGHTON

27, PATERNOSTER ROW
1903



PRINTED BY

HAZELL, WATSON AND VINEY, LD.

LONDON AND AYLESBURY






LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



PAGE



Sir Walter Scott ..... ... Frontispiece

A MiNiAiTjRE OF Sir Walter Scott . 1

Sir Walter Scott's Great-Grandfather, " Beardie " . . . .2

Sir Walter Scott's Mother . . . . . . . .3

College Wynd, Edinburgh (Birthplace of Sir Walter Scott) . . .4
A Portrait of Sir Walter Scoit (by James Saxon, 1805) ... 5
Sir Walter Scotia's Father . . . . . . . . . 6

A Portrait of Lady Scott (Charlotte Margaret Carpenter) . . 7

No. 25, George Square, Edinburgh . 8

Sandyknowe Tower . . . . . . . . . . .9

The Grammar School, Kei^o . . . . . . . . .10

Waverley Lodge, Kelso . . . . . . . . . .10

EuLL-LENGTH PORTRAIT OF SiR Walter Sco'iT (by Sir Henry Raebum, 1808) 11
Lasswade Cottage ........... 12

Old Sheriff Court House, Selkirk . . . . . . . .13

No. 39, Castle Street, Edinburgh 13

AsHESTiEL (from a drawing by J. M. W. Turner, R.A.) . . .14
A Portrait of Sir Walter Scott (by Joseph Slater) . . . .15
Sir Walter Scorr (by John Graham Gilbert, 1829) . . . . 16
Sir Walter Scorr (by Sir J. Watson Gordon, R.A.) . . . .16

Abbotsford and the Eiij)on Hills , . . . . . . .17

Loch Katrine 18

Melrose Abbey 18



IV



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



The Chantrey Bist of Sir Walter Scoit, 1820
SiE Walter Scorr (by Sir Thomas Lawrence)

Rhymer'*s Glen

Finding the MS. of "Waverley'" .

Sir Walter Scorr (by Sir David Wilkie, R.A.)

Sir Walter Scott (by Andrew Geddes, A.R.A., 1818)

Sir Walter Scorr (from a painting by C. R. Leslie, R.A., 1824)

Sir Walter Scorr (from a painting by G. S. Newton, R.A.)

Sir Walter Scorr (painted for Mr. Murray by Thomas Phillips, R.A.



19
20
20
21
22
2S
24
24

25



1818)

John Gibson Lockhart, Son-in-law and Biographer of Sir Walter Scorr 25

Chi EPS WOOD CorrAGE ........... 26

A Portrait of Mrs. J. G. Lockhart ....... 27

"The ABBo-rsFORD Family '^ (by Sir David Wilkie, R.A.) ... 28

A Portrait of Scorr (by Knight, 1826) 29

AbBOTSFORI) from the SOITH-WEST ........ 30

The Entrance Hall at Abbotsford .'30

Sir Walter Scorr and his Friends (from a painting by Thomas

Faed, R.A.) ! . . 31

The Old Tolbooth Door at Abbotsford . . . . . . .32

Sir Walter Scorr (by Sir William Allan, R.A., 1832) . . . .32

The Library at Abbotsford ......... 33

The Study at Abbotsford 33

Sir Walter Scoit in his Study (from a painting by Sir William

Allan, R.A.) 34

Sir Walter Scorr (by Sir John Watson Gordon, R.A., 1830) . . 35

Sir Walter SWALTE R- S C OTT •/



(Reproduced from an etching l,y I). Y. Caincruii in Oeui-e G. Napier's
" The Homes and Haunts of Sir Walter Scott, Bart.," bylind permission
of the author and of Messrs. James Maclehose & Sons)



