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^ LIBRARY '^

UNIVERSITY OF
CALIFOftNIA
SAN DIEGO

\» ■■'



51/



CHRISTIAN ADVENTURES IN SOUTH AFRICA.




i{i:v. wili.ia:m jayi.or.



CHRISTIAN ADVENTURES



SOUTH AFRICA.



KEV. WILLIAM ^YLOR,

OF THE INDIAN' MISSION DDNT^kNCE.



AUTHOH OF

" CALITORNIA LIFE ILLUSTKATEP," "ADDRESS TO YOXTNO AMERICA.

" SEVEN years' street-preaching IX SAN FRANCISCO,"

" RECONCILIATION: OR, HOW TO BE SAVED,"

"the MODEL PREACHER," ETC.



" St. Paul declared particularly what things God had wrought among the Gentiles
by hid ministry. And whan they heard it they glorifled the Lord. '—St, Luke.



ELEVEN' TH THOUSAND.

NELSON i' PHILLIPS, 80.5. BROADWAY
1877.



,„i \ju-,^v Printftvfi T.nniloii and AylesbUTy.



PREFACE.

rpHE numerous facts and incidents contained in.
this volume are illustrative, first, of the history,
extent, resources, population, and varied life of South
Africa ; and second, of Christian adventures in
South Africa, in great variety, through a period of
fifty years, but especially of the recent great work
of God in Cape Colony, Kaffraria, and Natal. I had
no '' guide books " from which to copy, but derived
my facts from their original sources. I am in-
debted for some historical matter to Wilmot's Esso//
on the " llise, Progress, and Present Condition of
Capo Colony,^' and to Rev. Wm. 8huw's very inter-



VI PREFACK.

esting workj Tlie. Story of my Mission, and for statis-
tical matter to the Colonial Blue Books, but tho
mass of my facts and incidents are fresh from their
original life sources, accompanied by the names cf
their living actors and observers.

THE AUTHOK.

London^ November ^Oth, 1867.



INTRODUCTION.



1. As this interesting and remarkable narrative
will probably be read by many who are but partially
informed respecting Christian Missions in South
Africa, it appears desirable to state, that, within
and beyond Cape Colony and Natal, four of the prin-
cipal English Missionary Societies, one American,
two Scotch, and five Foreign Societies, occupy
among them about two hundred and twenty-four
principal Stations, and employ above two hundred
and Seventy European ^lissiouaries, besides KV^ve



Till UTTRODUCTION.

Assistants. This appears to be a large supply of
]\Hnisterial Agency to meet the spiritual wants of a
population not exceeding by the highest calculation
much more than a million of souls ; and contrasts
strangely with the disproportionate number of ]\lission-
aries labouring in India and China ; but, on the other
hand, it must be kept in mind that this population
is widely scattered over an area of more than a mil
lion of square miles : rendering a larger amount ol
agency necessary than where the population is more
dense ; and, further, that many of the ]\Iissionaries,
acting as Pastors of European and native congregations
in the Cape and Natal Colonies, as well as in the two
Dutch Republics, are, to a great extent, supported
by local resources. The leading Societies have, of
late years, been paying special attention to the train-
ing of a native ministry, and with some measure of
success. Lleanwhile, the languages of South Africa
have been mastered : grammars and dictionaries com-
piled : and translations of the Word of God and of
other books have been executed with considerable
ability. A small reading population has been called
into existence, and the civilizing influences of Chris-
tianity have been widely spread. The AVesleyan



INTRODUCTION. XI

is ho that planteth anything, nor he that watcreth :
but God that giveth the increase." (1 Cor. i. 87.)

3. It is no disparagement of Mr. Taylor's ser-
vices, to apply to him the words addressed by our
blessed Saviour to the disciples " And herein is that
saying true, One soweth and another reapeth. I
sent you to reap that whereon ye bestowed no la-
bour : other men laboured ; and ye are entered into
their labours.'' (John iv. 37, 38.) The toilsome
and perhaps thankless labours of more than one race
of Missionaries had prepared the people to under-
stand and receive good from the ministry of this
honoured servant of God, and to God alone be as-
cribed all the glory. It is pleasing to observe the
cordial reception given by the Missionaries to this
stranger from afar, and their no less hearty rejoicing
over the results of his ministry. All human littlenesses
disappeared in the presence of these spiritual mani-
festations, which solemnly testified that Jehovah-
Christ was passing by ; " forgiving iniquity, trans-
gression, and sin." (Exodus xxxiv. 7.) Mr. Taylor's
unassuming manners, together with his scrupulous
delicacy in abstaining from interfering in matters
properly the exclusive business of the pastors and



