Copyright
William W Backus.

A genealogical memoir of the Backus family, with the private journal of James Backus, together with his correspondence bearing on the first settlement of Ohio, at Marietta, in 1788. Also, papers and correspondence of Elijah Backus, showing the character and spirit of the times during the revolutiona online

. (page 1 of 27)
Online LibraryWilliam W BackusA genealogical memoir of the Backus family, with the private journal of James Backus, together with his correspondence bearing on the first settlement of Ohio, at Marietta, in 1788. Also, papers and correspondence of Elijah Backus, showing the character and spirit of the times during the revolutiona → online text (page 1 of 27)
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Genealogical Memoir



Ol- IIIK



BACKUS FAMILY



Willi



THE PRIVATE JOURNAL OF JAMES BACKUS, TOGETHER

WITH HIS CORRESPONDENCE BEARING ON THE

FIRST SETTLEMENT OF OHIO, AT

MARIETTA, IN lySS.



ALSO,



J/^-



Papers and Correspondence of Elijah Backus,

SHOWING THK CHARACTER AND SPlKIl' OI' WW. IIMES
DlKINr, I UK RKVOU'TIONARY rKRIOlJ.



IN TWO PARTS :

Part I. Genealogical, including jDunml of James Backi s, and

Poems l)y Miss Sakah Backls.
Part II. Historical, containint( Sketches of the First Settlements

of Connecticut and Ohio, with Miscellaneous Papers of

Historic Interest.

BY

WII.IJAW VV. BACKUS.

o-RWICH. CON^/.T/?£SSOFTAjrBULlErX/V.Cor[
^ 1889. -^

A\f'€



I



CS7/



^fe.



- •-



PRESS OF I (j")

THE BULIETIN CO., S=-

85 ¥A-N ST., /-,

VJ.' . NORWICH, CONN. ^ ^



< I'/U'r/'t,'/!/, /AV/<>, />y l\'i/f/,nn 11 ' /Uu/:us.



J

>



PREFACE.



This little volume, although primarily a family memorial, will never-
theless be interesting to the general reader, from the fact that many let-
ters, documents and other articles are inserted, illustrating the spirit and
character of the times in which they were written. Of these, the private
journal and correspondence of James Backus is, perhaps, the most instruc-
tive and interesting. The journal, with a few breaks, covers a period of
about three years, and was written on the spot where occurred one of
the most important events in the country's history, — the settlement of
I Ohio, at Marietta, April 7, 1788. The journal, and also the correspond-
', ence, is full of interesting facts connected with this event, James Backus
I being one of the first settlers. The papers of Elijah Backus, bearing
on another critical time in the country's history — the period of the
Revolution and the period just before — is also very interesting. We
see by these papers the character of the people who secured for us our
independence, and the trying times through wliich they passed, Elijah
i'ackus seems to have been very active at that time, and his i)apers
throw a strong light on the character of the people and the times.

These papers have been lying idle for a hundred years and more,
I and it is one of the objects of printing this book to preserve and make
]iublic these records, which, although they may not give any new points
on the history of the country, yet may serve to corroborate the statements
of other historians, and serve to fix some of the uncertain points.

As a family memorial, this volume does not pretend to be exhaustive.
In fact, within the limits of this little book it would be impossible to
even mention ever)' member of so large and widely a scattered family So
it has been thought best to follow the Norwich branch, that of the sec-
ond William. Of his two children who settled in Norwich, we have
followed only the line of Joseph,



PRKFAC^E.



