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Practical lessons in








1901



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PUBLIC LIBRARY THE BRANCH LIBRAR E!

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This young lady thinks she is Mme. Patti singing before
the king.




This young gentleman believes himself to be once again
a nursing infant while the young lady thinks she is a nurse
in a foundling asylum.



PRACTICAL LESSONS IN

Hypnotism



CONTAINING COMPT.F.TF INSTRUCTIONS IN
THE DEVELOPMENT AND PRACTICE OF
HYPNOTIC POWER, INCLUDING MUCH
VALUAULi: INFORMATION IN REGARD
TO MENTAL HEALING, MIND READING,
AND OTHER KINDRED SUBJECTS

BY

WM. WESLEY COOK, A.M., M.D.

Professor of Physiological Medicine in the
National University of Chicago,



*



CHICAGO
THOMPSON & THOMAS

PUBLISHERS



COPYRIGHT, IQOI,
BY THOMPSON A THOUA;



AUTHOR'S PREFACE.



This book has been written for those who are
anxious to know the truth concerning hypnotism
and who desire to learn the best methods of hypnotic
practice. It is written in plain language for intellec-
tual people, and all its statements are absolute facts
and its illustrations are actual occurrences. Nothing
has been exaggerated and the sensational has been
strictly avoided ; for the truth of hypnotism is more
wonderful than the fruits of imagination.

The reader is asked to dismiss the thought that
hypnotism belongs to the field of legerdemain or
sleight of hand; for that is far from the truth. It is a
natural science, dealing with mental and physical ac-
tions; and the exercise of its power is the result of a
natural endowment which all are capable of devel-
oping.

Those who study hypnotism and become acquaint-
ed with its laws and phenomena cannot help but
realize the great benefits to be obtained from it in
social, intellectual and business life. It broadens the
scope of thought and banishes from the mind false
notions of "the mysterious relationship of soul and



4 PREFACE.

body." It helps to destroy bigotry and superstition
and to establish truth.

From the pages of this book many facts may be
gleaned that will explain the power of the mind over
the body that has become such an important factor in
the treatment of disease. Many hundreds of thou-
sands of people, realizing the great benefits to be de-
rived from the exercise of "faith" or will power, have
completely discarded the use of all material sub-
stances when endeavoring to cure their bodily ail-
ments ; and to the influence of what is in reality hyp-
notic suggestion they trust their lives.

A celebrated medical writer once said: "It is the
mystery surrounding the use of poisonous drugs that
prompts human beings to blindly swallow whatever
their physicians administer, and as knowledge , in-
creases, this mystery is being swept away." The
philosophic mind cannot realize how poisons, with
inherent characteristics to destroy life, can be physi-
ologically utilized in restoring health, and conse-
quently many thinking persons have joined the Chris-
tian Scientists, Faith Curists, and various other
organizations opposed to medical treatment.

All revolutions are early characterized by extreme
actions; and it is inevitable that both of the extreme
factions that are so antagonistic in their views con-
cerning the treatment of disease, shall finally unite
upon the golden medium of truth. Proper foods,
pure air, pure water, and very many harmless rem-
edies may be judiciously administered with wonder-



PREFACE. S

ful benefit in the treatment of disease ; and when used
in conjunction with "faith" or "mental healing,"
which are hypnotic suggestions, results may often be
obtained that are little short of miraculous. Let these
facts be realized by those who depend upon the use of
drugs and those who discard the use of all material
substances; then the ideal practice of medicine may
be scientifically established. The proper study of
hypnotism will hasten such a consummation, which
the author devoutly hopes to realize.

There is nothing trifling in the science of hypno-
tism. Its truths, like the truths of all other sciences,
are simple and easily understood ; but it is their sim-
plicity that renders them of such great value to all
mankind.

Knowledge in any branch of science may be used
for frivolous amusement or questionable purposes;
and hypnotism is no exception. But it is sincerely
desired that those who read this book, will read it
for the good that they can acquire the good that a
knowledge of hypnotism always brings to those who
possess it and the good its power enables them to
extend to others.