X INTRODUCTION

error on the right side. The increase of the churches
in heathendom must, under such circumstances, be
very slow in the beginning ; but we must- not judge
of the success of such Missions by the paucity of
genuine converts. This habit of "numbering the
people," which was David's sin of vanity and self-
confidence, when applied to modern INIissions, is a
temptation to certain minds to despair. We forget
the " upper room '' and that " the number of names
together were about one hundred and twenty/'
(Acts i. 13-15.) Spiritual influence cannot be repre-
sented in figures. It baffles our arithmetic. Half
a century or more of preparation and labour may
present few converts in response to our eager inquiry
for results ; and then we are in danger of crying in
unbelief, " Can these dry bones live ? ^' At such a
crisis it frequentlj' occurs, that some man of God is
raised up " to prophesy upon the bones, and to cry
unto them, * O, ye dry bones, hear the word of
the Lord ; ' '*' and thus '' a noise '' and " a shaking,''
followed by the breath of the Spirit infusing spiritual
life into those who had been spiritually dead.
(Ezek. xxxvii.) In this mode of procedure, God
vindicates His sovereignty, teaching us that *' neither



INTRODUCTION. '»S

Mission, with which Mr. Taylor came most in
contact, occupies fifty- three Stations, employs
sixty-one ]\Iissionaries, and reports ten thousand one
hundred and eight church members. It is calculated
that nearly sixty thousand persons, including members
and scholars, are regular attendants on the public
ministry of the Missionaries of this Society. Other
Societies have equal reason, in the retrospect of their
labours, to thank God fe* the measure of success
vouchsafed to them, and to take courage for the
future.

2. Compared with the accounts of the success of
Romish ]\lissionaries in pagan lands, the results of
Protestant ^Missions appear t-o disadvantage. But
Popery is satisfied with conformity to forms and
ceremonies. The administration of baptism and a
professed assent to the creeds of the Church, are its
main conditions of membership ; while Protestant
j\Iissionaries are not satisfied without a reasonable
proof of genuine sincerity, and of the beginnings at
least of a spiritual work. It is possible that they err
on the side of scrupulousness, by requiring a higher
degree of kuowleJge and of raor^l progress before
baptism than is absolutely uecessar}' ; but this is an



XU INTRODUCTION.

church officers, contributed, no doubt, materially to
the ready acceptance and grateful acknowledgment
of his services. Ministers in general, honoured the
gift of God in him, manifesting, on this occasion, the
enlarged sympathy of the great Jewish legislator,
when he said : — '^ Would God that all the Lord's
people were prophets, and that the Lord would put
His Spirit upon them." (Exodus xi. 29).

4). No one can read the Notices of the Wesleyan
Methodist Missionary Society from October 1866, to
November 1867, and the Annual Eeport for 1866,
without being convinced, that, a great and glorious
revival of religion has taken place in South Africa,
among Europeans and natives, and not only among the
Methodist Societies, but also among other religious
bodies. The native work has partaken largely of
this blessed outpouring of the Spirit. Whilst be-
lievers have been strengthened and confirmed, the
careless have been quickened, sinners have been con-
vinced of sin, and have found peace with God. The
extraordinary nature of the work, the power which
attended the preaching, and its immediate results,
seem to have afiected even the heathen mind. It
appeared as if God were speaking to them in the



INTRODUCTION. XUl

words of the propliGt : " Behold ye among the lieathen,
and regard and wonder marvellously : for I will
work a work in your days, which ye will not believe,
though it be told you." (Habakkuk i. 5.) Revivals
of religion were not unknown in South Afi-ica, but
hitherto they had been of a local character ; this was
more general, and, is we trust but the beginning of
a great spiritual work which shall go on until the
most distant tribes and nations partake of the bless-
ing. South Africa is one of the most accessible
gates of entrance into a large portion of the conti-
nent. The prospect of extensive usefulness in regions
far beyond our present field, we regard as the justi-
cation of our large outlay on the comparatively
small population of the Colony and its adjacent
territory. Such were the views and the hopes of the
two great and good men who were the pioneers
of Wesleyan Missions in South Africa. They knew
that in their very nature they must be aggressive^
and that the Colonial and Frontier Stations were to
be regarded but as stepping-stones to the regions
beyond. Barnabas Shaw has gone to his reward.
William Shaw happily yet lives to rejoice in the
** showers of blessing " which have been poured out



XIV INTRODUCTION.

upon the thirsty land in which he laboured so long,
and with so much success. " A stranger " cannot
''intermeddle with his joy." (Provei'bs xiv. 10.)

