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Inhabitants of cities 1,963,800

Population belonging to wandering tribes 1,909,800

Inhabitants of villages and country districts 8,780,000

Total population 1881 7,663,600

By the same authorities, the number of Inhabitants in 1894 was estimated at about 9,000,000.

The total revenue in cash and kind in the year 1876-77 was 60,700,000 krans, or (1 kr. = 9£5d.)
£1,950,000. In 1888-89 it was 54,487,680 krans, or (I kr. = 7.6d.) £1,608,680. With the rise in the price of
silver, the value of revenue rose in 1890-91 to £1,775,000, and owing to the fall in silver the receipts for
1806-97 are estimated at £1,860,000.

The expenditure for the year 1888-89 amounted to about 50,100.000 krans: of this expenditure
18,000,000 were for the army, 10.000,000 for pensions, 8,000,000 for allowances to princes, 600,000 lor
allowances to members of the Kajar tribe, 800.000 for the Foreign Office, 5,000,000 for the royal court,
500,000 for colleges, 1,500,000 for civil service, 2,630,000 for local government expenses, 800,000 remission
of revenue in poor districts; the remainder was paid into the shah's treasury.

Besides wheat, barley, rice, fruits, and gums, Persia produces silk, the annual yield, chiefly from
the Caspian provinces, being about 606,100 pounds. About two- thirds of this quantity is exported.
The opium industry is on the increase. In 1870, there were exported 600 boxes of 150 pounds each ; in
1891, the export amounted to 10,000 cases, and is now estimated at 13,0**0 cases, the opium sent to
Europe bein^ " *- - *•• • * •* . . ~. . .. -. *. *._.. , .^

annually to t

POUndS, abOUt OUO-IUUU b\S UVriXtLFOkjr, miU IIIV3 ICUIOIUUCI U1IACU TTIUI X l4HkJOLl nUUIiVUICUJ VVf 1'1I»1<7«MX4W.

Persian carpets, of which there are about thirty different kinds, are all made by band, and the design
varies with each carpet. The export of these carpets in 1888 reached the value of £140,000, and is now
a little more.

The estimated value of the combined imports and exports is as follows ; in the absence of any
official records, however, the estimates are very uncertain :



Years. £ sterling.

1891-93 7,114,200

1892-93 6,710,425

1898-94 6.100,000

1894-95 5,870,375

1895-96 7,500,000



Years. £ sterling.

1885-86 7,500,000

1886-87 7,600,000

1888-89 7,080,000

1889-90. 7,272,700

1800-91 7,236,200

The Imports consist mostly of cotton fabrics, cloth, gla«s, woolen goods, carriages, sugar, petro-
leum, tea, coffee, drugs, etc. The exports principally consist of dried fruits, opium, cotton and wool,
silk, carpets, pearls, turquoises, rice, etc. Ihere are annually exported from Persia about 10,000
boxes of opium, valued at about £750,000.

Tne customs duties* uiv, for foreigners, five per cent, ad valorem, the value being the invoice
price plus the freight.

The monetary unit is the kran, a silver coin, formerly weighing 28 nakhods (88 grains), then
reduced to 26 nnkhoda (77 grains), now weighing only 24 nakhods (71 grains) or somewhat less. The
proportion of pure silver was before the new coinage (commenced 1877) 92 to 95 per cent.; it was then
for some time 90 oer cent., and is now about 89V$ per cent. The value of the kran has in consequem-e
much decreased. In 1874, a kran had the value of a franc, 25 being equal to £1; in December, 1888, a
£1 bill on London was worth 34 krans. In consequence of the fall in the price of silver, the value of
a kran is (October, 1897,) about 4^d., a £1 bill on London being worth 53 krans, while the average ex-
change for 1895-96 was 50.



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86



THE COMMERCIAL YEAR BOOK.



AFRICA.



EGYPT.




The area of
In Upper Eg:

S°Ai a . t fll a iL ( ^l WD i^i , r ,0I i;^ * ,j"if 25L D y. nationalities, tne number of foreigners in Eg __

Kni^m^iS^Sf 11 ^ it? 1 ! 5 Aurtaiang. &<fc; English. 6,118; Germans, »S;othw forei£S
nations, 4,116; total, 90,886. Of this total, nearly 90 per cent, reside in LowerEgypt.

