William Usborne Moore.

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Articles. Europ

Butter cases. 6,338

Cheese do .. 1,881

Kice cwt.. 853,538

Beer barrels.. 4,629

Do cases.. 6,574

Salt fish drums. . 5,036

Flour bags.. 404,019



Trade with Other Foreign Countries.
Chief Articles of Import into Cuba in 1896.
-From-



Total
America. Value.
1319,700
323,673
2,807,481
83,379
43,090
686,000
4,285,622



54

44,358

23,800

2,860

2,044

79,621

100,321



-From-



Articles. Europe. America.

Coal tons.. 29,060 180,487

Potatoes... barrels.. 53,083 231,774

Maize bags 97,303

Lard cwt 194,308



Total..



Total
Value.
$2,085,370
996,702
467,049
2,078,811

$14,175,777



The trade of Mexico with Cuba during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897, was : Imports from
Cuba, 1363; exports to Cuba, 126,700. The commerce of the island with the principal European coun-
tries cannot be given with accuracy, as the various official statistics include Porto Rico in the state-
ments of trade— the figures for Germany comprising other Spanish dependencies as well. The com-
merce of the United Kingdom, France, and Belgium with Cuba and Porto Rico in 1896 was as follows
the figures for the United States and Spain for the same year being repeated for comparative pur-
poses:



Country. Imports. Exports.

United Kingdom $174,187 $5,843,892

Belgium 208,304 1,089.239

France 3,338,900 424.600



Country. Imports. Exports.

United States $40,017,730 $7,530,880

Spain 4,257,360 26,145,800



Railroads, Etc.



Name of Company.
, Caibarien



(From the "Railroad Gazette.")



Headquarters.
.Caibarien



Cardenas & Jucaro Cardenas

Cienf uegos-Santa Clara Cienf uegos

Cuba-SabaniUa-Maroto Santiago de Cuba.

Gibara & Holguin Gibara

Ciuantanamo Guantanamo

Las Tunas y SanctiSpiritus.. . .Sancti Spirit us.. . .

Marianao & Havana Havana.

Matanzas Matanzas

Puerto Principe Sc Nue vitas.. .Puerto Principe...
Sagua la Grande Sagua la Grande. .



United of Havana Havana. . . .



Urbano

Western of Havana.



Pas-



Length.




Loco-


senger


Freig


Miles.


Gauge.


motives.


Cars.


Can


37.25


4 ft. 8.5 in.


9


12


196


24.75


3 ft.


8


8


245


211


4 ft. 8.5 in.


49


40


1,130


64.5


4 ft. 8.5 in.


20


23


455


38


4 ft. 8.5 in.


4


10


34


18.75


3 ft.


3


4


16


22.4


4 ft. 8.5 in.


7


7


81


24.25


4 ft. 8.5 in.


4


5


37


9


4 ft. 8.5 in.


5


23


&>


170


4 ft. 8.5 in.


47


29


1,070


45.4


5 ft,


10


8


93


70


4 ft. 8.5 in.


23


21


546


»


2 ft. 6 in.


3





40


227


4 ft. 8.5 in.


78


89


1.819


11


2 ft. 6 in.


3


54




12.5


4 ft. 8.5 in.


11


67


5


no


4 ft. 8.5 in.


21


20


219



There are 2,300 miles of telegraph line with 153 offices. Messages in 1894, 357,914.



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558



THE COMMERCIAL YEAR BOOK*



PORTO RICO.



Area and Population.

In 1887, the population numbered 813,937, 300,000 of which were negroes. It has an area of about
8,668 square miles -35 miles broad and 95 miles long. The chief city, 8an Juan, numbers 28,414 inhabi-
tants ; Ponce, 37,545 ; 8an German, 30,146.



Industries.

Agriculture and lumbering are the chief industries of the island. The principal crops are
sugar, tobacco, coffee, cotton, corn, rice, bananas, pineapples, and many other fruits.