Honoured and devoted men are treading in his
footstepSj and to them, with holy exultation, we
would say, " Beloved brethren, be ye stedfast, un-
moveable, always abounding in the work of the Lord,
forasmuch as ye know that your labour is not in vain
in the Lord." (1 Cor. xv. 58.)

William B. Boyce,

London AVesleyan Mission House,
November 22, 18G7.



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



THE AUTHOR, (FRONTISPIECE).

SPECIMENS OF THE KAFFIR FAIR SEX - 18

THE LION AND THE CHRISTIAN NATIVE 33

CHARLES PAMLA - - - . - ISb

INSTITUTIOM AND CHAPEL AT HEALD TOWN - 149

JAMES ROBERTS - .219

M. STUART TAYLOR - . 225

AMAPONDO - . - - 346

TSITSA FALLS - 370

WOMAN ROASTED BY WITCH-DOCTORS 43S

AMAZULU - - - -458

YOUNG GENTLEMEN OF THE AMAZULU » 467

JOHNNY DAVIS AND THE LION - . -477

TOM PALFREYMAN AND THE TIGER - - 482

REV. MK. BUTLER AND THE ALLIGATOR - 485
CAPTAIN NGOYA, IN NATIVE HEATHEN DRESS - 498



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

PROVIDENTIAL MISSION TO SOL'TH AFRICA.



Pair*



The author leaves California. Labours as an evangelist in
most of the United States and Canadas. Visits England,
Ireland, Asia Minor, Palestine, Egj^t. Labom-s nearly
three years in the Australias, New Zealand, and Tasma-
nia. Dr. James Brown. Dr. A. Sloffatt. Author's trip
to Wallaroo. Rev Mr. Flockhart. Startling telegram.
Glad tidings. Rev. Mr. Caldwell. Ilis imdpng energy.
His death. His widow. Rev. C. T. Newman. Evil
tidings. Church opening at the " Moonta." Hasty re-
treat. Voyage to Sydnc}'. Author meets his family.
Touching scenes. Watches a sick son at the gates of
death for many wearj' weeks. Returns to South Australia.
Sails for the Cape of Good Hope. Rev. James Calvert.
Safe arrival. Parkes' Hotel. Rev. John Thomas. Rev.
Bamuel Hardey - - - - - -1-11

CHAPTER II.

GAPE COLONY.

Synoptical Historj"- of the Cr;lony. Population. The Dutch.
The English. The Blalay.s. The Hottentots and Bas-
ards. The Kaffirs. The Fingoes. Government of the
Colony ....... 12-25



U CONTENTS,

CHAPTER III.

CAPE TOWN.



Fage



Its topooxaphy, surrounding scenery. Population. Insti-
tutions. Churches. Sir George Grey. Rev. A. Murray,
Junior. Historic reminiscences. Henry Reed, Esq. His
Malay hoatman. His detention in Cape Town. His ad-
ventures in Small-pox Hospital. Mrs. Gunn's boarding-
house. Reed's interview with Rev. Mr. Hodgson. The
native Christian hero and the lion. Author's first Sab-
bath in Cape Town. Sunday-school Anniversary. Mr.
Eilmer's speech. Special services in Cape Town, and re-
sults. Rev. Wm. Impey. Voyage to Port Elizabeth - 26-37



CHAPTER IV.

PORT ELIZABETH.

Rev. John Richards. Roman Catholic Church opening.
Independent minister installed. Too late for posters.
The chapel. Visit among the shops. Incredulous laugh
of the Local Preacher. Mr. Sidney HiU. Series of ser-
vices, with facts and incidents. Preaching in Couit-
house Square. Wayside illustrations. The old Galifor-
nian and his story. Joseph Tale, the tall Kaffir. Preach-
ing to the natives. Calls from the interior - - 38-47

CHAPTER V.

ITITENHAGE.