The famUv. in a., i.s Inand.e. i,as l.ac. many .llu.nous rep escnU
.ivc ana all ^.cn. to l.ave been active, cne.getic. patnot.c c.t..en.. ^U
f T'.hent as Justices of .he Peace, Collectors of Customs Judges, etc.
r^^ili H.ca. Cces .ere much more ^ "^^ of cWacter thar
now >.hen the laws once made were enforced, and a dead letter aw
2, :Iuown. Of clergymen, there were a numher in th. f^m . a,.
.„ iere much interested in the church, contribut.n« largely to . ^
,..,. The family was well represented in the army, and on the d.lTe^n
Llmittees for caring f-r the safety and .elfare of t e tow. J
founder of .he family in this country was a p.oneer, and .n h -
Kcnera.ion was ano.her, James Backus. This .s a th.ng wh.ch .s not th
^ood fortune of every one to be. and especially for so young a ma
wa, lames Hackus. The f.rst settlers of Ohio were men of a h,gl. cha,
acter. and .nen of fixed civil and religious principles, and most were .
,he prime of life or beyond. James Hackus was probably the younges

beine only iwen.yfour.

There is a l.lUe uncertainly connected with the original place m hnj
bud from which this family came. We have followed the generally a.
teptcd tradition, which undoubtedly is correct.

Of the books which bear on the history of the times which is cove
e.l in the present volume, the following which we have consulted w,
prove in.eres.ing- Miss Caulkins' - History of Norwich." Black's " Slo,
of Ohio." •• History of New London County," "Magazine of Amencc
IIi*lory" for Sept.. 1888. Centennial Address by I. W. Andrews, T.I.. T
rrcoidcnt of Marietta College, etc.

NVe can only hope .his Utile volume may be inleresling to the gen
(.1 reader, and that a little may be added to the already abundant a.
in.^csting history of our country. If so. our labor will be rewarded.
Norwich, Conn., Aug. 1889.



PART I. GENEALOGICAL,



INCLUDING THE



PRIVATE JOURNAL OF JAMES BACKUS,



AND



POEMS BY MISS SARAH BACKUS.



■' Lives of great men all remind us

We can make our lives sublime,
And departing, leave behind us

Fool-prints on the sands of time."

H. W. Longfellow.

" The spot where once our fathers dwelt,

To us should sacred be ;
At the same altars where they knelt,

I.et us, too, bend the knee."

Mrs. John W. James.



PART I.



The earliest records of this large family are uncertain.
From the best authorities it appears that William Backus (or
Stephen, according to some authorities) came from Norwich,
England, and was living at Saybrook, Conn., as early as 1637.
He was twice married, his two wives being Sarah Charles and
Mrs. Anne Bingham.

About 1659, he moved to Norwich, in the same State, being
one of the first settlers under the leadership of Rev. James
Fitch and John Mason. He brought with him three daughters,
two sons, and his stepson, Thomas Bingham. Since the young
men were near mature age, and since he made over his settle-
ment to his son Stephen, his sons are regarded as first proprie-
tors, and his name does not appear on record as such. He is said
(by consent of the others, he being the oldest man) to have given
the town its name, from the place in England from whence he
came. He died soon after his arrival in the colony, being of
an advanced age. He was the first Englishman, and second
person to die in the settlement.

He left two sons, William, Jr., and Stephen, and three
daughters, who were united in marriage to John Reynolds,
Benjamin Crane, and John Bailey. The family was prosper-
ous. In Caulkins' History of Norwich, page 158, it says of this
family :



g A C.KNKALUl.lCAl MKMOIK.

•• II is interesting lo observe how rapidly the settlement ad-
vanced in prosperity and comfort. This family, and others, m
the course of a single generation grew strong and luxuriant,
throwing out buds and branches of rich and noble growth."

Slephcii Uackiis received his father's rights and privi-
leges, as stated abo7e, soon after the settlement. The house j
lot was entered upon his name as first purchaser.

"The house lot lay in the pent highway by the Yantic,
between the town green and the allotment of Thomas Bliss,
bounded by the Hliss homestead on the east and Hammer
Hrook on the west, and descended by gift or purchase to the
Leffingwells, who were connected by marriage."