SIR WALTER SCOTT



home of beauty and song, with other dehghtful domains, all well
known to Scott but covertless enough in his day, are now fully
mantled in the glory of elm and oak, fir and beech, and rowan,
intermingled with copses of hazel and laburnum, wild-rose and
broom. Not, of course, that the country was a broad, bald stretch
when the Wizard was casting his spell over it. Tweed was a " fair
river" then also. And the beauty-spots of Scott's time abide the
beauty-spots still. But the by-past century on the Border was
emphatically a century of arboriculture, a revivifying of the time
when the colloquial name for the region between the Ettrick and
Tweed valleys was " the Forest," classic in history, and immortal
in the sweet settings of Border minstrelsy. With Abbotsford, too,
the neighbouring
mansions, many of
them, passed from
their priinitive shoot-
ing-box condition
into superb palatial
residences. Railways
have long interlaced
the wide Border, and
the most^ inaccessible
hill hamlets of Scott's
day are linked by the
telegraph-line to all
ends of the earth.
But the vexing, al-
most heartre n d i n g ,
feature of present-
day Border life is the
tremendous depopu-
lation of the outlying
districts. The Border
land question (the

subject is hardly con-

lined to the Border) a portrait of sir walter scott, by james saxon, iSos




SIR WALTER SCOTT




SIR
WALTER
SCOTT'S
FATHER

(Reproduced from

Lockhart's " Life of Scott,'

by kind permission of

Messrs. A. & C. Black)



is surely ripe for discussion. When is Government going to deal
with it ? And the settlement of the baneful '* led-farm " system,
that most aggravating curse of the Border parishes, unknown in any
great degree to Scott, should be insisted upon from landlord and
tenant alike. How deserted the glens of Ettrick and Yarrow,
and Tweed and Teviot, since Scott was their most familiar figure !
More than one-half of their peaceful, plodding populations have
gone to swell the big local manufacturing centres, as Hawick
and (ralashiels, and the already overcrowded and over-garreted
cities like Glasgow and Edinburgh. The spirit of Border rusticity,
as Scott gloried to live amongst it, has been rudely disturbed.



SIR WALTER SCOTT





1

A PORTRAIT

OF
LADY SCOTT
(CHARLOTTE

MARGARET
CARPENTER)
I

(Reproduced from

Lockhart's " Life of Scott,"

by kind permission of

Messrs. A. & C. Black)




^^^H^^'^^T*' ^^H^^H^^^^I


1

1



and a remedy might well be found against this continued
decrease.

Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey,
Where wealth accumulates and men decay.

When Walter Scott touched for the first time the land he was
most of all to adorn, and which was to be identified with his name
through the centuries, he was a child of barely three years — dull, lame,
and thought to be dying. It was to Sandyknowe, his grandfather's
farm at Smailholm, in Roxburghshire, he was sent to retrieve, if
possible, his little life trembling in the balance. Here he hved, for



SIR WAI/PER SCOTT




the most part, until his eighth year,
recovered his health, grew into a
fine fair-haired boy, and, above all,
caught, as no other did, the true
spirit of the scenes amidst which
he lived and moved. Had he re-
mained in Edinburgh he would
almost certainly have succumbed.
It was the happy thought of
Smailholm that saved him to his
family and the world. But it did
more. It gave the keynote to his
future. It made a man of him
in the best sense of the phrase.
What the boy felt in that first
consciousness at Smailholm never
left him all through life. It was
there that destiny began to work
itself out. From the " honour-
able humility " of Robert Scott's
" thatched mansion " he reached
the topmost rung of the Scottish literary ladder, and he still
stands, at the beginning of the new century, among Scotsmen
"first in Honour's lofty list." The farmhouse of Sandyknowe has
long given place to a more commodious dwelling. A small part
of the original wall is said to be recognisable in the stable and
cartshed of the modern steading. The true shrine, however, is
not the farmhouse, but the grey old fortlet of Sandyknowe,
strongly posted on its beethng crag, about a bowshot beyond. It
is one of the best-preserved feudal relics in the south of Scotland,
but, lying slightly off the beaten track, is unknown to a large circle
of Scott students. The lines descriptive of it in the Introduction
to Canto III. of " Marmion" are among the finest of Scott's word-
pictures :

It was a barren scene, and wild,
Where naked cliffs were rudely piled,



From a photo by John Patrick, Edinburgh

NO. 25, GEORGE SQUARE, EDINBURGH

The residence of Sir Walter Scott's parents shortly
after his birth in 1771



SIR WALTER SCOTT



But ever and anon between
Lay velvet tufts of loveliest green ;
And well the lonely infant knew
Recesses where the wall-flower grew,
And honeysuckle loved to crawl
Up the low crag and ruinVl wall.
I deeni'd such nooks the sweetest shade
The sun in all its round surveyed ;
And still I thought that shattered tower
The mightiest work of human power ;
And marveird as the aged hind
With some strange tale bewitched my mind,
Of forayers, who, with headlong force,
Down from that strength
had spurred their horse.
Their southern rapine to

renew.
Far in the distant Cheviots

blue.
And, home returning, filPd

the hall
With revel, wassel-rout,
and brawl.