DR. WM. WESLEY COOK.



Evanston,

Chicago, 111.



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



The Author's Preface 3

Introduction 13

History of Hypnotism 16

Definitions 20

CHAPTER I.

PHILOSOPHY OF HYPNOTISM.

Practical understanding of the subject Hypnotism one of the
exact sciences Relationship to other sciences Analysis of
hypnotic phenomena Practical illustrations Explanation of
hypnotic influence Overcoming mental resistance Mental
action explained Relationship of thought to physical ac-
tion Involuntary action Day dreams A well balanced
mind Relationship of operator and subject Concentration
of thought Passive condition of the mind Transfer of
thought to the seat of physical action Hypnotic perform-
ances are natural actions First essentials Hypnotism
illustrated by object lessons Hypnotic susceptibility not a
sign of mental weakness 23

CHAPTER IL

QUALIFICATIONS OF A HYPNOTIST.

Natural talent and special adaptability Hypnotic power un-
knowingly possessed by many Bodily health and strength
A sound mind in a sound body Self-confidence Determina-
tion to succeed Exercise of will power Fearlessness Con-
centration of thought Quick perceptive powers Self-pos-
session M

CHAPTER III.

QUALIFICATIONS OF A SUBJECT.

Percentage of persons capable of being hypnotized Natural
antagonisms Discordant and harmonious vibrations Who
are good subjects Feeble-minded not always easily hyp-
notizedStrong-minded persons may make excellent sub-
jectsConcentration of thought Laboring men Following
a leader Mobs easily led by suggestion Murat Halsted
and the strikers Farmers not easily hypnotized at home
The confidence man Slaves and servants Climate has an
influence Susceptibility of men and women Precautions
necessary in hypnotizing women Hysterical attacks Emo-
tional persons Nationality Dutch Scandinavians Bast In-
dians French Italians Americans Influence of age , 5



t TABLE OF CONTENTS.

CHAPTER IV.

FAVORABLE AND UNFAVORABLE INFLUENCES.
Circumstances and surroundings Hypnotizing stubborn sub-
jectsInfluence upon others Avoidance of failures New
experiments The experimenting room Influence of light
and darkness Sunlight and colors Temperature Intense
heat and drafts of air Examples Physical suffering-
Agreeable and disagreeable odors Perfumes Tobacco
smoke Loud and discordant sounds Music Lullaby-
Chants Monotonous sounds Melody Music boxes Singing
of Angels Soothing influence of music Insanity and melan-
cholyNoise and quietude Hypnotizing new subjects Per-
sonal comfort Position The chair Clothing Recumbent
position Emotions Fear of being hypnotized Fascination
of reptiles Recognition of superior power Domestic grief
Anger Tranquillty of mind Condition of the skin Dry-
neas Influence of time 61

CHAPTER V.
PRECAUTIONS TO BE OBSERVED.

Reputation and safety of the operator Welfare of the sub-
jectDangers of hypnotism no greater than ordinary Little
evil and great good Compared with dangers of other
branches of science Exaggerated reports of harm Pres-
ence of a third party Accident to the operator Danger
reduced to a minimum Rarely used unlawfully Avoidance
of sudden shock Cc. ies of danger Weakness of the
heart Catalepsy Physical Injury Staring at the sun-
Change from darkness to light Fascination Falls and
other causes of injury Contortions Jumping Violent exer-
ciseEating injurious articles Suggestions of death Post-
hypnotic cautions Suffocation Hypnotizing the feeble-
mindedInsanity and crime Liability of exciting anger-
Avoiding misunderstandings Relief from suggestions 66

CHAPTER VI.
HOW TO HYPNOTIZE.