The budgets show the estimated revenue and expenditures to have then been as folio* s :

&^—: **« « E -fe * E -lfe? «gaa

The table following: shows the amount of the Egyptian debt in January, 1897 :

Guaranteed loan. 8 per cent £« am Ann

Privileged debt, §H per cent UaS«2

Unified debt, 4 per cent Sw2K

Daira Sanieb loan, 4 per cent Titti'SK

Domains loan, 4H per cent .'......'.'.*.'. , .'.'.'. , .'.'. , .'.'. fcTS&OOO

Total £104,418,740



Crops.

About sixty per cent, of the area of Egypt is under cultivation. The agricultural year includes
three seasons or crops. The leading winter crops, sown in November and harvested in May and June,
are cereal produce of all kinds; the principal summer orops, sown in March and harvested in October
and November, are cotton, sugar, and rice : the autumn crops, sown in July andgathered in Septem-
ber and O tober, are rice, sorgho (a sort or malse). and vegetables generally. The total number of
date trees which yield fruit or seed is about 8,462,674. Cattle and farm animals, including horses and
camels, number 1,668,860.

Tnef ■" *



) following table shows (in feddans*) the area of the several crops in 1890 and 1891 :



Crops.

Wheat

Maize and durrah

Clover

Cotton

Beans

Barley

Lentils

Rice

M Helbe " (Fenugreek) .. . .

Vegetables, potatoes

Bugar-cane

" Guilbane " (chiohling
vetch)



1890.

Feddans.

1,166,676

1,669,906

876,761

864,809

628,211

466,075

77,216

148,095

133,484

37,244

66,505

32,211



1891.

Feddans.

1,215,841

1,580.983

820,263

871,241

643,751

460,330

75,756

167,164

139,660

84,542

64,539

88,702



Crops.
Watermelons, melons.

Lupins, smut

Tobacco

Peas, etc

Flax, henna, indigo.
Castor plant, sesame...



Total orops.
Area cultivated..



1890.

Feddans.

44,012

18,141

860

8,819

6,050

14.133



1801.
Feddans.
48,180
17.355



7.169
5,829
9.664



Double cultivation..



6.130,701
5,0tt,70l

1,106,000



6,145.849



The following table shows the cultivation of cotton :



1888.
1889.
189U.
1801.
1692.



Year.



Area Cultivated.
Feddans.
1,021,250
862,829
864.400
851,000
864,000



Yield.
♦Kan tars.
2,900.000
3,158,000
4.160,000
4,765,000
4,987,500



Produce per Feddan.
Kan tars.
2.84
3.7
4.8
5.5
6.8



The exterior commerce of Earypt, comprising imports and exports of all kinds of merchandise.
Is given at the following figures for six years:

* Feddan = 1.038 acre ; the kantar = 99.049 lbs.



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EGYPT.



87



Year. Imports. Exports. Totals.

1890 £E. 8.081,297 £E. 11,876,087 £B. 19,967,384

1890 9,091,481 13,341,818 22,432,799

1898 8,718,736 12,789,687 21,608,422

1894 9,266,116 11,883,621 21,168,991

1895 8,389,933 12,682,000 21,022,383

1896 9,828,604 13^82,000 28,060,713



The values of the leading imports and exports are shown below In £'s (Egyptian) :



Imports.

Butter, fresh and salted

Cheese

Clothing, ready-made

Coal

Coffee

Corn, wheat

Cotton yarn

Cotton manufactures ]

Flour, wheat or maize

Indigo

Linen, manufactures of

Linen, hosiery, drapery, etc

Petroleum

Rice

Sacks

Silks, thrown or yarn

Soap, common

Wine

Wood, for building

Wood, for fuel

Woolen and silk manufactures..



1896.
51,660


5.
24


B


67,608


18


O


162.837


19


O


404,578


84


O


266,850


01


H


60,412


97


H


130,519


24


O


,333,946


27


O


199,675


12


H


192,676


£9


Si


33,971


40


Vi


166,809


43




142,996


65




106.803


99




108,432


05




81,139


22




82,358


93




118,898


44




496,319


57




23,719


19





Exports.



is, untanned.
is, tanned....



1896. 1896.

469,482 413,415

89,466 58,818

118,245 3,614

9,463,498 9,986,861

61,508 64,214



33,864

41,492
159,244

11,268
472,968

52,525



32,659
56,571

128,740
6,276

765,172
68,123



Total 8,390,000 9,829,000 t.^? Total 12,632,000 13,232,000



1 he trade with the principal countries is shown as follows, in £'s (Egyptian) :



^^Z «. S - fi*!ZZ ' Imports f rom-



1890.