Jones's carriage and pair. Travelling companions. The
beard question. Captain George Appleby. Rev. Purdon
Smailes. Wool-wanhing on the Zwart Kops River.
Dutch RefoiTued Church. Rev. Mr. Steytler. A chapel
ready for the " moles and bats." Ser-vices in the Dutch
Church. Plan of conducting a prayer-meeting. The
dash of the Dutchman. " Satan is getting more polite
each day of our meeting." Preaching to the Kafirs in a
wood-shed. Post-cart travelling - 48-61



CONTENTS, m

' Page

CHAPTER VI.

geaham's town.

Uistoiy, topography, churches, population, &c. " Com-
immoration Chapel." Mr. AY. A. Eichards. Hon. R.
Godlonton. Rev. W. J. Davis. Rev. G. H. Green.
" Hor.se sickness." Opening of the campaign. Disap-
pointment of the fi'iends. Removing hindrances. Venti-
lating the chapel. "Brother Atwill." "The Apollos of
South Africa." " Caed mela faltha." Christian states-
men. The widow AylifF and her tall sons. " Old Brother
Sparks" -..-.,. C>2-U

CHAPTER Vn.

Graham's town (continued).

Review of the series of three weeks. Fellowship-meeting.
Rev. Mr. Holford. Illustrative facta and incidents.
Celebration of the Queen's buthday. " Mr. Taylor, I
have come to ask your pardon for what I have been
thinking about you." " The right impulse at the right
moment," Getting off the old Jewish track of "going
about to establish their own righteousness " into the only
way of salvation. The Sergeant's long struggle. Sudden

conversions. Sir D and the barber. Preaching

through an interpreter, ilr. D. Penn. Seventy miles
journey - - - - 75-87

CHAPTER VIII.

KINO William's toavn.

The old pioneer, Rev. John Brownlie. Wesle5'an Chapel.
Rev. J. Fish. A Colonial audience. " Bar of reserve
and prejudice broken down." The missionary's account
of the work. " A Kallir came running with the message
that four missionaries were in 'the path.'" Rev. John
Scott. Rev. Robert Lamplough, and his Kaffir pi-eaciiera.
Rev. Brother SawteU and his Fiugocs. Chaiies Pamla.



IT CONTENTS.



Page



lietter to Mr. Impey. Eev. J. W. Applfyard and liis
Kaffir Bible. George Impey, Esq., and liis dying tri-
umphs. Eev. Mr. Hillier, his success, his sudden death.
Mr. Joseph Walker. Kaffirs mounted on young bullocks.
Journeying incidents - - - 88-107



CHAPTER IX.

ANNSHAW.

•Chief Kama and his Kaffirs. Mr. Shaw's mission among
them. Eev. Wm. Sargent. Kama's refusal to take a
second wife. His piety and courage. Kaffir huts. " Bro-
ther Lamplough gave me Charles to interpret for me."
Private lecture on "naturalness." Lights and scenes of
the first service. Grandeur of the night service. Hymn
and tune put into KafiSr on the first hearing. " Don't
send them off to the river to battle with Satan alone,
and take a bad cold as well." Stirring scenes. Glorious
results. Mr. Harper. Trip to Lovedale. Eev. J. Wil-
son. Fort Beaufort. Good tidings from Annshaw.
Xiamplough's reports. Illustrative incidents. The hea-
then lame man. The old heathen convert and his two
wives. " Our last stroke is being levelled against Kaffir
beer." Witnesses for Jesus. How the deaf and dumb
testified. How the heathen try to explain it. Persecu-
tions - - - - 108-135



CHAPTEE X.

FORT BEAUFORT.

Population and Burroundings. Eev. John Wilson. Strong
force from Graham's Town. Specimens of the work of
the Spirit. " A sacrifice, indeed ? Why, it's a glorious

riddance ! " Mrs. D changed her mind. Jlr. James

Eoberts, a man of Providence for Kaffrarian adventures.
" Wars in the path." Missionary's report of the work as
" great and glorious." Work among the natives. " That
shawl! that shawl!" - - - -136-148



COXTETSTS. T

CHAPTER XI.

HEALD TOWN.