Mental condition of the operator Certainty of results Mental
strain upon the operator Principle of action First steps In
producing hypnosis Concentration of thought Impressing
the subject Taking a dare Medium of the senses Attract-
ing the subject's attention Objects used by the operator-
Oriental mirror The Sheik's plate Snakes of India's
fakirs Glass marble Chinese idol Metal disk Rubber disk
The author's disk Sense of hearing Monotonous tones-
Oriental chants Public speakers and preachers Chanting
of snaka charmers Effect of music upon animals Use of
the voice First suggestions Tone of the Voice Hypnotiz-
ing small children The sense of touch Mesmeric passes-
Mesmerizing a subject Rubbing the fingers The sense of
smell Odors Tobacco smoke Sense of taste Eating and
drinking UB of orange water

CHAPTER VII.
DEGREES OF HYPNOSIS.

Arbitrary division Power of the operator Susceptibility of the
ubJct^Drowlness Light sleep Profound sleep Absolut*

gbdlfnc Somnambulism Catalepsy Lethargy ,. HI



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 9

CHAPTER VIII.
CLAIRVOYANCE.

Second sight Oriental power Clairvoyance compared with
electrical means of communication No restriction upon
sight of clairvoyants Distance not considered Familiar
manifestations Illustrations How to produce clairvoy-
anceDirecting the mind of the subject Asking questions
Clairvoyance not mind-reading Finding hidden articles-
Confirming a clairvoyant's statements Who are the best
clairvoyants 96

CHAPTER IX.

SELF-HYPNOTISM-AUTO-SUGGESTION.

Hypnotism a natural endowment Keeping appointments
Blind men telling time Going to sleep is natural self-
hypnotism Self-hypnotism easily learned How to practice
self-hypnotism Prolonged self-induced sleep of orientals-
Death of Bishop Hypnotizes himself at church Prolonged
iiypn;;sis undesirable Diseiii-e and self-hypnotism Con-
tagious diseases Heart disease Controlling heart action
Kai m thr.-ugh imagination Imagining benefit from
placebo Fish stories A bogus author An imaginary in-
ventorAids in restoring health Lightens sorrow Prompts
fearlessness Increases general happiness 103

CHAPTER X.
ACCIDENTAL DEVELOPMENT OF HYPNOTIC POWER.

Case of Gertrude Pennington Playing while asleep Case of
Mr. Charles Gardner Put the baby to sleep Couldn't wake
the baby Mothers naturally hypnotize their babies Case
of Marguerite McAllister Hypnotizing restless patients
The crucifix used to concentrate the thoughts 114

CHAPTER XI.
THE HYPNOTIST'S SECRET.

Unpublished facts How hypnotic power is developed Focusing
the mind Forcing subjection Expelling thoughts Over-
coming the subject's resistance Practicing on dummies
Useless efforts Practicing self-control Increasing hypnotic
power Realizing individual influence Overcoming individ-
ual habits Curing personal disorders Making friends-
Overpowering enemies Forestalling events Sphere of hyp-
notic influence 120

CHAPTER XII.
DEVELOPING A SUBJECT.

Do not attempt too much at once Choosing a subject Avoid
mental superiors Lead gradually to submission The best
subject for beginners Privacy desirable The first seance-
Drowsiness How to produce hypnosis How to think and
act The object Tone of voice Making passes Weariness
produced Second seance Hand movements Third
seance Muscular suggestions Opening the eyes Fourth
seance The senses Somnambulism Fifth seance Dancing
Anaesthesia Post-suggestion Clairvoyance Sixth seance
Catalepsy The perfect subject Lethargy 130



10 TABLE OF CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XIII.

ANIMAL MAGNETISM-MAGNETIC HEALING.

Long recognized by physicians Dr. Alva Curtis Philosophy of
animal magnetism Neuraura Impressible* Distinguishing
mental power How to recognize impressibles Metal rod-
Organs not equally impressible Harmonious and antagon-
istic organs Restoring mental balance Diagnosing dis-
ease Relief of pain Curing headache Relieving toothache
and neuralgia Relieving inward pains Producing sleep In
Insomnia Suppressing respiration Regions of the brain
Perceptive faculties Intellectual faculties Propelling facul-
ties Unbalanced and well balanced brains Doctrines of
magnetic healing Precautions to be observed How to mag-
netize a person Mesmeric passes Experiments in animal
magnetism Examining diseased persons Magnetic healers-
Magnetic Influence exerted by physicians 141

CHAPTER XIV.
OVERCOMING HABITS BY HYPNOTISM.