Russia... 328,683

Germany 64, 132

Belgium 112,775

United Kingdom* 3,111,686

France and Algeria. 804,154

Italy 232,018

Austria-Hungary 775,201

Turkey 1,633,987

India, China, Japan 588,161

Total, all countries 8,061,000



1896.
300,667
216,396
389,629

2,769.858
958,044
308,084
635,881

1,672,916
652,696



1896.

871,162

281,826

458,048

3,164,881

1,824,495

883,172

701,884

1,988,814

601,792



1890.

1,017,411

2,578

46,885

7.704,121

943,670

764,766

829,925

334,179

5,418



-Exports to-

1896.

1,252,854

394,916

46,194

7,321,425

1,088,312

437,599

527,519

344.450

102,284



1896.

1,473,080

325,928

25,972

6,981,607

1,215,978

370,906

610,981

885,561

81,298



8,390,000 9,829.000 11,876,000 12,632,000 13,232,000



The movement of specie has been as follows :



Imports. Exports.

1891 £E. 2,824,861 £B. 1,523,950

1892 3,826,393 2,048,474

1898 2,946,674 8,517,152



Imports. Exports.

1894 £E. 1,996,676 £E. 1,816,266

1895 4,819,265 2,322,190

1896 8,817,000 1,874,000



The trade of Egypt (and Tripoli) with the United States is shown as follows, for the years ending
June 80 :

1894.

Imports into United States $2,206,029

Exports from United States. 181,252



1895.


1896.


1897.


1898.


$3,719,238


$8,114,811


$7,146,243


$5,092,766


137,694


215,540


323,798


816,915



In 1896, the principal imports into the United States were: Cotton, unmanufactured, $5,129,266;
sugar, $2,657,426.

The arrivals and clearances of commercial vessels at Alexandria have been as follows ;



/ Arrivals >

Year. Vessels. Tons.

1890 2,019 1,632,220

1893 2,271 2,033,060

1894.... 2,375 2,221,145

1895 2,393 2,206,667

1896 2,132 2,123,591



Clearances »

Vessels. Tons.


2,020


1,613,800


2,233


2,025,438


2,397


2,201,885


2,339


2,194,964


2,105


2,094,684



* Includes British possessions in the Mediterranean.

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88 THE COMMERCIAL YEAK BOOK.



The Suez Canal.

The Suez Canal is 87 miles long- (66 actual canal and 21 miles lakes), connecting the Mediterranean
with the Red Sea; opened for navigation November 17, 1869.

The net tonnage for the year 1807 shows a decrease of 660,910 tons as compared with that of 1896,
and of 549,010 tons as compared with that of 1895.

The amount of dues has fallen proportionately from 79,669,994 francs in 1896 to 72,890,545 francs
in 1897, being a decrease of 6,739,449 francs.

The number of vessels which passed through the canal was M34 in 1895, 8,409 in 1896, and 2.986 in
1897, of which 2,818 in 1895, 2.162 in 1896, and 1,906 in 1897 carried the British flag.

The tonnage as well as the number of British vessels has decreased, having fallen from 6,062.587
in 1895 and 5,817,768 in 1896 to 5,319,136 tons in 1897 ; while for the same period the tonnage of German
vessels has increased from 693.645 tons in 1895 to 808,279 in 1896 and 858,685 tons in 1897.

The percentage of British vessels and their tonnage in 1897 was 63.8 and 68 respectively, as against
63.4 and 68 in 1896. There has been a slight increase in the percentage of German, French, Dutch, and
Norvreflriau. vessels

In the ten years 1886-95 the annual net tonnage ranged from 5,767,655 tons to 8,448,888 tons, and the
transit receipts from 66,527,390 francs to 78,103,717 francs ; the average of the net tonnage was 7,254^222
tons, and of the transit receipts 69,279,605 francs ; while in 1897 the net tonnage amounted to 7,899.373
tons, and the transit receipts to 72,890,545 francs. The mean net tonnage per vessel also rose from
1,860 tons in 1886 to 2,645 tons in 1897, being 134 tons per vessel In excess of 1896 and 185 tons more than
in 1895.

The mean duration of passage for all vessels navigating the canal shows a decrease from 18
hours 38 minutes in 1896 to 17 nours 44 minutes in 1897. In 1897, the percentage of vessels navigating
by night was 95 per cent., as against 94 per cent, in 1896.

The percentage of vessels drawing less than 23 feet declined from 62.80 in 1896 to 59.7 in 1897, while
vessels drawing more than 23 feet increased from 37.20 in 1896 to 40.3 in 1897.