Gold, copper, and iron are found, as also a large variety of marbles, limestones, and other
building stones. There are salt works on the island of considerable importance.



Commerce.
Total Imports and Exports of Merchandise.



Calendar Years.



Imports. 'Exports. Expor

1887 $10,627,510 $10,610,091 $21,237,601



Total
Imports

and
Exports.



1888 13,886,034

1889 13,681,362

1890 17,592,322

1891 16,274,497



11,579,281 25,465,315

10,679,350 24,360,712

10,335.651 27,927,973

9,539,989 25,814,486



Total
Imports
and
Calendar Years. Imports. *Bxport*- Exports.

1892 $16,483,754 $15#S,o41 $31,fcr7,»5

1893 16,714,238 16,159,304 32,873342

1894 19,086,336 16,690,191 85,776 5*7

}«£ 16,835,453 15.245,639 32,081.092

1896 18,282,690 18,341,430 86,824,130

Annual average,
1892-1896 $17,480,494 $16,390,041 $33,870,535



Annual average, !

1887-1891 $14,412,345 $10,548,872 $24,961,217 i

Imports and Exports of Merchandise into Porto Rico During 1894 and 1895, Classified
as Agricultural and Non-Agricultural.



Imports.
-Calendar Years-



, 1894-

Per Cent.

Agricultural $7,683,416 40.26

Non-agricultural.. 11,402,920 59.74



Per Cent.
$7,171,352 42.60
9,664.101 57.40



Exports.*
- Calendar Years -



-1896-



t 1894

Percent. Per Cent.

$15,853,069 95.58 $14,573,366 95.94



733,642



4.42

100.00



617.490



4.06



Total $19,086,336 100.00 $16,835,453 100.00 $16,586,711

Commerce with the United States.

The total trade of the United States with Porto Rico is shown as follows :

Imports :
Free



$15,190,856 10O00



1891.

$1,856,965

1,307,155



Dutiable...
Total $3,164,110



$3,236,337
11,670



1893.
$3,994,673
13,950



1894.
$3,126,895
8.739



1895.
$375,864
1,131,148



1896.
$48,608
2,248,045



1887.
$101,711
2,079,313



$3^*48,007 $4,008,623 $3,135,634 $1,506,512 $2,296,658 $2,181,024



Exports :

Domestic.
Foreign....



$2,112,134
42.900



$2,808,631
47,372



$2,705,646
14,862



$1,820,219
13,341



$2,080,400
21,694



$1,964,850
24,«38



Total $2,155,234 $2,856,003 $2,510,607 $2,720,508 $1,833,544 $2,102,094 $1,988,8*8

The imports into the United States classed as agricultural and non-agricultural, and of sugar
and molasses, for u series of years, api>car below :



Agricultural
Years ended Imports.

June 30— Per Cent.

1888 &.5H5.677 99.I©

lss9 3.075.195 99.13

ls««0 4.035,863 99.56

181M 3,141,545 99.29

185*2 34331,115 99.48

Annual av'ge,

1888-1892 $3,693,879 99.37



Non-amicultural , Sugar-
Imports. Quantities.
Per Cent. Pounds.
$26,806 .61 115.654,059
32.178 .87 81,340,747
17.763 .44 76,926,934
22,505 .71 80,013,652
16,892 .52 80.474,547



$23,241 .63



86,881.988



Values.

$2,997,721
2.766^32

2,750,774
2.410.403
2,308,657

$2,647,957



< Molasses -^

Quantities. Values.



Gallons.
4,995.306
3,050,708
4,106,368
2,464.314
3,312,448

3,585,820



$1,0*5,554

MlM.473
(H4.921
861,079



* Including re-exports.



+ Domestic.



Digitized by LjOOQ IC



PORTO RICO.



559



Agricultural Non-agricultural , Sugar-
Tears ended imports. Imports. Quantities.

June 80— Per Cent. Per Cent. Pounds.