Nature of habits Drugs of no avail Suggestion the basis of
sanitarium treatment Morphine and alcohol cures How
hypnotism overcomes habits Currents of nerve force-
Memory and post-hypnotism Frightened horses Tobacco
habit cured Cause and cure of stammering Cigarette
smokingCure of other habits 158

CHAPTER XV.

CRIMINAL HYPNOTISM.

Hypnotism does not corrupt morals Sensational newspaper ar-
ticlesStole while hypnotized Melancholy Induced by a dis-
carded suitor Elopement due to hypnotic influence Sensa-
tional reports Trained criminals Hypnotism an excuse
A drug clerk's error Possibilities of crime Possibility of
bodily harm Confidence In the operator 186

CHAPTER XVI.
HYPNOTISM AND DISEASE.

Influence of mind over health Resisting contagious diseases-
Immunity of nurses Concentration of thought Dispensa-
tions of Providence Protection a natural law Mental de-
termination Case of Dr. Tanner Maintenance of health
No time to get sick Danger In retiring from business
Imagination and disease Fear often causes disease Imag-
inary hydrophobia Idleness Invites disease Hypochondria-
Appliances to ward off disease Belts and charms Electric
belts Pilgrimages Miracles performed at shrines 174

CHAPTER XVII.

ANAESTHESIA DURING HYPNOSIS.

Freedom from pain through hypnosis Religious ecstasy-
Queen Jezebel's priests Ghost dances Oriental devotees-
Burning of martyrs Catalepsy produced by savage rites-
Religious fervor subduing pain Modern instances Produc-
tion of anaesthesia a natural endowment How to produce
anaesthesia Case of Robert McGann Performance of dan-
gerous surgical operations during hypnosis Minor surgical
operations Dangers of chloroform Indiscriminate use of
anaesthetics Value of hypnotism In surgery Sewing the
lips together Passing pins and needles through the cheek-
Tongues sewed together Dangers



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 11

CHAPTER XVIII.

HYPNOTISM AND THE INSANE.

Maniacs not easily hypnotized Melancholia Weak-minded per-
sons not good subjects Hypnotism the rational method of
curing insanity Concentration of thought Insane on the
subject of perpetual motion Case of Mr. Williams Pacify-
ing a maniac Insanity from bad habits cured Religious
insanity Organic diseases must be recognized Overcoming
Imaginary notions . 191

CHAPTER XIX.

HYPNOTIZING ANIMALS.

Hypnotic power possessed by animals Hypnotizing animals -
Training dogs and horses Teaching tricks to dogs Trained
elephants Bringing wild animals under subjection Man
the god of animals Producing lethargy In frogs Snake
charmers Experiments with rabbits Hypnotizing roosters
and pigeons 196

CHAPTER XX.

HYPNOTISM IN BUSINESS AND SOCIETY.

The successful business man Driving a bargain Executive
ability Controlling employes Soliciting insurance Can-
vassing Auctioneering The air of prosperity Diplomacy-
Social popularity Entertainers A brilliant hostess Aris-
tocracy Influence of money and titles Assuming wealth-
Consciousness of incapacity Mental superiority Compell-
ing recognition Losing his grip In the swim 200

CHAPTER XXI.

HYPNOTISM IN THE PROFESSIONS.

Professional success Impossible without hypnotic powers Per-
sonal magnetism Popularity and success Hypnotism and
the law Pleading before judge and jury Criminal law-
yers Following hypnotic methods Hypnotism an acknowl-
edged aid in curing disease Securing patients a necessity-
Hypnotic power and medical ability Securing the confidence
of patients Using every means to aid nature Mental In-
fluenceFaith curists Christian scientists An Ideal prac-
tice of medicine The physician's presence an inspiration
Medical and financial success Hypnotism and the min-
istryHow to compel acceptance of church doctrines-
Schools of oratory and elocution Successful preaching 209

CHAPTER XXII.