The maximum draught allowed for vessels passing through the canal is 25 feet 7 inches, and 891
vessels drawing more than 24 feet 7 inches used the canal, as compared with 360 in 1896, 228 in 1895, and
172 in 1894, representing a percentage of 5.1 in 1894, 6.7 in 1895, 10 6 in 1896, and 12.1 in 1897.

There has been a very considerable decrease in the number of troops carried through the canal,
owing chiefly to the cessation of French and Italian military operations in Madagascar and Abyssinia
respectively. The returns show 92,639 military passengers in 1897, as against 198,520 in 1896.

In the year 1870, 26,768 passengers were carried through the canal ; in 1880, the number had risen
to 98,900, in 1890 to 161,362, and in 1&7 to 191,224.

Other particulars will be found in Volume III, pages 95 and 96, of the " Commercial Year Book.*



Post-Office, Railroads, Telegraphs. (Sec index.)



Monby.— For gold and silver coins, see Index.



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CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.



89



CAPE OP GOOD HOPE.



Area and Population.

The Cape of Good Hope, or Cape Colony, is a possession of Great Britain, having an area of
221.811 square miles.

According to the census of 1891. the total population was 1,627,224, of which 870,987 were Euro-
pean and 1,150,237 were native and colored. The population per square mile was 8.9.

Pondoland was annexed in 1894, with an estimated population of 200,000. Bechuanaland was an-
nexed in 1895, with an area of 51,574 square miles and a population of 72,736.



Fiscal Affairs.



The income and expenditure are shown as follows :

Revenue.

Tear ended Services Colonial Fines, Stores

June 80. Taxation. Rendered. Estate. Issued, etc.

1890 £1,774,352 £2,292,875 £319,198 £45,125

1892 1,748,924 2,342,709 346,915 56,796

1893 1,836,098 2,731,873 350.588 52,655

1894 1,951,652 2,894,577 »i3,772 121,361

1895 1,902,860 3,089,567 337,272 80.472

1896 2,418,024 3,927,267 375,146



Loans.

£1,141,857

1,075,523

1,474,985

300,000

26,441



Year ended Public

June 30. Debt. Railways.

1890 £1,068,280 £1,018,065

1892 1,166,368 1,219,655

1893 1,218,204 1,474,163

1894 1,561,932 1,666,261

1895 1,244,749 1,552,446

1896 1,243,808 1,780,176



Expenditure.



Defense.

£142,774
150,681
149,287
161,231
158,584
190,135



Police

and Jails.

£217,509

289,354

' 266,748

290,819

317,913

350,109



Civil Estab- Under
lishment. Loan Acts.



£128,624
131,975
182,347
135,557
140,448
149,798



£1,048,571

2,054,837

1,066,627

626,465

236,423

709,079



Total.
£5,571,907
6,670,867
6,446,149
6.621.852
6,416,612
6,808



Total,

Including

Other H'ds.

£6,327,496

6,371,230

6,734,508

6,823,449

5,388.157

6,360,404



Agriculture and Industries.

In 1896, 4,464 titles were issued, alienating; 3,174,408 acres of land. Up to December 31, 1896, the
total area disposed of was 126,145,704 acres, 60,858,616 remaining. There are 637 square miles under
forest. -i

Regarding the area under cultivation, there are no recent statistics. In 1876 the total was 580,-
000 acres, of which 18,000 were under vines.

The chief agricultural products for the year ending MaySl, 1897, were : Wheat, 1,954,873 bushels;
oats, 878,373 bushels; barley, 753,048 bushels; mealies, 1,002,827 bushels; Kaffir corn, 803,488 bushels:
rye, 253.407 bushels ; oat hay, 88,650,235 bundles of VA lbs. ; tobacco, 6,146.065 lbs. There were 84,592,579
vine stocks, yielding 4,219,952 gallons of wine, 1,397.880 gallons of brandy, and 2,019,261 lbs. raisins.
There were 8,615,700 fruit trees. The chief pastoral products were: Wool. 43,311,884 lbs.; mohair,
8,193,756 lbs. : ostrich feathers, 258,768 lbs. ; butter. 3,055,096 lbs. ; cheese, 99,265 lbs. There were 2,231.370
head of cattle, 357,960 horses, 75,112 mules and asses, 14,049,076 sheep, 6,033,188 Angora and other goats,
and 237,960 ostriches.