Stephen married Sarah Spencer, Dec, 1666. He moved to
Canterbury about 1692, after living over thirty years in Nor-
wich. He had eight children. We will leave this branch and
turn to

Wiiliain liackiis, his brother. He married Elizabeth,

daughter of William Pratt, of Saybrook. 'i'hey lived in Nor-
wich and had six children. Of these, William and John settled
in Windham, and are reckoned among the early proprietors of
that town. The |)resent Windliam green was part of the house
home lot of William Backus. Joseph and Nathaniel remained
in Norwich and left numerous descendants. Joseph married
Kli/.abeth Huntington, and Nathaniel, Elizabeth Tracey. Of
the other two children there is no record. We shall not follow
thi* line of Nath.aniel, but follow that of Joseph.

Jose|»li HacUus was a leading man in the town. Besides
being t Peace, an office of much dignity at that lime,

he was for several years a representative of Norwich in the
Legislature of Connecticut. He opposed the " Saybrook Plat-
form," and withdrew from the church at Norwich when it was
accepted. " He seems, indeed, from the brief notices that re-



IHK HALKUS KAMII.V. 9

main of him, to have been a genuine lover of * the old path,'
an able and energetic defender of the Congregational polity, a
man of deep radical convictions, which governed his actions,
and made him willing to suffer loss for the sake of Christ and
His truth."

Joseph had eight children. Two of his sons, Simon and
Joseph, Jr., were the first graduates of Yale College of the
name. The former became a celebrated clergyman, and the
other was known for a long time as ''^lawyer Backus of Nor-
wich!'

Another son was Samuel. We will now follow his line.



Samuel Backus was the second son of Joseph Backus.
He was born January 6th, 1693. January 18, 1716, he was
married to Elizabeth Tracey. He died November 24, 1740.
He had eleven children, as follows :



1


I.


Samuel,


born Jan. i, 1717.


Died Oct. 2, 1796.


•[


2.


Ann,


" Jan. 10, 1718.


•' Dec. 29, 1756.


«


3-


Elizabeth,


" Feb. 9, 1721.


'■ July I- I7-45-


•i


4.


Isaac,


" Jan. 9, 1724.


" Nov. 20, 1806.


1


5-


Elijah,


" March r4, i72e


. •' Sept. 4, 1798.


ir


6.


Simon,


•• Jan. 17, 1729.


■' Feb. 16, 1764.


IF


7-


Eunice,


" May 17, 1731.


•' Aug. 10, 1753.


H


s;


Andrew,


" Nov. 16, 1733.


" Nov. 20, 1796.


*\


9-


Asa,


" May 3, 1736.


" July 23, 1788.


m

1


10.


Lucy.


" April 19, 1738.




^


II.


John,


" Oct. 16, 1840.


" April 27, 1814.



1,

" Samuel Backus, son of Joseph Backus, was a quiet, enter-
prising farmer, prosperous in his own business, but having little
to do with public affairs. He was an affectionate father, and

Ikind husband." The family had removed from the original
home lot nearer the Landing, to what is now known as Yantic.
Here he erected a grist mill — the second one in the settlement
— receiving special grants from the town, and commenced the
i erection of the iron works.



A CKNKAl.DGK AL MEMOIR.



(The different signs used may now be explained.]

Name underlinc.l three times, thus "■ " . '* second generation.

' third



two
once.



The Nic" *^ before the name denotes



««



«»*«



-, " fourth
fifth
sixth
seventh
eiglith
ninth
tenth



• Samuel liacUiis, Jr., oldest child of Samuel and
Kiizabeth Tracey Backus, was married to Phebe Calkin, Dec.
14.1743 Their children were,

jc ,. I'liKliK. horn Oct. 28. I744- l*ie<l Oct. 5. 1786.

^ 2 KUZABKTH. ' ^^^g- 2f>, I74(j- " 1S23.

^ 3. Sami'KI., ■' J-in. 20, 1749. " 1S18.

S; 4. Hannah. • l-el>. 23, 1851.

55 5. A diiu};hter, born and died March S, 1755.