GENERAL HYPNOTIC INFLUENCE.

Lasting Impressions made upon passive mlnds^ Learning to
spell Expectancy a hypnotic Influence Seeking pleasure
Determined to be gloomy "Sunset Cox" and his postponed
. lecture Public gatherings Spirit of the meeting Magnetic
speakers Hypnotic power necessary to successful public
speaking Powerful preachers All more or less obedient
Sleight of hand exhibitions Oriental magicians An East
Jndigt exhibition -Hypnotized through objects 214



12 TABLE OF CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XXIII.
POST-HYPNOTISM.

Suggestions carried out after awakening Somnambulistic state
Practical Illustration Awake at four o'clock In the morn-
Ing Post-hypnotic suggestions always obeyed Honorable
persons will not commit crime by post-hypnotic sugges-
tionKeeping an appointment Unable to eat his Sunday
dinner Cannot drink tea or coffee Overcoming the liquor
habit Post-hypnotic suggestion a great power for good or
evil Valuable In treating nervous conditions Changing
personal likes and dislikes As an aid for self-control
Avoiding evil companions Hypnotism cannot change a per-
son's moral nature Affairs of the heart Had her sweet-
heart hypnotized A parent's use of hypnotism 223

CHAPTER XXIV.

AWAKENING A SUBJECT.

Mistaken belief Subject can always be awakened Accidental
injury or death of the operator Extreme lethargic condi-
tionCommon method of awakening Display of alarm No
harm from delayed awakening Lethargic subjects awaken
slowly Blowing upon the neck Sleeping all day Sugges-
tions of the operator Not awakened suddenly from som-
nambulism Pleasant suggestions before awakening 229

CHAPTER XXV.
MIND- READING TELEPATHY.

Communication of thought Natural power Birds and ani-
malsThoughts of children Betraying the emotions Guilty
conscience Detection of crime Criminal demeanor Atr
tractlng attention School recitations Love and anger Im-
pressions during sleep Premonitions Distance no barrier-
Tests Transmitting thoughts Clairaudlence How to trans-
mit thoughts 233

CHAPTER XXVI.

HYPNOTIC MISCELLANY.

Signs of hypnosis Fascination Catalepsy Lethargy Exalta-
tion of the senses Muscular contortions Singing and
speaking Speaking in foreign languages At the prize fight
Hunting and fishing Laughing and crying Make me a
child again Aged and inflrm Becoming animals A trip to
heaven Up in a balloon E42

CHAPTER XXVII.
SELF-ANAESTHESIA.

Self-anaesthesia a natural power Exhibited by animals Com-
mon examples in human beings Heroism of children-
Daughter of Mr. French Case of Ernest Gunther Remark-
able power of Hakim Abdel Sureddln Clinical experiments.. 248

CHAPTER XXVIII.

METHOD OF PRODUCING HYPNOSIS.

General directions Objective method Fascination The candle
method Mou tin' s method The Nancy method Mesmeric
method Exercise of will power The rotary mirror of Dr.
Luy'i method The Hindoo sleep Theory of the Od and in-
fluence of mafneu and current ,



INTRODUCTION.



Hypnotism is the most practical science of the
age. It enters into our everyday life, and confers
advantages that cannot be acquired through any
other medium. Its practice is no longer a mere
pastime for amusement and sensation; as profes-
sional men of the highest standing now recognize
its value and seek to profit by its benefits; and scien-
tists regard it as a natural power, for ages kept dor-
mant, but apparently destined to perform an active
part in the welfare and development of future genera-
tions.

To study hypnotism is like unfathoming the hidden
mysteries of magic and human miracles and making
them matters of absolute knowledge. Its possibili-
ties are almost boundless and are interwoven with
every phase of human life, and its powers are largely
responsible for the successful terminations of modern
business and social undertakings.