" Industrial School." Governor Grey. Kev. Wm. Sargent.
Eev. John Ayliff. Theological Institution. Rev. Wm.
Impey. Eev. R. Lamplough. Mission press. The mon-
keys by the way. Mr. T. Templcr. Barnabas. Siko
Radas. The marriage. The sermon. The missionary in
his report of that day says, " What a day ! I know not
how to record it ! " Second day greater than the first.
" I realized by faith, on that occasion, what I never can
explain." "If you know all this time that black fellow
going to hell, why you no tell black fellow till now ? "
Caring for the lambs. "Satan is conquered," &c. "My
Father has set me free," &c. Marvellous results. Con-
tinued progress. T. Templer's poem. Permanency of the
work -..-... 119-177



CHAPTEU XII.

SOMEKSET EAST.

Journey. Adelaide. Rev. P. Davidson. The Dutch " Nag-
mal." Benjamin Trollip and his son. Bedford. Mr.
Francis King. Rev. Mr. Solomon. King's advcntui-es
among the "Bushmen." "Dig away, you'll find plenty
of honey in there ! " "I was awakened by something cold
touching my toe." Rev. John Edwards. Rev. Wm.
Shaw. R. Hart, Esq. " Government Farm." Large
circuit. Mr. Nash. Mr-. Burch. Work among the
whites and natives. Remarlcablc naiTativc of missionary
adventures, from Rev. J. Edwards. Daniel, the Fingo
IVuphot -. - ... 178-191



CIUPTER XIII.

GKADOCK.

Mr. Sargent, senior. " Dagga Boer." The Trollip family.
The rebel Hottentots. Prejudices against i^js native races.



VI CONTENTS,

Page
KaflSr fidelity. ■ Dr. Adam Clarke's prayer. Rev. W.
Chapman. Cradock. Dutch farmers. Kcv. John Taylor.
Hon. Henry Tucker, M.L.C. Hon. Samuel Cawood,
M.L.C. John and William Webb. Mr. H. Park. Jack,
the Kafiir. The Gospel preached in three languages at
once. Glorious results - - - 192-205

CHAPTER XIV.

queen's town.

Journeying with Brother Tucker. Mr. Hines. " Tarkiss-
taat." Queen's Town. Rev. H. H. Dugmore. Governor
Cathcart's generositj*. Messrs. Shaw, Barnes, Elliott,
and Jakins. " Joyful tidings to write to my sister in
Tasmania." The blind widow and her sons. Dugmore's
preaching on " The American Preacher." Lesseyton.
Eev. J. Bertram. Wm. Bambana, "the head man."
" Dear me, this is horx'ible ! Hero are hundreds of thirsty
souls, and I can't teU them how to come to the river ! "
James Roberts. J\I. Stuart Taylor. Charles Pamla.
Tidings from Annshaw. Fellowship-meeting. John
Weekly. Wm. Trollip, twenty years a seeker, and
thii-ty years a Christian. A soldier's courage tried - 206-223

CHAPTER XV

KAMASTOXE.

Rev. Wm. Shepstone. ]\Ioonlight stroll with Stuart. KaSir
pony for Stuart. Description of the audience. Remark-
able scenes. " I never knew that I was such a sinner till
the Holy Ghost shined into me." "0, I felt nasty."
" Walked forty-six miles to get to this meeting." " She
seems to be a near relation to the antediluvians."
Perfect loyalty, faith, and love preached to Kaffirs. The
"ivy" and "niilkwood" illustration. Eflect of Pamla'g
address on Mr. Shepstone. Report of the numbei-s
saved. Great baptismal service for saved heathen. Mis-
sionary's report of progress. " mother, my dear
mother, I have found Jesus ! " - - - -22^-241



CONTENTS. Vll

Page

CHAPTER XVL

LESSEYTON.

Interpreter lost in the scrub. First night's ser^dce, and
lodgings with a native. Wonderful scenes of the next day.
A hcatlien woman shouting the pi'aises of God. The for-
given Kaffir who could not forgive himself. Bamhana's
two sons. " I went away and left the oxen, wagon, and
precious cargo standing in the road." " Wc have heard
of washing the disciples' feet, and of kissing the Pope's
toe ; hut to kiss the sole of a Kaffir's boot is a new idea."
" The milk is good, and you have given us a great feast."
Starting for Kaffraria. Dugmore's letters reporting the
advance of the armies of the Lord in Queen's Town,
Lcsseyton, &c. _ - - - . 2i2-250

CHAPTER XVII.