Mis wife died April i, 1755, and he married for a second
wife, Kli/.abeth Wid^e, July 2, i755"i"d had by her three
children, viz : —

^ 6. .\NN, born June 25, 1757.

55 7. Wll.l.lAM. '• AiiR. 28, 1758.

j; ». Rl'KLS, " May 12, 1761.

Samuel Backus died Oct. 2, 1778.



•i Ann HacUus, second child of Samuel Backus anc
Klirabclh Tracey, was married to Capt. Joshua Abel, July 22
1742. She had seven children, viz :

{J I. Isaac.

^ 3. An'n, (died young.)

{( 3, Ann, (married Uriah Waterman.)

55 4. Ft. I/.AIIKTII, (marric<l Joseph Ch.Tpman.)

{$ 5. AliACAll., (married Samuel Huntington, May 7, 1752.)

^ (). Ko(;krs.

g 7. Rurus.






THK BACKUS FAMILY.



I I



^ Elizabeth Backus, third child of Samuel Backus
and Elizabeth Tracey, was married to Jabez Huntington, Jan.
20, 1742, by whom she had two sons, viz:

J; I. JiiDEDiAH, born Aug. 4, 1743. Died Sept. 5, 1818.

^ 2. Andrew, " June 22, 1745. '• .\pril 7, 1S24.

Elizabeth Backus died July i, 1745. [See Huntington Me-
morial, page i6r. I



•", Isaac Backus, fourth child of Samuel Backus and
Elizabeth Tracey, was married to Susannah Mason, of Middle-
bury, Nov. 29, 1749.



He had nine children.



>5 f


Hannah,


boin


Nov. 8, 1750.


> 2


Xathan,


;l


June 18, 1752.


J^ 3


Isaac,


a


Feb. 21, 1754.


^ 4


Eunice,


a


Oct. 23, 1755.


J5 5


Susannah,


u


Oct. 13, 1758.


^ 6


Louis,


41


Aug. 3, 1760.


f5 7-


Lucy,


II


April 13, 1763


?5 3


Simon,


'•


March 7, 1766


S 9


LUiEL,


"


Feb. 17, 1768



•^ Isaac Backus. Little is known of his childhood.
His early education was obtained in the public schools of his
native place. He joined the Church in his native town, July
II, 1742, but did not long continue with it, leaving it, with
many others, in 1745, not being satisfied with its pastor or gov-
ernment. This separation gave rise to a new body, called Sep-
aratists. In this faith Isaac Backus became a minister. Then
he began to preach, spending about fourteen months in the vari-
ous towns of Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts ;
and finally, April 13, 1748, was ordained pastor at Titicut,
Conn., at the age of twenty-six — a Separatist Church having
been formed there. This did not prevent him from making
frequent journeys for the purpose of preaching the gospel. On
Sept. 29, 1749, he married Susanna Mason, of Rehoboth, Mass.
Soon the subject of infant baptism divided the Separatist
Church. After much thought and deliberation, Isaac Backus
became a Baptist, and was baptized in that faith. He made



A ..KNKAl.OC.ICAl. MKMOIK.

.1,.. r,o«;npl visitinn Massachusetts,
„..„, journeys - ""'/„ ,rH;,i" continued n„n.
New Hampshire, and Conncciicui. n . ,

ll ,„ pal, of .he Separatist Churcl, at T.t.cut, .iMch l,ad
formed .hemseUcs into a Baptist Church there.

he raptists n,et w,th a good deal o. opposition and pers ■

cu„on. Is ac Backus was untirtng in his efforts to secure re^

ipous hberty and in defending his church, spea^- <i

."inns much on the subject, and maV.,ng long and d.fficul

journeys to help the cause. The object he had sought was not

obtained until 1833. ftK<.^Unrrh

At the same time, he had his dat.es as pastor o the church

at Tiiicul. which he performed diligently and faithfully^ He

not only addressed them from the pulpit on the Lord s day,

frequent journeys, preaching the gospel, and helping to estab-
lish churches. Finally, after a life of great service and useful-
ness, he died November 20. 1S06, at the very advanced age of

"^\Te wi^s a most prolific writer, his publications being more
numerous than any other man of his denomination in America,
in his day. and no one did more service in the country than he.