The whole building is
suggestive of immense
strength. The assaults
of armed hosts and
Time's corroding
touches have left little
difference upon it.
Was ever scene so
grand and fair ! That
must be the reflection
of all who have gazed
from the summit of
Sandyknowe on the
majestic panorama
spreading far and wide




From a drazving by J. M. W. Turner, R.A.

SANDYKNOWE TOWER

(Reproduced from Lockhart's " Life of Scott," by kind permission ot
Messrs. A. & C. Black)



10



SIR WALTER SCOTT




THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL, KELSO

(Reproduced from W. S. Crockett's " The Scott Country," by kind
permission of Messrs. A. & C. Black)



around it. Scott
knew it well, and
brought many of
his friends in later
years to get into
raptures over it.
His last visit was
with Turner in the
autumn of 1831,
when the great
artist sketched the
place for a new
edition of the
Poems. As an
amphitheatre of
the most perfect
beauty, crowded with a thousand memories of the heroic and the
romantic, the view from Sandyknowe should satisfy all lovers of the
land of Scott. Close at hand are Mertoun's Halls — " fair e'en now "
— the seat of Sandyknowe's laird, son of the reivers, but bearing,

too, in his veins
the softer blood of
Yarrow's gentle
'' Flower." A
short distance
to the west the
Brethren Stanes
shrine their tearful
tragedy, whilst
legends of the
youthful Cuthbert,
greatest of Border
Saints, still linger

WAVERLEY LODGE. KELSO by thc haUUtS of

The residence of Miss Janet Scott llis bovllOOd

(Reproduced from W. S. Crockett's " The Scott Country," by kind t^ ■ i

permission of Messrs. A. & C. Black) ^ UrtnCr OVCr IS



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Sm WALTER SCOTT



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FULL LENGTH

PORTRAIT

OF

SIR WALTER SCOTT,

BY

SIR HENRY RAEBURN,



(Reproduced from

Lockhart's "Life of Scott,"

by kind permission of

Messrs A. & C. Black)




Bemersyde of the perennial Haigs, eternally fortified by the
Rhymer's couplet —

Tyde \\'hat may betyde,

Haig shall be Haig of Bemersyde ;

and away yonder are Dryburgh, its white monks long laid to rest, and
its bells long done ringing ; the Wizard-cleft Eildons ; INIelrose, " like
some tall rock with lichens grey " ; the storied vale of the Gala ; the
Ettrick and Yarrow landmarks ; and in the distance the grassy peaks
of Peeblesshire. On the south are the D union and Ruberslaw,
Penielheugh and Lilliard's Edge, Carter Fell, and the long wavy
outline of. the Cheviots. To the north " the grim Black Hill of



12



SIR AV ALTER SCOTT




Co wd en-
know e s "
(red enough
from this
aspect, how-
ever) senti-
n e Is the
Rhymer's
Ercildoune
and the
sweet pas-
toral haughs
of the Lead-
er. On the
east rise the
crags of
Hume, with
its disman-
tled Castle,

"stern guardian of the Merse," the Dirringtons, Covenant-haunted
Duns Law, and the open-spreading, cultivated, and fertile valley of
the Tweed. " Such," says Lockhart, " were the objects that had
painted the earliest images on the eye of the last and greatest of
the Border Minstrels."

More mighty spots may rise, more glaring shine,

But none unite in one attaching maze,

The briUiant, fair, and soft, the glories of old days.