J. C. Warner, Esq. " British Resident for Kaffraria."
Warner and Shepstono on the true principle on which to
establish Mission Stations. ("Likaka laba Fasi.") Both
sides of the qucstiou fairly stated. Long day's journey.
Travelling in the dark. "A sudden jolt sent us both over
the ' larboard,' head foremost down the hill«" Rev. E. J.
BaiTett. Campaign of one day in the open air, and its
results. Chief IMatanzima among the seekers. Fellow-
ship meeting in a stable. The man who saw a great light,
could not pass. "The dcAal ordered his Hottentot servant
to make off with the goat to Kriclio's country." Colonel
Barker at the Tsomo. Captain Cobb. " The road rough
and dangerous." - - - 251-268

CHAPTER XVm.

BUTrEinVOKTU (iGEU-yA)..

Rev. W. Shaw. Rev. Mr. Shi-ewsbury. The great chief
Uiutza. " A cake of bread from the house of Kauta."



VUl CONTENTS.

Page
Conspiracy against Rev. John Ayliff. Revs. Davis and
Palmer come to his rescue. The "great wife" Nomsa.
"Sing again." "If he remains he might ti'amp on a
snake in the grass." Destruction and re-estahlishment of
the mission-station. Chief Kxielie. Great di-ought.
Protracted meeting of the rain-makers. " Xo rain while
the missionaries were allowed to remain in the country."
Davis took the bull by the horns. " Stop all this non-
sense, — come to chapel next Sabbath and we'll pray to
God to give us rain, and we will see who is the true God,
and who are His true servants." Station " destroyed the
third time. Chief Ivrielie's " daring desperate plan for
forcing his people into an exterminating war against the
Colonists." Sir George Grey's great bread victory.
Mission established the fourth time. Rev. John Longden.
Description of the congregation by the river-side. "What
has that old red blanket to say for himself?" "Loaves
and fishes" needed for the hungry multitude. "Brother
Longden told the father that if he meant to seU his
daughter to the heathen, he must at once leave the sta-
tion." The great snake-killer. He " chose rather to re-
tain his skull for his own personal use." Umaduna. "A
nxwtyr-spuit under a sheepskin." - - 269-290

CHAPTER XtX.

GLAKKEBXJRY (fMGWALl).

W. Shaw's visit to the great chief Vossanie. Rev. Mr.
Haddy. Mr. Rawlins killed. Massacre of Rev. J. S.
Thomas. Chief Vadana's expedition to seize Mr. Davis
dinner-pot. " Well, this is a strange thing. Here's a man
who is not a&aid to die ! " Rev. Peter Hargraves and his
wife. Rev. Edwin Gedye in exile. Mr. Joseph Walker.
Mr. Crouch. H. B. Warner. Great chief Ngangelizwe.
" They are determined to have a heathen chief to rule over
them, and I'll let them feel the power of a heathen chief."
" He threw an assegai through the arm of one of them."
" Go home, and sit down in peace, and take all j^our cattle,
I don't want thein," " The cavaliy of the tiain consisting



CONTENTS. IX

Page
of alout forty coimcillors, fell into line, single file, the
chief being ubout the middle." Prince Usiqukati.
Preaching to the great chief and his councillors. H. B.
Warner's appeal to them. Kaffir proposition to unite
Church and State. King Thackenbau of Fiji, and King
George of the Friendly Islands, — illustrative examples.
Rev. Peter Turner, the apostle. Pamla's grand talk to
the chiefs. Ngangolizwe's child dying. " The chief must
return to the Great Place at once." Striking testimonies
in the fellowship-meeting. " Isikunisivutayo." "My
heart was as tough as the hide of a rhinoceros." ]\Ir.
Wm. Davis, licv. Wm. Hunter, D.D. "The Eden
above." "Icula EHteta Ngelizwe eli Pezulu." - 291-321



CHAPTER XX.

MORLEY (iNGANASEUe).

Rev. Wm. Shepstone. The invasion of the bloody chief
Qeta, a deserter from his more bloody master Chaka, the
great Zulu. Shepstonc's narrow escape. The Amapondo
chief, Faku. Rev. J\Ir. Palmer. IMission re-established
under Rev. Wm. B. Rayner. "Smelling out." J. C.
Warner, Esq. on " Kallir laws and customs." Witchcraft
and the witch-doctors. Different methods of torturing
witches and wizards. Man roasted for thii-ty-six hours.
The ant-eaten woman. " We can't kill such a witch ! She
won't die!" Out-door preaching scene. Chief Ndunyela,
with his warriors and wives at preaching. How they de-



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