• I-lijah HacUus, fifth child of Samuel and Eliza-
beth Backus, married Lucy Griswold, daughter of John Gris-
wold. Ks.,.. of Lyme. Jan. 9, i753- He had nine children.

55 , EllJAH l>orn July 17. '754- l»'e<l Maixh 8. 1755.

I 2. Aaaughtcr. - Jan. n. 1756. " Feb. 21 175^..

5 3. Ltrv. ■• Jan. 31. 1757. " Oct. I, 1817.

A 4 Elijah. ' May 2. '759-

K 5 lAMKS. •■ J"ly>"- '7f". •• Jan. 17, 1762.

K 6 AcbuKhlcr. • March iS, 1763. " A,.iil 20, 1763.

J ,; J.VMKS. •• Julyi4. '7f>4. ^ Sept. 2-), .8,(..

^ 8. Mathkw. •• Sepl. 24, 17W).

S q. Cl.ARINA. * Auy. 7. 1769. ' J"ly 21,1831.

Klijah Hackus possessed a large estate, and was a skilled
mechanic, and a man of considerable influence. Assisted by
hit son James he carried on the iron works at Ycintic, whicli



THE I'.ACKUS FAMILY. 13

were so serviceable to the country in the Revolutionary War.
Ikfore the iron works, was built the grist mill, supposed to
have been the second one in the settlement. This he also
carried on. He died the 4th of September, 1798.

sj Lucy Hackus, daughter of Elijah Backus and Lucy
Griswold, was married to Dudley Woodbridge, who was
among the first settlers of Ohio, April, 1778. Their children
were :

* Lucy, born Aug., 1775. Died Dec, 1816.

* Sali.y, " Jan. 28, 1777.

* Duni.F.v, " Nov. 10, 1778.

* William, "

* Daviu, '• Died 1795, at Marietta.

* John, " Nov. 25, 1785.

* William Woodbri(lj»;c became United States Judge,
Senator, and Governor of Michigan.

§ Elijah Backus, son of Elijah and Lucy Griswold
Backus, married Lucretia Hubbard. Their children were :

* Thomas. born Aug. 8, 1785. Died Oct. 25, 1825.

* Lucretia, . " Jan. 7, 1887.

Elijah Backus removed to the Northwest Territory, and was
Receiver of Public Moneys. He was elected to the Senate,
and was considered a good lawyer. Before this, his first wife
had died, Feb. 17, 1787, and he married again, taking for a
second wife Hannah Richards. He is said to have owned the
first printing press west of the mountains.

, * Thomas Backus, only son of l^lijah and Lucre-
lia Hubbard Backus, married Temperance Lord, at Marietta,
Ohio, Nov., 1810. Their children were as follows :

** Elijah, born March 3, 1812. Died Nov. 7, 1855.

** Lucretia, " June 14, 1813.

** William W., " Oct. 12, 1814. " Aug. 12, 1842.

** Alexander, " Sept. 15, 1816. " Dec. 13, T3r>i.

** Abn'er Lord. " June 27, 1818.



14 A GENEALOGICAL MF.MGIK.

** Abncr Lord IJackus, fourtli son of Temperance
and Thomas Backus, was married Oct. 29, 1844, to Eliza-
beth Reed. Their children were •



*** William Woouhkidck, horn April i, 1846.

*** Ei.siK McDowKii.. " Aug. 26, 1847. I

*** Samuel Rkkd, ' March 10, 1849. /

*** Alexandkr, ■■ Oct. 18, 1850.

*** Adelaidk, " May 25, 1852. )

*** Elizabeth Rekd, " Dec. 26, 1853. Died Sept. 25. 1854. '

*+* Twin daughters, " July 9, 1855. " Aug,'. 13. 1S55.