It does not require years of study to become a
hypnotist, for this great blessing to mankind is a
natural endowment possessed by practically every-
one and capable of being developed by all who will



14 INTRODUCTION.

devote to its study the patience and energy always
so necessary for the development of natural talents.

The reward is great that follows the persistent
study of hypnotism ; for it is a science that bestows
upon its devotees a power that seems almost super-
human. It overawes everyone who witnesses its
indisputable facts and its marvelous manifestations.
It overthrows the theories of judges and philosophers
and theologians, and shakes the faith of material
scientists in their preconceived opinions. It sup-
plants the physician and the surgeon and cures the
afflicted and deformed whom they pronounced
beyond the hope of recovery. It breaks the chains
of demoralizing and destructive habits. It comforts
the sorrowing and brings peace of mind to those
distracted by the perplexities of life. It abolishes
periods of time and extents of distance. It makes
the lame to walk and strengthens the weak, and
causes the raving maniac to become docile as a little
babe. It checks the hand of death and snatches
almost from the grave the grim destroy erV victims.
It loosens the tongue of the stammerer, overcomes
the self-consciousness of the backward and tempers
the impetuosity of the rash enthusiast. To mankind,
in every walk of life, it is a blessing leading his
inmost thoughts to higher and nobler things ; devel-
oping his powers to plan and to execute and giving
him social, financial and intellectual eminence among
his fellow-men. All this, and more, is hypnotism.

It does not require years of study to become a



INTRODUCTION. 15

hypnotist, although an expert can become such only
through constant practice, such as is necessary to
insure proficiency in any art.

Every intellectual person may exercise hypnotic
power, in a greater or less degree, without regard to
previous education or the established habits of life.
In fact, hypnotic power is a natural endowment,
capable of being developed by all who will devote
to its study proper patience, energy and persistency.

The possibilities of hypnotism are almost bound-
less and its influence is connected with every suc-
cessful undertaking of life ; for which reasons we can
enter upon its study with enthusiasm and a deter-
mination to develop to the fullest our latent ability.

There is no restriction upon the acquisition of
hypnotic knowledge ; its blessings belong to all who
desire them and are willing to strive to secure them ;
and these blessings are of such a character that when
once experienced they become absolutely essential
to our enjoyment of life.

At the commencement of this twentieth century
the practical utility of the science of hypnotism is
universally recognized. Thousands are eagerly seek-
ing to learn its principles and laws, that they may
reap the benefits of its powers. Business men are
almost unconsciously becoming practical hypnotists;
lawyers are realizing that hypnotic power is the secret
of success; ministers and public speakers are swaying
their audiences according to the laws of hypnotism ;
while physicians and professors of medicine are



14 INTRODUCTION.

openly advocating and employing "suggestive thera-
peutics" as their most effective aid in curing disease.

Prejudice, bigotry, avariciousness and narrow-
minded sophistry have until lately succeeded in
smothering the great science of hypnotism. Men
who were bold enough to make known the marvelous
nature of the hypnotic power they were able to mani-
fest, were denounced as wizards, charlatans, impos-
ters and mountebanks. But now the tables are
turned. Those who were formerly denounced are
now regarded as scientific investigators; and the
doctrines they taught are being eagerly learned by
the most noted scientists. What was held up for
ridicule is now regarded as a dignified science. What
was attributed to evil machinations is now regarded
as one of the greatest of blessings to the human race.

Hypnotism has triumphed. It occupies the posi-
tion of a dignified science; and with its present im-
petus and its future certainty of development, it is
destined to startle the world by its marvelous revela-
tions.

HISTORY OF HYPNOTISM.

The germ of the science of hypnotism was recog-
nized by the ancient Greeks and Romans, who de-
rived their knowledge of it from the early Egyptians.
There is also evidence that the Chinese practiced the


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Online LibraryWilliam Wesley CookPractical lessons in hypnotism → online text (page 1 of 15)