1808 $3,992,718 99.60 $15,905 .40 99,617,911

1884 3,122,046 99.57 13,588 .48 75,546,030

1806 1,482,171 98.38 24.341 1.62 56,352,954

1806 2,262,253 98.50 34,400 1.50 81,582,810

1807 2,094,319 96.02 86,705 3.98 86,607,317

Annual av'ge,

1806-1807 $2,590,701 98.67 $34,968 1.38 79,941,404



Values.


Quantities.
Gallons.


Values.


$3,228,933


2,502,666


$708,905


2,394,061


2,554,265


630,87a


994,084


2^277,346


460,120>


1,707,318


2,256,073


520,275-


1,577,911


2,639,134


470,532:



$1,980,460



2,445,897



$558,042



Imports and Exports in Detail.



Imports from Porto Rico.



Articles.
Free of Duty.

Coffee

Fruits, including nuts... .
Sugar and molasses-
Molasses

Sugar

All other free articles... .

Total free of duty.







Articles.






1803.


1897.


Dutiable.


1898.


1897.


$23,814


$22,489


Sugar and molasses-
Molasses






26,628


61


t
+$1,411


$470,63?
1,577,911




Sugar


708,905




All other dutiable articles.


12,589


80,879


3,227,522











7,804


79,161


Total dutiable


$13,950


$2,079,815






Total imports


4,008.623


2,181,024


$3,994,673


$101,711


Gold


6,625


24,15*






Silver


11,743


6,959



Exports to Porto Rico.



Articles.
Agricultural and
Products.
Breadatuffs—
Bread and biscuit.

Corn

Corn-meal

Wheat flour

All other



other



1893.

$22,768
14.614
43,065

733,308
23,301



1897.

$29,787

433

1,698

516.188

13,379



Total $837,056 $561,486 1

Fruits, including nuts 5,873 4,123 I

Hops 518 266

Oil cake and oil- cake meal. 129

Oils-
Animal-Animal & other. 300 454
Vegetable— Cotton and

linseed 2,763 166

Provisions, compris'g meat
and dairy products-
Beef, canned 354 192

Beef, xalted or pickled.. . 3,894 2,905

Tallow 778 256



Articles. 1898.

Bacon and hams $113,844

Pork, pickled 282,980

Lard 308,809

Oleomargarine 5,458

All other meat products. 10,895
Dairy products-
Butter 9,780

Cheese 28,721

Milk 544

Total $764,067



Vegetables -
Beans and peas.

Onions

Potatoes

Allother



23,685

44

1.559

681



Total $25,969

All other ag'l products 2,636

Total ag'l products. . . $1,639,301



1897.
$112,602
152,411
228,051

23,520>

4,009

8,022

729

$627,706



57,560

'sjdi

216

$63,470

3,029

$1,160,689



Commerce of Spain with Porto Rico.



1891.

Imports from Porto Rico $8^60,650

Bxports to Porto Rico 3,806,243



1892.


1893.


1894.


1896.


1806.


$4,428,891


$4,108,654


$4,164,964


$6,824,694


$5,423,780


3,929,186


4,653.023


5,535.027


8,572,649


7,828,889



Imports and Exports, by Articles.

Imports into Spain.
(Expressed in pesetas = 19.3 cents.)



Articles.
Leather, & manufactures of

Fruits.

Sugar

Oacao

Coffee


1893.
343,266

5,311,467
248,474

13,326,968
169,996


1898.

899,227

113,639

8,346.250

1,016,7H7

16,985,768

23i,576


Articles.
Special imports-
Tobacco—

Leaf

Manufactures of

Other articles


1893.

... 1,215,280
149,750
423,164


1896.

459,794

65,159

239,101


8acks and bags.


Total

Silver


... 21,288,365






27,857,292
28,346,749











♦See "Dutiable."



t See " Free of Duty."



Digitized by LjOOQ IC



560



THE COMMERCIAL YEAR BOOK.



Exports from Spain.