*=^* Julia, " May 7, 1857.

Abner Lord ]jackus is by profession a civil engineer, and
was connected with service constructing and managing Ohio's
800 miles of canals nearly all the time from 1837 to 1878.
Having entered the state engineering department as a rodman,
by industry and constant application was finally elevated to the
highest position, that of President of the State Board of Public
Works of his native state by vote of a majority of her citizens.

For nearly twenty years he has been actively engaged in
Toledo as a grain commission merchant, owner and manager
of a grain elevator.

He has three sons connected with him in business, who are
industrious, sober, active and successful business men, credit-
able alike to himself and the ancestry from which he descended.
Of his three daughters, two are married, one of them living at
(-incinnati, O., and the other at Detroit, Michigan.

* Lucrctia, only daughter of Elijah and Lucretia Hub-
bard Backus, was born Jan. 7, 1787. She married Nathaniel
Pope, of Illinois, delegate in Congress from Illinois in 1816,
and Judge of the United States District Court. Maj. Gen.
John Pope, of the United States Army, is their son, born
March 12, 1823.

sj James Backus, seventh child of l%lijah and Lucy
Griswold Backus, married ]-)orothy Church Chandler, daughter
of Charles Church Chandler, Esq., of Woodstock, Conn., Sept.
'5) '793- Their children were :



*


I.


Mary,


*


o


Lucy,


*


3-


Sarah,


*


4-


James,


*


5.


Nancy,


*


6.


William,


*


7-


Frances,


*


3.


Henry,



THE nACKUS FAMILY. 15

horn Nov. 9, 1774. Died May 17, 1847.

" March 28, 1769. " Nov. 12, 1S27.

" March 29. 179S. " Marcli 24. 1S43.

" Jan. 18, 1800. " Oct. 23, 1873.

'• Oct. 31, iSoi. " Sept. I, 1802.

" Oct. 22, 1803. Still living.

•• Nov. 16, 1806.

'• April 4. 1S09. Died July 13. 1877.

James Backus was one of the first settlers of Ohio, going to
Marietta in April, 1788. As agent of the Ohio company, he
made the first surveys in Marietta, and is said to have built the
first regular house in the town, at the point of the junction of
the Muskingum and Ohio rivers, afterwards owned and occu-
pied by his brother-in-law. Judge Dudley Woodbridge, it being
the first regular house in Ohio, at that time Northwest Terri-
tory.

In October, 1789, he made a trip to Connecticut, returning
again soon after. March, 1791, owing to the urgent request of
his father, he left Ohio and returned to Connecticut, to live at
the family residence at Yantic.

" He was a man of great ability, both physically and men-
tally. He commenced and carried on a large business. The
grist mill, which was the first erection on the premises, and
supposed to have been built by Joseph, or his son Samuel, was
the cause of their removal from the home lot nearer the Land-
ing, and by grants of land for that express purpose, followed
by the erection of the iron works. The latter were of a more
varied and expensive character, supposed to have been built
by Samuel Backus, but enlarged by his son Elijah, and were of
great service both before and after the war." Their work was
various, varying from a horse shoe to anchors for privateersmen.

Tames Backus built the saw mill, and in later days, 181 2,
"built and ran two carding machines for carding wool for the
farmers, hatters and others." He also built a merchants' store,
and manufactured potash and pearlash, and besides, built a
provision house for the purpose of packing beef and pork, and
kept salt. He bought out the interests of his brothers and



j6 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR. '

sisters, and ran and conducted the whole, improving the quality
of iron goods, and doing a large and prosperous business until
the manufacture of iron in the old way ceased, and the site
gave way to other enterprises. Besides all these, he carried on
a large farm. He died in i8t6, Sept. i6.

The following is an extract from his Journal, covering a
space of about three years, during which he was in Marietta. It
will show his life and experience there, as well as show his
character, and the high degree of confidence his associates had
in him, and the esteem in which he was held.