Tue sheep farms of the colony are often of very great extent, from 3,000 to 15,000 acres and up-
wards ; those in tillage are comparatively small. The grazers are, for the most part, proprietors of
the farms which they occupy. In 1875 the total number of holdings was 16,166, comprising 83,900,000
acres; of these. 10,766, comprising upwards of 60,000,000 acres, were held on quit-rent.

At the census of 1891 there were 2,230 industrial establishments employing, altogether, 32.735
persons, having machinery and plant valued at £1,564,897 and annually producing articles worth
£9.238,870. Among these establishments were flour mills, breweries, tobacco factories, tanneries,
and diamond, gold, copper, and coal mines.



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90



THB COMMERCIAL YEAR BOOK.'



Foreign Commerce.

Of the total imports in 1804, the value of £2,049,972 (including £289,451 specie) was duty-free,
while the value of £9,638,124 was subject to duty. The customs revenue amounted to £1,479,244, or
about 16 per cent, of the imports subject to duty.

The values of the total imports and exports, including specie, of Cape Colony and dependencies,
for the years named, were as follows :

Year. Imports.

1890 £10,106,406

1894 11,688,096

1896 19,094,880

1896 18.771,371

1897 17,997,789



Imported
Merchandise.


Exports.
£9,970,870


Exports of Colo-
nial Produce.


£8,470,650


£9,668,962


10,887,787


13,812,062


13,508.044


13,286,005


16,904,75(1


16,798,137


16,942,865


16,970.168
21,660.210


16,700,108



Leading Articles of Export ot Colonial Produce.

1890. 1892. 1893. 1894. 1895. 1896.

Wool £2,196,040 £2,029,093 £1,855,076 £1,599,632 £1,695,920 £1,874,566

Ostrich feathers 563,948 517,009 461,552 477,414 527,742 519.589

Hides (ox and cow) and

skins (sheep and goat).... 448,108 478.879 497,109 419,211 475,898 896JB16

-Copper ore 326,757 253,681 202,316 284,800 246,597 218,422

Hair (Angora) 337,239 373,810 527.619 421,248 710,867 572,230

Wine 19,587 18,645 18,964 18,908 20,289 21,412

•Grain and meal 14,605 7,689 7,313 6,154 6,529 1L244

Diamonds 4,162,010 3.906,992 3.821,443 3,013,578 4,775,016 4,646,487

Oold bullion 1,445,039 4,095,512 5,259,120 7,147,308 7,975,637 8^52,543

The total value (partly estimated) of diamonds exported from 1868 to 1897 was £83,807,087. The
gold given among exports is really imported from the Transvaal, though not included among imports.

The principal imports are textile fabrics, dress, etc., £4,962.210, and food, drinks, etc., £3,545,881
in 1896.



Railroads, Post-Office, and Telegraphs. (See index.)



Banking.



The following are the statistics of the banks under trust laws in the colony :

Assets and

* Including Head Offices » Circulation. Liabilities.

December 31. Capital. Paid Up. Reserve. Colony Only. Colony Only.

1890 £5,180,610 £1,558,612 £850,489 £740,210 £9,221,861

1893 5,862,090 1,555,953 770,000 615.320 9,668,086

1894 5,362,090 1,555,953 815,000 585,442^ 9,521,464

1895 7,189,090 2,382,003 1,006,837 612,266 11,864,152

1896 7,189,090 2,582,953 1.090,700 762,409 11,864,152

The money is the same as that of Groat Britain.



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NATAL— ALGERIA.



91



NATAL.



This colony of Great Britain has an estimated area of 20,460 square miles. The total population
as officially reported was, in 1879, Europeans, 22,654 ; Indians, 16,099; Kaffirs, 319,934; total. 369.687. In
1891, Europeans, 46,788 ; Indians, 41,142; Kaffirs, 455,983; total, 543,913.

The revenue and expenditure of the colony, exclusive of loan funds, in the years ended June 80.
were as follows :

1890. 1892. 1898. 1894. 1895. 1896.

Revenue £1,507,788 £1,392,455 £1,069,678 £1,011,017 £1,169,780 £1,457,338

Expenditure 1,444,964 1,280,964 1,099,858 1,082,373 1,148,093 1,282,484

The public debt on June 80, 1896, was $8,054,343.