Articles. 1893. 1896. ;

Glass and earthen ware. . . . 143.214 81,510 '

Oils and paints 82,227 12931 j

Chemicals, medicines, etc.. 60,352 131,494 I

Soap 1,371,872 1,255,814

Wax and stearine 377,807 701,578

Perfumery* etc 274,696 307,104

Cotton, manufactures ot... 7,299,649 12,439,767
Flax, hemp, etc., manufac-
tures of 692,628 812,912

Wool, manuf actui es of 308,248 438,688

Silk, manufactures of 330,885 2*9,235

Paper in rolls 25,598 83,660

Writing paper 79,923 107,074

Books, music, etc 76,31 4 125,127

Packing paper 233,9»»7 350,560

Other paper 237,231 176,747

Wood, manufactures of . . . . 404,539 463,195

Leather 199,866 342,088

Shoes 3,907,360 5,380,740

Saddlery 106,512 105,120

Machinery and musical in-
struments 80,246 38,500



Articles. 1893. 1896.

Hams and meats, salted,etc. 34,668 110,312

Butter 160,763 233.916

Rice 101,403 2,652,611

Wheat flour 478,185

Beans 5?2,042 451,366

Other dried vegetables 155,532 141.826

Oil, common 877,213 1,302,075

Wine 605,523 603,461

Preserved food and pressed

meat ;.. 709,671 844,021

Chocolate and sweets 430,909 387,512

Soup pastes & biscuits, etc. 410,971 524,S46

Sandals 136,188 3,-601,380

Playing cards 41,315 69,0*5

Felt hats 1,426,640 829,446

Umbrellas 196,495 93,567

Other articles 1,893,522 1,736,826

Total 24,044,929 37,660,609

Silver 64,000 5,466,980



Imports and Exports with Foreign Countries.
Import* into Porto Rico.



From 1893.

Spain 15,012.408

United States. 4,397,614

United Kingdom... 2,177,004
Brit.po8S'ns,n.e.8.. 1,281,004



Annual
r-Calendar Years— v Average.



15,971,445
3,973,855
2,267,982
1,751,971



1893-1996.

$5,765,317
4,214,375
2.136,191
1,570,393



f Annual

•-Calendar Years-^ Average.
From 1893. 1896. 1893-1896.

Germany $1,148,437 $1,297,429 $1,370,633

British East Indies. 1,080,320 886,339 914,485
Cuba 699,622 692,719 703,134



Exports from Porto Rico.



To

Spain

Cuba

United States
France







Annual


^-Calendar Years-s Average.


1893.


1896.


1893-1896.


$4,035,847


$5,288,257


$4,122,757


3,754,160


3,873,632


3,903,086


2,588,256


2,552,174


2,630,877


1,686,877


2,608,002


1,892,293



Annual

/-•Calendar Years-> Average.

To 1893. 1896. 1893-1896.

Germany $1,866,895 $1,885,739 $1,679,701

United Kingdom... 522,999 139,430 727,730
Italy 585,900 1,024,096 666^23



The following table shows the quantity of coffee exported to various countries in 1895 and 1896,
and the value for the latter year :



Countries to which
Exported. ,

Spain

France

Germany

Italy

Cuba

United Kingdom...
Austria-Hungary. .
Sweden & Norway..



Quantities —



1895.
Pound*.
9,760,620
6,232,410
5,237,342
2,665,152
14.341,560
1,117,881

651,562
38,173



1898.
Pounds.
16,405,900
11,306,689
8,120,409
4,388.819
15,577.710
334,119
2,280,221



Values.

1896.

$3,734,195

2,573,549

1,848,310

998,951

3,545,688

76,050

519,008



, — Quant it les — .

Countries to which 1895. 1896. Values.

Exported. Pounds. Pounds. 1896.