LIST OF STAGES TO FORT PITT. AND THK EXPENSES OF

TRAVELLING TO IT, FROM TMURSDAV, rillRD

DAY OF APRIL, 17S8.

£. s. d.

Heniy's, Po(iuong, ........ 3

Warner's Ferry, ferriage, ....... 4

Buckingham's, Saybrook, \

Lodging, supper, liorse keeping, j- Friday, .... 41

8 qfs. oats, )

Graves's, Guilford, baiting, ...... 4

West, . 4

Branford, bailing, ........ 4

E. Haven — ferry, ........ 9

N. Haven, Anderson's, 3 miles \

from town. Supper, hay 6 ([Is. |- Saturtlay, ... 29
Oats for horse, lodging, '
Stratford ferriage, ........ ^j

Breakfast and baiting, . iiaW

Baiting, .......... 9

Norwalk, bailing, ..... ^Yz

Stamford, Wells's, supper, lodging. / j^^^^^^j,^^,^ ^ ^

(t <|ts. oats, hay, »

Rye, Havaland's, breakfast, l)aiting. .....

Kingsbridge, baiting, etc., .... 10

N. York, apples, . . .Monday 04

F'ish line and hook, ...... 10

Portmanleau. ... ... 5 o

Crupper anil cloth, ...... 5

Malestraps, . . " 1 '^

Segars, ... .... i 1.







THE r.ACKUS FAMILY.



17



Sight of camel, .....
Meiuliiig rod, ....

Horse keeping, etc., ...
Po\vla|)'.s Hook, ferriage,
Kerger, ferriage, ....

Newark, ferriage, ....
Lodging, supper anil horse keeping,
ft (jts. Elizabeth Town, breakfast,



€ s. tL
I

4 3



'■'/z



Tuesday,



I o
6 10



Baiting, etc., .........

Brunswick, baiting, ........

Oysters,

Cherry, ..........

Kingston, \^an Tilburg's, lodging, horse keeping./ „, , ,
fa • & > fa !»> I &• I Wednesdaj

3 ([ts. oats, breakfast, baiting, 3 ([ts. oats.



/;2 8 4

2 6



s



7
6

f) I



o

r- O O

c — c

o >-
t. 4-. 1)

>~ j= c;

rt til rt

•^ " >^

^ Ti C,

u



9.



Bristol, baiting, etc., .

Baiting, etc., ,

Philadelphia, apples,

Cigars,

Penknife,

Watchchain,

Portmanteau lock, .

Penknife, .

Apples, ....

Shaving and dressing hair,

Ticket 2 I 6, raisins 8d, .

Apples 3. ginger 4, etc., i.

Steelyards, | 3 ; pepjier, 2

Paper, | i ; flint.s, 2 | C ;

Fishhooks, 2 ] 6 ; lOO do. 2 | 6 ;

lib. buck and 2 lbs. goose shot.

Raisins, | 3 ; apples, | 4 ; .

Sundries, | 98 ;

Comb, I 6; glass and barbering.

Shaving, &c., i | ; ))aper, j g ;

Ebnz. Branham's bill,

Board and horse keeping, 42 qts. oats.

Boot money in exchanging saddles.

Ferriage, Schuylkill,

Sundries, ........

Supper, lodging, horse keeping, 2 (|ts. oats

At the Sign of the Buck, 14 miles from Philadelphia, \ 'p|,y^^j
breakfast.



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l8 A GENEALOGICAL MEMOIR.

t' s. d.

Dinner and baiting at Downing's, ...... 33



Online LibraryWilliam W BackusA genealogical memoir of the Backus family, with the private journal of James Backus, together with his correspondence bearing on the first settlement of Ohio, at Marietta, in 1788. Also, papers and correspondence of Elijah Backus, showing the character and spirit of the times during the revolutiona → online text (page 1 of 27)