Of the total area of the colony, 2,250,000 acres have been set apart for native occupation, 7,514,315
acres have been acquired bv grant from the Crown by Europeans, 1,158,138 acres have been sold on de-
ferred pavmenta, and about 1,000,000 acres remain unalienated from the Crown. Of the total area in
1898, 229,393 acres were under cultivation by Europeans, the leading: crop for export being sugar (prod-
uce, 1896, 110,839 cwt.), though large quantities of maize, wheat, oats, and other cereal and green crops
are grown. Tea planting has recently been introduced, 2,802 acres being under tea in 1896, the yield
for the year ended June 30, 1896, being about 793,100 pounds. Estimated total number of acres under
cultivation by natives, 633,926.

The coal fields of the colony, which are of large extent, are now in direct communication with
the seaport of Durban. The output for the year 1894 was 151,520 tons ; 1895, 160,115 tons ; in 1896, 216,106
tons.



The annual value of the maritime imports and exports has been as follows :



1870.
1880.
1890.
1891.,
1892.



Year.



Imports.
£429,527
2,338,584
4,417,085
8,535,831
3,165,249



Exports.
£382,779
890,874
1,371,240
1,480,606
1,480,606



Year. Imports.

1893 £2.236,738

1894 2,316.596

1895 2,460,303

1896 5,437,862

1897



Exports.

£1,242,169
1,197,611
1,318,502
1,785,375



About 70 per cent, of the imports are from, and 50 per cent, of the exports to, Great Britain.

The principal imports in 1890 were: Apparel and slops, £353.514; haberdashery, £413,716; flour,
grain, £527,204: leather goods, etc., £273,988; iron and goods, £570,218; cottons, £182,412; woolens,
£101,859; machinery, £367,870; wines, spirits, ales, £165,856.

The principal exports were: Angora hair, £24,925; hides and skins, £42,730 ; sugar, £22,376; coal,
£88,334; wool, £590,605; gold, bar, etc., £102,624; bark, £16,450.



ALGERIA.



The estimated area of this French colony is officially stated at 184,474 square miles, although
some of the territory is claimed by the nomad tribes. The following table gives the area of each of
the three departments of Algeria, according to the census of 1896 :

, Population s Population

Area. Civil Military per Square

Square Miles. Departm't. Departm't. Total. Mile.

Algiers 65,929 1,313,206 213,461 1,526,667 22

Oran 44,616 888,177 140,071 1,028,248 21

Constantino 73,929 1,671,895 202,611 1,874,506 23

Total 184,474 3,873,278 556,143 4,429,421 22

The total does not include the army.

Of the total population in 1891, there were 271,101 French, 47,564 Jews, 8.554,067 French Indigenous
subjects, 18,617 Moroccans and Tunisians, besides Spaniards. Italians, Anglo- Maltese, and Germans;
3,301,796 persons were dependent on agriculture, 494,435 on trade, industries, and carriage bv sea and
land, 66.075 on the public service, 83.893 on liberal professions, 72,759 lived on their means, 56,374 were
without profession or means, and 94,319 were of unknown or unclassed occupation.

The estimated revenue and expenditure, not including public debt, war and marine, for 1896
were : Revenue, 52,147,194, and expenditure, 71,219,959 francs. For 1898, revenue, 62,087,152 francs, and
expenditure. 71,147,857 francs.

A great part of the land is held undivided by Arab tribes. Most of the State lands have been
appropriated to colonists. The population engaged in agriculture in 1895 was 3,482,356, 205,642 being
Europeans. About 20,000,000 hectares are occupied by the agricultural population.



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92



THE COMMERCIAL YEAR BOOK.



Tn 1895-96, the the total yield of cereals was 16,577,589 quintals, of which 7,070,971 were wheat, and
8,412.263 were barley. In 1896, 122.186 hectares were under vintis, the yield being 4,350,120 hectolitres.
In 1895, 1,486,779 hectares were worked for alfa, 385,484 quintals being picked, in 1896, 22,073 quintals of
cork were sold, value 696,815 francs. There were 5,720,360 kilos tobacco harvested in 1895. Other
products are olives, dates, flax, colza and other oil seeds, and ramie.

In 1895, 17 mines were worked for iron, zinc, lead, mercury, copper, and antimony. Iron ore
extracted, 94,200 tons, value 722,430 francs; zinc and lead ore, 14,143 tons, value 482,225 francs.

Three-fourths of the trade of Algeria Is conducted with France and French colonies. The total
"special " commerce was as follows (in francs) :

—Total



1890.
1893.
1894.
1895.
1896.,



Year.



Imports.
260,090,131
231,406.103
259,300,000



Online LibraryWilliam Usborne MooreThe Commercial year book → online text (page 15 of 125)