United States 78,502 322,591 $73,426

Denmark 92,872

Netherlands 16,237

Danish possessions. 11,382 19.595 4,480

Brit ish possessions 452 103

Santo Domingo 23,501 5^49

Total 40,243,693 58,780,008 $13,379,089



Shipping, 1895.



^-Entrances.—
Ton-
Country. Vessels, nage.

Spain 150 —

England 109

Germany 50

France 44

Belgium 16

Italy »

Cuba 1J1

United States 190

Denmark

Austria

Dominican Republic 59
Colombia 2



296.424
135,349
79.495
55.908
12.751
4,537
180,772
182,165



20.103
1,341



-Clearances.— »
Ton-
Vessels, nage.
121 126,662
3 1,580
25 a?,740
48 65,926



8
262
284

11
5
60



8,139
358.427
201.051
4,686
8,513
21,594



Country.



Venezuela 25

Haiti 2

Argentine Republic. 1

Uruguay 9

Brazil 4

West Indies-
British 160

Danish 45

Dutch 7

French 30

Mexico



,— Entrances.— — Clearances.^
Ton- Ton-

Vessels, nage. Vessels, nage.



36.089

2,454

286

4,893

2,789

49,997

11,140

279

2,264



151

47

9

34

1



68



44.285

21528

505

U97

78



Total..



1,077 1,079,238 1,070 900^79



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THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. 561



THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.



Area and Population.

The Philippine Islands, the most northerly of the Indian Archipelago, embrace an area of about
115,000 square miles, and are bounded on the north and east by the Pacific, on the south by the Celebes
and Soofoo (or Mindoro) Seas, and on the west by the China Sea. The group consists of nine larger
and over 1,200 smaller islands, most of the latter being hardly more than Dare rocks of volcanic origin.
The larger islands, exclusive of Palawan, with their area and population, as estimated by Dr. Meyer
in 1871, are as follows :



Area

Sq. Miles. Population.

Luzon 4U21 4,640,191

Panay 4,742 1,052,686

Cebu 2,215 427,356

Leyte 3,502 285,495

Bohol 1,190 283,515



Negros

Samar

Mindanao..
Mindoro . .



Sq. Miles.


Population.


3,480


255,878


5,028


250,062


33,377


191,802


3,940


70,926



The total population is variously estimated at from 7,500,000 to 10,000,000.



Climate.

The climate of one region differs considerably from that of another, owing to the great distance
covered by the islands, though the general characteristics are everywhere tropical. The northern
islands lie in the regions of the typhoons. Three seasons are usually recognized— cold, hot, and wet.
The cold extends from November to February or March. The atmosphere is bracing, for the most
part clear and sunshine, and woolen garments can be worn with comfort in the mornings. The hot
season lasts from March to June, and the heat becomes very oppressive at the approach of the south-
erly monsoon. During July, August, September, and October the rain comes down in torrents,
flooding the lower country. The following meteorological record, iept by the Jesuits during eight
years, will give an idea of the temperature and precipitation :

Cold. Hot. Wet.

\r«««o S Mean temperature 72.8

ManI,a ""'{ Rainfall, Inches 8.6



r*»H,'. j Mean temperature 75.0

cebu 1 Rainfall, Inches 12.5

twit'oa j Mean temperature 86.9

1>arao 1 Rainfall, inches 16.6

o,.i„ j Mean temperature 82.0

Bulu » Rainfall, inches 15.7



87.8


84.6


10.5


36.0


86.2


75.9


9.3


26.9


88.7


87.1


39.3


32.1


83.0


83.0


33.8


35.4



Industry and Production.