Here, at Sandyknowe Tower, is the scene of Scott's first ballad,
" The Eve of St. John," written, it was said, to avert its demolition.
But that can scarcely be, remembering the exceeding strength of the
structure, and the utter needlessness of what would have been an
unpardonable vandalism. It has been suggested that Sandyknowe
might be purchased and put in a better state of repair by some such
body as the Edinburgh Border Counties Association, which has
already done admirable work in that direction, having annexed the



i.ASSWADE COTTAGE

Scott's country home during the early years of his married h'fe

(Reproduced from George G. Napier's " The Homes and Haunts of Sir Walter Scott, Bart,
by kind permission of the author and of Messrs. James Maclehose & Sons)



SIR WALTER SCOTT



13



Tower of True Thomas
at Earlston and John
Leyden's Cottage at
Denholm, and contem-
plating other com-
mendable schemes. At
any rate, the visitor
to Sandyknowe will
not depart disap-
pointed. In its bold
and rugged surround-
ings he may discover
a wonderfully correct
index to the deter-
mination and keen-
spiritedness of the boy
who gambolled by its
base, and as a youth
climbed to its highest
bartizan, and — last
scene of all — as a
white-haired paralytic
wept over the long-
dead days as they came
back to him here,
fancying himself once
more on the broomy
knowes of Smailholm
in the midst of the
thunderstorm and
lightning flashes, clap-
ping his hands and
crying in his ecstasy,
" Bonnie ! bonnie !
dae't again, dae't
again ! "



OLD SHERIFF

COURT HOUSE,

SELKIRK

Where Sir Walter

Scott sat when

Sheriff of

Selkirkshire

Fro}n a photo by

R. Clapperton,

Selkirk



NO. 39, CASTLE

STREET,

EDINBURGH

Sir Walter Scott's

town residence

from 1798, shortly

after his

marriage, until

1826

From a photo

by John Patrick,

Edinburgh






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14



SIR WALTER SCOTT




ASHESTIEL

Frovi a drawiftg-
by J. M. IV. Turner, R.A.

Scott removed from Lasswade

to Ashestiel in 1804,

and here wrote "The Lay

of the Last Minstrel,"

•' Marmion," and

"The Lady of the Lake"

(Reproduced from

Lockhart's " Life of Scott,"

by kind

permission of

Messrs. A. & C. Black)



Kelso, where some of Scott's happy boyhood years were spent ^
is only six miles distant. He was a pupil in the old Grammar
School, long demolished, close to Edie Ochiltree's prison — a vault
in the Abbey — which the blue-gown declared " wasna sae dooms bad
a place as it was ca'd." Many of the houses where Scott was a
frequent guest have disappeared, or, like Waverley Lodge, as his
Kelso home is now called, have changed beyond recognition. At
Kelso, Scott's Ballantyne comradeship began. Here he printed his
first ballad-collection — a mere pamphlet, indeed. Then the first two
volumes of the *' Minstrelsy " issued from the Kelso press in a
splendour of typography which evoked the highest admiration. We



SIR WALTER SCOTT



15




like to think of Scott's associations with this charming Tweedside
town — the " Queen of the Borders," and, as described by himself,
"the most beautiful if not the most romantic village in Scotland."
He had the kindest of friends at Kelso in his maiden Aunt Jenny,
and indulgent sailor uncle at Rosebank. It was from Kelso, too,
as a law-student on holiday, free for a time from the " dry and
barren wil-
derness of
forms and
convey-
ances," that
he sallied
forth to
Flodden, to
No r h a m
Castle, and
Berwick,
and as far
south as
B a m b o r -
ough and
Lindisfarne
— all after-
wards
shrined in
" Marmion,"
the greatest
of his verse-
romances.
Round
about Kelso,
he would be
quite at
home at
Ednam, the

birthplace of a portrait of sir WALTER SCOTT, by JOSEPH SLATER




^^W



* //



16



SIR WALTER SCOTT




SIR WALTER SCOTT, BY JOHN
GRAHAM GILBERT, 1829



the author of " The Seasons " ; at Yetholm,
the Gypsy Capital; at Jedburgh, Southdean,
Crailing, and Ancrum — names of stirring
note in Border history and romance.

Scott married in 1797, settHng down with
the prim but pleasant, if not particularly
pretty, mademoiselle with whom he fell in


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Online LibraryWilliam Shillinglaw CrockettSir Walter Scott → online text (page 1 of 4)