The "Bulletin de la Societe de Geographic Commerciale" (Paris, 1897) says of the industrial
condition :

" There are about 25,000 Europeans resident in the islands, of course not counting the troops.
Some 12,000 are established in the capital, Manila. English, Spanish, and German houses are engaged
in trade, advancing money to the natives on their crops. Such business methods involve risks and
necessitate large capital in the beginning, but the profits are immense. The land is fertile and pro-
ductive, and lacks only intelligent cultivation. Abaca (manila hemp) is one of the chief sources of
wealth of the country. Sugar cane does not give as satisfactory returns, owing largely to the igno-
rance of planters. The average production is 178,000,000 kilograms (175,188.98 tons), while that of Cuba
is equal to 720,000,000 kilograms. The sugar goes almost entirely to Japan, England, and the United
States. It is of poor quality and very cheap. The cultivation of tobacco is one of the most impor-
tant industries, although it is capable of much greater development. The native coffee, although not
equal to the mocha or bourbon varieties, has a fine aroma. 1 1 goes chiefly to Spain. Cocoa trees grow
in abundance, and the oil is used for lighting houses and streets. The indigo is famous for its superior
qualities. The inhabitants are apathetic to a degree that is noticeable even in these countries where
every one is averse to exertion. The women have long and slender fingers, remarkably fine and sensi-
tive, and well adapted to their work. The hats and cigarette holders they make and the articles thev
embroider are models of delicacy. Cotton spinning and work in bamboo are among the chief in-
dustries."

Mineral. Resources.— The following memorandum is compiled from a recent report of the
U. S. Geological Survey. Only about a score of the islands are known to contain deposits of valuable
minerals. Grouped according to the character of the minerals, the distribution is shown below :



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562



THE COMMERCIAL YEAH BOOK.



Coal.

Luzon.
Mindoro.
Carraray.
liatan.
Rapu-Rapu.
Mas bate.
8amar.
.Semirara.
Kanay.
Leyte.
Cebu.
Negros.
3findaaao.

Gold.

Luzon.
Catanduanes.



Mindoro.

Samar.

Sibuyan.

Panay.

Cebu.

fiohol.

Panaon.

Mindanao.

Copper.

Luzon.

Mindoro.

Masbate.

Panay.

Mindanao.

Lead.
Luzon.



Marinduque.
Cebu.

Iron.
Luzon.
Panay.
Cebu.

Sulphur.
Luzon.
Billran.

Marble.
Luzon.
Romblon.

Kaolin.
Luzon.

Silver.
Marinduque.



Cebu.

Oil.
Panay.
Leyte.
Cebu.

Gas.
Panay.
Cebu.

Mercury (?).

Panay.

Leyte.

Platinum.
Mindanao.

Pfari r.
Sulu Archipelago,



Coal.— All of the coal is best characterized as a highly carbonized lignite. It is analogous to the
Japanese coal and to that of Washington, and it is stated that the native coal might supplant the
English or Australian coal for most purposes. Analyses of some of these coals show the heating
effect is about three-fourths that of Cardiff coal. The islands in which coal is found appear in ths
preceding paragraph.

Gold.— Deposits of gold are found in a vast number of localities. In most cases the deposits are
detrital, and are found either in existing water-courses or in stream deposits now deserted by the
cm rent. They are washed by natives, largely with cocoanut shells for pans, though the batea is also
in use At Paracale there are parallel quartz veins in granite, one of which is 20 feet in width and
contains a chute in which the ore is said to assay 38 ounces to the ton. This is hardly supposed to be
an aVerage sample. In the Island of Mindanao there are two known gold-bearing districts. The
product of one of these districts was estimated at 150 ounces per month, all extracted by natives
wii h bateas or cocoanut- shell dishes. The general distribution of gold findings appears in a preceding
paragraph.

Copper.— Copper ores are reported from a great number of localities. Some of the deposits are
worked by the natives, who employ an ancient process said to have been introduced from Chins or
Japan.

Fiscal Affairs.



Official statistics give the following figures
year ending June 80. 1807 :

Income.

Contribution direct $3,498,170.00

Oistoms receipts 8.200,560.00

Monopolies, opium, etc 1,222,000.00

Lotteries. 1,000,000.00

Kent for Government property 257,100.00

Miscellaneous * 296,800.00



Total HM74.020.00



as the revenue for Philippine Islands for ths 1

Expenditures.
Obligation general (bonds Spanish

Government, etc.) 91,607,0

Estado (State) 74,000.00

Gracia y Justicia (charity & justice) . 1,896^877.71

War (army) 8,042,449.43

Haciendo (interior) 1,898,184-68

Navy 8^568,628^6

Gobernacion (government) 2,198,85' .OS

Fomento (school and education) 615,198.74

Total $17,200,887 Ji

Deductions 85,7*7.61

„ Total.. $17.258,146J»

Excess of increase 21&£78u00



Foreign Commerce.

The following table shows the volume of trade of the islands, reduced to American currency,
for representative years from 1810 to 1894 :







Excess of








Excess of








Exports








Exports








over








over


Calendar Years.


Imports.

$5,488,870


Exports.
$4,038,850


T ts.


Calendar Years.


Imports.
$13,552,159






1810


920


1887


l


I


1841


3,200,667


4,522,960


883


1888


16,413,338




\


1851


4,224,986


4,384,772


T86


1889


17.236,256




t


1856


7,348,704


9,728,928


224


1890


15,884.060




\


1861


11,325,864


8,444.055


909


1891


16,798,289






1865


18,781,370


21,999,532


162


1892


16,314,901




>


1870


24,510,600


29,204,000


WO


1893


15,890.502






1873


13,482,103


17,088.686


(93


1894


14,250,717




i


1875 . .........


11,921,840
22,937,815


17,817,856
21,105.000


316
815


Annual average,
1880-1884


19,500,274


20,838,325




1880


1,338461


1H81


18,491,717


21,875.312


596


Annual average,








1882


18,964.602


18,440,316


286


1885-1889


15,789,165


20,991,265


S^OEUOO


18X3


18,559,270


22,977,613


343


Annual average.








1884


18,547,968


19,793,383


415


1890-1894


15,827,694


19,751.293


a,ttS5U»


|8K r >


16.046,519


20,551.434


015


Annual average.








1886


15,697,554


20,113,847


293


1880-1894


17,039,044


20,526,961


3,487,917





* Excess of imports over exports.



Digitized by



Google



TBE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.



563



Exports in 1897.



Hemp '60

Sugar WO

Copra 00

Tobacco leaf XX)

Cigars «0

Various articles. BO

Indigo )00

Coffee 100



Rope 163,400

Sibuoao, dyewood 40,100

Gums. 47,500

Skins for glue 38,900

Mother-of-pearl shells 27,800

Total 141,842,280



Imports in 1897.



Woven fancy goods (ginghams, grand-
vills, muslins, regattas, trouserings,
etc.) £880,000

Printed goods (prints, printed gran-
dines, etc.)

Yarns and sewing thread

Ironware, hollow ware, and fancy arti-
cles, known in China trade as " muck
and truck "



270,000
180,000



280,000



Skirtings, gray cloths, drills (white and

twills), crydons, etc £300,000

Imports from Hong Kong 800,000



Total £1,610,000

Say, in Mexican money. 116,100,000



Coal imports amounted to about 90,000 tons.

Petroleum imports amounted to about 114,380 cases.

The average value of coal in Manila Is $10 a ton, which would make this item 1900,000. Petroleum
is worth on an average S3 a case, or $842,990. Adding these two items to the estimated table of imports
gives a total of $17,342,990.

Imports and Exports, 1897, by Countries.



Countries. Imports. Exports.

Great Britain $6,223,436 $2,063,598

France* 1,990,297 359,796

Germany* 228.720 774,928

Belgium* 272,240 45,660

Spain t 4,819,344 4,978,589

Japan 1,332,300 92.823

China 56,187 97,717



Countries. Imports. Exports.

India* $7,755 fe),156

Straits Sett lements * 274,180 236,001

New South Wales 119,550 176,858

Victoria* 180 178,370



Online LibraryWilliam Usborne MooreThe Commercial year book → online text (page 95 of 125)